32 Burst results for "Jenny Kaplan"

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:00 min | 3 months ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Magic, and mystery, in honor of October. Tune in next month for a month of peace builders. Now, onto the episode. Hello, from wonder media network, I'm Alessandro Takeda, and I'm a junior producer here at WN, which means that I write and produce episodes for a manica. This episode was originally part of our October 2019 theme, which is and saints. Today, we're traveling back to 16th century Spain to talk about one of the great mystics of the Roman Catholic Church. She founded a religious movement, started convents, and contributed to the literary canon of Christian mysticism. I really like this episode because it's a tiny window into a time period. We don't often hear about on this show. And it also delves into the life of a woman who has experience is so different from mine. And it's incredible to see that enduring legacy in the studies of all that she left behind. Now, here's host Jenny Kaplan to talk about saint Teresa of Avila. Teresa dissipated Yao Mara was born in 1515 in Avila, Spain. Her father, a wool merchant who bought a knighthood, was one of the wealthiest men in the city. Teresa's mother was a devout Christian who emphasized the importance of her faith to her young daughter. Around 1535, after finishing her schooling, Teresa joined the local carmelite convent of the incarnation against her father's wishes. He was a strictly devout and austere man, who wasn't impressed with an order known for being fairly liberal in its devotional practices. After entering the convent, Theresa began an intense study of works on contemplative prayer, written mostly by medieval mystics. She was especially interested in the spiritual inner contemplation known as mental prayer. She believed it was integral to spiritual life. During that period, Teresa became seriously ill and spent nearly three years as an invalid. She had become somewhat of a local celebrity and her confinement caused significant worry throughout the community. While ill, Teresa maintained intense practical study of mental prayer and self reflection. Then in 1555, Teresa underwent a spiritual awakening and began having ecstatic religious experiences. In 1559, she reported that Jesus had come to her in bodily form, but invisible. In another ecstatic vision made famous by Bernini's sculpture of the ecstasy of saint Teresa. She claimed to have experienced an angel repeatedly driving a fiery spear into her heart. Causing incredible physical and spiritual pain. Teresa wrote down nearly everything that happened to her during her adult life. So these many episodes were meticulously documented. Their fascinating today for students of theology and modern medicine. Teresa's visions coupled with her brilliant mind and strong knowledge of an interest in Christian mysticism. Soon made her a well-known figure far beyond Avila. With her star on the rise and vexed by what she saw in her own convent, Teresa decided it was time to restore the carmelite order to its original focus on austerity and a strictly contemplative life. Over the prior two centuries, the carmelites, like many orders, had become more spiritually lacks and disinterested in austerity. In the vein of the counter reformation occurring throughout Europe. Teresa found this highly problematic. She decided to take action and founded the reformed carmelite movement. In 1562, with the Pope's authorization, Teresa opened the first convent of the carmelite reform. Nuns there withdrew completely from the world to focus exclusively on prayer and divine law, as well as complete austerity and a total reliance on charity for survival. In 1567, the head of the entire carmelite order traveled from Rome to Avila to visit Teresa, an officially approved her reforms. He then directed her to found more convents, and also to establish monasteries. Teresa recruited a young carmelite priest to start the carmelite reform for men. Later known as St. John of the cross, this young priest would become a famous mystic and poet in his own right. Though Teresa was almost always an ill health, she spent the rest of her life establishing and nurturing 16 more convents throughout Spain. A schism in the carmelite order, sidelined Teresa for a bit, but her great admirer king Philip the second of Spain, advocated for a solution in the reform movement's favor. And soon she was again traveling hundreds of miles on journeys to found new convents and check in on her established ones. Perhaps Teresa's greatest gift to posterity is her writings. These include her autobiography, the life of Teresa of Jesus, and her seminal works, the interior castle, and the way of perfection. These along with other writings, poems, and letters, form a vital part of the literary canon of Christian mysticism. There are also considered classics of Spanish renaissance literature. Teresa died on October 4th, 1582, while traveling to Burgos. She was canonized 40 years later by Pope Gregory the 15th. In 1970, Pope Paul the 6th, named Teresa the first female doctor of the church. In recognition for her centuries long spiritual legacy to Catholicism. We're taking a break for the.

Teresa saint Teresa Alessandro Takeda Avila Jenny Kaplan Yao Mara Spain Roman Catholic Church saints Bernini Theresa Jesus Pope Europe Teresa of Jesus king Philip Rome St. John Burgos
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:25 min | 3 months ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"To be introducing this best of episode of omana. This episode was originally part of our August 2019 theme villain esses. Our romantic and today was a legendary criminal gang leader and river pirate in New York City. I really like this episode because it highlights such as scrappy and adventurous figure in NYC's history. Now here's host Jenny Kaplan to talk about Sadie the goat. Not much is known about the particulars of Sadie's youth, but Sadie Farrell was an Irish American who lived in mid 19th century New York City. She's believed to have lived in New York's fourth ward, which was located around what's today known as the financial district. The fourth word had serious sanitation issues and a crime problem. In 1865, the citizens association of New York published a report on sanitation and public health in the city. Of the fourth ward, the report said, there are more than 400 families in this district whose homes can only be reached by wading through a disgusting deposit of filthy refuse. Sadie was a colorful character in the area. She earned her nickname because when she came across travelers walking solo, she headbutted them in the stomach like a goat, while an accomplice fired a slingshot at the victim and robbed them. One anecdote that's made its way prominently into the folklore surrounding Sadie, involved a longtime feud with a woman named gallus mag. Gallus mag was a tough, 6 foot tall female bouncer. Her signature move was to bite off the ear of troublemakers. Most of the time, that meant she was biting off the ears of men, but Meg didn't necessarily discriminate. And in the midst of a major bar fight, mag bit off Sadie's ear. Sadie fled the area and ventured to the west side of Manhattan. Story goes that Sadie was walking the docks on the west side in the spring of 1869. When she saw members of the Charlton street gang attempt to board a small ship, anchored in the river. They were unsuccessful against the ship's crew. Sadie offered to help and became the gang's leader. Days later, she successfully led efforts to steal a bigger ship, thus Sadie and her crews pirating careers began. They sailed the Hudson and Harlem rivers, going as far north as Poughkeepsie and Albany, New York. The gang wreaked havoc under Sadie's leadership, creating villages, robbing houses, and kidnapping for ransom. Local newspapers at the time said the Sadie made several male prisoners walk the plank. The gang's strategy worked for several months before the tides of fortune changed. Farmers in the Hudson valley began to fight back. Whenever Sadie and the Charlton street gang landed, the farmers would open fire. When the locals won, the pirates disbanded and returned to their previous homes. Sadie went back to the fourth ward, where she was deemed queen of the waterfront. It's believed that she made a truce with gallus mag, and gallus mag gives Sadie her ear back. Mag had been keeping it displayed in a jar on the bar. The tail goes that Sadie kept the ear in a locket and wore it around her neck for the rest of her life. Sadie, the goat was referenced in many historical novels and was part of the basis for the character hellcat Maggie in the movie gangs of New York. All.

Sadie gallus mag omana Jenny Kaplan Sadie Farrell citizens association of New Yo New York City NYC Harlem rivers New York Meg Manhattan Poughkeepsie Albany Hudson valley hellcat Maggie
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:12 min | 3 months ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hey, it's Jenny. We're currently gearing up for a brand new season of womena. Until then, we're bringing you our favorite episodes featuring villains, troublemakers, magic, and mystery, in honor of October. Now, on to the episode. Before we get started, just a warning that this episode contains some mentions of violence. Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Edie allard, managing producer, and I'm so excited to be introducing this best of episode of well manica. This episode was originally part of our October 2021 theme, troublemakers. Are women mannequin today was a queen known for her ruthless 33 year reign in Madagascar. She is often portrayed as both a bloodthirsty dictator and an anti imperialist leader. Before hearing this episode for the first time, I knew almost nothing about the history of Madagascar, so I was really excited to learn. I'm also always keen to tune in to episodes of womena, where we cover women that have complicated narratives. Ultimately, even murderous dictators are part of our world's history. So, here's host Jenny Kaplan to talk about ranavalona the first. Our subject was born ramavo in 1792. For the first three and a half decades of her life, that's how she was known. Then when she was 36, Rama foe's husband, king radha first, took his own life in a fit of delirium. The cause of this delirium remains a mystery. It may have been caused by malaria, Blackwater fever, and or excessive alcohol consumption. Regardless, 6 days after her husband's death, ramavo ordered all of his relatives either strangled or starved to death and declared herself queen. Bravado then took on the royal name, ranavalona, and began her long reign on the malagasy people. Becoming queen presented early challenges, before European influence, the malagasy people had been a matrilineal society. But prior to ranavalona's Ascension to the throne, the royal family adopted a rule of patrilineal Succession. Rana valona declared herself to be a man in order to safeguard her rule. This prevented her from remarrying. Still, she was allowed lovers and any children she bore were considered descendants of her dead husband. Ranavalona's rule was profoundly different from her late husbands. Unlike ramada the first, round of valona did not have a friendly attitude towards Europeans. She threw out the Anglo malagasy treaty of friendship signed by her husband. She also forbade building roads. So that no invading European army could have a straight shot to her kingdom. Royal policies were often dictated by divination boards known as sikhi. Ranavalona also reinstated slavery as a social and economic institution. It had previously been abolished. At the age of 37, ranavalona gave birth to her only child, rakoto. The child's father was one of ranavalona's generals. The father was assassinated a year later by the queen's newest lover, Ronnie harrow. Two years later, by chance, a French man named Jean labourd washed up on the beach. He was treasure diving on the coast of Mozambique when his ship got caught in a storm. When he landed in Madagascar, he automatically became the property of The Crown. He was taken to the queen and ended up signing a contract to manufacture rifles and cannons for ranavalona. This began an industrial revolution on the island. Jean and the Queen employed 10,000 malagasy people to manufacture everything from soap to guns. At the age of 43, ranavalona became very ill. Fearing she may die, the queen prayed dutifully to her ancestors to help her heal. When she recovered, ranavalona attributed her health to malagasy spirituality. She was inspired to safeguard her cultural beliefs. So she made all missionaries stop baptisms. Then, in 1835, all missionaries were expelled from Madagascar, and all missionary schools were closed. A year later, the queen ordered the capture and execution of every Christian on the island. Whether you were malagasy, European or the highest ranking court member. Everyone was subject to the queen's trials. Her punishments were torturous, spanning from poison to enslavement to dismemberment. A decade after missionaries were expelled, ranavalona banned all Europeans from trading in Madagascar. Anyone who disagreed with the decree had to leave within two weeks of the order. As the queen got older, she grew more outrageous with her power. She was responsible for 50% of deaths on the island. Those who survived were burdened by the fact that she also mismanaged the economy. By the early 1850s, ranavalona's son, prince rakoto, had become a young man. Because of his relationship with Jean labourd, he was sympathetic to Europeans. In January of 1854, the prince dispatched a secret letter to Napoleon the third. Asking him to bring the French army to Madagascar to replace his mother's advisers. He never got a response, but three years later, ranavalona found out about her son's plot and expelled all remaining Europeans from Madagascar. After confiscating their possessions during round up a lona's reign, the island was gripped with paranoia and terror. She ruled with an iron fist. In 1861, she died at the age of 69. She had earned the nickname ranavalona the cruel. All month, we're bringing you the.

ranavalona ramavo Madagascar Ranavalona Edie allard Jenny Kaplan king radha Rana valona Jean labourd European army rakoto Ronnie harrow Jenny Rama malaria fever Mozambique Jean prince rakoto
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:52 min | 3 months ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello, from wonder media network, I'm Brittany Martinez, a producer here at WME, and I'm here to introduce this best of episode of woman manica. This episode was originally part of our August 2019 theme, villainesses. Today's villainous is known by many names. The death house landlady, the Black Widow of Sacramento, and the grandma serial killer. While she was still at large, she was simply known as a sweet community loving old woman. Once she was caught, it became clear she spent much of her life lying and stealing before murdering victims for their money. I love that this episode proves the old adage. It's always the people you don't expect. Now here's host Jenny Kaplan to talk about Dorothea puente. Dorothea Helen gray was born in 1929 in Redlands, California. She was the second youngest of her 7 siblings. Her family was poor and struggled even more when Dorothea's father died of tuberculosis when she was just 8 years old. The following year, Dorothea and her siblings were removed from their mother's custody because their mother was an alcoholic. Dorothea's childhood was then spent living with different relatives and foster families. When she turned 16, she moved to Olympia, Washington, and worked as a prostitute. A few years later, she met and married her first husband. The pair moved to Nevada, where Dorothea had two kids in two years. But she quickly decided that that life wasn't for her. In 1948, she put both children up for adoption and divorced her husband. She moved to San Bernardino, California, spent a few months in jail for falsifying a check and got remarried. Dorothea and her second husband moved together to Sacramento. Her second pass at married life was tumultuous, thanks in no small part to her cheating, drinking and gambling. And she got divorced again in 1966. In 1968, she met and married Roberto puente. Her third and final husband, day two, separated in 1969. That same year, she opened her first boarding house. Dorothea's boarding house earned her a place of respect in the community. She housed alcoholics and drug addicts who no one else would. She gained a rapport with social workers for helping with such cases, and further bolstered her reputation by donating money to local political campaigns and charities. She met multiple California governors, including Ronald Reagan, and she claimed she met vice president Spiro Agnew and Clint Eastwood. But underneath its altruistic facade, Dorothea's first boarding house was a much darker place. She stole her tenants benefits checks by forging their signatures. In 1978, she got caught, was sentenced to 5 years of federal probation, and was banned from owning a boarding house moving forward. In 1982, Dorothea's business partner and roommate Ruth Monroe, mysteriously died from an overdose of codeine in Tylenol. Dorothea claimed that Ruth was depressed and authorities officially ruled the death of suicide. But Ruth's family disagreed and suspected that Dorothea was responsible. Unable to own a boarding house, Dorothea worked as an in home caregiver. She drugged multiple clients and stole money and valuables from their homes. She got caught once again, and wound up in prison. Her sentence was originally 5 years, but it was reduced to three for good behavior. That's despite the fact that a state psychologist warned that Dorothea was dangerous and unapologetic. When she got out in 1985, Dorothea moved in with 77 year old Everson Gilmore, a pen pal from her time in prison. In November, Dorothea hired a handyman to build her a coffin sized box. Two months later, a fisherman recovered that box from a nearby river. Inside, police discovered a decomposing body. Three years later, it was identified as Everson Gilmore. In the meantime, Dorothea impersonated Everson in letters to his family and collected his pension. The following year Dorothea opened her second boarding house. Again, Dorothea red tenant's male and stole their social security checks. In 1988, one of Dorothea's tenants, Alvaro Montoya, disappeared. When Alvaro social worker reported him missing, police visited Dorothea to question her. They found disturbed soil in the backyard and discovered 7 buried bodies. Good evening, everyone. It happened around 10 o'clock this morning when Sacramento police went to a house at 1426 F street. They were responding to numerous tips which led them to believe a human body was buried in the backyard of the house. It turns out the tips were right. Neighbors of the F street house described or theft one day as an eccentric but caring person. She's a very good person. She's nice to everyone. While Dorothea wasn't initially a suspect, she fled to Los Angeles, rousing suspicion. Dorothy, I know if we dig, we're going to find more. I have never killed anybody in my life. And who did kill somebody? She was eventually charged for 9 deaths, including the deaths of Ruth Monroe and Everson Gilmore. She was found guilty for three of the murders and received two life sentences for her crimes. Dorothea maintained her claims of innocence until she died in prison in 2011. She was 82 years old. Dorothea puente's meek, motherly demeanor, masked her horrific penchant for crime. When her actions came to light, it astounded the.

Dorothea Dorothea puente Brittany Martinez WME Jenny Kaplan Dorothea Helen gray Sacramento Everson Gilmore Roberto puente California Ruth Monroe Redlands tuberculosis Ruth Spiro Agnew Olympia San Bernardino Clint Eastwood Nevada Ronald Reagan
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:01 min | 3 months ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Magic, and mystery, in honor of October. Hello. From wonder media network, I'm abi delk. I'm a production assistant and I write scripts and produce womena episodes. I'm so excited to be introducing this best of episode of omega. This episode was part of our October 2019 theme, which is insane. Today, we're going back to 19th century New Orleans. To talk about one of the most renowned practitioners of odoo in American history. I like this episode because the jazz music and sound mixing, transports the listener back in time to a mysterious and exciting moment in American history. Now here's host Jenny Kaplan to talk about the vodou Queen of New Orleans. Marie laveau. Marie was born in either 1794 or 1801. In New Orleans, Louisiana, to a free woman of mixed Native American African and French descent, and a wealthy white landowner and politician. Little is known about Marie's early years, but it's likely that she was introduced into the vodou tradition and its practices during childhood by her mother. Her story picks up again around age 25. When she married a white immigrant from what's now Haiti, named Jacques park. Jacques had fled with other French refugees to New Orleans after the Haitian revolution. Marie and Jacques had two daughters together. Then, only a year or so after the wedding. Jacques mysteriously disappeared and was later declared dead. Marie then began domestic partnership with another man. It's reported that they had as many as 15 children together and continued their partnership until his death. During that period, Marie opened up a beauty parlor and worked as a hairdresser to help support her family and herself. She also got paid to provide spiritual counsel, including to many wealthy members of New Orleans society. Marie had a familial background in African spirituality and religion, and became even more drawn to it after her mother's death. She studied under a famous Senegalese root conjurer, named Doctor John Bayou. And after finishing her apprenticeship, she hit the ground running. In just a short period of time, Marie began to dominate the vodou religious and cultural scene in New Orleans. Marie used one job to support the other. While she styled the hair of black clients who worked for wealthy families, she would glean personal information about those families and reuse it when counseling members of those households. She amassed a huge clientele of wealthy and politically powerful individuals, both black and white, who would come to her for advice on personal and business matters. If needed, Marie would use vodou rituals to intervene in some situations, and similarly provided relief and protection from any evil energy or spellcraft that might be placed on her clients. To provide a bit of background, voodoo is a religious system that's derived from a variety of West African spiritual practices that are in many ways not wholly dissimilar from western religions. Though they tend to put more stock in magic, if a nation, animism, and alternate ritualistic practices. Voodoo originally made its way to New Orleans via the transatlantic slave trade. And then, a slightly different form of vodou was brought to the city by refugees fleeing the Haitian revolution at the beginning of the 19th century. The New Orleans style of vodou, which differed slightly from that fountain Haiti or in West Africa. Consisted of conjuring known as root work. And the use of Greek or juju. People would seek out root workers for spiritual intervention or protection in their daily lives. The favors clients asked for ranged from solutions to romantic issues to greater political power and everything in between. Although most vodou workers used their powers exclusively for good. Some acted otherwise. Many historians believe it was the work of this small percentage of people acting on bad faith. That was sensationalized by the media and non believers. That aspect of the religion became known as hoodoo, and as the basis for misconceptions that the public still tends to have about vodou today. Known within the religion as a voodoo queen, Marie spent decades doling out advice on everything from marital infidelity, domestic disputes, judicial issues, business, finances, personal health, and almost any other life problem you can imagine. Marie also sold protective spiritual objects such as candles, powder, and an assortment of other items mixed together to create protective charms or amulets. Marie presided over voodoo rituals at her home on saint Anne's street in a public area called Congo square that served as an officially sanctioned gathering place for both enslaved and free African people. And at length punch our train, where major ceremonies took place for those initiated into the voodoo faith. These rituals consisted mostly of singing, dancing, drumming, and spirit possession that would not be entirely out of place at a Pentecostal revival. Still, these practices were seen by many white people as strange and sensational at the time. Though Marie faced off against many rivals over who should rule the voodoo system and community in New Orleans. She remained queen until 1850 without any serious challenges. Marie died in 1881, still at the top of her game. In her death, Marie has become a veritable icon. Her tomb and St..

Marie New Orleans Jacques abi delk Jenny Kaplan Jacques park New Orleans society John Bayou Marie laveau Haiti Louisiana West Africa white saint Anne Congo square
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:13 min | 3 months ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hey, it's Jenny. We're currently gearing up for a brand new season of womena. Until then, we're bringing you our favorite episodes featuring villains, troublemakers, magic, and mystery, in honor of October. Hello from wonder media network, I'm Brittany Martinez, a producer here at WME, and I'm so excited to be introducing this best of episode up on manica. This episode was originally part of our October 2021 theme, troublemakers. Today, we're telling the story of the longest skyjacking. Yes, stealing an airplane in American history. And the young woman at the heart of the crime. I actually produced this episode. When I first heard this woman's story, it sounded more like an action film than reality. So, I squirted that way. Now here's host Jenny Kaplan to talk about Catherine kirko. According to modern myth, Catherine was a good girl with a capital G, all American, like apple pie. She was born and raised in coos bay, a small city on the Oregon coast. After high school, she moved to Southern California. Kathy as she was called, dreamed of being a singer. But instead, she found work in a massage parlor. One day, while she was in the shower, Kathy's doorbell rang she answered it in her bathrobe. When she managed to rub the soap out of her eyes, she came face to face with roger holder. Roger was a Vietnam vet and a member of the black Panthers. He'd been looking for Kathy's roommate. But he and Kathy hit it off and soon, Cathy became a member of the Panthers, too. By the early 1970s, the black Panthers had weathered years of being vilified. By the press, by white Americans by the FBI. Several of its leaders had been assassinated, others jailed. Some escaped the U.S. choosing to live in exile. On June 2nd, 1972, Rogers mother drove roger and Kathy to the airport in Los Angeles. The couple told Rogers mom that they were heading to coos bay to meet Cathy's parents. Instead, they got on a plane to Seattle. Roger then handed a stewardess a handwritten note. It read success through death. Everyone except the captain will leave the cabin. There are four of us and two bombs, do as you're told, a no shooting will take place. Roger gestured to a large briefcase he'd carried on board. Wires were sticking out. The bombs he implied were in there. Roger also insisted on $500,000 from the airline, and for the release of Angela Davis, a Black Panther who had been in jail for over a year on several felonies. They received the requested money and Angela was acquitted two days later. Roger and Cathy led about half of the passengers off in San Francisco. And the other half in New York. They went back and forth on where they wanted to go. Vietnam was on the list. But they settled on Algiers in North Africa. Roger and Cathy's trip remains the largest skyjacking in American history. In the media frenzy that followed, many questioned whether Kathy had been taken hostage herself. Why would a 20 year old white girl from Oregon hijack a plane in the name of the black Panthers? But in phone interviews with news outlets, Kathy said that living in coups bay had left her in the dark about the world. She decided she wanted to make change rather than sit around waiting for it to happen. Would you jump into something like that without doing a lot of thinking? She said to her reporter, I had a lot of people to think about. A lot of consequences to worry about. For the subsequent 6 years, roger and Kathy remained on the run. The international headquarters for the black Panthers were in Algiers. The couple settled there at first. And then in 1974, they traveled to Paris using fake passports. Roger and Cathy were arrested, but French authorities didn't feel the crime warranted extradition to the U.S. because of its political motivation. For the next few years, Kathy and roger but especially Kathy found their cultural niche. In 1977, roger walked into The Associated Press's Paris office. He told a reporter that he would go back to the U.S. and face whatever punishment was waiting for him. He also said that he hadn't seen Cathy now 25 for over a month. He was worried. That was the last time anyone heard from or about Kathy. Roger returned to.

Kathy Roger Panthers Brittany Martinez WME Cathy Jenny Kaplan Catherine kirko coos bay roger holder Rogers Jenny Vietnam Oregon roger Catherine Southern California Algiers Angela Davis
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:38 min | 4 months ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"This best of episode of womena. Today's episode was originally part of our October 2019 theme, which is insane. She was the last woman to be hanged for witchcraft in Boston. But her trial went on to influence many of the cases of the infamous 1692 Salem witch trials. Stories of witches are always fascinating, and I found particular attachment to this one as this woman and I share a nickname. Now here's host Jenny Kaplan to talk about Anne goody Glover. Little is known about Anne's early life. She was born in Ireland and moved to Barbados at some point after Oliver Cromwell's invasion of Ireland in 1649. It's not entirely clear how she got from there to Boston, but by 1680, Anne was living with her daughter, Mary, and pureed in Boston and working as a housekeeper for a man named John Goodwin. In the summer of 1688, John's 13 year old daughter, Martha, accused Anne's daughter of stealing clothes from the family laundry. And denied the accusation and ended up in a major fight with the young Goodwin children. During the fight, the Goodwin children started acting strangely, supposedly because of the argument. When the doctor was called in, he couldn't figure out what was wrong with the children, so he chalked it up to witchcraft. Anne was quickly arrested and officially charged with witchcraft, a very serious allegation in 1680s Boston, where fear of witches ran rampant. The leading accuser in her trial was none other than reverend cotton Mather, who would gain significant infamy for his actions during the Salem witch trials a few years later. During her trial and was unable to answer questions in English, though she apparently understood the language. At first, she was accused of speaking the language of the devil. When Anne's accusers finally realized she was speaking Irish, they were able to find an interpreter and continued the trial. Still, her inability to speak English was a mark against her. Anne was asked to recite the lord's prayer during her trial, which she was able to do in Irish and broken Latin, but not in English. Being unable to say the lord's prayer in English was considered to be the mark of a witch. That belief speaks to the significant anti Catholic prejudice and puritan Boston. As most Catholics of the period, like Anne, would likely only know the lord's prayer in Latin. Other evidence supposedly proving Anne's witchcraft were small doll like figures, found during a search of her home, and an account from reverend Mather that claimed Anne engaged in trysts with the devil and his minions in her prison cell. Reverend Mather wrote that Anne was a scandalous old Irish woman very poor, a Roman Catholic and obstinate in idolatry. Anne was found guilty of witchcraft and was hanged on November 16th, 1668. In front of a mocking crowd of onlookers. Robert califf, a Boston merchant who knew Anne. Wrote that, her behavior at her trial was like that of one distracted. They did her cruel. The proof against her was wholly deficient. Anne's.

Anne Boston Jenny Kaplan Anne goody Glover John Goodwin Goodwin Ireland reverend cotton Mather Oliver Cromwell Barbados Martha Mary John reverend Mather Reverend Mather Latin Robert califf
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:53 min | 4 months ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"In honor of October. Now, on to the episode. Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Edie allard, managing producer, and I'm so excited to be introducing this best of episode of women manica. We're talking about one of the most famous suspected axe murderers in American history. I'm fascinated by the story of this woman because despite the fact she was found not guilty, her name is still inextricably associated with that grisly murder. She's such a great example of the conflict between history and folklore. Now, here's host Jenny Kaplan to talk about Lizzie Borden. Lizzie was born in Fall River, Massachusetts in 1860 to Andrew and Sarah Borden. Andrew made his fortune mostly in textiles and property development and was well known in Fall River for being frugal. Lizzie and her older sister Emma were raised in a religious household and spent their younger years heavily involved in church activities. Lizzie's mother died when Lizzie was just two years old, and three years later, her father married a woman named Abby gray. Lizzie and Emma both hated their stepmother from the beginning. They thought she'd married their father for his fortune, and they may have felt threatened because, unlike their frugal father, it seemed the two sisters had expensive tastes. On the morning of August 4th, 1892, Andrew Borden left for work as usual. The only people left at home were Lizzie, her mother, and their maid Bridget. Andrew came home a few hours later, and laid down for a nap on the couch. According to Lizzie's later testimony, at approximately 1115 in the morning, she found her father dad on the couch. It appeared that he'd been struck in the head multiple times with the sharp object. Abby, the hated stepmother, was found dead upstairs brutally mutilated. The coroner determined that Abby had died about an hour before her husband. Police quickly came to the conclusion that the murders had to be an inside job. But they were confused by the lack of blood at either scene, except for on the bodies themselves. They also couldn't find anything resembling a murder weapon. Prosecutors later argued that the weapon had famously been an axe. Suspicion almost immediately turned toward Lizzie. Her sister had been out of town at the time of the murder, and it was well known that Lizzie had issues with her father and stepmother. Her alibi was also unconvincing. Lizzie claimed to have no idea where her stepmother was after 9 a.m.. And then she claimed that while her father was being murdered, she was in the barn looking for lead sinkers for a fishing trip. But when the police examined the barn, there were no footprints on the dusty floor. Police also learned that Lizzie had visited a drug store the day before the murder to buy a deadly poison. On August 11th, Lizzie was arrested. At first, the grand jury refused to issue an indictment, but then a family friend presented new evidence. The friend had stayed with Lizzie in the days following the murders and said that she witnessed Lizzie's suspiciously burning a blue dress in the kitchen fire. Lizzie had said the dress was covered with paint. Lizzie's maid had previously stated that Lizzie had been wearing a blue dress on the day of the murder. The new evidence convinced the jury to issue the indictment. The trial of Lizzie Borden began on June 5th, 1893 in the New Bedford courthouse. It was a public sensation even before the first gavel. The newspapers had covered the story from the beginning, and the country was both enthralled by the story and split over Lizzie's guilt. It was essentially the O. J. Simpson trial of its day. Lizzie had a high powered defense team at her side, including Andrew Jennings, and George Robinson, the former governor of Massachusetts. The jury was made up of 12 men. Newspaper accounts were very impressed with the performance of Lizzie's lawyer, George Robinson, who seemed to consistently poke holes in the prosecution's case. They weren't nearly as impressed with the quality of the prosecution's bench. In his summation of the defense, Andrew Jennings argued, there is not one particle of direct evidence in this case from beginning to end against Lizzie a Borden. There is not a spot of blood. There is not a weapon that they have connected with her in any way, shape or fashion. Robinson, who gave his own summation for the defense, claimed that the crime could only have been committed by a maniac or the devil. It certainly couldn't have been committed by a respectable lady. The jury deliberated for only an hour and a half before returning with its verdict. Not guilty. Today, many speculate that the jury may have been more inclined to convict had Lizzie been a man. Most people in the late 19th century found it hard to believe that a woman of Lizzie's background could have pulled off such brutal killings. How unladylike. That said, modern experts believe it's very likely that Lizzie was guilty. After the trial, Lizzie returned to Fall River where she and her sister Emma purchased a large home called maple Croft and lived a quiet existence. Lizzie was involved in the theater scene in town, and mostly associated with what one might call bohemian types. She died at 67 years old and fall ripper and was buried next to her parents. Whether she killed her parents or not. The story of Lizzie Borden, the axe murderer, holds a special and disturbing place in the American imagination and pop culture.

Lizzie Fall River Edie allard Jenny Kaplan Sarah Borden Andrew Lizzie Borden Abby gray Emma Abby Andrew Jennings Massachusetts George Robinson Bridget O. J. Simpson New Bedford Borden Robinson maple Croft
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:29 min | 4 months ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"In honor of October. Now, on to the episode. Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Sarah, and I'm a production assistant here at WME. I'm so excited to be introducing this best of episode of womena. Today's episode was originally part of our October 2019 theme, which is in saints. Our women of the day was a famed Russian spiritualist and author. She cofounded one of the earliest societies to promote theosophy. It's a philosophical religious system that leans into the mystical experience of revelation and meditation. I loved learning about her travels around the globe to study spiritual traditions from different cultures. Now here's host Jenny Kaplan to talk about the most notorious occultist of the 19th century. Helena blavatsky. Look at the bright side of your life ain't enjoy every single time for sure to be wild Helena Hahn was born in 1831 in the Russian Empire to an aristocratic Russian German family. At the age of 17, Helena married a Russian military officer and provincial vice governor named Nikki for blavatsky. They separated after just a few months. And when her marriage fell apart, Helena became interested in spiritualism, occultism, and esoteric and eastern philosophies. Spiritualism refers to the belief in communication with the dead, particularly through mediums. And occultism refers to belief in the power and influence of the Supernatural. Both spiritualism and occultism were particularly popular during this era and would become even more so over the next century. Many historians attribute interest in this movement to the clash between enlightenment science and traditional religious beliefs. People were looking for a new spiritual paradigm that encompassed and reconciled both the scientific revolution and the spiritual realm. For the next few decades of her life, Helena claimed to have traveled throughout Asia and Europe, searching for religious and philosophical truths. She said she spent several years in India and Tibet studying with Hindi and Buddhist gurus. In 1873, Helena arrived in New York City. There, she met a man named Henry Steele olcott, who shared her spiritual and intellectual interests. Two years later, the pair, along with several others. Founded the theosophical society. Helena described theosophy as the synthesis of science, religion, and philosophy. She said theosophy revived an ancient wisdom beneath all religions. Around the same time, Helena traveled to chittenden Vermont. It was the height of a time known as the epidemic of wraps. People all over were taking part in seances with self described mediums and spiritualists. And believe that spirits were making rapping noises on tables and walls in an attempt to communicate. When one reporter wrote that the noises got louder and more frequent once Helena got to town. Her celebrity was solidified. In 1877, Helena published her first book entitled ISIS unveiled, highlighting the importance of mystical experiences and laying out the basic elements of her theosophical belief system. Despite the book gaining attention, the theosophical society was losing members in the U.S.. So two years later, in 1879, Helena and Henry olcott moved to India and established a theosophical society headquarters there. They started a society journal and gained a significant following in the country. Helena faced rebuke from around the world at various points in her life, including from her Indian followers. She was often accused of faking spiritualist activities. An investigation done by the London society for psychical research found that she was a fraud in 1885. Though a century later, those findings were reevaluated by the same organization and were found to be unjust. Not long after that 1885 judgment, Helena left India. She moved to Germany, then Belgium, and then London. She wrote three more books about her theosophical beliefs called the voice of silence, the secret doctrine, and key to theosophy. Helena died in London in 1891. Despite the fact that many described Helena as a charlatan. She had a significant impact on the introduction and advent of alternative religions and philosophies in the west. She helped to turn Europeans and Americans toward Asia for spiritual inspiration. During a time when traditional Christian beliefs were facing new challenges. Helena lavrovsky's influence was just the beginning of a spiritual movement that still evident today. As westerners continue to turn eastward for spiritual inspiration and practice. Her influence is also heavily felt and what we now call the new age.

Helena WME Henry Steele olcott Jenny Kaplan Helena blavatsky Helena Hahn theosophical society blavatsky saints Sarah Nikki India chittenden Tibet Asia London society for psychical r New York City Vermont Europe U.S.
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:07 min | 4 months ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"In honor of October. Now, on to the episode. Hello from wonder media network, I'm Brittany Martinez, a producer here at WME, and I'm so excited to be introducing this best of episode of omega. Today's episode originally came from our villainess theme in August 2019. This will mannequin was a 16th century Hungarian countess, who allegedly murdered hundreds of local young women, and bathe in their blood. Some even say she was the inspiration for Dracula. I read a lot of horror novels and hearing that this woman had an influence on the modern vampire genre is so interesting to me. Now here's host Jenny Kaplan to talk about Elizabeth Báthory. Elizabeth was born in 1560 into an extremely prominent Protestant family of Hungarian nobility. Her family controlled the territory of Transylvania, and her uncle Stefan was king of Poland. We know very little about Elizabeth's early life, other than the fact that she was raised at her family's castle. In 1575, when Elizabeth was just 15, she married the son of another powerful Hungarian family and moved into a castle given to the couple as a wedding gift from her husband's family. Elizabeth had four children and as far as we can tell, her life appeared to be relatively normal until her husband's death in 1604. That's when rumors started circulating that Elizabeth was committing acts of murder and extreme cruelty in the castle. People apparently found it hard to believe. For 5 years, accounts that peasant women had been murdered were ignored. Finally, in 1609, claims that Elizabeth had murdered noble women started attracting actual attention. King Matthias of Hungary felt it necessary to investigate in order to noble named gyorgy thurzo to find out what was happening. Georgi took depositions for more than 300 witnesses and survivors living in and around Elizabeth's castle, who supposedly verified the stories of serial murder and sadism. He also found physical evidence, not the least of which was the presence of dead dying and mutilated girls imprisoned in the castle. Based on the interviews and the physical evidence, he determined that Elizabeth had tortured and murdered more than 600 young women with the assistance of her loyal servants. Elizabeth and her servants were arrested on December 30th, 1609. Two years later, the servants were put on trial and three were executed. Elizabeth herself was never tried. Likely because this would have been a public embarrassment. Instead, she was put under house arrest in her own castle where she remained until her death. The story of the countess who murdered hundreds of young women in her castle quickly made its way into the national folklore, and over the centuries the story evolved. For example, many versions of the Elizabeth Báthory story claimed that she murdered young girls so that she could be than the blood of virgins, as some sort of beauty treatment. Others claim that she had vampire like tendencies, I needed to drink their blood. These and other claims were generally recorded years after Elizabeth's death. And are not historically reliable. Still, Elizabeth's infamy persists to this day. She's often compared to Vlad the Impaler, and some insist that she served as the source material for the masterpiece novel Dracula. While documents exist from the 1611 trial, supporting accusations against Elizabeth, many modern scholars question the veracity of such evidence. Elizabeth, after all, was a powerful woman of her time, made more so by her control of her husband's massive estate after his death. It's interesting to note that king Matthias owed Elizabeth a rather large debt. That debt was forgiven in exchange for letting Elizabeth's family manage her captivity. As such, historians have suggested that the acts attributed to her may have been politically motivated slander,.

Elizabeth Elizabeth Báthory Brittany Martinez WME Jenny Kaplan king Matthias gyorgy thurzo Transylvania Stefan Georgi Poland Hungary Vlad
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:32 min | 4 months ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is will manica. This month we're highlighting women who led extraordinary lives of resistance. Today, we're talking about the woman who argued roe V wade in front of the Supreme Court. Her dedication to reproductive justice led to one of the most influential court decisions in American history. Sarah weddington was born Sarah Catherine regal on February 5th, 1945. Her father was a methodist minister. Sarah received her college degree at the age of 19 from what's now McMurray university, a methodist college in her hometown. After graduating, she worked as an 8th grade teacher for a short time, but didn't find the work fulfilling, so she enrolled at the University of Texas at Austin to study law. Sarah later said this decision was partially inspired by a dean at her college who had told her. No woman from this college has ever gone to law school. It would be too tough. Sarah wanted to do it anyway. During her law school years, Sarah dated another law student, Ron weddington, and became pregnant. Sarah and Ron drove to Mexico together, so she could get an abortion. She couldn't get one in her home state of Texas. Sarah didn't speak publicly about this experience until many years later, when she published her 1992 memoir, a question of choice.

Jenny Kaplan roe V wade Sarah weddington Sarah Catherine regal Sarah McMurray university Supreme Court Ron weddington University of Texas Austin Ron Mexico Texas
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:45 min | 5 months ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"This August on will manica were taking a trip through history to discover the stories of muses. Women whose lives inspired work that's shaped our culture in small ways and large. Special thanks to this month's sponsor, Mercedes Benz, whose own famous namesake was inspired by a young muse named Mercedes. Join us all month long for fascinating stories of women who are drivers of creativity, inspiration, and artistic expression. Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is what manica. This month we're talking about muses. Women who were drivers of creativity and inspiration. You may not recognize today's muse by name, but you've almost certainly seen her likeness in a museum or on a poster. This dancer used swirling silks multi colored lights and inspiration from nature in her routines. And her artistry helped inspire the Art Nouveau movement of the early 20th century. Please welcome loey fuller. Marie Louise fuller was born in Illinois in 1862. From the beginning, her life revolved around the stage. So much so, the details of her life were often reimagined to make a better story. Loey claimed she made her onstage debut when she was two years old, because she said, there was no babysitter in the dance hall. As a teenager, she worked as a Temperance lecturer and learned how to captivate an audience. Loey didn't have formal dance training, but she didn't let that slow her down. In fact, she embraced it.

Jenny Kaplan Mercedes Benz loey fuller Marie Louise fuller Loey Illinois
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Jenny Kaplan, and this is where manica. This month we're highlighting visionaries. Today we're talking about a photographer of the avant garde. She was a radical leftist who fled war and persecution. Please welcome Kati Horner. Kati was born cattle and Deutsche blough in Budapest on May 19th, 1912. She came from a family of Jewish bankers. When she was 19 years old, she left home and moved to Berlin. Katy sought to make a living for herself, which was unconventional for women at the time. In Berlin, she surrounded herself with artists, writers, and other creative thinkers. One of the people in her circle was a Hungarian intellectual named Paul paros, who became her first husband. The pair shared similar leftist political beliefs and a frequently socialized with Marxist theoretician Karl Koch. In 1933, with nazism on the rise, Katy and Paul fled Berlin, and briefly returned to Budapest. Their Katie studied photography under the renowned Josef peachy. He was not only a teacher of photography, but also a teacher of politics. Under his influence, Katy refined both her radical anarchist beliefs and her photography skills. After a few months in Hungary, Katy and Paul moved to Paris. Kati was in pursuit of financial independence, and she soon secured magazine commissions for a series of photos about street life in Paris. She drew inspiration from the French flounders and captured the everyday life of the city. She was drawn to flea markets, where she captured dream like surrealist scenes. In particular, dolls, masks, and mannequins took center stage in her work. The title of her first photo series was marchet Opus, which translates to flea markets. Katy also explored satire. In 1936, she worked on an anti fascist photo series titled Hitler I. The work reads like a political cartoon. Hitler's depicted as an egg with a hand drawn mustache. The following year, Katy was commissioned by two leftist organizations to cover the Spanish Civil War. She moved to Barcelona in search of understanding how people led their daily lives with the Civil War happening around them. Kati's wore photography was non traditional. Instead of capturing soldiers, she photographed women children and workers. People who were struggling to make ends meet. But who had to carry on, even in the midst of intense loss. Women's experience of war was at the heart of her work. During this period, Katy and Paul separated. In 1938, Katie married her second husband, Jose orna, Spanish painter and sculptor. Jose was imprisoned in an internment camp, and they were narrowly able to secure his escape. Together, Katy and Jose fled to Paris, where they lived in fear of police surveillance. At the outbreak of World War II, pati and Jose moved to Mexico City. Their new home became a hub for other exiled surrealist artists. Katie lived out the rest of her life in Mexico, and even became a naturalized Mexican citizen. She published her conceptual works with numerous publications in Mexico and was a photography editor for mujeres, a publication devoted to women artists. She worked as an architectural photographer, collaborating with some of the most famous Mexican architects. She also taught photography at a square light di de sanyo and la universidad ibero Americana. Katie died at the age of 87 on October 19th, 2000 in Mexico City. Since her death, her work has been exhibited in galleries across Europe, Mexico, and the United States. All month, we're highlighting artistic visionaries. Special thanks to Liz Kaplan, my favorite sister and co creator, and special thanks to Alessandra teja, who curated this month's theme. As always, we'll be taking a break for the weekend. Talk to you on Monday..

Katy Kati Jenny Kaplan manica Berlin Kati Horner Paul paros Karl Koch Budapest Josef peachy Katie Paris Paul Deutsche Jose Jose orna Hungary Hitler Barcelona Mexico City
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan and this is will manica today. We're talking about a woman. He believed so strongly in the rights of women to receive an education that she was willing to defy the traditions of the church and the edicts of the english government. Let's talk about. mary ward. Mary was born on january. Twenty third fifteen eighty five in england to a large roman catholic family at a time when catholic persecution was rampant. Mary was raised in religious households. When she was a teenager she lived with the family that maintained a strict schedule of prayer and instruction even had a priest secretly living in residence at the age of fifteen. Mary felt that god was calling to her to lead a religious life so she moved to northern france and joined a convent in sixteen o eight. Mary left france to found her own convent for english. After a year. Mary decided that living a life of contemplation and prayer. The standard for women involved in the catholic church wasn't enough enough for her. She also wanted to do active ministry. Work things like helping the poor founding schools and teaching christianity so mary gathered community of like minded women and they established an institute to run schools for girls in england. Mary's ambitions were highly controversial. For starters the english government was still heavily persecuting catholic people which meant that. Mary had to conduct her operations covertly and the catholic church wasn't on her side either. The church had ruled that women should stay in. Enclosed convents nuns. Despite these challenges. Mary pushed forward continuing to provide english girls with an education. She wrote there is no such difference between men and women that women may not do great matters. I hope in. God it will be seen that women in time to come. We'll do much in sixteen twenty one. Mary walked fifteen hundred miles to rome for an audience. With pope gregory the fifteenth. Mary wanted the pope to allow women to train for the same ministry work as men but the pope didn't grant her in person. Audience and mary never got an official decision about her proposal. Still mary continued establishing schools. All over europe in rome naples and perrugia munich vienna and pressburg all while petitioning the pope to allow women to stand on more equal footing in the church. Finally in sixteen thirty one hope urban the eighth issued a papal bull. That called. Mary a heretic. Her institute was dissolved. Mary was imprisoned in a tiny dirty cell and a munich convent. She wasn't allowed to speak to anyone and she wasn't given any writing materials to communicate with the outside world. She wrote letters in lemon juice on the back of paper. Her food came wrapped in in sixteen thirty to mary traveled to rome for trial. The pope acknowledged that. Mary was not a heretic but he refused to reopen her schools. Still mary's followers continued to teach in sixteen thirty nine amidst worsening health. Mary was allowed to return to england. On january. thirtieth. Sixteen forty five. Mary died she was sixteen years old. In nineteen o nine. The catholic church confirmed mary ward's institute and named her the founder a hundred years later pope benedict the sixteenth gave mary the title. Venerable commending her heroic virtue. Mary ward was champion for women's education. Her schools have helped educate countless girls across the globe and her perseverance and determination fundamentally reshaped. How women were treated in the church. Today mary ward's institute of the blessed virgin. Mary has established teaching foundations on five continents all month honoring the legacy of educators. For more on. Why we're doing what we're doing check out. Our newsletter manica weekly follow us on facebook and instagram at encyclopedia will manica special. Thanks to lose kaplan my favorite sister and co-creator talk to you tomorrow. This month of encyclopedia will manteca is proudly supported by unc greensboro founded as a women's college in eighteen ninety one unc greensboro presents. She can we.

Mary mary ward jenny kaplan mary catholic church english government england france rome perrugia pressburg pope gregory naples munich vienna europe institute of the blessed virgi pope benedict instagram
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:55 min | 1 year ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan. And this is. We'll monica today. We're discussing a radical social reformer. Who fought against the caste system and four fair quality education for all in india while she was alive society hurled insults and even rocks in her direction but nothing could slow her down. Let's talk about sevi- trip. I fully savvy tree by was born on january third. Eighteen thirty one in ny go a city on the western coast of india. Her parents were farmers at that time. Young girls were made to enter arrange marriages early. So savvy troop. I was married off at age. Nine to joe chiro fully. Who is just a few years older joe. Chiro strongly disagreed with society's caste system and restrictions on women when saffy trip. I showed a strong desire to learn. He taught her how to read and write. Savagery by quickly grew passionate about teaching. She took what she learned from her husband to the next level enrolling in multiple teachers training courses in eighteen forty eight. She and her husband opened the first indian run school for girls. In the city of puna those savagery by was still in her teens. She became the first teacher. The curriculum included math science and social studies. The schools very existence contradicted social tradition so much that savage her by and jodi row were ostracized by their own families and community. still savage. your passion for social reform only grew stronger. India finit hearing to a social caste system for centuries though the original casts were based on someone's occupation. They were eventually considered hereditary. Certain lower castes. For even deemed untouchable savagery by and her husband started schools for children. The mang and mahar castes. Two groups of so-called untouchables by eighteen fifty to the fullest had three schools in operation. That taught about one hundred. Fifty girls in all savagery by also started the hilla. Cba mondo an institute that aim to empower women to stand up for their rights. She organized a barbara strike in mumbai and buna and opposition to the custom that demanded widows shave their heads. An eighteen fifty seven indian staged a rebellion against the consolidation of british power through the east india company after the widespread uprising ended in eighteen. Fifty eight the british rule or arise started in earnest. That same year all of savagery by schools had to close. They were no longer receiving private european donations. And the government also withdrew. Its support for the fula foolishness. Nevertheless the fullest kept fighting to spread education. Eventually they would open more schools eighteen over the course of their careers. Because of savage revise attempts to educate women in the lower castes. Members of the conservative upper caste fought against her locals threatened her and through mud stones and cow dung at her. When she walked to school she had to carry an extra saris a change of clothes. But this didn't deter her. Savage revive encouraged the girl. She taught to take creative. Pursuits like writing and painting an essay written by one of her students titled about the grief of mahar and maine's strongly criticized the unjust caste system. And the atrocities committed against the untouchables. This would become the first known writing by dalit woman. A member of the lowest cast. It became a cornerstone of daulat. Feminism eighteen seventy four savagery. By and joe. Chiro adopted a child from a brahmin widow. A member of the highest cast. This was a strong symbolic message to society as savage. Your by was part of a lower caste. Their son would grow up to be a doctor together. Savage you're buying. Her husband would continue fighting against child. Marriage the concept of caste untouchability and inequality in eighteen seventy six. They created fifty. Two free food hostels. During a famine they also encouraged relief action from the british government during a massive drought in eighteen. Ninety seven eighteen. Seventy three joe. Chiro started a social reform society dedicated to freeing all the less privileged castes from oppression and exploitation there were members of all religions and castes. It's part of the movement including some government officials. Joe chiro passed away on november twenty eighth eighteen ninety following his death. Savagery by became the organization's chair. The third pandemic of bubonic plague hit puna in savagery. By and her son opened a clinic on the outskirts of the city to treat infected patients in doing this work savage you by contracted the disease herself. She died on march tenth. 1897 savage chubais efforts changed indian society at great risk to her own safety there her teaching and her advocacy work savvy buys passion inspired countless young women before and after her death all month. We're talking about women who shaped the world of education for more on. Why we're doing what we're doing check out our newsletter manica weekly follow us on facebook and instagram at encyclopedia britannica special. Thanks to lose kaplan my favorite sister and co-creator talk to you tomorrow this month. Encyclopedia will manteca is proudly supported by unc greensboro founded as a women's college in eighteen ninety one unc greensboro presents. She can we can beyond. The women's suffrage centennial through performances films lectures and concerts. Unc g examines. How the decisions are past affect us today. Join the experience. Learn more at she can. We can dot unc dot edu..

jenny kaplan Chiro joe chiro saffy india hilla joe puna monica buna jodi Cba east india ny mahar mumbai barbara Joe chiro Savage maine
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Sidedoor

Sidedoor

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Sidedoor

"Hey cider listeners. We'll be back in just two weeks with the start of our new season. But in the meantime we have a little treat for you in honor of the start of the new school year where sharing an episode of a great show from our friends at wonder media network. It's called encyclopedia will manica every day. The podcast explores the trials and triumphs of groundbreaking women. You probably didn't read about in the history books but definitely should have. Each episode is only about five minutes long so you can get inspired. Learn something new. In the time it takes to shower each morning. I'm particularly excited to share this episode. Because it's better woman who made a very brief appearance in the side door episode votes for hawaiians. Today you'll get to hear more of her story. The first woman of color elected to the us house of representatives patsy mink years host. Jenny kaplan with that story from encyclopedia. Manteca hello from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan and this is we'll manteca today. We're honoring legendary politician. Who throughout her career prioritize gender and racial equity in education. Not only is she. The first woman of color and asian american woman to serve in congress. She was also a major author of title. Nine let's talk about patsy. Mink hatzi matsu. Takimoto was born in pya maui y territory on december. Six nineteen twenty-seven patsies grandparents emigrated from japan to work in hawaii. Sugar plantations growing up as a third generation. Japanese american patsy witnessed heavy discrimination towards japanese americans and indigenous hawaiians when patsy was fourteen years old fighter jets bombed pearl harbor. Patsies father was subsequently taken by authorities one night and heavily questioned. Though her dad returned safely. The next day patsies family lived in fear from that point on patsy later said that that moment made her realize that one couldn't take citizenship and the promise of the. Us constitution for granted hats. He graduated for maui high school as both class president and valedictorian. She went on to study at to different colleges in the mainland. Us before moving back to hawaii in nineteen forty eight. Patsy graduated from the university of hawaii. With a bachelor's in chemistry and zoology patsies original career goal was to become a physician but no medical school would accept her so she decided to change career paths and instead pursued law she applied to university of chicago's law school and accidentally got accepted as a foreign student at the time. Patsy was one of only two women in her class in nineteen fifty one. Patsy earned her. Jd and married graduate student. John francis mink a year later. The couple had their only child. Patsy faced a lot of discrimination for being a working mother and having an interracial marriage many major chicago law firms rejected her application so her family relocated to honolulu in nineteen fifty-three patsy became the first japanese american and woman to pass the bar and practiced law in hawaii but many law firms in hawaii still turned her away instead. Patsy went into private practice and taught business law at the university of hawaii. It was during this time.

patsy patsy mink Jenny kaplan jenny kaplan Takimoto pya maui Patsy us house of representatives maui high school hawaii pearl harbor congress japan university of hawaii John francis mink Us university of chicago honolulu chicago
The First Lady of the Black Press: Ethel Payne

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:44 min | 1 year ago

The First Lady of the Black Press: Ethel Payne

"Hello and welcome back from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan and this is encyclopedia manica. Today we're talking about a fearless journalist and civil rights activists witnessed and reported moved the most monumental moments in american history known as the first lady of the black press. Meet our pioneer of the day. Ethel l payne born in chicago in nineteen eleven to the children of slaves at those one of six siblings. She was raised by her single mother after her father's early passing in nineteen forty eight. Ethel was working as a senior library assistant at the chicago public library. She decided to move across the world to work for the army special services club in tokyo. When the korean war broke out in nineteen fifty ethel wrote extensively in her journal about the discrimination. She saw against african american troops stationed in japan. Even though the military had been ordered to integrate she noticed that soldiers were still segregated. She also noted the racial slurs commonly used against african american soldiers and the regular abandonment of babies born to japanese mothers and fathers. Ethel eventually showed her journal to a korean war reporter and he sent her observations to the chicago defender a newspaper that served african american communities. Breeders were

Jenny Kaplan Ethel L Payne Army Special Services Club Ethel Chicago Public Library Chicago Tokyo Japan
"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"jenny kaplan" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Stay tuned for a brand new season coming in september. Thanks for listening. I'm here lesbians and all that way back to our all. Hello from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan and this is encyclopedia. Britannica if you're just tuning in for the first time. Here's the deal we're telling the stories of women from throughout history and around the world who you may not know about but should each month is aimed at an honor of women's history. Month march is all about feminists women who fought for gender equity are woman of the day today fought for intersectional awareness and progress. She was a poet author. Black feminist woman est civil rights activist queer rights. Activists librarian professor and publisher. She described herself as a black lesbian. Mother warrior poet. Let's talk about audrey..

jenny kaplan audrey
Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:16 min | 2 years ago

Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Britannica. Today's politicians but most of her life fighting for civil rights, she put her life at risk to change the course of American history, but she's often left out of history books. Let's talk about Constance Baker Motley. Constance Baker Motley was born on September fourteenth nineteen, forty one in new haven connecticut she was one of twelve children born to working class immigrant parents from the West indies. Constance. Was a bright child who grew up attending integrated schools and quickly fell in love with reading. She didn't learn much about black history in school. But what she did learn about civil rights leaders inspired her she decided she wanted to become a lawyer, but constance couldn't afford higher education. She took a job as a maid for a while before moving on to work for the National Youth Administration an organization focused on providing work an educational opportunities for young adults. Constance was giving a speech at a local community center one evening when her oratory skills impressed a wealthy white philanthropist. He, offered to pay for constants college tuition. So in nineteen, forty, one constance began attending college at Fisk University in Nashville. She later wrote that the train ride down to Tennessee was the first time she experienced overt racism and Jim Crow laws after being forced to ride in a broken down segregated train car, it was a perspective changing moment for constance two years into her attendance at Fisk Constance transferred to New York University and finished her bachelor's degree in economics. Then in nineteen, forty, four constance became the first black woman to be accepted to Columbia law school. After graduating from Columbia in nineteen, forty, six constants worked for the NWC peas legal staff under Thurgood. Marshall who later became a court justice over the course of her work at the N. double ACP constance assisted with almost sixty cases that ended up reaching the Supreme Court. She also personally argued ten supreme court cases and one nine. Constance is work integrated multiple southern state universities putting her toe-to-toe with racist governors determined to bar black students from schools. She also helped protect the right to peaceful protests and opened up parks for. Black. Americans. She did all that despite the sexism and racism personally experienced during her legal career. Some judges actually turned their backs on her and refused to hear her speak. But Constance didn't let others biopsies bar her from success. Her work made her a key player in the civil rights movement and she even occasionally represented Dr. Martin? Luther. King Junior. Constance was constantly in danger when she was working in the south racists threatened her life and the lives of other prominent figures in the black community constance was barred from staying in hotels. So she had to stay with local activists, but even that didn't make her feel completely safe her friend Mississippi civil rights leader Medgar. Evers. was murdered his own driveway. So in nineteen, sixty, five constance left her work in the south and moved back to New York City. Shortly thereafter, she became the first black woman to serve in the New York State Senate. She was also elected president of the borough of Manhattan which made her the first woman in that role. During her time as a politician constance focused on raising up under served communities in the city like Harlem and East Harlem in nineteen sixty, six president Lyndon Johnson appointed constance to the US. District Court in the southern district

Constance Baker Motley Fisk Constance Constance District Court Supreme Court Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network New York State Senate Fisk University Columbia Law School New York City West Indies New York University National Youth Administration Connecticut Nashville Mississippi Manhattan Lyndon Johnson
Civil Rights Champion, Unita Blackwell

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:24 min | 2 years ago

Civil Rights Champion, Unita Blackwell

"Hello for Wonder Media Network, I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Today. We're talking about a key figure in the civil rights movement who risked her life to lift her voice and the voices of other black. Americans. Through violence and abuse she campaigned for equality and became the first black woman to serve as mayor and Mississippi. This is the story of UNITA. UNITA Zelma Blackwell was born he uses brown on March Eighteenth Nineteen thirty three in Lula Mississippi. Her father was a sharecropper and you need a picked cotton in the field alongside her mother until her mother sent her to live with relatives in Arkansas to receive a better education. At that time in Mississippi, black children could only attend school for two years before they were forced to return to the fields. Though you need us mother couldn't read or write. She was determined to give her daughter a better life. You need a chose her own full name after her teacher told her. She couldn't just go by the initials UC. She decided to go with UNITA Zelma. At the age of twelve, you need a left school she returned to picking cotton until she was thirty one years old she married three times but kept the last name of her first husband Jeremiah Blackwell. It was with him. She had her only child Jeremiah Junior. The turning point of UNITA's life came in nineteen, sixty four during the freedom summer. The student nonviolent. Coordinating Committee or Snick was campaigning to raise awareness about registering black citizens to vote you need a signed up to help right away during her attempts to help register black voters across our community. She was arrested more than seventy times. She was also targeted by the K. K. K. members burned crosses in her yard. You need was one of only eight black people in her county who tried to register to vote armed white men threatened you need other brave people trying to vote outside the courthouse and nearly prevented them from entering when they were finally allowed to enter the building they were forced to undergo an unfair literacy tests which all of them failed. You need to realize that despite the fact voting was illegal right society still stacked all the odds against the black community. She was more determined than ever to make her voice heard. So she began to participate in one movement after another to fight the unjust system. In nineteen sixty five UNITA sued her county's board of Education for suspending three hundred students including her own son for wearing freedom pens. She also suit to desegregate the school district. These cases traveled all the way up to federal courts though the pins remained banned, the district was ordered to desegregate. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, six UNITA was elected mayor of mayors spell. which reportedly made her the first black woman to serve as a mayor in Mississippi. When she took office, the five hundred person town had unpaved streets and no sewer system many residents lived in small tin roof shacks with no running water. UNITA immediately set to work on improving conditions serving the town for two decades from a one room. City Hall. She led the way for the town to pave a name. It's roads, install streetlights, built sewers, improve its housing, and even get its first fire truck. In nineteen eighty three UNITA earned a master's degree in regional planning from New Mass Amherst having never previously attended college in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two, she brought national attention to mayors, Ville, and all rural communities when she won three, hundred, fifty, thousand dollar Macarthur Genius Grant. Throughout her career you traveled internationally she gave speeches advised presidents like Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton a never stopped fighting for civil rights. She was defeated for re election to her position in two thousand one by then she'd long made positive mark on the rural communities of Mississippi and beyond. You need. Blackwell passed away on May, Thirteenth Twenty nineteen she made an enormous difference in Marysville Mississippi enter influence extends far beyond her hometown. She fought for the rights of all Americans and brought attention too often forgotten areas of the country.

Unita Unita Zelma Blackwell Mississippi Unita Zelma Ville Jeremiah Blackwell School District Lula Mississippi Black Community Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Jeremiah Junior Arkansas Thirteenth Twenty K. K. K. Bill Clinton City Hall Marysville Jimmy Carter
Elizabeth Fry, The Prison Angel

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:59 min | 2 years ago

Elizabeth Fry, The Prison Angel

"Hello from Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Monica. Today's activist was a major proponent of prison reform in Britain. She's known as the Angel of prisons. Let's talk about Elizabeth Fry. Elizabeth Gurney was born in Norwich Norfolk in seventeen eighty to a wealthy quaker family. Her Father John was a successful banker and her mother Catherine was a member of the family that founded Barclays Bank which still operates is one of the largest banks in the world. Elizabeth was the odd one out amongst her siblings. She experienced mood swings and had difficulty learning which biographers attribute to her dyslexia. Elizabeth once said I was thought and called very stupid and obstinate I certainly did not like learning nor did I believe attend my lessons when Elizabeth was twelve years old her mother passed away and Elizabeth was left to care for her younger sisters and brothers. Eighteen hundred at the age of twenty. Elizabeth Mary Joseph Fry London banker and quaker together. They had many children most sources say eleven, five sons and six daughters though some sources suggest that had even more kids. Elizabeth was an observant quaker and frequently worshipped at the Friends Meeting House. It was there the she heard Williams savory preach about the importance of altruism and philanthropy. His words inspired Elizabeth to help those in need. In eighteen thirteen elizabeth visited newgate prison, which was notorious for its filthy state and its dismal treatment of its prisoners. Elizabeth was appalled to see such harsh conditions. Women and children were tightly packed in small spaces with little room to wash themselves or cleaned their clothes, and while many of the newgate prisoners had committed severe crimes, some of them had not. And others hadn't even received a trial. Elizabeth was determined to act the next day she returned to the prison with fresh loaves of bread and clean clothes, but she had sewn herself. She distributed them to the prisoners and encourage them to keep their cells clean and find ways to be hygienic in the oppressive environment. Elizabeth didn't come back to newgate until eighteen sixteen due to financial difficulties within her family. But upon her return, she dove back into the Work Elizabeth educated the children of Newgate who were imprisoned with their parents teaching them practical skills like reading and selling. In eighteen seventeen, Elizabeth founded the Association for the improvement of female prisoners along with twelve other women she worked to advance prison reform and to provide female prisoners with education and tools for employment Elizabeth fought for the idea that prison should be based round rehabilitation rather than punishment she wrote it must indeed be acknowledged that many of our own penal provisions as they produced no effect appear to have no other end the punishment of the guilty. Eighteen nineteen Elizabeth wrote prisons and Scotland in the north of England and encouraged her society friends to visit newgate themselves. At. That time Britain was in the practice of sending prisoners to penal colonies in. North. America Australia and India. At newgate. Prisoners en route to be transferred to convict ships, rebound by chains and unable to move around and tiny carts people in the streets pelted them with garbage. Elizabeth convinced the governor of new gate to carry the women enclosed carriages rather than open ones and to ensure that all the women and children had enough food to eat on their voyage. Elizabeth also gave the prisoner sewing tools, bibles and other necessities to accompany them on their long journeys. With the help of her efforts, the act of transporting criminals so far away lands was prohibited in eighteen, thirty seven. Prior to that change in policy Elizabeth visited every convict ship bound for Australia for more than twenty five years. Throughout the eighteen twenties, Elizabeth inspected prison conditions and continued to advocate for the rights of prisoners. She presented her findings to the House of Commons committee in doing. So she became the first woman to present evidence to parliament. Elizabeth's ideas influenced the eighteen twenty three jails act which introduced a series of prison

Elizabeth Elizabeth Fry Elizabeth Mary Joseph Fry Work Elizabeth Newgate Britain Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network House Of Commons Committee Norwich Norfolk London Friends Meeting House Barclays Bank Australia Scotland England America John Williams Catherine
Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:19 min | 2 years ago

Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is encyclopedia will Manica. All month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up against injustice and four a better world. Today we're talking about an American civil rights activist whose work began as a student and extended throughout her life and beyond. She was one of the leaders of the sit in and Jalen movements continuing to fight for a more just society even when faced with serious harm. According to The New York Times her FBI file was over four hundred pages long. Let's talk about Patricia Stevens do. Patricia Gloria Stevens was born on December ninth nineteen, thirty, nine fifteen months after her sister Priscilla who would go on to be partner in many organizing efforts. Patricia was the second of three kids born to Lottie Mae Powell Stevens, and Horace Walter Stevens. The Stevens family lived in Belgrade Florida for most Patricia Youth. By the time she was thirteen years old Patricia was very aware of the discrimination she faced for being black and was ready to protest. She and her sister refused to go to the designated colored window at their local dairy queen. Instead, they stood in line for the window marked whites only. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, seven Patricia started school at Florida Am University. Two years later in Nineteen fifty-nine Patricia and Priscila attended a workshop put on by the Congress of racial equality or core on nonviolent civil disobedience. Patricia then started a local chapter of the organization in order to continue the work, she tried to tackle it just thirteen years old integration. The following year on February. Twentieth Nineteen Sixty Patricia, her sister, and some other students sat down at a whites only lunch counter at a Woolworth Tallahassee and refused to get up until they were served. Nineteen days earlier, four guys sat down at a similar lunch counter in Greensboro North Carolina officially kicking off. Since movement across the South Patricia and ten of her peers were arrested rather than paying three hundred dollar Fine Patricia and. Out Forty nine days in jail. Their determination to serve their time as a statement became a norm when others were arrested and charged on fairly. Patricia leadership and courage caught the attention of people around the country support of the cause including Jackie Robinson Eleanor Roosevelt Harry Belafonte, and James. Baldwin. Dr Martin. Luther King. Junior. Sent the sisters telegram that said. Going to jail for a righteous cause as a badge of honor and a symbol of dignity. After she was finally released, Patricia continued the fight to change her city and country. One of her fellow activists was a man named John D do junior. He was law school at Florida Am University. The two got married in nineteen, sixty three and would go on to have three children together for their honeymoon Patricia and John went to the march on Washington and heard Dr King's I have a dream speech. The following year in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, Patricia took on a new role in corps. She served as field secretary for a voter education and Registration Project in North Florida under her leadership. program. More. Voters than any other regional program in the south. Patricia also worked to improve the lives of workers, the poor and other underserved populations in the US. But her activism took a physical toll on her. After being hit in the face by a can of tear gas, Patricia is were injured and she was forced to wear dark glasses for the rest of her life in nineteen sixty, seven, ten years after she enrolled. Patricia graduated from Florida Am. University it took her all of a decade to get her degree because she spent periods of time traveling around the US to rally energy behind the civil rights movement. She was also suspended multiple times by the

Patricia Patricia Gloria Stevens South Patricia Patricia Youth Florida Am University Florida Lottie Mae Powell Stevens Horace Walter Stevens Luther King Harry Belafonte Stevens Jalen Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan United States FBI Woolworth Greensboro John D
Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:57 min | 2 years ago

Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

"From Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny. Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Very. Excited to present our. September. This month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up and fought against injustice and for a better world today, we're talking about a woman who doesn't often receive the recognition she deserves for her behind the scenes activism. As a prolific activist, she had a hand in society changing work major civil rights leaders turned to her for her organizational skills. Let's talk about Ella Josephine Baker. Sisters in the struggle for human dignity and freedom. I am here to represent. The struggle that has gone on for three hundred years. Ella Baker was born on December thirteenth nineteen o three in Norfolk Virginia. She grew up in North Carolina on the very same land where her grandparents were enslaved a few decades earlier. Ella's mother was part of the Local Missionary Association. She helped feed their hungry neighbors and encouraged women to be a force for positive change this activism and kindness stuck with Allah. Ellis studied at Shaw University in Raleigh North Carolina and graduated as Class Valedictorian nineteen twenty seven shortly after she moved to New York City in Nineteen thirty ELA joined several women's organizations and served as national director of the Young Negroes Cooperative League that organization focused on supporting the economic development of the black community in nineteen forty Ella started working as a field secretary for the N. Double A. C., p. she moved up to work as director of branches after just three years. She later also served as the president of the New York. City branch. Then in Nineteen fifty-six, Ella Co created the organization in French. Which bought the oppressive Jim Crow laws in the south. The following year a move to Atlanta to help with Martin Luther King Junior's Organization the southern Christian Leadership Conference. At that time, the SC L. C. was a brand new venture. It was created after successes like the Montgomery bus boycott black leaders including Martin Luther. King Junior created the organization to assemble more boycotts and. Throughout the south. But for the venture to be successful, it would take a masterful organizer while Martin Luther King Junior took the reins as the SEC's public figurehead Ella worked behind the scenes setting the organization's agenda and framing the issues. She organized the crusade for citizenship a campaign to support voting rights. For African Americans, she also helped Rodney Atlanta s ELC headquarters and even served as a temporary director for several months after the resignation of the previous office holder, Ellis desire to focus on the issues and to have influence over the. Direction often clashed with the group's main. Right, as ellos considering resigning in nineteen sixty radical act of civil disobedience inspired her to take a new direction on February first black college students in Greensboro. North Carolina where I'm from refused to leave a lunch counter. Worth's where they'd been denied service for Joseph McNeil Franklin McCain and their to college dorm mates that time was February first one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty. The day they walked into a Greensboro. Woolworth's and sat down at the segregated lunch counter. Ella wrote a letter that encourage students across the south to join forces and take similar acts of protest. She also organized a meeting at Shaw University for the students who spearheaded the citizens from those meetings, the student nonviolent coordinating committee or Snick was created. snick would have a profound impact on the civil rights movement. Ella encourage snack to focus on practicing group centered activism rather than leader centered activism in contrast to the SE L. C.'s leadership style with Mlk at the forefront. Under, this method, of Leadership Snick ran many successful initiatives including the nineteen sixty one freedom rides and the nineteen sixty, four freedom summer and Mississippi L. continued her activism through the sixties. She was also a consultant for the Southern Conference Education Fund and organize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic. Party she later returned to New York City and continued her work until she passed away on. December thirteenth nineteen eighty six. She was eighty three years old. Ella Baker was an incredible driving force behind much of the public civil rights work. We learn about in school while she never sought the spotlight she was committed to improving life for future generations

Ella Ella Josephine Baker Ella Co Consultant North Carolina New York City Greensboro Martin Luther King Shaw University Ellis Martin Luther Kaplan L. C. Southern Christian Leadership Raleigh North Carolina Woolworth Joseph Mcneil Franklin Mccain Atlanta Montgomery
Clara Schumann

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:02 min | 2 years ago

Clara Schumann

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will manteca today's musician was a piano virtuoso and composer at a time when women rarely performed or wrote their own work although many of her compositions remain unknown her collaborations with her husband resulted in one of the most fruitful musical partnerships at the early nineteenth century. Let's talk about Clara Schumann. Clara Josephine was born in Eighteen nineteen in Leipzig Germany her father Frederik peak was a sought after piano instructor. Frederick married one of his students, Marianne and together they had five children, Clara and her four brothers. Is Five her parents divorced Clara, and her brothers became the legal property of their father. Clara's mother remarried and moved to Berlin which limited contact between them two letters, periodic visits. Frederick Recognize Clara's early musical talents and dedicated himself to her musical education. Under his tutelage she studied Violin Piano Music, theory, and business. Frederick even sent Clara around Germany to study with some of the finest composition teachers in Leipzig Dresden and Berlin. In eighteen twenty nine at the age of eleven, Clara made her performance debut in Leipzig Clara began touring in Germany France and Austria. She was one of the few pianists of her time who played by memory and she performed not only her own compositions but also those that were more well known by Johann Sebastian Bach Domenico Scarlatti. Ludwig. Van Beethoven and Robert Schumann. Robert Schumann due to a self inflicted injury to his right hand was the only composer among his contemporaries who did not play his own work. Clara took on his work for him. In nineteen thirty, one at the age of twelve she gave her first performance of his piano composition papillon. Over the course of the next five years, Clara, became wildly infatuated with Robert Schumann the match made her father very concerned at that point Clara was already famous and successful performer. Robert was a relatively unknown composer. Frederic. Saw The match as beneath Clara and so at the age of Seventeen Clara's father center to Dresden in hopes of severing ties between the two. But as is the case with many famed love stories. Parental intervention didn't go as planned. Despite, Clara's demanding performing and touring schedule. Clara and Robert wrote to each other in secret over many months using an intermediary to deliver their letters. When the two decided to wet. Strong resistance from Clara's father in nineteenth century Germany, a woman could not marry without her father's consent and Frederick refused to give it. Robert took Frederick to court over his refusal and Frederick countered with charges against Robert After nearly a year of legal battles the court finally sanctioned the marriage the couple married in September eighteen forty one day before Clare Clara's twenty first birthday and settled in Leipzig for years. Later, Robert suffered a severe breakdown and the couple relocated to Dresden at the recommendation of Roberts doctors. Over the course of their marriage Clara was pregnant ten times and had eight children despite having such a large family Clark continued to perform, compose, teach piano, and support Robert in his career. Despite Clare's existing professional success, it was Robert's career that was prioritized in the marriage nevertheless clar used the arrangement to her advantage. She performed her own arrangements of Roberts pieces during her concert tours and Robert in kind what insert phrases from Clarence compositions

Frederick Recognize Clara Clara Schumann Clara Josephine Leipzig Clara Robert Robert Schumann Leipzig Dresden And Berlin Germany Leipzig Robert After Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Frederik Peak Johann Sebastian Bach Domenico Berlin Van Beethoven Instructor Clare Ludwig Marianne
Leading Ladies: Anna May Wong

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:07 min | 2 years ago

Leading Ladies: Anna May Wong

"Alot from wonder media. Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manteca. Today we're talking about the first major American movie star. She openly criticized racist typecasting her accomplishments were groundbreaking and many of her critiques still. Ring true today. Let's talk about the prolific Anna. May Wong. Anna was born in Los Angeles in one, thousand, nine, hundred, five. Her birth name was Wong lead song. She initially attended a majority white school but transferred to Chinese school to. Escape racism she. From her classmates. Anna often skipped class to check out nearby film sets pushing her way to the front of the crowd to get closer to the cameras. She came up with Anna May Wong as her stage name by age eleven. And she was fourteen when she appeared in a silent picture, caught the red lantern. At Seventeen, Anna played the lead role in the toll of the sea one of the first movies and color. Anna's most notable early role was in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, she played in the hit movie the thief of Bagdad. Though. This part was a stepping stone for her career. It's also emblematic of the problems with Hollywood casting that Anna would soon after vocally advocate against and interviews. In the thief of Bagdad, Anna played a treacherously in a subservient role wearing very little clothing. Anna appeared in more than fifty films throughout her life and she often struggled with subservient. typecasting Hollywood also repeatedly granted lead Asian roles to white actors and cast actual. Asian. Actors. As villains. After working in the United, states for several years, Anna had had enough of Hollywood's biased casting. So she moved to Europe. Europe was more receptive when it came to Anna's acting ability. She started films throughout the continent with reporters praising her transcendent talent. One notable appearance was in the British movie. Piccadilly in nineteen twenty. Nine After a few years in Europe and a decided to give Los. Angeles. Another shot she appeared in the famous nineteen thirty two movie. Shanghai Express opposite. Marlene Dietrich. I must confess I. Don't quite know standard respectability that you know newborn how But Hollywood hasn't really improved. It's racist casting methods. Anna, auditioned for the lead role in the gutter. A film based on the novel about a family of Chinese farmers despite Anna's film

Anna May Wong Hollywood Europe Jenny Kaplan Bagdad Marlene Dietrich Manteca Los Angeles Chinese School Shanghai United LOS
Ching Shih

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:07 min | 2 years ago

Ching Shih

"Hello and welcome back for Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia. Manica today's villainous has a bloody rags to riches tale. Some consider her the most successful pirate in history, and she got away scot-free despite years of plunder. Let's talk about the pirate Queen Juncture. Chung show was born, should young in southeast China in Seventeen, seventy five. Historians don't know much about her early life, but she soon became a prostitute for a floating brothel in Guam Joe. A city also known by Westerners as Canton in eighteen o one when junk show was twenty six, she had her first run in with the pirate John G. He was the commander of the Red Flag. Fleet a horde of two hundred ships with thousands of pirate underlings. Junk says beauty struck the commander and he wanted her for himself. Some accounts say that he ordered his men to raid the brothel and kidnapped juncture to be his bride. Others say that he just asked juncture to marry him, and she agreed in exchange for sheriff his power and plunder. Together they ruled the red flag fleet and form the Cantonese pirate coalition. The fleet included more than seventeen hundred ships and more than fifty thousand pirates. The couple adopted junkies second command establishing an official Air John Shit also gave birth to two sons then in eighteen o seven just six years after they got married, chung-yee died in a rebellion. Junk, ship seized her opportunity. Rather than pass the power to the appointed air, she took over control of the red flag fleet and established the air as her own right hand man. She was a strict leader. She created a system of government with its own laws and taxes plunder had to be registered, and then the pirates keep twenty percent of what they stole. There were firm rules around captured women two. Girls, she deemed ugly were immediately released. Pirates take beautiful women as their wives, but they had to be faithful, reap or infidelity was punishable by death. Deserters from the fleet would also be hunted down and killed. Under junctures rule the red flag fleet captured villages for miles along the coast. She was called the terror of south China. And she took down Chinese Portuguese and British naval ships. The Chinese government was desperate to end junctions reign of terror. They offered amnesty of the pirate fleet if they ended their criminal activities. Around eighteen ten junctures, right hand man started negotiations with the government, but failed to make real headway. Juncture then took matters into her own hands. She marched unarm into the governor's office with seventeen women and children. Her negotiation was quite successful. Almost all of her thousands of underlings walked free without giving up any all they had to do. Kneel before the governor. Juncture herself refused that part of the deal. She demanded the government allow her to marry her right hand man they wed with the governor as a witness and finally Neil to thank him at the end of the ceremony. Junk ship successfully negotiated her way from pirate. Queen very wealthy free woman. She and her new husband even became members of the Chinese aristocracy by imperial decree. After junction second husband passed away. She returned to Joe and opened a gambling house. She remained there until her death in eighteen, forty four when she was sixty nine years old.

Queen Juncture Chinese Government Commander Cantonese Pirate Coalition Red Flag Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Manica China Guam Chung John Shit JOE Official Neil
The Story Of Ching Shih

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:41 min | 2 years ago

The Story Of Ching Shih

"Hello and welcome back for Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia. Manica today's villainous has a bloody rags to riches tale. Some consider her the most successful pirate in history, and she got away scot-free despite years of plunder. Let's talk about the pirate Queen Juncture. Chung show was born, should young in southeast China in Seventeen, seventy five. Historians don't know much about her early life, but she soon became a prostitute for a floating brothel in Guam Joe. A city also known by Westerners as Canton in eighteen o one when junk show was twenty six, she had her first run in with the pirate John G. He was the commander of the Red Flag. Fleet a horde of two hundred ships with thousands of pirate underlings. Junk says beauty struck the commander and he wanted her for himself. Some accounts say that he ordered his men to raid the brothel and kidnapped juncture to be his bride. Others say that he just asked juncture to marry him, and she agreed in exchange for sheriff his power and plunder. Together they ruled the red flag fleet and form the Cantonese pirate coalition. The fleet included more than seventeen hundred ships and more than fifty thousand pirates. The couple adopted junkies second command establishing an official Air John Shit also gave birth to two sons then in eighteen o seven just six years after they got married, chung-yee died in a rebellion. Junk, ship seized her opportunity. Rather than pass the power to the appointed air, she took over control of the red flag fleet and established the air as her own right hand man. She was a strict leader. She created a system of government with its own laws and taxes plunder had to be registered, and then the pirates keep twenty percent of what they stole. There were firm rules around captured women two. Girls, she deemed ugly were immediately released. Pirates take beautiful women as their wives, but they had to be faithful, reap or infidelity was punishable by death. Deserters from the fleet would also be hunted down and killed. Under junctures rule the red flag fleet captured villages for miles along the coast. She was called the terror of south China. And she took down Chinese Portuguese and British naval ships. The Chinese government was desperate to end junctions reign of terror. They offered amnesty of the pirate fleet if they ended their criminal activities. Around eighteen ten junctures, right hand man started negotiations with the government, but failed to make real headway. Juncture then took matters into her own hands. She marched unarm into the governor's office with seventeen women and children. Her negotiation was quite successful. Almost all of her thousands of underlings walked free without giving up any all they had to do. Kneel before the governor. Juncture herself refused that part of the deal. She demanded the government allow her to marry her right hand man they wed with the governor as a witness and finally Neil to thank him at the end of the ceremony.

Queen Juncture Chinese Government Commander Cantonese Pirate Coalition Red Flag Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Manica China Guam Chung John Shit Official Neil
Moll Cutpurse

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:32 min | 2 years ago

Moll Cutpurse

"Teach along the way and today we're looking back a mile uppers, and the reason why malls supper stands out because she's literally a women that do not play by the, and as you know, women make history when you break some rules. This episode initially aired during our building necessarily. And here's Jenny Kaplan to tell you more about her. Hello for Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Lamonica. When you imagine England in the era of Shakespeare, you may think of a golden age with the booming economy, a rising interest in exploration and growing merchant middle class, but there was more to it than that. Today traveling to the underbelly of London home to thieves, jokers and tricksters who played both sides of the law are villainous at the day was the most infamous woman of that world. Let's talk about Mary. Frith better known as mall covers. Mary's legacy lies somewhere between truth and legend. Records from her time are often exaggerated, biased or made up. That said here's the story of the cutting mall. Cut Purse as we know it. Mary was born in London in about fifteen eighty four. Her father was an honest cobbler. Nonetheless, Mary's first brush with the law occurred when she was sixteen years old. She was prosecuted for sealing purses. Mary's family quickly grew frustrated with her unf- eminent behavior. Some accounts say that in sixteen o nine. They learned her out to the docks by telling her. There was a wrestling match, and then tricked her onto a ship headed for north. America Mary managed to arrange passage back to shore with betting money. She brought for the match. When she made it back to London she quickly joined a group of pickpockets, earning her name mall cut purse in reference to the way pickpockets cut the purses straight off of their victims hits. Mary also earned a name for herself. Her tavern performances. She would sing dance. Play her loot and crack jokes wall dressed in male clothing. That was quite shocking at the time. To win a bet mall wants gallivanting through the streets of London on the city's most famous performing horse. She wore men's clothing dramatically carried a banner and Blue Trumpet. As soon as the locals recognized her, a riot broke out. The fans and enemies went while some tried to pull her off her horse while others cheered her on mall, just barely managed to escape and collector winnings in the next furrow. Walk quickly grew infamous enough to have books and plays written about her. One play called. The roaring girl features a comedic matchmaking main character named Mall. She's Cold Mad Mall. Life these acts. Team. According to her own testimony, Mary performed at least one after piece for that show. That's short, lighthearted act that follows a theaters main event. In sixteen eleven mall was arrested and thrown in jail for a few months, possibly because of her seemingly inappropriate performance, the following year after pieces were outlawed in the country for their often vulgar nature and tendency to attract pickpockets. Very playhouse where mall performed was used as an example in the case mall was arrested once again a few months later in Saint Paul's Cathedral and she eventually confessed to being publicly drunk swearing, associating with criminals, and of course, flaunting her male clothing. She did Penance at Saint Paul's Cathedral Wall tearfully drunk. Malls. Illegal activities didn't stop there far from it. By sixteen fourteen, she was operating a brokerage of stolen goods out of her house on Fleet Street thieves came to her to sell their spoils and victims would have no choice but to try buying them back hoping to avoid a lengthy court case. Authorities didn't try to stop any of this. In fact, they sometimes came to mall for her expertise and familiarity with local feeds around that time mall also got married, though even that seemed like a means to a criminal end for her. She never actually lived with her husband, and didn't mention him in her. Will Mall continued her underground business as usual, but now at the elevated reputation given to married women, she could even defeat court cases brought against her maiden name by

America Mary Cold Mad Mall Will Mall London Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network Wrestling England Frith Saint Paul's Cathedral Wall Blue Trumpet Saint Paul's Cathedral
Healthcare Spotlight: Marie Colinet

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:13 min | 3 years ago

Healthcare Spotlight: Marie Colinet

"Maria stood out to me as a great example of a woman who succeeded despite the fact that society posed so many obstacles and in the process she thought outside. The box broke the mold and save lives. She came up with Sir really creative solutions this episode originally aired in September but just like lots of modern healthcare workers. Marie often doesn't get the credit. She deserves so she's perfect. Figure to highlight again in honor of the many people putting their lives on the line for us today during the Cova. Nineteen pandemic now. Here's host Jenny Kaplan to tell you all about Morocco high from Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia. Romantika case you're just in welcome. Here's the deal every weekday for a year. We're taking five minutes to tell the stories of women from throughout history and around the world who you may not know about but definitely should each month is themed and this month as kids around the world or at least in the northern hemisphere head back to school. We're talking about stem inist at that. I mean women who did incredible things in the fields of science technology engineering or math. Today we're heading back to sixteenth century. Europe are seminar improved childbirth methods and was an incredibly talented surgeon. Let's talk about Marie Colonna. Marie was born in Geneva. Switzerland in fifteen sixty. Her father was a printer growing up. Marie wanted to become a midwife. She was interested in the field of medicine from an early age and sixteenth century woman. That was her only option for practicing medicine on July. Twenty fifth fifteen eighty seven. Maria married Wilhelm fabry. A brilliant surgeon often called the father German surgery. We'll homeless the top German surgeon of his and he taught me how to perform in the operating room. He said the student quickly outpaced master. Marie showed natural talent and surgery at a time when it was unthinkable for a woman to take part in session important masculine endeavor. The couple traveled and worked in Switzerland Holland and the Rhineland before settling in Bern during this period Marine Wilhelm had eight children though only one outlived their mother. Marie treated many patients on her own. And by her husband's side she regularly assisted her husband and performing minor surgeries. She pioneered the modern caesarian section which employed a new more medically sound method. Prior to Murray's work c-section techniques hadn't changed since the time of Julius Caesar. Marie also invented the practice of using heat for dilating and stimulating. The uterus childbirth that not only increased the ease of childbirth also lowered the risk of certain complications. It's important to note that childbirth is very dangerous proposition at the time. In addition to being an obstetrician Marie was well known for a new form of Treatment. In one particularly notable case in sixteen twenty four a patient had a piece of metal in his. I wilhelm had attempted to remove it and failed. Marie succeeded using a magnet ingenious noninvasive technique. That still practiced today. The will gave Marie full credit for her actions. He's often cited as the techniques inventor that unfortunately it happened to Maria. Walk on another case. Marie treated a man with two shattered rips by opening his chest and resetting the bones with wire she closed dressed the wound with herbal plasters. That effectively deterred infection. We'll Detailed the case in his medical writings and said Maria was the inventor of the treatment. Method still will often gets the credit. Marie went onto write two books before we'll home passed away after his death. Her whereabouts are relatively unknown. She died in sixteen forty. At the age of eighty Marie colonies insights forever. Change the science of delivering babies and her. Ill invalidated the view. That women didn't belong in

Marie Colonna Maria Marie Wilhelm Fabry Jenny Kaplan Cova Switzerland Europe Geneva Marine Wilhelm Switzerland Holland Bern Wonder Media Network Morocco Julius Caesar Murray
Feminists: Ella Fitzgerald

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:36 min | 3 years ago

Feminists: Ella Fitzgerald

"Shining. Oh hello from wonder media network. I'm Jenny Kaplan. And this is encyclopedia. Manica deemed the first lady of Song. Today's Dreamer was the most popular female jazz singer in the United States. For more than half a century. She went thirteen grammy awards and sold over forty million albums. Her voice was flexible. Wide-ranging accurate and ageless. Let's talk about Ella Fitzgerald Ella. Jane Fitzgerald was born on April twenty fifth nineteen seventeen in Newport News. Virginia to William Fitzgerald and Tempe Henry Ellis parents separated shortly after Ella's birth and she and her mother moved to Yonkers New York where they eventually moved in with Tempe longtime boyfriend. Joseph Dasilva three soon became four LS half-sister Francis was born in Nineteen twenty-three. The family struggled to make ends meet. Both parents worked multiple jobs. L. Occasionally took on work to their apartment was a mixed neighborhood. Where Ella made friends easily? She considered herself more of a Tomboy and often join neighborhood baseball games. Sports Aside Ella enjoy dancing and singing with friends and would perform at lunch and on her way to school in Nineteen. Thirty two ELLAS. Mom Tempe died from serious injury. She received in a car accident. Ella was devastated. She eventually moved in with her aunt Virginia and when her stepfather Joe died shortly thereafter. Ala stepsister. Francis came to live with them. To Ella was in a dark place. She started skipping school and her grades dropped. She got in trouble with the police and was sent to a reform school where she was subject to beatings by her caretakers. Eventually Ella escaped from the reformatory. She was fifteen years old broke and alone during the Great Depression. In nineteen thirty four Islas name was pulled in a weekly drawing the Apollo Theater for a chance to perform and compete an amateur night. Two sisters who the dance in the sisters in the world call the edgewood sisters and they closed the show about I when I saw those ladies. Dan I says no way. I'm going out there and try to dance. Because they stop the show. She was planning to dance but when the Edwards sisters closed the main show. She changed her mind fearing she couldn't compete with their moves. And when I got out there somebody follow up nobody else. What is she going to do? She made a last minute decision to sing and ask the band to play. Hoagy Carmichael Judy. Heavens hurt to me. By the end of the song the crowd demanded an encore and Ella had found her calling one of the people in the band. That night with saxophonist and Arranger Benny Carter wowed by her natural talent. Benny introduced a lot of people. Who could help launch your career? The era of big swing bands was coming to a close in favor of bebop. Ls successfully made the transition using her voice to sound like another horn in the band. She began to experiment with scat singing. Eventually turning it into an art in nineteen thirty eight Ella recorded a version of the nursery. Rhyme a-tisket a task it. A million copies of the album were sold it. Hit number one on the charts and it stayed on the pop charts for seventeen weeks. Ella was suddenly famous her wife. Changed Professionally and personally while on tour with Dizzy Gillespie's band in nineteen forty. Six Ella fell in love with bassist. Ray Brown the two got married and adopted a son Ray. Junior through the two later got divorced. They remained lifelong friends L. O. Worked with all the jazz greats including Frank Sinatra Duke Ellington Nat King Cole Dizzy. Gillespie and Benny Goodman from nineteen fifty six to nineteen sixty. Four Ella recorded eight songbooks in which she covered other musicians songs. Including those by Cole Porter Duke. Ellington the Gershwin's Johnny Mercer Irving Berlin and Rodgers and Hart Ella continued to work throughout her life by the nineteen nineties. She had recorded more than two hundred albums she received the Kennedy Center honors the US National Medal of Arts and Francis Commander of Arts and letters award. Thank you and I'm so proud to be in class with all these younger ones coming up. Ain't gonNA leave me behind. I'm learning out a wrap in her later. Life Ella suffer from diabetes. She was hospitalized. Congestive heart failure in nineteen eighty six and for exhaustion in nineteen ninety. Nine hundred ninety three. She had to have both of her legs amputated below the knee due to complications from diabetes. She never fully recovered from the surgery. And on June fifteenth. Nineteen Ninety six at the age of seventy-nine Ella Fitzgerald died at her Beverly Hills. Home fans all over. The world mourned her death. A wreath of white flowers was placed next to her star on the Hollywood walk of fame and the Marquee outside the Hollywood bowl read. Lmu will miss you

Ella Fitzgerald Ella Ella Fitzgerald Ella Hart Ella Dizzy Gillespie Virginia Grammy United States Carmichael Judy Frank Sinatra Duke Ellington Francis Jane Fitzgerald Jenny Kaplan Benny Carter Mom Tempe Manica Diabetes Benny Baseball Cole Porter Duke
Hatshepsut: 'The First Great Woman of History'

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:41 min | 3 years ago

Hatshepsut: 'The First Great Woman of History'

"Jenny Kaplan. And this is encyclopedia Lamonica. Today's leader was one of the few female fan and each in Egypt and one of its most successful pharaohs overall ruling for over twenty years. She led Egypt through a period of prosperity completed ambitious building projects and increased trade with surrounding lands. She sometimes called the first great woman of history. Let's talk about huts ships. Hatshepsut was born in around fifteen o seven BC to the Eighteenth Dynasty Addiction. King Tut most of the first and his primary wife very little known about her early childhood around the age of twelve hotshot so it was married to her half brother. Tet moves to the second who was a younger son of Hatshepsut's father and his secondary wife cut most of the second had three older brothers authors. So he wasn't originally next in line for the throne but each of his older brothers died before coming of age as the eldest living son of most of the first. I tut most of the second ascent to the throne around fourteen ninety two ABC hardships. It became his primary wife and Queen. She gave birth to a daughter but never had a son to inherit the throne. One took most of the second died around fourteen seventy nine B C e. his eldest son took most of the third was named King Tut. Most of the third was the eldest son of a lower harem queen and was only an infant when he took power as US such hardships. It acted as regent for the baby. This was fairly common arrangement at the time. But by most of the third seventh year in Power Hatshepsut sit herself had been crowned King and was given the full titles and Regalia of Traditional Pharaoh. Technically she co ruled with the young cut most of the third but there was no question about who the primary rule really was. It's unclear exactly how hot chips it gained that level of power and how she convinced. The Egyptian elite beat to accept a female fair. It's generally thought that she spent years promoting loyal officials into major positions of power and they in turn supported her bid for the throne during its reign. Egypt enjoyed appearing to peace with its neighbors. She went on a short successful military campaign in Nubia. Yeah when she first came to power after that. Her government's foreign policy was almost entirely focused on trade scenes on the walls of shops at. Stay here Bihari. Temple show trade expeditions and imports of valuables like gold. Animal Furs Ebony. And spices as part of their duties. Egyptian Pharaohs rose were expected to take on major building projects and restore the buildings of former pharaohs that had gone into disrepair in this regard had chips. It didn't buck the norm. She took on a massive building program that included temple to the God. Amon Ray in thieves a full remodeling of her father's hall and the addition addition of her own shrine at the Great Karnak temple complex and a beautiful temple cut out of rock at Beni Hasan among others hut ships. Greatest building chief of all was the year up a hurry temple. It was meant to serve as a living memorial temple that would continue to be used by her subjects after her death breath for her actual burial spot hardships. It added onto her father's tomb in the Valley of the Kings so she could be buried next to him as Hutch. Upset that older. She gave her co ruler. Tut Most of a third more power and a larger role in state government after Hatshepsut died around fourteen eighteen fifty eight BC Tut. Most of the third ruled alone for more than thirty years. During his rule. He tried hi to remove all traces of shops. Its existence here moved statues of her and Ethan wiped her name off. The official list of Egyptian kings. Modern scholars originally thought that this must have been an act of revenge. But it's now believe that it probably had more to do with cleaning up the line of succession. It's worth noting that other pharaohs did similar things to their predecessors including scrubbing building inscriptions and claiming the buildings as their own because of this campaign of erasure. Racer hardships it became essentially unknown to history until eighteen. Twenty two when the newfound ability to understand hieroglyphics finally allowed archaeologists theologists and scholars to read descriptions at her temple and rediscover this incredible.

Hatshepsut United States King Tut Egypt Great Karnak Temple Complex Jenny Kaplan Eighteenth Dynasty Addiction Kings Beni Hasan Official Nubia Amon Ray Hutch Ethan
STEMinists: Mary Kenner

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:38 min | 3 years ago

STEMinists: Mary Kenner

"Hello from Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this encyclopedia will Manica in case. You're just tuning in. Here's the deal every weekday. We're telling the story of a woman who you may not know about the definitely should each month is themed in this month. Were talking about Stamina's. Women did incredible things in the fields of science technology engineering and mathematics. Today's stem was a prolific inventor created the first sanitary Napkin pioneering product for women's health. Let's talk about Mary Kenner. Mary was born in Monroe North Carolina a small town near Charlotte in one thousand nine hundred twelve father Sydney Nathaniel Davidson and is an incredibly inventive man who encouraged those same traits in Mary and her younger sister mildred. Sydney was an inventor himself and patented a pants pants presser in nineteen fourteen. Mary's maternal grandfather was also well known inventor his most important contributions attract color light signal for trains Though Mary received a good education she didn't have any formal scientific training instead with she and her sister were constantly encouraged courage to come up with creative solutions for problems. They saw in everyday life. Mary moved to Washington. DC got married and started her own Floral Laurel business that she ran throughout her life in her free time she kept inventing in Nineteen fifty-six. Mary put together a formal formal patent application for the first sanitary belt. She hit apparently invented while still in her teens. This was a major step forward forward in giving women a better way to handle their periods while tampons were available at the time they were considered. Indecent and pads wouldn't become available until nineteen sixty. Most women were still using cloth or rags and we're limited in their ability to leave the house while menstruating Mary. Sanitary sanitary belt was a major improvement. It was made of Elastic straps that held the patent place once the belt was secured by safety pins women could easily wear it under their clothing without feeling limited giving them back a significant amount of freedom a company interested in manufacturing this new invention had contacted Mary about purchasing it but as soon as a representative met her in person and realized that she was African American. The interests suddenly disappeared it took. Mary decades to file the patent on her own in the interim. Mary kept inventing things to help. In her everyday Friday life in nineteen eighty two she patented a toilet roll holder that easily provides the loose end of the role and in Nineteen eighty-seven patented an ingenious shower wall and bathtub mounted back scratcher. Mary also invented special attachment for a walker that included a hard surface office TRAE and a soft pocket for carrying items. Mary sister mildred with whom she remained. Very close throughout her life was also an inventor. Milton was a professional singer who eventually had to stop working when she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis mostly confined to her home in Washington. DC Z. Mildred invented a board game meant to teach family relationships and help children understand their place the extended family she called it family family traditions and received a patent for the game in one thousand nine hundred eighty neither military nor mary ever made much money from their inventions but but that didn't stop their desire to make the world around them a better and more convenient place before she passed away in two thousand six. Mary Kenner filed total of five patents. She's remembered not only for creative problem solving and entrepreneurial spirit but for stalwartly addressing a major women's health issue with intelligence and compassion even if abject racism meant. She never got to see her product on shelves as always we're taking a break for the weekend tune in on Monday for the story of another incredible stem inist special. Thanks to my favorite sister this your co-creator Lizzy Caplan talk to you on Monday.

Mary Kenner Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Sydney Z. Mildred DC Lizzy Caplan Washington Sydney Nathaniel Davidson Charlotte Co-Creator Monroe North Carolina Floral Laurel Representative Milton