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"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

03:10 min | Last week

"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"And scripted. I'm your host. Jenny Curtis and I am thrilled to welcome back. Our Returning Guest Co host Dana You've seen Dana's incredible acting in projects such as the hateful eight Django unchained Lee. Daniel's the Butler and American Horror Story Everyone I Ginny Dana I'm so glad you're back with us today we are thrilled to be talking to mark bombeck mark as a writer and producer of some really bad projects live free or die hard. Wolverine Insurgent Don of the planet of the apes and. And War, for the planet of the Apes, and most recently, the creator of the chilling Apple, TV plus series defending Jacob Welcome mark thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. This is a stuck at home series because of the pandemic and we like to start with a little check in of how are you doing? How are you handling being an artist at home? During warranting well, you know I feel almost guilty saying I'm doing pretty well. I'm very lucky when you're a writer primarily which? which is what I am and you work at home, which is how I work. This is business as usual and F- I'm being really honest. It's almost bit of an assist for me in that I'm usually needing to get on a plane every now and then to meetings with folks in La and now everybody's accustomed to doing meetings on zoom that I'm hoping refresher beyond to return to flying out to la all the time, so I personally doing fine I have four kids. A lot of mental energy is. Is actually spent a long son, my wife, making sure they're doing okay. It's certainly been tough on them in various ways, but again they have pretty rate lives, and they're doing all right to thank you for asking. How are you guys going? I got a little cabin fever at one point, I'm pretty active to be out in the world, but then I just took a deep breath and realize my blessings. There's so many things to be worried about in there, so many other people letting really worse situations. Have like you know a along. Look in the mirror. It's like okay, you're sad. Is You're inside like on relax, you know we live in Westchester County New York. which was in the news a bit because it was sort of ground zero for Covid, and so he had a lot like my brother and my in law next door neighbor. My uncle I know a lot of people who had it for twenty. Twenty nine of them in another brother and his wife doctors who are dealing with on a daily basis, so in a sense, it's weird to become such a regular part of our lives that I process a lot of it already like I think if you'd asked me two months ago or a month and a half ago I. Think I was more shellshocked now. It's grown feeling hopeful in the sense of normalcy. Normalcy of going to the supermarket, everybody wearing a mask and you really behaving themselves at least where we live. We haven't had anybody trying to just listen to this report today from folks in Orange. County complaining that they have to wear masks and people are luckily out here. It's interesting for me. I took a lot of this time to kind of ponder what it is to be an artist if you're stuck. Stuck at home, and you're not out creating and what that means really morphed for me, having the pandemic turn into protests, and all of this has basically the to use an overused phrase. The unprecedented times affected the way you perceive yourself as an artist or what your job is as an artist. Yeah, I mean very much, so it's funny. Their ideas kicking around that are discarded that they just feel shoes superficial. In the. That I am getting around I haven't done that to yet..

Ginny Dana writer Jenny Curtis Westchester County La Jacob Lee Apple Daniel Covid Orange producer
"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

11:15 min | 2 months ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Encouraged to go a little deeper. You know really immerse ourselves in the in the characters we were playing and in my world so unhappy so yeah it was a film set in nineteen host and not removed out there before production Worked on integrating ourselves within the community and put on faked off US accidents in stock widows and we're encouraged to do that and takes quite love courage to do that actually to stay with it and to really force yourself to keep in the voice because the voice ultimately completely changes who you are as a plus when you change your voice over new of your own voice get thrown to one side and you have to create new ones decree Of We joined the sort of boxing gym in a very soon Area where we refusing people didn't know that we will not from the local area. It was really exciting and I got huge amount from him as an answer. I sort of thought. Okay this is acting Mrs. Like this is the real deal. It's a level deeper. Really really really really. We did for that film and it worked for that film. I then realized it doesn't work for every film in all. You have to be a team player work because we will encourage the all nuts. It's sort of in a head space. You know I've tried to do it for another film where the other actors were doing that. And it was a much more on some pace and I was staying in some foreign accent and nobody else was an F. O. At and I realized that it only works. If the project is going to help you go have any of your characters. Had An effect on who you are as a person They do because we spent so much time but having a world that they live in learning about it and so cool soon foams my own Brian about new things and emotions and situations you get a glimpse at you. Get some idea of what that might have felt like. It's efficient environment is. It's a film set but they can make it feel pretty Create worldview so the existing. So yeah I feel like amongst so much for being an actor. Think it's why I love doing it because didn't learn much school. I get a lot of mind. Learning lay rage in life through being an actor and researching character and Rosa definitely definitely stays at the then at the same time quiet wig concepts of time you make film when you'll be working on the phone for four months sometimes and then it finishes and everybody goes home and you're back in England and you're in the program and it felt like a dream and you felt like even happ- with so as I wait and then you back in real life in the stig new was so invested in people you with just absolutely a family like your time felt like this magical dream like whiplash. You'll slow it. Has there been a moment onset in your career where in the moment you realize like. Oh this is this is it. I am an actor. This is what I'm doing. I love this. Is there like a scene or shoot? You could point to that. You had a moment like that. I think trauma and have a moment lead on every film by. I might you trying to just absorbing Adam actually face. Tom Hanks and I'm working on is not as well as doing some seen. Wherever you know that Johnny Depp in a movie we did a big Fifteen minute improvisation scene he requested I slow. Had to go head-to-head tugs Johnny Depp. Wadis improvising blow This is what we signed up for. This is really exciting. Stuff struggle Fan of films that I always get really overwhelmed when I may other axes and I still to this down still like when I was somebody in a folk watching him in films and I try and many films as I can and then you're a fan of their work when you meet him. You're like Oh shit they said. Do you get nervous. Yeah get really nervous chanting. And how do you deal with that because the camera will pick that up? Yeah I don't I get nervous meeting people normally so rate throughs and rehearsals. Once you're onset. I find who goes away? Work GonNA TAKE SOGA. If prepared. I get more interested in the woods than I am of wants. The barriers are broken down and you start to work. It becomes so even playing field. But it's more you know when I made that time in the production office. I know I'm GonNa read through and I'm GonNa be doing through. Its whoever if you could reprise one of your characters. Who would it be good? It'd be fun to go back to Vegas Fifteen years later. What was that like shooting? Twenty one getting to go live. Basically the highlight of shooting a movie. You got to do all the GLITZ and the Glam in the I don't WanNa say stereotypical but in in the Classic Vegas Type Yet a stereotypical alive. Yeah Yeah will allow. It was nuts. It was crazy it was a group. We were young when we will over excited. And we've not. I've never been in Vegas before I didn't know what to expect it kind of blew my mind and we will go way way over excited. We will win crazy weights. Were method shooting the rest of the bill but was loud. I remember we were still living in the casino that we will filming in and we never even leaving to go outside for like five days having being outside and so fresh et for five days because it's really manipulative place in other. Make it like a maze. You kinda get lost and there's not windows is not crux. Nothing's quite real. 'cause I mean yeah you cannot agree to go by for like a week at the most. We were there for over months and we will start gun. Crazy at amend we got so particular pub- in The New York New York casino because it had an Irish bar and an almost did she angled your vote in particular way could almost believe you're Irish Dream of in reality but then you can hear the machines in the background in the background. So yeah we were already great for bus awfully in in in Vegas that man sign by so some things that my young English Brian. I'd never quite seen before in that movie as many movies. You've joked that you get beat up in almost everything you do. Has there ever been a fight choreography mistake? Have you ever actually gotten injured in anything because you do so many teams all the time I get her all the time? It's just never We're GONNA do five. Saint among cuts are used to really enjoy him as well. They really dive in. No riddick But I've had disengaged sodas crank McCullough bone in haunt on. Agnes the actress. I was working with with a sort of knuckledusters fragmin knows. Oh my Gosh I'm just. It's they look so great on camera but they can be so harrods gonNA shooting in real life in an obscene local. Forget get Hutton of as much as I used to. What happens then when you get injured on set so with Agnes cracker? Were you in the middle of shoot and had to keep going or do you call it for the day. They shut the same down so we were on vacation London and we just timed it you know and she just kinda connect you with my nose. Somebody wasn't that bad but there was a blood every ram stuff. The days film in I go sent home everybody panics. Because broke the star of the Shell. We go long way to go so yeah I think we stopped for the day at the hospital. A check out it was just bruised a lot of makeup on it. They did a lot of visual effects too. So smooth over a bit and then the facts. The next day I did a film called upside down in Montreal and I really really must showed up and that will so that one. They had like a full room flipping because Worlds were right on top of each other. You actually had to flip over to change worlds and they had a flipping room. Yeah it was a Whiz gingell in. It's kind of whale anyway. The Room Times upside down and use to stay is the sanctuary they used for so for the Stair. I think he was on the ceilings. And it's amazing. We worked so hard on the shot one shot and it was all done in real time. It was a real thing. Then what's the film you just think? Cj heartbroken nobody was so wowed but this once a flipped upside down right. Is that how you got injured? Then with your show that will Did Land on my head a couple of times when we were doing that but that wasn't what I disagree my show the stunned dentist stunt guy when a bit Rome Gocha overexcited. Knowing that you take things as they come and you don't plan too far ahead. Do you have a dream type role that you would hope comes to you one day. I really don't go Christian la on it's a just oh I just don't have any concept of what's GonNa come next and I'm always surprised when the job becomes what he becomes a love the period of just sort of not knowing in your antennas are often you kind of let the world come to you and tell you what it's GonNa Bay so I really don't. I wouldn't even know where to begin. Oh I WANNA play this on accounts on this. Oh thank you know. I love the like one minute. Are member shoot the way back in. I was trekking across landscapes playing prisoner. Who's just on the edge staying alive and we had to Brown teeth and long bids we don't loss slows away and Coveted Grind Fingernails rule rules starving to death. And then I finished the film. I think it was a month of satellite. I was planning carry tickle Dexter in one day and I was standing in front of a mirror wearing leather trousers and giant showed as long floppy couldn't have looked further from the person I've just been on a month or so ago so I love the pod. A pod spread opinion next. Well I could talk to you for hours but I know that you have a life to get too high. I really love home before dark. I highly recommend everybody watches it on Apple. Tv plus. I am very excited to know that you guys are shooting the second season. 'cause I can't wait to find out what happens. I hope that you get back to it soon until then is there anything else? You WANNA say everybody who stuck in quarantine. Yeah just keep going. You know. It's it's definitely a very interesting period of time in history. You know we're it. So just takes strength that dim star. Just thank you very much for joining us today. This has been. This must be great food. So we're gonNA people on lockdown. They're going to talk to somebody. Thank you very much and Hollywood unscripted was created by Kurt Co media. This special episode of the stuck at home series was hosted by me. Jenny Curtis with guest. Jim sturgis mastering by Michael Kennedy. The executive producer of Hollywood unscripted Stewart Helper in the Hollywood unscripted theme. Song is by Celeste. And Eric Dick make sure to subscribe any special episodes of Hollywood unscripted stuck at home. Stay safe and healthy and thanks for. Listening.

Vegas Johnny Depp Hollywood Agnes cracker Brian US Tom Hanks F. O. London England Adam New York Jenny Curtis Rosa Celeste harrods Eric Dick
"jenny curtis" Discussed on When Last I Left

When Last I Left

09:22 min | 2 months ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on When Last I Left

"Recording. Oh unless I'm left. I'm young I'm Jenny. I'm Mickey I'M A and this is our quarantine games. Yes right taken away while we're in quarantine. We don't have access to our usual buttons and prompts and things like that so what we're trying to do is come up with games that you can play over zoom or skype or whatever. The new facebook thing is that they're going to be putting out and I can do this yourself and have fun and we want you to record it and share it with us if you do. Because it's Super Fun. I we already introduced a game called detectives but this is a game. That's brand new. That came put. The name of it is called the US not into web. It is not the interweb wide web and it's also NOT SPIDERWEB. It's actually just a web of storytelling. Because what you do is one person will start the story and then come in contact with one of the other hosts somehow and they will throw the story to that person. That person then has to throw the story to somebody else and we keep throwing the story from person to person with the hitch being that each of us has to throw to each of the other hosts before the story concludes by returning to the original person. Who started the story? I the goal is just to make sure everybody gets to toss. It's everybody else. I nobody gets forgotten and just to make yourselves laugh as much as possible. So we'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA start now and I'm going to do. The nose goes again in this. I'm Mickey Whiz or make you. Don't you tell us how this story begins? Remember the only limit is your imagination has sectors wrong answer. I'd let's begin kids. It was Thursday night. And what night is Thursday night Bingo night? So I decided to walk down to my local synagogue and go to Bingo night because there's Synagogue Valley Stream there's a Bingo night. Oh I go there. I have markers into walk in his full full of beautiful geriatrics Germany and it's really crowded that day and so I decided to sit next to this one woman Who's kind of a at a emptier table and then I start taking my markers out. And she's got her whole setup there and she was she was very pumped and ready to go and I accidentally touched my marker onto one of her markers and it knocked her marker over keeps upright and she took her long. Wiry hand slaps markers off the table and I was like Whoa. Whoa WHOA WHOA WHOA. Whoa and then she was like none now none none none now and she was guys at. Listen Lady. I'm so sorry that I I I did. I didn't mean to your mark off. I could've just easily picked it up. He's like you're too young to be in here you to Yom that. I noticed on her of her name tags had a name tag on her. Last name was curtis. Are you of the Malou Curtis's as we said legged frog that she was like. Yeah what to to? Ya and I said I said you know one Jenny. Curtis is she's like yeah what you too. Yeah Jenny Caroline Curtis. Yeah what's to Ya? I'm I'm basically her brother. Unlike one of her best friends in the entire universe and so therefore. I don't think you should be angry at me. And she said well Johnny's in the bathroom right now and you will see how much of a friend. She's going to be what she knows what you did to me so that. Jd came back and she saw her her great great grandmother. Lauren's fuming and Jenny Jenness Estimate great great grandma. Florence blood is up and she was like had to duck out of the way obviously Chief laps our hands. And I'm used to duckings that. I don't get smacked in so I ducked and while I was ducking I noticed under her flailing arm that like Mickey was waving from the other side and he said like. Whoa what did you say I said? I'm so sorry I didn't realize this was your great great grandma. Florence and she's really angry at me and I don't want this to affect our friendship. Yeah and I said Maki Look. We're still friends. But I'm GonNa give you a word of advice gather your Bingo things and go because I you said I'm going to do the same gathered my great great grandma. Florence is big things. I said you know what gee-gee Ma we'd argo and so men Florence waves goodbye while I waved goodbye to make the Florence and smack me pace and I walked out with her and she knows she was doing her usual. Like I gotta be Cooler. And I really hope you didn't curse Mickey with the Kercheval Curse Curtis's Curtis Curt and she said. I did Dahl of your little friends to work. Grandma on my friends doesn't matter. I said the actresses were Shit so I dropped her off in front of the TV in the Nursing Home Hamburgers and a- pancakes and he's to get through that quickly so keep her going for a good long while. I gotTA warn my friends that I think they've been cursed with the curtiss curse an so. I hopped in an Uber. And I said take me to us and non done cool has your as cool. I'm so sorry I've got some bad news in critics cursed and he said. I know I've been Christie for a while while even weren't I gotta go out and as she was leaving I was trying to say no. No I was just kidding. It was a joke. It was but it was good. It was good to know that I was cursed by the curse. I had no idea what that entailed and so I basically just kind of went about my day to see if anything was going to be different and it wasn't really until later on that night where you know like especially. I was cooking dinner. Yeah and I was like trying to get my things ready. You know what I pour myself a little bit of wine and all of a sudden the wine glasses flopped off the table. And it's like this voice. That said not nice enough and I was like what the hell is that and early the Kurdish curse. I think is just completely dissing my wine because curtis have a really good wine collection I was classic. Got Slapped up again a bottle. Try again before you know it. There's three balls wine all over my floor. All of my glassware is broken. And I have no idea what to do Basically I grabbed my dinner. Went into my my. My table is always wondering like maybe it's going to judge food as well but it didn't. It didn't seem to care for my food so much. And yes so basically I was thinking what the hell do I do about this? You know. So what's kind of early I went to and I was like? I got a little bit of unemployment money so I'm GonNa go and buy myself a nice follow. Wednesday can delay figuring out so I buy a nice nice twenty two dollar bottle of wine and I bring home. Put it actually in a long shot. Glasses thing I don't want that much class so for a little bit. Nice that it down. Nothing interesting interesting interesting. I shot Mr just shooting wine. Great basically in his time was like you know what I Gotta. I gotTa see if anyone else is dealing with this and so I pulled up. my my phone book and I call Chris Personally. I and I was like. Hey what's up buddy? How you doing are you doing? I'm good I'm good. Hey Have you noticed a strange judgment of your alcohol intake.

Mickey Whiz Jenny Caroline Curtis Malou Curtis Florence facebook US Synagogue Valley Stream Jenny Germany Curtis Curt Chris Personally Jd Jenny Jenness Johnny Dahl curtiss Ma Christie Lauren
"jenny curtis" Discussed on When Last I Left

When Last I Left

11:09 min | 3 months ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on When Last I Left

"I would you please describe. Mickey's partly complex for me spree pig. There's like two thousand apartments I think in it and He he lives in Berlin twenties on the bottom level. Because he's not very doesn't have any money around the corner from you. Do you go very early in the morning very late night. Is that correct? Not Very early but like yeah before. Tanner after seven. Soya do you. Do you feel that you respect the store hours? I mean Ya isn't in a general sense but sometimes I have told the employees telling you leave to go fuck themselves but I I really my interest so in no. Don't interrupt me when I'm by. Ministerial gotta read all the ingredients for every single box. Please describe the Frappuccino is again for me. The best thing you can find outside of onsite starbucks They're really nice. What they do is they've season there blender and what that means is just like a steel pan. They don't wash it. So you get all these extra flavors nerds really nice. Yeah would you say that you have enough income to afford this many Frappuccino I do I do? Yeah I am a venture capitalist so I actually just use other people's money but also I sell weed inside so indefinitely. Here's my number set. Yeah no we're going to talk late. I don't care package coming your way. Thank you very much. Y'All please type police got it was. Curtis yes How often do you get that coffee at starbucks? Oh every day. Every day I wake up and I tried to make my own coffee and then I realized I fail that so I go next door. I sit at starbucks do you say would you say that you have enough income to be able to afford to go everything on? Are they like me so they give me the coffee for Free? They give it to you for free yes. Do you feel that that is in some regards possibly stealing from the corporation starbucks? I mean now because the employees are giving it to me but if anyone stealing it would be them so you're okay with stealing in moderation. Well I think they're putting it on their personal accounts you know like at a bar. You get Bar Tab and bartenders can buy you a drink like I said. I'm smoking hot. I get most things for free. Speaking of smoking have you ever been with Mickey when he's drunk yes and he smoked hysterical yes he has smoked before he has seen him smoking cigarettes. Do you know where he acquired these cigarettes now. Now I would assume a store would how would you? How would you describe the quality of Mickey's apartment while it's messy but it's Mickey you now so we love it anyway you there or do you think it's a front? I've never considered it being a front. But maybe what would it be a front for status? I don't know that. But he's with him. I I need to question some other people police said okay. Hello please describe to me your means of income and how much money you make on a yearly basis with wow Well I am a chief marketing executive at BLURT media. And you had to think about that. You had to think about that. Yeah well I'm new to this position so I think what do you do in this job? chiefly market things and achieve market. Market I run. I run the department and I oversee all of the other marketers. And what they're doing and it. Just you know Michael. Yes yes no yes no yes no yes no. Would you have any reason to lie to your friends about your current living situation? No I have no reason to lie to them. No why why why. Why why why? Indeed type for one moment of your back and kick. Hello please away. You're no quick. Yeah real quick back pocket back pocket. Sorry Stare Package Continue. What you're saying thank you. We will talk later. How would you describe a your living situation annual friendship with Mickey and Jenny while my living situation is pretty amazing latest? Use other people's money so I live in a five bedroom mansion It has more bathrooms than bedrooms which is odd but so amazing work And you know I mean I. I like Mickey. He's cool you know. He's got that bottom level apartment which is easy access Jenny's awesome. You know she's a great time. What has he told you he does for a living. I don't know if I never asked him most because I don't care but he seems to be Driving in his car a lot and I figured you know when I do go online I was gonna tap is shoulder. See if he wants to pick up some extra cash on from me as I haven't deliver my products are on but I haven't got yet so please sit here for one moment. Thank you for this bag. A you got it. Good Shit Hi detective. What has Mickey told you that he does for a living you know. He does a little bit of everything he he does. He finds like freelance. Where online sometimes? Sometimes he holds himself out on the corner. I mean he's really beautiful inside. His face is medical minded slant and I don't know if you noticed I meant these are I didn't notice you're not one of them not super hung what I did get a bag of weed from. Somebody does now so it will be smoking something. I don't think you're allowed to tell me that it's legal in California. Oh yes any of that law enforcers. Whoa oh everyone's gathered here today as my accent is shifted from forty s reporter into someone from the South so that can accuse the appropriate parties. The only thing Miss Jenny Curtis is guilty of is being smoking hot and getting free donations from the starbucks employees that are hitting on her in trying to advance the romantic relations. It is the truth. A coup up is a pothead. And I thank you for your gift. Concert you look. I'm sorry Mickey. I believe this is also an intervention that you need to stop living ally. You been squatting in the feeling of a supermarket and coming down at night to steal cigarettes. Would you deal the cigarettes because you steal the liquor? Your apartment is your job at the front. Nobody knows what you do for a living. Yeah I believe you're guilty. You're sadly mistaken I have. I am not using drugs. I got away with clean out there with a venture. Capital is a how dare you I? I do think we need to. We need to sentence Chris to prison because he broke the law. The bribe from so guys are half the time. Think I am the guilty party? Still find me guilty and tried to charge with things anyway. This sounds like our show normally so go. I think he made his life. All eternal coach of no voice goes probably stroke but like his office is right at the entrance of a grocery store so that he has to teach every person who walks in and then as they walk out he needs to get there soon enough of a crime. Yes that's a cough on. You got real all right. Let's the real story was all right so this actually came from Washington state of Washington. Men January of this year late January headline is police. Believe mystery man is living in grocery stores ceiling coming down at night steal things but they can't find him mentioned of even in using like heath napping scanners that that they've been called to the same grocery store since Christmas Day of two hundred nineteen a five times since Christmas Day and each time Stealing more and more of cigarettes and liquor looks like about a thousand thousands of dollars worth of cigarettes and liquor have gone missing hordes and there have been Numerous nine one one call about each time. Cops come The search the rafters come up empty. It's my job. I don't now the update on that one by the way no an anxiously waiting around so we want. We want to be very honest with all of our. You know we want to give good advice here on the show so apart from washing your hands and not touching your face. Please don't squat in the ceilings of supermarkets. Everybody just don't do it. Yeah don't steal cigarettes because honestly cigarettes are lumber Myers. Yeah and the Lakers should come to me anyways. So just read it over right. I'm trying to save you. Cherish you guys can see the finger bad guys thank you. Everybody vote.

Mickey starbucks Jenny Curtis Berlin Tanner Lakers cough California executive Michael reporter Chris Washington
"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

04:29 min | 3 months ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Was at the other end the house. It's just like mom. Do you know where my Blah Blah Blah is right. So I just want to ask one final question because you said you have to love this in order to do it. Can you put into words? What the love of making movies as I'd say it for film and TV. Honestly I I say to people when they ask for if you could do anything else and be as happy. You should do that. 'cause this is really hard and I don't mean hard in a brain surgery way but you get told no all the time you rejected even when everything comes together perfectly and you make something great. Nobody may show up or you know. I'm as proud of the television series sweet vicious as anything I've ever done and I got probably some of the best reviews in my career but it was a moment in time where MTV was doing away with scripted programming and they debuted it the night of the two thousand sixteen election and maybe it was ahead of its time but even when things go really well sometimes you can have heartbreak in it and again. I'm not talking about the kind of heartbreak. That are incredible. First responders are going through but for me. I was really lucky that seeing shows like Mary. Tyler Moore show or watching that girl after school when I'd come home because it was in syndication by that point. Which was this Marlo? Thomas Show where she was single and living in New York and on her own in Manhattan and not married. Those are the only characters that I saw that had careers when I was growing up that were women and I do believe that representation is incredibly important. And that if you can't see yourself reflected in pop culture. You don't know that you can live different. Lives or tell different stories. So the early producers were women that were visible. Were all addresses. Whether it was Jane Fonda Barbra streisand or Sally field. Goldie Hawn those were the people who were the first producers in jobs that were visible that like a kid growing up in Fort Lauderdale Florida. Could say hey. Maybe I could do this but really watching movies reading books listening to music watching television. Those were the things that were my salvation growing up and not pre Internet world. They were the things that allowed me to see. That bigger possibilities were out there and that I could relate to Ratto Rizzo Enjo- Buchan midnight cowboy and their emotions even though they were nothing at all like me a feelings of loneliness in the same way that you know somebody watching moonlight or parasite you understand that people have similar issues and that we're all part of this great human experience without cinema and I include television that or or art i. I don't know the ways we make it through for me. So that's why I couldn't do. And as long as I feel that way about it and as long as it continues to have that effect on me and I certainly hope that Mrs America has the people that they want to get out there and fight for their rights. Whether it's their right to stay at home mom or their right to work or their right to have control and sovereignty over their own body whatever those rights are to not sit back and let them be taken away from us. Stacey it has been such an incredible honor having you today. I really appreciate everything you've said all of the work you've done everyone should go watch. Mrs America April Fifteenth on Fx. On Hulu I cannot wait. I'll thank you guys. So much and Dana thank you for joining his Co host. It has been so much fun. Having you. Great to see you know we have to change soon as this quarantine is over. I'm coming over. I can't wait talk every thanks Jenny. Stacey Hollywood unscripted created by KIRKUM CO MEDIA. This episode of the stuck at home specials was hosted by me. Jenny Curtis Co hosted by the Amazing Dana Goria. Many thanks to our incredible guests. Stacey Sher thank you to the rest of our team as well. Michael Kennedy did the episode mastering Stewart Halpern our executive producer and Celestin. Eric Dick who created the Hollywood unscripted theme song. And thank you to all of our listeners. We hope you get as much joy and inspiration from these interviews we do. Please make sure to subscribe as we have several more specials coming your way during this time of quarantine we also appreciate if you'd leave us a rating in a review. We want to hear from you. Stay safe and healthy. And we'll see you next time.

Jenny Curtis Co Mrs America Marlo Dana Goria Goldie Hawn Stacey Sher Ratto Rizzo Enjo- Buchan Stacey Hollywood MTV Stacey Jane Fonda Tyler Moore Eric Dick Mary Hollywood Barbra streisand New York Michael Kennedy Fort Lauderdale Florida
"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

08:13 min | 3 months ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Welcome to Hollywood. Unscripted stuck at home. This is another special of Hollywood unscripted and today. We're doing things a little differently. I'm Jenny Curtis and today I will be your host along with my special guest. Co Host. Dana Dana is an actress and creative. She's been in project. Such as American horror story lead. Daniel's the Butler the upcoming the United States versus Billie holiday. She's also worked couple times with our guest today. Stacey Sher and Django unchained and the hateful eight. You know it's funny. I do want to share this with you. All when I graduated from CAL arts. I didn't know what to do at a know whether I was to get in line in Los Angeles or go to a smaller pond and so I decided to go back home to New Orleans. And that's where I was able to book a lot of really incredible projects namely Django unchained. Which is how I originally met Stacy and then I got to work with her again on the late and there were tons of projects in between them that I feel very blessed to say I was part of and Stacey is an extraordinary woman. She is a pioneer. And I'm just really happy to be here today. Look this industry is a team sport. It takes a village to create a project and the people at the helm affect everyone the good leaders standout and we're lucky enough to have one with us today today. Our guest is a prolific producer. She's worked on projects such as Erin Brockovich Garden State Gatica Pulp Fiction. Reality Bites Burnt Mathilde. Contagion the hateful eight Django unchained and the upcoming Mrs America. Just to name a few. I am thrilled to welcome. Stacey Sher Stacey thank you so much for joining us. It's a real honor to have you here so excited to be here and with U. N. Dana first and foremost. I WANNA say because we are recording this week. Four I believe quarantine. So how are you doing? We're hanging in there. I have two teenagers that are in online school. And we're all trying to figure out how to work in our house so my husband has taken the garage. My kids are in their bedrooms. And I'm in our bedroom and some days. We fear that the Internet will not support us a whole. But we're really blessed because everyone healthy produce contagious. I've been social distancing for a long time. We probably started a little bit sooner than most people did in really in California much to the irritation of my sixteen to eighteen year old. Maggie is we'll both. Your kids are so beautiful. But I see you're on your social media and she's grown up so fast. I know they were so little during her tiny during Jacob's Dana. I wanted to ask you just before we start. What is from your perspective? Stacy's producing style. Okay so I'm going to be candidate and what I mean by. That is so on hateful. I don't know if you remember. Got T shirts at my favorite line of all of the characters in the ones that I gave to the producers was everybody's got a mother and a t shirt have made for them because that's what it felt like. They mothered us in particularly Stacey if I had an issue or problem jenny or a concern Nervous or scared because this is a little daunting to be on sets like that you know especially as young as I was in my career and she was always there always extremely helpful and honestly she was not playing with anybody stacey. You didn't take no for an answer. You just boss lady went. Took a lot accused from you. I don't know if you know that but I watched and I learned a lot from an extraordinary producer. Thank you I mean. They were both challenging in different ways. But I think for you probably. Django is harder because it was newer for the first project. I've ever done at that scale. Shot maybe three projects prior to that knows too and then here are was which all of these incredible people including yourself. I just remember feeling so absolutely welcomed particularly by you being so green and I will never forget that ever. That's so kind of you. I do think that trying to really look out for people as I appreciate it so much when people did it for me. Early in my career has always been something. That's been really important to me talking about your early career. We did want to go back and start from the beginning you went to. Usc was filmed the dream before that. Well it's funny started college really. It started when I was sixteen and I started at the University of Miami. Because my parents wouldn't let me go further away by that point. Were living in Florida and transferred to the University of Maryland to study radio. Tv Film. And I thought I was going to go into sports broadcasting and I had an internship at this sports show called the George Michael Sports machine and I realized that moment that it was going into my senior year of college that I did not want to be that person pushing my way into a locker room and all of a sudden. I didn't know what I was GONNA do anymore. And I was really blessed with a professor at Maryland who was a trustee at AF. I and he said there's this relatively new program at USC UCLA love movies. And it's called the Peter Stark motion picture producing program. And it's for graduate students and no one in my family was in entertainment. I didn't know how ridiculously hard it was to get in and again a kind of divine intervention. I was accepted to stark and I started in right after I graduated so I was a film geek and I loved movies. It's just that when I was coming up. It was so long before people kind of thought of entertainment particularly for women with the exception of acting. It wasn't really visible. What jobs would be available for women so then you went to USC you graduated. It looks to us because we checked out your IMDB. Your credit is a thanks on adventures in babysitting and then your second is an associate producer and heartbreak hotel which were both Chris Columbus films. Yes while I was in graduate school I talked the Head Start Program Art Murphy into letting me keep the job that I was working at to help support myself and that was working for music video director so I worked on these sort of iconic eighties videos while I was in graduate school twisted sister. We're not gonNA take it and Pat Benicar. We belong all these early videos and so another one of my fellow students and I think this is really important lesson in coming up in the business which is getting to know your peers. David Simpkins who wrote adventures in babysitting was a production executive at a company called new world and basically new world made a really good movie called girls. Just WanNa have fun in the eighties. But they mostly made exploitation films call like Angel Hollywood high student by day. Hollywood hooker by NYC. A small known fact about new world pictures they also owned marvel at the time and nobody was interested in making marvel movies but David wanted to become a writer but he worked in physical production and I met him through another stark student and he wanted to meet me because he wanted to write a script and he wanted to cast twisted sister so we became friends while twisted summer. Never got made. He told me about something that he was writing in. The Martin Scorsese movie after hours had just come out and he was writing. This be called adventures in babysitting. He described it as after hours for kids. So one crazy night with your babysitter. The second job that I had while I was in graduate school was working as an assistant at Tristar pictures and there is a wonderful woman who is an executive there named Allan Stewart. And she said you seem really smart and when you get out of school if their jobs Europe for let me know if I can get you in for an interview. Most people don't do this. I tried to do it for people now as well because it changed my career and I had heard about a job. Working for producers Debra Hill and Linda hopes and I asked Alan to call for me and she did and they hired me on a temporary on a basis because they were about to go off and make a movie and during that time period. David Rodents script. He gave it to me before his agent. We bought it. It became the first movie that the two of them made and I got a fulltime job. That's me and adventures in babysitting. And it was Chris. Columbus's direct toil debut and then. He brought his second film which was an original to us to make and that was our big hotel and it was at that time period that I met Richard Lebron.

Stacey Sher Stacey producer Hollywood Usc U. N. Dana Jenny Curtis Stacey Sher Stacy Chris Columbus Django executive Billie holiday United States Erin Brockovich CAL arts Peter Stark Los Angeles Europe Daniel New Orleans
"jenny curtis" Discussed on Politics: Meet Me in the Middle

Politics: Meet Me in the Middle

05:30 min | 3 months ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on Politics: Meet Me in the Middle

"We had in two thousand election literally was too close to call but when you have a sea change election like the election of Reagan Eisenhower Roosevelt. There's no amount of cheating and tinkering. That's the results okay. Let's switch this over to Adam. WanNa talk a little about the pandemic the laws of quarantine. What our government's powers and things like shelter in place orders and civil liberties and how that relates to the constitution. Adam tell us are there specific laws and constitutional rights in place for such a circumstance. Well you know it's surprising Where we live in a time in which this kind of quarantine seems like such a foreign experience to all of us. It's so bizarre. But of course For the first one hundred twenty some years of American history After the founding of the Constitution we had lots of quarantines They weren't nationwide quite like the one we're having here. But the quarantining of vessels quarantining people on land. Who HAVE CONTAGIOUS DISEASES? This is something that public health authorities faced all the time and in fact the battle to fight these contagious diseases from Colorado yellow fever. Things like that really provided The real basis for the rise of In the nineteenth century Where we see the rise of government regulation of how you can live where telling you you have to throw out your trash on a certain way and they have to have trust disposal in a certain way. You can't slaughter animals in your home And and whatnot all done to prevent these kind of contagious diseases That were early versions of Corona virus so desert federal government. Have the right to shut us down kind of in a Wuhan style. Well there's a one of the real questions that we're seeing Is how this pandemic affects civil liberties. There's a whole bunch of things that are happening in the pandemic that raised constitutional questions. What is the power that states have to force you to stay at home shelter in place order? Stop you from doing business. Stop you from using your property Stop you from going to religious assemblies. Stop you from going into political unbelievably. You couldn't do a political convention today in California if you had one scheduled because the law doesn't allow you to do it So that's you know that's a real constitutional right that would be that would be burdened in this way courts are shut down. We See States. Discriminating against other states. So there's a lot of constitutional issues that are arising one of the interesting things that they arise in time of civil liberties But the civil liberties era of American jurisprudence really starts after the great influenza of nineteen eighteen and really takes off in the years immediately after that and the twenties and thirties and forties and Interestingly enough We we we haven't thought about how these civil liberties really work in a time of Some kind of global endemic helped me understand the difference between what the federal rights obligations are in a pandemic in with the state obligations and rights are independent question complicated complicated one but one of the things that we definitely see. Is that just like we talked about with regards to adds up at about voting in the November election and one of the problems that beset that kind of reform in space is that it's so many different elections the state's lead in control the electoral process. It's the same thing really with with the pandemic actually throughout most of the course of American history you have states leading the charge in the battle against pandemics of Public Health. Crises like this and the federal government really comes in and plays in the assistant role. Does the Fed have the right to overrule the state? One of the things that we find especially dealing with an emergency in the pandemic of how how crisis like is that the traditional limits on power really fall by the wayside I think that while the president obviously wouldn't be able to shut down Traffic between stakes in an ordinary time. I think not only. Would he have the ability to do it? Asserting emergency powers both under statute and under his inherent presidential powers might suggest that this is exactly what the framers envisioned the president's emergency powers to before house. I don't think the courts would step in and stop the president from doing something like this if it was genuinely thought to be in the interest of public health and not say you know to enforce the provisions of voting rights. Are you know we're going to take a quick break I'M GONNA go gargle with payroll so we'll be right back in a swallow Elo Out there. This is Jenny. Curtis I am a podcast producer at Kurkcu media and I am currently sitting alone in a very empty podcast studio surrounded by hand sanitizer and I'm recording this in an effort to reach out. It's not an easy time right now. We don't know what the day to day is going to look like for the next few weeks even months so I'm proposing something. Let's all make something together. Curto MEDIA HAS LAUNCHED. A podcast called a moment of your time. These are bite sized episodes and each one features. You out there go to kirk co dot com slash moment of your time for more information. We may have to stay apart..

president Adam Reagan Eisenhower Roosevelt federal government Curto MEDIA Fed Colorado Wuhan Elo California Jenny Curtis Kurkcu media producer
"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

07:14 min | 3 months ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Originally this had been announced under the title. Molly yes when did that change and why it changed partly feedback from distributors here in the US Because Street? Who said do you realize molly is the name of a street drugs that everybody is? GonNa think this film is about drugs and I kind of resisted dot feedback for awhile but also some other feedback. I got was that it didn't give enough of a clue really about what the film was going to be about. It didn't help people into it. It was a female name. And as you know man at the center of it but then fought for me. Her right to her name. Molly is important. Because although we're in his head she's the one who's holding it together emotionally on the fact that at the end of the story. He suddenly remembers hunt name and says it is an incredibly moving of the stories so there was good reason to call me but there was also very good reason to not call it molly and so finally decided on this title. That would at least give people clue that when we're seeing we'll be on the lives of the guy had these are the roads not taken. These are the life you didn't live. I saw an interview with you. Where once said ideas are to a penny? Yeah how do you know when the idea is the one you wanNA pursue when I'm still passionate about after euro two it has to withstand the test of time because you have to live with for a long time so it can't be something you're GonNa get bored with or or wish that you'd never taken on in the first place so it's like that if I'm still really intrigued by occupying I think one of the things that I've learned from talking with. So many filmmakers over the years is that every film you make ends up affecting you in some way. What's your takeaway having completed this project? Having completed this project is. I'm really looking forward to doing comedy next on my four D. written it so I think it's good to deal with subjects that have sadness or loss lisa part of life but will so there are other ways of dealing with this subject. I didn't feel it's Don's right from one subject to the next one way of telling the story to the next. I never want to repeat myself. I'm not interested. I feel I've had the experience not moving onto something else where there's something else new to learn here and not very much at the beginning of its life. Its trajectory in the world on. So I don't yet know how who's GonNa welcome it how it's going to be received. You never do. No I was just talking to a Spanish speaking journalists somebody from one of the Latin American countries and I was very interested to know how it was for him. And how it might be received by the Latino Latina community and it was very gratifying to hear the him. It was a great relief to hear some Spanish spoken a length. Not just like Papa my mouth or whatever and the Spanish speaking characters were not made or chauffeur's they were very complicated. Rounded human beings have been interesting and difficult transition. But it's very early days. I I'm finding out whether someone is GonNa loud in people's hearts and minds who's going to want it who's GonNa find themselves it who's going to recognize it. I don't know yet but has the process of telling this story changed you in any way. Yeah film I feel like I go into a universe. Somehow University of my own making in I start with a blank page and then it ends up. Kinda world on the film these people in it and inhabiting it doing things and speaking in it you know. I can't blame anyone myself for what exists up there on the screen. But I think I became through making it even more interested in whether cinemas a medium movies on on not like a doorway into the mind on minds of so mysterious. If you could put a recording device inside your mind and listen to watch sports in there it would be much more complicated than this film. You know the way off saw stance. From Associati from one thing to the next day memories the imagination the thoughts the visions Minds our new universes of such complexity and since the very beginning of making films. I've kind of wondered if we could have a Mak- film that function like the mind in a way so it's part philosophical part practical question but that's punishable. I was attempting to do this one. So you said you kind of move from style to style that you've tested one boundary and you're looking for the next. What drives you from style to style. Well it's interesting. You should ask that because I actually never think of it as a style really. It's like I think. Of what form does this story need or idea need in order to be told so? It's a consequence of things much deeper in the idea or in the story and then I try and find the necessary form for that so I don't think of it as something adding on to the top of the subject matter so just being how you know many things over. His style is kind of interesting if you like but rather as something that is it must be told this way on the has ended on with it looking palms if I'm exploring different genre and different ways of telling things rather than having one signature thing signature way of making films but for that reason because I'm trying to find out how must be told. What shape does this? Some need comes out of that. Feeling of necessity. And when you're developing that how does a movie tell you how it should be told? I suddenly meditates on it and I think I work out. You know I try this try that I tried to think that the first thought is not always best. You know what would be. Another way of. Doing this would be doing that. I look a lot of stuff. I look at photographs and look at other movies. I listen to music and I gradually find it. I I always loved the matter of the scope to look a block of stone and sees what form is waiting inside that block to be found and I experience making a film a little bit like that. It's like I'm finding something I'm not necessarily inventing it but I'm finding something that was hidden and that to be found. Thank you so much to our guest. Today Sally Potter Who's written and directed the roads not taken and also to our producer for joining us. Jenny thank you so much for calling in Sally Syndrome. Nice talking with you. Thank you very much. Hollywood unscripted is created by. Kurt comb media and presented in cooperation with the Malibu Film Society. This episode was hosted by Scott to law CO hosted by Jenny. Curtis with guest. Sally Potter produced and edited by Jenny. Curtis sound engineering by Michael Kennedy. The score for the roads not taken featured as the music. This episode was composed by Sally Potter and provided courtesy of Sony Music. Entertainment the executive producer of Hollywood scripted. A Stuart Halperin the Hollywood unscripted theme song by Celeste. And Eric Dick Please. Rate Review and subscribe to this podcast for more conversations with top industry professionals discussing the entertainment. You Love Creek. How media.

Sally Potter Molly Jenny Hollywood US Curtis Sony Music Latino Latina community Love Creek University of my Stuart Halperin Don Malibu Film Society Papa Eric Dick executive producer Sally Syndrome Mak Kurt
"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

10:42 min | 3 months ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Welcome to Hollywood unscripted. I'm your host. Got To law of the Malibu Film Society. Joining me today in the studio is our producer. Jenny Curtis Hi Jenny. And this is our final episode of the season. Our guest today is Sally Potter. Who has written and directed the roads? Not Taken starring. Javier Bardem L. Fanning along with Salma Hayek and Laura Linney welcome. Thank you very much indeed. Over the past several years we've had a steadily increasing number of films that have been dealing with dementia and I know you've had some personal experience with it. But what was the new territory? What was the difference that you wanted to get across with your story? I wanted to explore really the mystery of the mind. The sale is not necessarily only a really difficult and tough tragedy. Although there's often great difficulty involved but the fact that we don't really know what goes on in the mind when somebody seems to disappear. I ASK MYSELF THE QUESTION. Or maybe they're going somewhere really interesting. Not gave if you'd like a doorway into thinking differently about the mind about lives not adverts not taken us the title That somebody might be slipping in and out of different kind of a win. Says even of power lives the lives. They could've lived existing at the very least somewhere within the mind so it was using it not so dementia is not like the sum total of the stories. Not just about somebody with dementia but rather somebody in a state of mind in relationship with in this case of Dourson taking care of him and we're exploring that state of mind also through her is to know that you did. Dedicate this to your late brother. Nick and that he severed from frontal lobe dementia. Yes from a young onset dementia. He was very young when he got something. The symptoms took him over quite. He passed on within two years. As I understand it you were very involved in his care. Yes I was. So how did that inform the story that you wanted to tell me? It was accompanying him. If you like has his kind of witness and keg it there were other people carrying for him to but but being responsible for his car and going with him opened my eyes to many many things first of all how badly somebody in that condition is often treated as if they're becoming less than human song and I found that I became incredibly protective of ten. And also the people say as more and more hard to communicate with somebody in this state. Well I found. It was not the if I went into. Let's say his speech patterns and treated them like poetry and wrapped with him and stay in these fractured language. Other people couldn't understand that we could understand each other perfectly well also that we laughed alert through the you know sometimes humiliating experience. He was having. I tried to turn them into a joke into a kind of human comedy rather than human tragedy so I learned a great deal. Of course I was deeply deeply saddened by his loss and booze grieving and so on but I wanted to find a way of telling a story that might by transposing it and transforming it into something else might first of all be useful for other people who've been through similar experiences. Carrozza whatever semi off different questions about the mind the mysteries of the mind uncertainty from all the neurologist. I talk to all the specialist so that period I gradually realized there is still a great deal to learn about this and many other mental states and a great deal more respect owed to the people who are living with this illness but I didn't want to a portrait of him so the character portrayed in his from heavy. It couldn't be more different. Touch Lee is very different. The story is held by a father daughter relationship siblings so it went through many processes of transformation. But that's where it sprung from. The father daughter relationship is obviously the core of this film and the character portrayed by Al. The daughter is so incredibly sympathetic to what her father is going through to the point of sacrificing everything else about her life. It seems. Well it's left open at the end. Exactly what she is prepared to sacrifice. And what isn't but what we see is that she's split. We see the consequences that so many women face in their lives whether that's mothers caring for their children. How can they also have a life a guilt free life following their own trajectory and she is a doors trying to do the right and loving thing for her father's the guy she loves? She loves her father and Heart is kind of a King Fan and for his suffering but she also loved her and work on. She wants to do that for the very end. We see a signal that she's trying to do both she's trying to do both wants to an intends to do both. Did you start creating the story while you were caring for your brother know afterwards while I was coming from I was actually making another film so I know exactly what it's like when you're working and answering the phone and rushing out of the late at night is early in the morning to deal with crisis or something? I know not speeches like at first time but no when I was in the middle of it was kind of overwhelming so it was only later when I started to do all right. Just do which is transformed some of the biggest expenses they fought in the life and starts work with it and see what you can do it. Put it back out into the world in a way that will make sense others but at the time no. I couldn't now separate from the making of the movie. There is the business side. Was this a hard sell to either investors or to the actors that you approached it was very hard sell to investors not such a hard sell to the two because they could see in it the potential to explore an incredible range of profound human experience really even in the smaller parts like Salma. Hayek you know it's small but every good actor knows there's no such thing as a small part and for her. It was really interesting to play a Mexican woman that she recognizes as a total human being and not stereotype and so on so no. The actors were very enthusiastic and eager. Hardworking and intent I think for investors. It was difficult to see how this might work. Because it's quite a complicated structure to run. These kind of power lives into weaving through the mind of this but also because the subject of dementia or mental illness is kind of taboo. You know there have been some films. Yes but it's still a difficult area that people don't we want to look at and this was coming out in such a different way. It's not really the main focus of the thing. It's not dementia. The main focus of this loud. The many faces of love adores for her father. An ex wife. I somebody who she still loves. But it's no longer responsible for and so on and so forth so yeah I think it wasn't self-sided but there were enough. People who were finance who passionately committed to it from the very beginning core finances and then others came in late and talk to us a little bit more about the casting. Yeah but you want to know was how they are. Your first choice. Who WERE OTHERS CONSIDERED FOR? This role did consider others now conveniently forgotten once. I've ended up with somebody. How could I even thought if anybody else on that? It's often like that. Sometimes it takes bit of trial and error and kind of figuring out and initially I was thinking of somebody English speaking and it took a while for me. It was like a Eureka moment when I thought no this will be much more interesting. If it's a Latino person who's not only looking at life through the filter of this illness but looking at it through the filter of another language so in a way the issue of translation between the mental state and how people understand the more communication difficulties the feeling of a border line if you like a physical border between Mexican America and the United States but the border inside the mind between one state and another one thing became a metaphor for another. And I've thought many of the performance is that have you done in particular how he was in in your research foam beautiful which I think is an extraordinary film. How in it so I approached him with the script on T. was IGA take it on with some trepidation that he was eager to take it on. Vr BARDEM and Selma Hayek. They know each other in real life. Did that affect their casting or the way they interacted onset. She's very very close friends with penelope. Who Dare is hard to? But they made a decision early on while they were on such a while we earn Russell and working together the they would create a kind of professional distant as if they didn't know each other outside. But I think there was joking and sense of humor and kind of the rough and tumble of the fact that they do already know each other. That probably be helped shelley the ease with which they worked together and because SAMA is Mexican and she's playing Mexican and he's playing Mexican. He was looking to her for example to make sure his accent was correct and that everything he did aside was authentic to her as a Mexican individual. That was very helpful for me to so yea they worked off each other very well and in a very short space of time you know. We shot all of those things together in three days but we prepared for months beforehand and those people who like to prepare. Of course ELLE FANNING. You had worked with on. Ginger and Rosa eight years ago and she is outstanding performer. An outstanding professional young twenty one year old now Thirteen I I work with her and she brings a dedication and infuse the ousman lightness to to a role and is able to imagine herself into the shoes of others experiences. She's not hot directly herself. She somehow manages to empathize with and imagine in an incredible sunset way. And she's Joyce who was used as an extraordinary form. Did you have in mind when you're creating the character? When I was writing the script I was deliberately not allowing myself to imagine any particular actors in the row but rather let the characters themselves come to life under my pants so to speak to find out who they were. Now that's partly. Because if you get fixated on a particular actor. Will you know writing? And it doesn't work out for one reason or another show delaying or you know whatever you disappointed whereas if you allow the character to come to life and then start to think well who could play. This might take this car during the different direction. That can be very enlivening and now what I usually do. Once I've got somebody committed to the pot in principle I then what with them find out how it fits retailer it slightly to fit them more precisely to sit in that qualities. Whatever and so to the point where then I really content much? Anybody else.

Salma Hayek Sally Potter Javier Bardem L. Fanning frontal lobe dementia Jenny Curtis Malibu Film Society Hollywood producer Laura Linney Dourson ELLE FANNING United States Nick Lee Joyce Heart Vr BARDEM Russell shelley T.
"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

07:15 min | 4 months ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Cases in two thousand fifteen which is a zero. Nothing to see what we can do. We're up to six hundred cases now and his albendazole inspired Super Pale superlight. Great morality sounds like a July nineteen eighty-five degrees. Yeah Little Wind is blowing. Yeah that's the sailboats. Are just coming in. After a long day. Exactly right perfect we could be showing a screening of Tesla. Good works to Seattle. Tesla might go better with baby bear his Sarah now sa- rise one of my favorite names. It's hard to make a bad Sarai. Adding is their egg going in there. Nothing at all metro is straight. The Robert Mondavi way of let the grape speak for themselves speak and they speak. I started that particular wine in two thousand eight. My son Callum was born in two thousand eight hence the name bear we started with perceived by bear. We went to baby bear. Rosa was GONNA be blushing bear. Because I'm barely now and I have two new wines coming this year. One is called twin bear. Which is a little bit of an is two twin peaks very small production solely. Walla Walla. Av and then I is an entry level wine and this one is called bear cub. And it's this same barrel profile some of the same vineyards but just a little different Approach so you've joined a group of interesting people Dennis Hopper Johnny Depp David Bowie Joni Mitchell. Jim Carey Johnny Cash. They found in artistic outlet with paints on canvas. But you create sculpture glass. So tell me how does the wine making make you feel This is such a departure from my day. Job Working as an actor and yet it's still creative. It's still involves a group of people and now I have a larger group of people that I work with that I adore and I love that process. I love being able to sit down and work through problems ideas inspiration with this core group of people that I have around me now that I've curated all the idea that we're going to attempt to make the great wine every year and a great number of so I've started with a Cabernet have moved to the Sahara. Two Thousand Eight IANNA THE SARAH. Two Thousand Fifteen. But you don't make much less than five hundred cases though. They're very small production. I you know I miss slow mover. This is a labor of love and we don't make any money on this. Actually we'll probably lose money but this process to me is it's a pleasure. It's again a Labor of love so your dream next part. I don't know it's the same thing I want to work with. Creative people. The people that have fun people love what they do. It doesn't matter. You like being evil. Do you like being. Do you like being funny. Do you like being complex needs to be complexity of it's evil. It has to have some good. If it's good it has has some evil you know. It's the Yin Yang of character of a person of people to be real as real. There are no heroes that without flaws villains without heroic qualities. So when you dream I dream you know. See I dream all the time. Okay do dream as the character or do you. Just do you ever wake up and have had an experience that one of your characters would've had depending on what I've had to drink before I go to bed influences. The dreams are crazy and that was a bizarre question. Alan if you've dreamed and character get so deep into something. I assume that you really live it right. And so you know your brain takes over it. Does it does creep in. Have you ever had the actor's nightmare? Oh Yeah Oh yeah. Yeah what is that for the rest of us? It's like you. It's the day of the show or the day of the shooter. Whatever and you haven't read the script you haven't read your lines and you go out there and you're trying to figure it out and no one helps you and yeah it's such a cliche but I think everyone who has ever acted has had that dream at least one. It's bizarre yes without question. Okay so what was your most embarrassing moment while acting? Oh my most embarassing moment. Oh Man I'm what had a lot of them. I remember way back. In the beginning I was doing Dune and there was a scene where I was fighting the sky and killed him and then I suppose to stand there and then I'm supposed to cry and I was like not crying and crying. And so they come in and they give you the mental in your is it helps sort of get your tears were going and so I got this and I felt so bad and that was like It was frustrated nicer to rub. My eyes like don't do that and I just rubbed the blow the mental name. Would they put a little bit? Bigger danger gets awful. It was awful and I look back on that and I'm like why couldn't I you know I can. I do and I was like well. Imagine you have just had a mortal Kombat okay. That's hard to imagine that you've actually slain someone. What state are you in? You're in the state of of of heightened relief and maybe relief and like you're overwhelmed. Your adrenaline is running. You know are you in a state where you're going to not cry. It was the situation that needed to happen for the script. It was truncated moment. Twenty four hours if you've had time to sort of think about it and you've recovered and you're relaxed and now you're in front of a group of people and you're expressing what the death of this person means to you to the tribe to everything. Now that makes more sense but as a young actor I was like Oh my God I need to do this and so it was a great lesson that I didn't really figure out until much later. There is a natural sequence that has to happen and if it doesn't then you can't force that it's not going to work. It's not going to be real not to you or to the audience. I didn't understand it at the time. So the great thing about wine is with a really good wine you can talk about just about anything as we've got our engineers in the back going by these still still we want to go home and we're sitting here and we're talking about everything that's because we have a really wonderful wine pursued by bear created by an amazing amazing actor who were honored to have here. Kyle mclachlan And checkout pursued by bear wind dot com and kyle join us again. Please be my pleasure. Thanks thanks for coming in cow. My Gosh Scott's gone to the water missing all right. Good night everyone. Hollywood unscripted is created by Kurt commedia and presented in cooperation with the Malibu Film Society. This episode was hosted by Scott. Tal With guest. Kyle mclachlan additional conversation with Kyle. Mclachlan Scott to lull Jenny. Curtis and Bill Curtis produced and edited by Jenny. Curtis sound engineering by Michael Kennedy. The executive producer of Hollywood unscripted Stewart Halpern the Hollywood unscripted theme. Song is by Celeste. And Eric Dick Please. Rate Review and subscribe to this podcast for more conversations with top industry professionals discussing the entertainment. You Love.

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"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

05:41 min | 5 months ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Anything that was born out of that came from the awkwardness came from a line came from relief. Yeah I think you're constantly calibrating and you don't always know in the moment how far to go and where the boundaries are like. Jim said it's a lot of experimentation. And letting the comedy be born out of that drama so that it feels authentic and honest. We experienced that a little bit with the way back where we had through two different worlds. We had the drama that was going on in the House on the suffocation Asian and we had a kid and then we had this larger than life waterpark and it was blending those two worlds and make sure they fit in the same movie and this is not so dissimilar in the sense that you have their own experiences these two people and they go on their own separate days and have these exciting things happen to them but it does have to throw a fit in the fabric of the rest of the movie and Luckily we shot a lot and we had a lot of editing time to sort of make sure we were scenes in remove move scenes. Yes but it is a little bit of a trial and error as you go. You don't always know. Sometimes those broader moments actually work and give you a little release from the drama and and sometimes they skew too much and you realize it's doesn't fit that raises an interesting question because you keep referring back to the heart of the movie that eleven page scene and and that's as dramatic as deep as it gets between a married couple something and when you have that and then you're trying to work in the comedy. You have a choice this on the comedy you can go very real on the comedy or you can go broad you can go over the top And certainly some of the characters that you introduced in this movie tended towards the latter. What was behind that decision will to the first part? Yes you have Zach and Rosie sitting there and that represents us which allows the comedy to sort of present itself within that scene because there is uncomfortable as we are so. I think a lot of our comedy comes from just the very reactions. They're having to this moment and Zach attempting to put the fire out a little bit and try to make it better. As far as like sume you're talking to like Charlotte or into autos character and Guirellmo ski instructor as well in Rosy for that matter they function especially especially Charlotte as sort of this great European hovering just over the ground. There's a toast sticking. They're coming from a different point of view and we really wanted something. That was in billy's face you know in other words she and Guido and Rosie all pose the same question in different ways which is basically billy facing. Is She taking care of herself. Is She allowing it. Be about her is she letting go too. Much of herself. And Rosie's sane obviously roses point of view about black and white and billy knows it's not black and white but it's important for her to come in contact with these. I think being able to have a couple of characters Allison Janney. We always loved and way back. She just hovers little bit just over the ground and when you have actresses like Miranda Otto Allison Janney for that fact to know how to play this delicate line between a character and being grounded. That's the magic that you're looking for that that eleven page scene must have been somewhat painful to write. I guess if you enjoy pain I think actually I mean I think you know again force mature gifts gift shoe with that moment in the sense that the words change and the circumstances of the characters in some of the beats but again starting with Jesse starting to tackle it and then just sort of expands he's becomes juicier and juicier as you just keep adding layers and for Julia to be able to go in there in Cohen angry and then go through sorrow and then just be infuriated by then make terrible choice as a mother to put her kids as pawns in a game that she did not want to be a part of. You can't ask for more fun. Seen to both right and be a part of what I would think that in the process of writing that there's got to be a lot of new insights you find into yourself. Yes I came to realize that I just enjoyed writing writing stuff for Julia because I felt like I was just putting my words. Will I save a lot and I like. You can't run and Ski Gi boots. As of you're having seen it makes me think about my own life and about how I deal with things like that. Yes yes yes poor choices that you make think that's one of the wonderful things about that scene. You identify a lot of yourself in their help to and how you at times just make the terrible choice. It doubled down on your defense and letting your ego and your selfishness kind of get in the way of practicality or -nology or admittance you know a way out would of this whole thing but instead you stubbornly deny that to be the bell just that tension is what makes the scene so wonderful she. She said this. So I'm stealing sort of his thoughts about l.. Say Americans for this point. But he's talked a lot about how when we're presented in front of someone say Oh we're fine we're great how about you. And we shift the focus. Secures thing where they aired it something. None of us want to do in front of two people which is say how we really are right now and to have this moment that because his uncorked and has put up with enough to air. This what we call dirty laundry in front of them to exposes vulnerabilities to bring kids out as something that we all try to avoid in our lives. You know just to say great. Our you and don't speak our truth. So that's another enjoyment here. Hi this is. Jenny Curtis producer of Hollywood unscripted. We hope this show is igniting. Your passion as much as it is hours. Please subscribe rate us and leave a review. It really does matter as we bring you more inspiring conversations with filmmakers. You admire now back to the show..

Rosie billy Julia Allison Janney Zach Miranda Otto Allison Janney Charlotte Jim Jenny Curtis Jesse Guirellmo Hollywood instructor producer Cohen Guido
"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

08:41 min | 6 months ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"I was GONNA ask originally. Are there any stories that surprised and now I have to ask how many of I mean they all did. They all surprise me. Part of what surprised. Me was the permissiveness. In terms of public outrageousness ourageous nece in misbehaving was just way out of measure with what I had imagined and with what it is now. I mean that these stars would pass out and super bowls and end up naked in pools with this regularity and did they were fine. They had reputations maybe but their careers didn't implode and they weren't torn torn apart in the press for it and they weren't not getting hired back and uninsurable or whatever that's different than it is now but I would imagine in large part that head to have contributed to the founding of the Hollywood coat both on screen and off. I mean onscreen. They were limiting. What could be shown in film but the exploits were certainly the talk of the town? Yeah Yeah I think so and I think that there was a kind of puritanical tightening up of how they wanted people to behave and how they wanted them to be represented in. The code was was enforced to do that. We talked earlier about how the start of talkies meant that. Suddenly you had scripts. You had to have lines that had to be memorized memorized. And well. That's another point to which I didn't bring up is that you did have to do more work in preparation and remember your lines and that also maybe put some limits on the revelry But what other changes happened over the years in terms of how Hollywood was partying. Well I mean I think a big change that happened was people shooting on location much more and the of moving equipment and the desire to go to different locations and film in some ways that started early and chaplain was doing that and people were doing that but for for a lot of the years it seems to me. The first half of the last century so much production was happening in town on studio lots so kept all the actors in town. They lived here. They worked here. And in that way they went out to these places Chasen's and Romanovs encierros and the Polo Lounge and Brown Derby. They were just places were they knew they would be sort of welcomed and protected and also seen and then they would find each other there and so in that way. I think it was a hard charging community that it it may be became less so over time when people could live in different places and when worked for months in New Orleans or in you know Atlanta arm wherever aside from personalities you talked about the places that are now institutions but back then were not you mentioned garden of Allah a famous famous hotel. Yeah and the Beverly Hills Hotel which when it was built was almost a disaster for the owner because nobody was living in Beverly Hills what he did he couldn't get people to come out that far. I I mean one of the things that was interesting for me and moving to Hollywood in writing about these places was looking for ones that were still around and not so many of them are I mean the Beverly Hills Hotel L. is and Musso and frank grill is but there's a lot of other places you know carneval as not cock and bull like different ones and yeah these contributed to partying being in it was an important ingredient in making it all happen. The book does talk about different places sometimes the case of the Brown Derby which had a cocktail the Brown Derby and whether they invented the cocteau himself so it was invented and named after them which is one of my favorite cocktails which is bourbon grapefruit juice and honey syrup or the cock and bull which he's credited with inventing the Moscow mule and had to do with the fact that the owner of the cock and bull was making and distributing his own brand of ginger Beer and he found himself saddled with too many cases of SMIRNOFF and he had a surplus of his own brew that he was hoping wouldn't go bad and so in this sort of desperate Britt did he kind of poured it all together. He decided he often just mix my remaining ginger beer with this vodka and added some lime and served it up and he served served at actually in the copper Mug and one of the actors who hung out. There was a great character actor Roderick Crawford who is through giant man and a big drinker and he apparently was the first customer former to give it a try. He liked it a lot. He said it had a bit of a kick to it. So that's how the Moscow mule was born the drink with the velvet kick before we wrap any other stories stories that you want to share with us. Well I could read a fun. One about Ava Gardner. There's a lot of men who were hard drinking and big screen personalities. In that way but there I also a lot of women who were having their own fun in wild time in Ava Gardner has perhaps my favorite quote in the entire book. A party isn't a party without a drunken bitch lying in a pool of tears which may be configured for your New Year's party probably not a good goal to shoot for now when I think about it though. The story and Ava Gardner all region that we had a wonderful time. That was all she would say. Ava Gardner during Frank Sinatra had met before years ago at Macondo back when she was still married to Mickey Rooney Sinatra had led with soft open something to the effect of wishing he'd gotten to her. First Gardner found him charming. They bumped into each other a few times thins at various nightclubs. There's even been a dinner date once after. She'd left Artie Shaw. They kissed a bit at the end of the evening but Sinatra was still married to Nancy and had kids so she hadn't let it get too far. This time though is different. They were at Daryl's Gerald Xanax. House in Palm Springs for a party. It was fall. Nineteen forty nine Sinatra. As usual was flirting with her crazy she put up with it for a while then reminded him once. He got too pushy that he was still married now. He insisted he and Nancy were finished for good in seeing as he was now available would he be interested in going for a drive. Gardner grabbed a fifth of whatever for the road. While Sinatra quite famously had a predilection for Jack Daniels to garner the tape of booze hardly mattered. It all tasted like hell to her. Anyway so bottling hand. She climbed into Sinatra's Cadillac convertible in the two of them sped off into the desert night. swigging all the way by the time they came to it was stop in the little town of the streets were deserted Sinatra pulled her clothes they kissed and kissed and at some point during their escalating passion Sinatra reached into his glove compartment in pulled out a gun scratch that he pulled out two guns both Smith and Wesson thirty eight naturally. They began to shoot up the street lights hardware store window several rounds that ended up who knows where Sinatra hit the accelerator and they kept on shooting all the way back to the highway. It was a few hours later. When Sinatra Actress Publicist Jack? Keller received a phone call from the police station. They had a story that hasn't yet reached the press. Not just a story about frank. Sinatra's drunken arrest but a story of his drunken arrests while out with famous actress who wasn't his wife in if Keller wanted to keep it under wraps he would need to get to India fast. The police back then were so much more. Amenable Keller immediately called a friend who managed the Hollywood knickerbocker hotel borrowed thirty thousand dollars and took a charter flight out of Burbank. By early morning he paid off anyone. You want who might have been inclined to talk the cops. The hardware store owner some poor drunk schmuck who'd been grazed by one of the bullets Sinatra and Garner were released without further incident Gardner for her part denied. Any of this ever happened. When she returned to the house he was renting in Palm Springs and her older sister Baffi asked how her night with Sinatra had been all she would say was? We had a wonderful time so I guess the bottom line is for our whole show have a great time on New Year's Eve. Just oh get caught. The book is Great. I do recommend it is available on Amazon and elsewhere of all the GIN joints stumbling stumbling through Hollywood history Mark Bailey. Thank you so much for joining us on this special New Year's Eve episode. I'm thank you you know. Thanks fun to tell these stories stories and I think New Year's is a good time to go out and have some fun and let loose a little bit. I recommend it quite like these folks did but you know I hope everybody has a good time. Fine thanks for joining us. Hollywood unscripted is created by Kurt commedia and presented in cooperation operation with the Malibu Film Society. This episode was hosted by Scott to law school. West Bailey producing edited by Jenny. Curtis Sound Engineering Nehring by Michael Kennedy recorded at CO media's Malibu podcast studios the executive producer of Hollywood unscripted is Stuart Halperin. The Hollywood unscripted the theme song is by Celeste. And Eric please rate review and subscribe to this podcast. Thank you for listening and have a happy new year.

Mickey Rooney Sinatra Ava Gardner Hollywood Beverly Hills Hotel Keller Palm Springs Moscow Nancy Jack Daniels frank grill Beverly Hills Artie Shaw Hollywood knickerbocker hotel Brown Derby Atlanta Roderick Crawford Romanovs encierros
"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

08:37 min | 7 months ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"And the I've worked out how to do that now. As a director you know I go for the emotion version and I push push and carve and create my stories using everything words pictures music to get you to a point where I really want you to calve because these are people that you probably think you have nothing in common with on the screen and my point is to say see how would like we will see Europe set now on the but wait a minute. I'm going to bet you love to give you a minute and I'm GonNa make you laugh and then I'll come back and say oh you're right. There did not an idea that because I want you to be involved in the film and I want you to have that emotional experience which is what I always look for those. The film's I respect and love is the ones that I get emotionally engaged in those the ones that I love to me one of the things that really helps make that happen is the music. And while you have the music of Bruce Springsteen you also have the score in this film by robots well. Ar is the king of emotion. His School for Viceroy's House. I think is just masterful if you watch that movie and just watch it for the school alone. It's an incredible the piece of work so that much to do on this film because so much of the music was bruce and of eighties tracks. But what little he did. He pulled doubt the emotions which is what scoring Dow's. He sent me a message yesterday saying that billboards picked out his one song as one of the songs to watch which for the original song agrees he was very happy about that Standing and then you had been Smith from Downton Abbey as cinematographer Short Viceroy. I have as well and yeah. He's a grumpy old English bloke and his crews of in complaining about these grumpy but for me Oman gods are Gal with him or anything and he was very excited making blinded by the light just precisely because it was the opposite of Downton Abbey and the opposite of that kind of a plush English period costume drama you know here was a gritty looking film about Britain in the eighties but what we went for was amazing. The graphic look is that was what the eighties was about. There's lots of lines lots horizontal lines versus lines in all the the show's shopfront always shooting the estate. Where Javid lives or buildings? You know there's a lot of graphic imagery three in the film that convey well that shows. The harshness of the period is very eighty s mainly as the hard lines concrete lines factories blue-collar architecture as opposed to plash beautiful Victorian. Whatever period English? Mich- that often you get. I mean this in the best possible way. Does it help to be a control freak to do what you do. I didn't think good directors are control control freaks. If you're a control freak thing you can get the best out of your team. I think what you have to be to be a good director is to be a good good communicator and actually have some humility with what your team is going through. What you're actors are trying to achieve? What your heads of departments trying to achieve what you cruise strategy for you and then your job is to help them do their best work for you? Everyone's there for you. You shout to get people is just going to totally undermine the process and lose respect and then also controlling to the point where you're not listening to varian pert. I think undermines the process because you know has people saying film is a collaboration and everybody's creative imports are important. If you're fighting is because you haven't communicated enough during prep that might not have been the best choice of descriptive and especially when you are producing and directing in writing. It's all yours. That singular vision that comes through. Yes but that doesn't mean that you appreciate other people's work in helping you achieve achieve that vision. Some people find it quite hard when I jumped from different roles but people were with me understand the I do it and I'm quite good at when I'm the writer I am the writer and I will write as a writer and then suddenly when I'm the director I will look at that script and go. Who wrote that scene is dreadful and pull all say you wrote that seem like well? It's good can you change. And he will you wrote it and I'll go. Yeah but you're the writer to kids so I'm able to different hats on and then the same isn't producer so when money is tight or we can't do something that we need to do as a director of fight for it and the producer will say. Well it's GonNa come out of your production Fi. You're hurting yourself and I'll go arden in cash as its rector. I need but then as a producer when something goes wrong on a film set. That's where I jump into produce a mode when was shooting not before that before the I helped get all the money in. I secure the big finance because of my relationships and then I have other people that come in with me to sort of take it to the next level when I become a director but when things go wrong that's what I have to jump him and that's when I become a producer director and all of it all at once mother. Psychotherapist you name it. Don't the films that you've made. Although they originate from a commonplace are all very very different stories. It's at the end of the day. You Finish a project and you reflect back on it. Do you find that you are finding some sort of different completeness after each one well they're all going to come from the same place because they will come from me and I'm about and it's true. I think directors make the same film over and over again the themes. They're obsessed with at the beginning. Stay with you but I think the wonderful part surfing attractor is that you can do films in different genres and in different ways that allow you to use your writing skills. But you're still kind of say the same thing and my starting point. The reason I involved in the media was is to combat racism and make us visible and I continue to do that with every film might make in different ways in different genres but you can always produce every film on my bet on one thing at the end of this one at the end of the day what's your takeaway on this film. Might take on the end of blinded by the light is I. I really enjoy working with music and I know how to to use music in a good way in terms of storytelling and that also also I can be Marshall touch an audience in a very human way and that is why bring at. She is my bring emotion to project superficial awesome fish oil would like to thank you so much for coming and joining US Kingwood unscripted. It's not often that one gets the opportunity to open up and talk about the combination of your thoughts. What you think is the meaning of life and the purpose of life and combine it with your craft and I think all those things are definitely connected and I've got to a point now in my career where I just feel very empowered by by the fact that I've learned to not measure myself on what do against the standards of the industry that I'm in and take my successes in my valleys as through other means and I think that's been a very liberating thing for me? Actually say thank you for giving me the opportunity to talk about that. I thank you for joining us. Yes the producer director screenwriter blinded by the light during Dicenta out now on home video. Hollywood unscripted is created by Kurt commedia and presented in cooperation with the Malibu Film Society. This episode was hosted by Scott to law with guest girl. Chadha produced and edited by Jenny. Curtis sound engineering by Michael Kennedy Executive Producer of Hollywood unscripted Stewart. Halpern the Hollywood unscripted. Theme Song Is Celeste. And Eric Dick Please. Rate Review and subscribe to this podcast for more conversations with top industry professionals. Discussing the movies movies. You Love.

director producer Bruce Springsteen Downton Abbey Ar writer Europe Oman Hollywood Malibu Film Society Javid Dow Mich varian Short Viceroy Chadha Eric Dick Executive Producer Halpern Scott
"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

03:57 min | 7 months ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"And it is is so important for people to recognize that. We're all seeing him as a hair out mean. He is a conservation hero now and the scientific community. He's got our attention. This way of filmmaking is so important it does have a hard time really telling our stories. We need storytellers to get involved and help put put everything in our brains on the screen and into words and help us get there and make us feel comfortable in doing that. This is such a good example of a storyteller Taylor being completely invested in the outcome and being there to make sure the story is accurate and compelling and seen and so I appreciate appreciate what he says about us which is of course very meaningful tall of us but thank God for him and for the film team and for their courage and I hope that more films sounds like this are made because we need them. The planet is in crisis and he just walked right into the middle of it and he told the story so bravo to him to Richard. And the and Tame thank you. I'm blushing but I can't help myself Jack. How did your family react? I mean you're young kids still I mean and you gave gave up a career in aerospace engineering any push-back at all from your family. First of all my family didn't really know what I was doing. I said I was sailing on a yacht so until they saw shadow. You got to take the film and they were sort of like you're grounded. Ah No more fighting the cartel but secondly in terms of looking back. I mean we have a massive problem with our planet right now. We've a problem with climate Lima Change. We have so many of these things that need our attention that for so long have been ignored to the point now where kids do not have a stable future. Sure like we are at a turning point in history where we're not sure if our species is even going to survive where at such a point where people need to do everything and especially my generation and and young people need to look at what's going on and and sort of realize that we don't have a reliable planet to live upon like I'm in the business of ships and if I killed all my engineers my ship would sink and we are doing that to our planet right now. We are killing. Its life support system. We need to realize if the oceans nations die. That's pretty much our entire source of oxygen. If the oceans die weet will die and we need to take a serious look at conservation realize that we cannot live the way that we have been so far. You're the whole system needs to change. I don't have any regrets looking back and having left like no. I need to do everything I possibly could for the planet and I think lots of people are so now thinking the same way. Is Your family onboard. They've seen it they are. They're very proud my father whenever we did the premier's like Oh. It's like the graduation that you never never had well. I WanNa thank today's guests here. Hollywood unscripted WanNa thank Richard Lot. Connie honey the director of Sea of Shadows Dr Cynthia Smith and certainly Jack Hutton. You guys have been great. It goes without saying keep up the good work and we look forward to the next film. Thanks so it was great being here. Thank you Hollywood. UNSCRIPTED is created by. Kurt come media and presented in cooperation with the Malibu Film Society. This episode was hosted by I Scott to law with guests. Richard Lead Connie Cynthia Smith and Jack. Hutton the audio clips from C. of shadows were provided courtesy of National Geographic. Hollywood unscripted is produced edited by Jenny. Curtis sound engineering by Michael Kennedy. The executive producer of Hollywood unscripted is Stuart Halperin. The Hollywood unscripted theme song is by Celeste. And Eric please. Rate Review and subscribe to this podcast for more conversations with top industry professionals discussing the movies. You love.

Hollywood Jack Hutton Richard Lot Connie Cynthia Smith Taylor Malibu Film Society Stuart Halperin Kurt Eric executive producer Celeste Dr Cynthia Smith Curtis Scott National Geographic Michael Kennedy Jenny director
"jenny curtis" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

News Talk KOKC 1520

05:33 min | 8 months ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

"A vehicle how do you go about checking in you there's so much somewhere I would need a staff of fifty people just to check all of those ads that you're running right that that's exactly and that's what Facebook as facing because they're most everything is automated for them yeah by an ad you target the add to the people that you want to have a seat you created you upload it no one ever looks at it so they're trying to deal with it not Twitter obviously have responded the other way saying we're gonna Justin no political ads at all they were gonna shut everything out we're not going to be a part of this we don't want to be in interfering in election that's not what we're about end of Facebook is now trying to be able to get what Twitter just did there's some folks also again tutors and hold on you create a platform where no one can really engage on the political side visual scanned but politically you can engage SO there though both face their own push back on it I one last thing I want to touch and we already talked about this over the phone a couple weeks ago and that would be the government shut down right now we can keep that from happening it is possible to be able side we've got twenty one government shutdowns in the last forty years this is not new we this is an ongoing issue for us as a government so what I've done working with Maggie asters democratic senator from New Hampshire she and are trying to partner together to me and say how can we stop government shutdowns we have a very simple process on this you get the the fiscal year if your preparation bills are not done this year to be November twenty one if everything's not done at this point then we'll have the spending will continue exactly the same level as last year but members of Congress and our staff cannot travel we're in session every single day including weekends and you can't moved issues other than appropriations so it kind of puts us in a box to say your work is done done the American people are held harmless federal workers are held harmless they're still getting paid all those things are still going on but members of Congress and our staff we're all stuck in DC until we solve the problem of the budget so it basically goes back to a constitutional principle there are things that we're responsible to do national defense the way we spend American people's taxpayer dollars all those things are basic responsibilities constitutionally you can't move to other things until this part of the work is done when it's done then you can move on I think everybody in in in in America would agree to because most people know if they don't get their job completed by the end of the work week or what in many cases they spend your house they got a light they stay later come in on Saturday is the way it is senator Lankford thanks so much for being here appreciate you taking the verdicts good to see you good to see you as well and now in segment to focus on Oklahoma Jack Kelly discusses Medicare open enrollment with Jenny Curtis and Jennifer Melton from him see him insurance so the two ladies in studio that I mentioned a moment ago Jenny Curtis and Jennifer Melton with M. C. M. insurance are you guys doing right good good UCLA these thanks for coming in the reason we had you in obviously mentioned this earlier in the broadcast is to talk about Medicare and open enrollment and I I got to tell you for anybody is going to go through the process it is a lengthy process it least in the minds of those who sit down and look at the paper working fill out the forms and do everything you're supposed to do so yeah my wife helped me through the process because I'm pretty like lame when it comes to you know him paperwork on Ted agrees with paperwork and what have you so what's the first thing I I just sat on the throne out there because I really don't know what's the first thing somebody needs to know as they approach the age where they're leaving the workforce and their in going into you know Medicare as a insurance provider what what's the first thing they need to know I think the the most important thing is to be clear with what their expectations are and to know that they don't want to read change everything that they're currently doing to get on a Medicare plan so they need to find the plan do the homework you know shop and do the research to make sure that the plan that they're selecting fits their needs better than the company's name okay and that's with the but the problem comes in and I I as an individual I thought Medicare was a governmental thing that they take care of you but you really need a company that you have to select a company to as a your Medicare provider correct correct Medicare gives the basis of your coverage and then you build off of that based on what you need okay we're talking to a Jenny Curtis and Jennifer Melton with MCM insurance so are we talking about the supplemental end of Medicare are we talking about the overall package again like I said I'm pretty since yeah I'll be truthful I'm ignorant when it comes to this it is about everything's about everything with your original Medicare a and B. there are some gaps so Medicare doesn't cover per prescription drug right so you get a plan for that the supplements help supplement what Medicare covers or they allow but they don't cover the full amount and then there's the Medicare advantage plans so depending on your situation one may be better fit than the other so Medicare itself is partially due to the money you put in over the years as a member of the work force and that sort of a governmental thing right so your Medicare a and B. you're a you earned through the years of pain and a fight or flight command right and then be you elect to take that and you pay that you pay a premium for that when you turn sixty five and then those two benefits together equal some hospitals doctor coverage but it doesn't cover all the ins and outs test and everything else at times so then your your funding that difference that's not covered by Medicare with those other plans so a and B. as part of your initial.

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"jenny curtis" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

News Talk KOKC 1520

11:16 min | 8 months ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

"Prostate cancer symptoms and all of us guys minds as we get older fortunately we got a treatment right here in Oklahoma that is the best I've ever seen treating cancer warning side effects Oklahoma protons center is one of the just thirty two centers delivering cutting edge proton therapy I recommend anyone prostate cancer call Oklahoma protons center before making a treatment decision I know why what is it OKC proton dot com this is focused on Oklahoma a weekly public affairs show from tiger media exploring issues that impact Oklahoma this week on focus on Oklahoma segment one Jack Elliott speaks with senator James Lankford about several issues including impeachment opioids and election interference and his segment to Jack Elliott discusses Medicare open enrollment with Jenny Curtis and Jennifer Milton from MCM insurance very very happy to have in studio with us this morning senator James Lankford of Oklahoma good to see you Jack good to see you as well Hey glad you could pop in and visit with us this morning we've talked before but generally it's all been telephonic you've we've had you on the phone to talk about various things going on in Washington I'm sure people in Oklahoma always want to know what is the big big issue right now of course obviously imposing a fine yeah each man is obviously the thing so where do we stand on this well first let me say it's nice to be in studio with is what I I kind of take in the studio atmosphere you got pictures the kapple yet American flag you bald eagle in here I mean just just all out americana so as well but yeah the impeachment is the dominant news please write down there's a lot of conversation about trying to get the US MCA trade agreement done stints in there for thirteen months on done within the house we've had lots of issues deal on spending bills no preparations been dominating everything's increase for right now rock on a waiting to see when this goes public and they've had several weeks of hearings in private behind closed doors in the basement of the house area we all want to be able to get more than just kind of the three minute clips that were getting each day of what happened right and try to get all the information I see that Kendra horn was in the Democrat represented Oklahoma last week voted to continue the impeachment of president trump and then she came back and said what she didn't really vote for impeachment but rather for more transparency with the impeachment inquiry well the transparency could have been done before I would I I read that answers well I was a little surprised by because there was nothing stopping the house from being transparent from the very beginning or allowing the White House or other folks to be a part of the questioning but they haven't been there's been a very select group they've been locked into a room and they've been told you can't share anything it's happening in this room until ready for this to be able to go public so there there's there's nothing that requires the house to be able to do it the way that they've done it there continue to do that this week a lot of folks are surprised to hear there was a vote last week to make it more transparent this week they're still doing behind closed doors hearings they said they're going to continue to do that as long as they can and then once they got the witnesses they want to get then they'll take those witnesses and take them public but only the witnesses they liked in private will they be the witnesses that come in public and for Republicans they're asking okay when can we call witnesses the way they set up the rules were Republicans can call witnesses that Democrats also approve so the Democrats don't approve of the witness they can actually come but they republics are allowed to ask I guess at this point but they can actually bring unless Democrats approve those same witnesses wow what a selective process it is it it's been it's been painful to watch and see how different this really is this looks more like the very partisan process around bill Clinton's impeachment on and the American people look that person that and they said okay we've got opinions on whether it's okay to lie under oath and that's really what president Clinton was being in pizza right he lied under oath on that if their bases about sex but it wasn't about sex it was him lying under oath exactly about that in so people have different opinions about that saying that's that's a Berber not appropriate you go back to Richard Nixon when he was impeached this same vote that the houses took last week there was a very partisan if you go back to when Richard Nixon the house voted to start the impeachment inquiry there were four hundred and ten votes it was overwhelming Republicans and Democrats alike looked at and said there's a problem here with what's on the presidency that's not what happened last week in my heart is in the interesting we have Pam online wanted to check in if it's okay with you grab a question from Pam hi Pam how are you Erin doing really good and I do have a question all thank you all for your in laws are there to protect you but they're not helping people who have your reversible damage and they can't function without pain medication now they've cut him back so far my husband can't do anything and there is there going to be any change where are they gonna start allowing people who really need them they get on are they just going to make a blanket thing because of you when people overdose yeah that's a that's a great question sorry for the pain that your husband continues experience there many of us myself included that have said there are people that deal with legitimate long term chronic pain issues that they've got to have access to the opioids as prescribed or very effective method the problem is within twenty one days of using opiates continuously they do have a change in your nervous system one hundred percent of the time for every person so what is currently is going on is there's a transition to safer doctors first time prescribing to make sure that they're not giving a month's worth of opioids to people because it really does have a long term affect only deals with the pain but can have other side effects as well based on addiction but for individuals that have long term pain we've actually added additional funding to the National Institute for health to be able to research are there non addictive drugs that can be developed to deal with chronic pain they're in the process of researching that out at the same time many states like our state are also dealing with how do we help people with addiction able to transition out while still protecting people have legitimate long term pain issues so what is Pam's husband do in this case well she should continue stay with one doctor and that's very important if you end up with multiple doctors on it in the eight starts exploding in a hurry to say Hey there there's a problem here on its stable one doctor that can manage the paints typically a pain management specialist that can help to be able to walk to the process those are the folks that are identified the most to say they're they're effective they know what particular treatments to be able to use and then to be able to stick close to that doctor what they're trying to do and some doctors are right now experimenting saying it we've had to an opioid for a long time let's try it some other things here and to see if we can separate see we can manage the pain and to be able to break some of the cycle of addiction as well I hope that help keep him well you with the same doctor and he tried many different alternatives and in war he was on two different kinds of morphine and cutting through and does the court want to ask show me can't function here because there and you can't move the I can manage that's really tough we hope but you know things get better for you Pam and for your husband especially thanks thanks for the call we appreciate you the in studio with us this morning senator James Langford got an extra day to spend some time with the media visiting with people one of the questions that getting rid called and wanted to know how you know we had this big deal with soccer Berg being you know question the right couple weeks ago how did Facebook he wanted to know how to Facebook actually affect the election so there is really nothing the Russians were trying to engage in two different ways in twenty sixteen to try to influence the election one of them was on social media they had work starting at about twenty fourteen working to develop friend groups basically they created these fake names fake personas FAQ pages and they were trying to be able to bill followers at that time no one knew who was going to be a for like anything twenty fourteen they were planning to be able to interfere in the election of twenty sixteen as they build these different pages they all were fake personas that were American citizens what they were creating and then they started using them to try to affect everything if you go back and look at the Facebook ads that were run during that time heard by the Russians there were a lot there were against Hillary Clinton there were some against Donald Trump there were some for Joel Stein it was a Green Party candidate there was Bernie Sanders ads they were basically hitting everybody the Russians focus on line is to stir controversy right is to find a way to be able to get Americans to fight what I described as the went when you go back to playground days in elementary school there were always two kids on the edge of the playground fighting but there was always one kid on the other side the playground screaming fight fight fight fight fight to get the crowd to run to it the Russians are like that one kid screaming fight fight fight fight fight they're not starting the fight if you're coming in we're already arguing about as Americans but they're trying to get as many people to be as divisive as they can the Russians are this autocratic dictatorship run under Putin and one of their goals is to be able to undermine the Percy's every single NATO country has that Russian interference in their elections every single one of them we were just the last of those and the techniques that the Russians using the Ukrainian elections in two thousand twelve they then decided to use those in the American elections in twenty sixteen they didn't change any votes they were just adding to the noise and I do tell people not every person you see online on a Facebook page or not every tweet from somebody really is an American citizen right over those are created individuals that are for actors trying to just create stories and controversy I'm sure when Mr Zuckerberg created Facebook and came up with this concept primarily it was for college to rise to become yeah within communications of each other and help each other out in some cases with tests and all the other things that college students have I'm sure you had no idea yeah come to this would have no idea yeah that that is an obvious thing the things that they're watching for now and like fourteen gauge and for your friends have never seen now the new issues what's called deep fakes Dick faces when you can take a picture of someone from multiple different angles take their voice office speech that they've done and actually blend in new words and sounds exactly like them and looks exactly like them but you could put president Obama you could the president trump you could put them in a setting that it would look exactly like they actually are saying it and like you're watching it but all of it is manufactured I've seen some of this I've seen some of the videos on it I saw some of former president Obama effect and I thought wait a minute wait you know you look at it and think that's his voice in that looks like it looks like him and it looks like that's what he's saying it sounds like him but like you said these are one of the quality of the call deep fakes and if you think the second act even old school like the force gum yeah and you see Forrest Gump and Tom Hanks in all of these historic things that are really looks real that is doable now with just a normal PC in that people can take that same technology that would've been millions of dollars years ago the great forest Gump and to be able to do it very quickly now so be even harder for people to see things online India is really them you know one of the other things with regards to Facebook and I'll try to wrap this up on the the the Facebook deal but some of the questioning of Zuckerberg included do you not fact check all the ads that run on Facebook but I thought you know we run ads here TV stations run ad right there's no way we can fact check everybody including an auto dealership that claims to be knocking fifteen thousand dollars off MSRP on.

Oklahoma cancer OKC fifteen thousand dollars one hundred percent thirteen months twenty one days three minute Milton
"jenny curtis" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"jenny curtis" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Go to i am db i'm only a couple of cliques away from with nail that's pretty great man castillo place of barmen in the movie set is found his role to be ironic he said i quit drinking a couple of years before so i think the idea of being a barman was sort of ironic in my mind hello there oh jerry what he was shooting the movies like man this is nothing like with helena what what what will they get myself when i get myself into the production here's another little fact the production made sure the girls didn't read the script oh that's that's good kim full wrote the script with additional writing from genie curtis not jamie lee curtis jenny curtis which was originally titled five he knew the girls might not like the script or even read it he gathered the ladies at hotel in london he said i went in and said look turn your phones off this is serious i'm going to read you the story followers in 1997 i guess year they would have found right 1997 and they will flip phones sure they liked the story ginger spice contributed script ideas even when she was in bali look at that israel to ginger spice the most creative spice oh man all right so we got more more facts about spice world coming out i just love that the it was with nail in either to that convinced elvis castillo to do it that's really funding all right three to ninety one seven two hundred the phone number for talk and text and also if you have a favorite spice girl i would love to i would love to.

jenny curtis elvis castillo kim full london israel