5 Burst results for "Jenny Anya"

"jenny anya" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:51 min | 3 months ago

"jenny anya" Discussed on KCRW

"And I'm just humbled beyond belief to be a small part of that was Brian McConnell, speaking with his wife, Nora in Atlanta, and their interview is archived with the rest of the story Core collection. At the U. S. Library of Congress. You're listening to weekend edition. From NPR news. Olivia's presidential election is tomorrow on the atmosphere surrounding it may sound familiar fears of voter fraud, worries about violence and a deeply polarized country. As NPR's Philip Reefs reports. Lender. Yannis is getting ready for Bolivia's election day in the same way you prepare for an earthquake. She's stocking up. Ah, Rose can tell their soul guard. She says. She's bought lots of rice and sugar and plans to slaughter a cow to feed her three kids in case the shops ran out of meat. Yannis is in Bolivia's capital, La Paz. Talking to NPR from a gas station. She's lining up to buy emergency fuel supplies. Just in case there's violence and everything shuts down. People are desperate, says Yannis. They don't know what might happen in the next few days. Bolivians go to the polls tomorrow amid an unprecedented crisis, the pandemics causing havoc so our politics in my three decades of writing and studied Bolivia, I have never seen it. This polarized. Eduardo Gamarra is professor of politics at Florida International University in Miami. He's from Bolivia and believes the countries at a crossroads, its really going through a major transition to either a more stable Bolivia or an incredibly incredible Unstable set of years to come tomorrow says if the first round is tight, and there are allegations of fraud, it could be very dangerous, very, very dangerous because it's in fact, a repetition of last year's scenario he's talking about last November. That's when evil Morales was driven from power after 14 years. Morales was Bolivia's first indigenous president, a Socialist admired by leftists worldwide. He stepped down amid mass protests triggered by US supported allegations that he rigged last year's election. Morales was replaced by an unelected interim president, Jenny Anya's Ah, hardline conservative Christian Morale is his supporters took to the streets, accusing her of a coup. Anya's crackdown. 23 people were killed after government security forces fired.

Yannis Bolivians Morales Bolivia NPR Jenny Anya Olivia Brian McConnell Eduardo Gamarra U. S. Library of Congress Philip Reefs Nora La Paz president Christian Morale interim president
Bolivia Prepares For Its Long-Awaited Presidential Election

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:13 min | 3 months ago

Bolivia Prepares For Its Long-Awaited Presidential Election

"Olivia's presidential election is tomorrow on the atmosphere surrounding it may sound familiar fears of voter fraud, worries about violence and a deeply polarized country. As NPR's Philip Reefs reports. Lender. Yannis is getting ready for Bolivia's election day in the same way you prepare for an earthquake. She's stocking up. Ah, Rose can tell their soul guard. She says. She's bought lots of rice and sugar and plans to slaughter a cow to feed her three kids in case the shops ran out of meat. Yannis is in Bolivia's capital, La Paz. Talking to NPR from a gas station. She's lining up to buy emergency fuel supplies. Just in case there's violence and everything shuts down. People are desperate, says Yannis. They don't know what might happen in the next few days. Bolivians go to the polls tomorrow amid an unprecedented crisis, the pandemics causing havoc so our politics in my three decades of writing and studied Bolivia, I have never seen it. This polarized. Eduardo Gamarra is professor of politics at Florida International University in Miami. He's from Bolivia and believes the countries at a crossroads, its really going through a major transition to either a more stable Bolivia or an incredibly incredible Unstable set of years to come tomorrow says if the first round is tight, and there are allegations of fraud, it could be very dangerous, very, very dangerous because it's in fact, a repetition of last year's scenario he's talking about last November. That's when evil Morales was driven from power after 14 years. Morales was Bolivia's first indigenous president, a Socialist admired by leftists worldwide. He stepped down amid mass protests triggered by US supported allegations that he rigged last year's election. Morales was replaced by an unelected interim president, Jenny Anya's Ah, hardline conservative Christian Morale is his supporters took to the streets, accusing her of a coup. Anya's crackdown. 23 people were killed after government security forces

Bolivians Yannis Bolivia Morales NPR Olivia Jenny Anya Philip Reefs Eduardo Gamarra La Paz President Trump Christian Morale Interim President Rose Fraud Florida International Universi Professor
"jenny anya" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:50 min | 5 months ago

"jenny anya" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Elections, twice, citing the pandemic. The unions, social organizations and left his supporters of Eva Morales see this as a threat to democracy. They've been blocking highways around the country covered 19 hasn't so far hit Bolivia as hard as neighboring Brazil today and Peru. Yet it is causing mayhem. The police have collected many hundreds of bodies from homes, cars and streets. Videos have appeared online of a prison where inmates protest on the roof. Commanding medical support. Dr. Jose Antonio US is head of intensive care at a hospital in El Alto says many patients are dead when they delivered to his hospital after going from one hospital to another in search of treatment. He says he's not politically partisan. But as a medical professional. He's against the street protests, women entrepreneurs and one in which they're counterproductive, says video is be more infections. As the pandemic grows in Bolivia, so do political tensions. The government's accused protesters of endangering corona virus victims by blocking highways and cutting off oxygen deliveries. Protest leaders say they're letting medical supplies through. Lift the blockades, says Government Minister Arturo Marie Show at a press conference. Otherwise will do it for you. Those words aren't taken lightly. In Bolivia. The interim government has a history of confronting opponents, believing they're experiencing one of the most repressive periods since it became a democracy nearly 40 years ago. Thomas Becker is from Harvard Law School's International Human Rights Clinic. The government has violated the freedom of the press. By targeting journalists who have criticized them and by shutting down stations, and the government has targeted human rights defenders and politicians who have spoken out against them because one of the authors of the report about the interim government's human rights record It says security forces killed 23 indigenous Bolivians during protests just after Anya's took office, the government's condemned the report is one sided. Bolivia's electoral authorities say the election will be held on the 18th of October. The candidates include Jenny Anya's, Her opponents accuse her of delaying elections to buy time to unify the right wing. We've proved willing to protest in a pandemic, even though everyone knows it's risky, says 80 Martino, the accountancy student. So friend. We're not up against the Rachel. Our rights are being abused, she says. Matina says she plans to go on taking to the streets to ensure she has the chance to elect the people who govern her fly breeze. NPR news I'm going to stay in Latin America. The pandemic has also affected how people watch TV there as it has pretty much all around the world. But we're not just.

Bolivia Government Minister Arturo Mar Dr. Jose Antonio US Jenny Anya Matina Eva Morales International Human Rights Cli Brazil El Alto Latin America Thomas Becker Peru Martino Harvard Law School Bolivians
"jenny anya" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:53 min | 5 months ago

"jenny anya" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Hit Bolivia as hard as neighboring Brazil, Chile and Peru. Yet it is causing mayhem. The police have collected many hundreds of bodies from homes, cars and streets. Videos have appeared online of a prison where inmates protest on the roof demanding medical support. Dr. Jose Antonio video is is head of intensive care at a hospital in El Alto casinos took us says many patients are dead when they delivered to his hospital after going from one hospital to another in search of treatment. He says he's not politically partisan. But as a medical professional, he's against the street protests. Women this contra proves him to contact their counterproductive, says video is be more infections as the pandemic grows in Bolivia, so do political tensions. The government's accused protesters of endangering corona virus victims by blocking highways and cutting off oxygen deliveries. Protest leaders say they're letting medical supplies through. Lift the blockades, says Government Minister Arturo Marie Show at a press conference. Otherwise we'll do it for you. Those words aren't taken lightly. In Bolivia. The interim government has a history of confronting opponents, believing they're experiencing one of the most repressive periods since it became a democracy nearly 40 years ago. Thomas Becker is from Harvard Law School's International Human Rights Clinic. The government has violated the freedom of press. By targeting journalists who have criticized them and by shutting down stations, and the government has targeted human rights defenders and politicians who have spoken out against them because one of the authors of the report about the interim government's human rights record It says security forces killed 23 indigenous Bolivians during protests just after Anya's took office, the government's condemned the report is one sided. Bolivia's electoral authorities say the election will be held on the 18th of October. The candidates include Jenny Anya's, Her opponents accuse her of delaying elections to buy time to unify the right wing. We've proved willing to protest in a pandemic, even though everyone knows it's risky, says Oedema. Tino, the accountancy student. So friend, another pregnancy, the Rachel, our rights are being abused, she says. Bettina says she plans to go on taking to the streets to ensure she has the chance to elect the people who govern her for Bree's NPR news. I'm going to stay in Latin America. The pandemic has also affected how people watch TV there as it has pretty much all around the world. But we're not just talking about a lot more eyeballs on streaming services. In Mexico. The pandemic has led to a resurgence of the telenovela, the corny TV melodramas that for decades ruled the country's airwaves recently, though, ratings were down, way down..

Bolivia Government Minister Arturo Mar Jenny Anya Bettina International Human Rights Cli El Alto Brazil Rachel Peru Dr. Jose Antonio Mexico Chile Thomas Becker Tino Latin America Harvard Law School NPR Bolivians
"jenny anya" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"jenny anya" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is Punit McDonald with the BBC news negotiators are working through the night to you and climate talks in Madrid trying to salvage efforts to fight global warming the Chilean government minister leading the tolls has appealed to delegates to show flexibility a major rift over the extent of the commitment needed to cutting greenhouse gas emissions the minister Catalina Schmidt said the deal was almost there adding that it was hard but would be worth it some of the biggest polluters including the U. S. Brazil and India have been resisting demands for promised cuts to carbon emissions to be stepped up our environment correspondent not McGrath is in Madrid all over the place we've been getting some reports from different countries talking about being excluded from some meetings there's obviously some very key discussions going on right now involving carbon markets and obviously some serious horse trading going on but there are many angry delegates here and it's still possible that the whole thing could collapse in a heap the second year of desire amongst many people here to see the countries to go further the Bolivian interim president Jenny Anya says an arrest warrant will be issued in the coming days for the former president evo Morales accusing him of sedition Mr moralis is in Argentina where he's been granted refugee status our young skippers reports Mr moralis left Bolivia November after he resigned under pressure from the armed forces he said it was a coup d'etat this government had been accused of manipulating the results of the elections in October which gave him a fourth term as president Mrs on yes said Mr moralis had no respect for the constitution and he would have to answer for that if he returned to the country she said he was welcome to do so Mr moralis meanwhile tweeted from Argentina that he would prove that had been no election for old the ceremony is taking place to dedicate the new national stadium in Tokyo which will be the main venue for the twenty twenty summer Olympics and Paralympics the event was attended by the Japanese prime minister Shinzo Ave Steve Jackson reports the completion of the sixty thousand seater stadium is an important milestone on the road to the twenty twenty Olympics the governor of Tokyo Yuriko Koike K. said it was a world class venue and promised a memorable games tions are Abbe said the opening of the stadium marked the start of a new area the venue was empty except for a small huddle of officials and journalists but it will be open to the public next week visitors will then be able to admire the wooden lattice structure by the architect can go cuma which gives the state of the all sports facility a traditional Japanese feel dozens of demonstrators have been wounded in Beirut has clashes between riot police and protesters continued into the night the police fired tear gas and rubber bullets well protesters threw stones it some of the worst violence since demonstrations began in October world news from the BBC police in Albania have arrested nine people on suspicion of murder and abuse of power over the collapse of buildings in last month's deadly earthquake prosecutors have issued seventeen arrest warrants were builders engineers and officials suspected of breaching safety standards fifty one people died in the six point four magnitude quake police in New Zealand see search teams have conducted a further land search on point island I've been unable to locate two bodies still missing after last week's deadly volcanic eruption one more burn victim died in hospital in Australia raising the number of dead to eighteen the leader of Britain's opposition labor party which suffered a crushing defeat in Thursday's general election has insisted that he won the arguments on climate change of strategy and corporate power writing in the observer newspaper Jeremy Corbyn expressed regret for the leverage of feet but insisted he been successful in rewriting the terms of the political debate here's our political correspondent Iain Watson Jeremy Corbin's under pressure from some of his own MPs to relinquish the party leadership sooner rather than later but so far he's resisting he says he accepts his responsibility for labor's heavy defeat at odds progress doesn't come and the simple street flooding party officials will have initial discussions next week I'm drawing of a timetable for electing and your leader then you could argue in National Assembly is authorized the nationalization of a major petrol station company two days after the US imposed sanctions on it the US treasury department alleges the company G. and P. which controls a third of the country's petrol sales is used by president Daniel Ortega's family to launder money for the government on Thursday the US imposed sanctions on the president's son Rafael Ortega D. N. P. on to other companies he owns or controls to First Street his role as the alleged money manager BBC news it's six minutes past six G. M. T. welcome to weekend from the BBC world service with me Judea more care we start the program in Madrid where negotiations continue at the U. N.'s climate summit a deal was meant to be announced on Friday afternoon local time it's now Sunday morning and a deal is now moving on forty hours over do you and still no end in sight the E. U. and some island states vulnerable to climate change all pushing for stronger commitments to cut carbon emissions the deadlock is due to some larger pollution's among them the United States India and Brazil objecting to further actions protesters outside the summit staged a mock hanging to express their frustration of world leaders failure to strike an agreement our environment correspondent Matt McGraw is in Madrid and has been attending the conference all around the conference all now they're just desperate huddles of very weary negotiators all over the place we've been getting some reports from different countries talking about being excluded from some meetings there's obviously some very key discussions going on right now voting carbon markets and always the sincerest horse trading going on but there are many angry delegates here and it's still possible that the whole thing could collapse in a heap the second a desire amongst many people here to see the countries to go further I think almost all the discussions of them going on here one of the key elements of seems ever rise apart from the individual to minds is the question of the Chilean presidency the chewing gum is hot is running the conference but it's not being held in Chile as we have here in Madrid because of the civil unrest in Chile a couple of months ago and now you have two governments involved Spain as those in Chile is the president and according to Jennifer Tolman from the environmental think tank the three G. Chileans hundred doctors well to the circumstances here the requirements for for that is you're changing it used to be that incrementalism was acceptable at the sorts of things and that's no longer the case because of the fact that climate change is not a real to a lot of citizens around the world you have to not only move this process forward you have to move this process forward in a way that is seen to be responding to the crime emergency and what that means is the only safe strategy for a presidency going for it is the high ambition one that is the only way that a presidency can defensively say that they've tried to use the sorts of formats the sorts of negotiations to respond to what the world is calling for so in a sense what people are saying here is that the Chileans you didn't use their office well in that sense that they said to lower gold are too low and I live in I'm patient expecting country selected up when the fact they should have gone the other way around with a very high level my mission and let people weren't in favor and I choose it down a bit and find a compromise somewhere in the middle as opposed to going in very little and annoying everybody absolutely they are now in a position whether but having to negotiate upwards and downwards.

Punit McDonald Madrid BBC Chilean government