17 Burst results for "Jennifer burns"

"jennifer burns" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"On going construction in either direction between Klein and cal you met it's in the left lane both ways the traffic and weather together on the H. every ten minutes on newsradio seven A. U. moral five point out I found WBBM accu weather forecast mostly cloudy muggy areas of fog and a touch of drizzle in spots during these early morning hours temperatures holding nearly steady in the low to mid sixties later today it'll be breezy humid and warmer with times of clouds and sunshine look for a high of eighty three sixty four degrees cloudy at o'hare sixty three fog in Waukegan sixty four here at the lake front WBBM news time at three twenty. our top story this hour president trump over the weekend shares a prediction of a civil war like fracture in the country if he is removed from office we'll have much more on this story coming up at three thirty one a special class reunion is taking place this week in the western suburbs the downers Grove high school class of nineteen forty four we'll celebrate its seventy fifth reunion during home coming on Friday October fourth at downers Grove north high school classmates to attend include lifelong downers Grove community members and World War two veterans they will be participating in the homecoming festivities including the all school assembly community parade and a tour of the school seven classmates from nineteen forty four gather this summer to start planning and searching for fellow classmates and they say they are still hoping to hear from classmates who might be able to attend downers Grove north plays Glenbard west in football on Friday WBBM news time three twenty one and now this feature eating right yesterday was national coffee day if you're a coffee lovers sip on this good news there are health benefits to drinking this beverage this is a registered dietitian nutritionist Jennifer burning a member of the academy of nutrition and dietetics with eating right drinking moderate amounts of coffee including decaf has been linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease type two diabetes Parkinson's disease and some cancers to ensure your daily calcium and vitamin D. needs are met add fat free milk to your coffee if your diet does not include Derry a fortified soy beverages the calcium rich alternative and remember there is such a thing as too much coffee stick to no more than three to four cups per day people with hypertension pregnant women and individuals who are elderly they want to limit their intake even more for more tips visit it right dot org and listen to past programs at WBBM newsradio dot com slash out. encouraging you to eat right I'm registered dietitian nutritionist Jennifer burning for news radio seven eighty and one oh five point nine FM if you're feeling a chill at home it's time to think about hi I'm Jay Farner CEO of quicken loans America's largest mortgage lender I've got great news mortgage interest rates have dropped so if you're thinking about buying a.

Klein eighty three sixty four degree seventy fifth ten minutes four cups milk
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"And he i think everything you say is true and there's that you had to kind of i focused a lot on the political aspects of it just as they thought that has looked at that there's a there's an apolitical piece that that speaks to all lewis enes at selfdiscovery selfknowledge stuff recognition selfcultivation that's that's really powerful on video i ate it if the policy hasn't changed it the politics at least have that there is a fairly robust multilayered multistrain conservative movement out there on most of which is critical of what they say is liberalism our state is on an funneled people into that for for decades on i think she's may be less now i'm not sure kind of jury still out i read something for the washington post about that iran is dead late wondering where what she's doing in the current political environment i think that's a little unclear but you know she's she set people's minds in a certain way she opened their they're reading list to people they might not consider in if the policy hasn't changed yet at least were in the environment or people talk about it in conversations that going on for quite some time i don't know if it takes um i don't know what it takes to two to me the policy more in those antigovernment directions innate also be the other thing is the bigger the irony got some of the more people object to it the more popular it is to read it out on criticisms of the government because the more evident it is in people's lives in it's like it's more of a target rate so and he could also be related that the failure of the policy she promotes in the popularity reading about how great it will be windy succeed those can be related.

iran lewis washington
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"The media and then academia so at the public and the media have been respectful freeman more or less partly because of that credential he has the fact that it was going to receive cargo professor eventually as the nobel prize bud uh among fellow academics there was all that allow people thought it was cook thought he was crazy odd though he was dangerous and hated him uh force for his policy positions um i'm i'm curious how uh i'll be so me rephrase this your views online rams philosophy do not come through in the book which is a tribute to your uh scholarship and your evenhandedness andrew roles historian i think you could read this book it have no idea what jennifer byrnes thinks of on rant um and i'm not gonna ask you now qatar but if you want but i am more curious about the social aspect of it which is obscure is how your friends and family reacted to the fact that your books pretty evenhanded because i suspect like you said there are plenty of people out there you probably know and love who a few of them i like an rand i bet a lot of them don't weicker and dr what was the reaction to the book and what was the reaction aw academically among historians yeah i think can loyalty fence a complimentary yeah i mean i wanted i wanted ranjini to center stage not knee and would i happen to think i feel like us less interesting and that i think by enlarged it the reception has been positive on especially within academic community i would say um a lot of people were curious about rand and were sort of like we're curious that needless it down and need all his books to lake she like you we could read your book instead and your book is really interesting and then like now i feel more informed citing cnn reported that gratitude it very much than part of the convention of the yields he try to understand the person me and the people you're writing about so in us considered the mark of a good history rather than just sort of pull rank on these people who were born earlier than you were and point out all the things they got wrong and all the things that you know we're now more like devoutly test.

professor nobel prize jennifer byrnes cnn andrew qatar rand
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"Are you point out the capitals when free to buy bone freed was written shortly after a shrugged an has some much in common with a intellectually uh i don't think freeman perfectly drew on it but the bait let's say this where they they mind similar seems in a particular they both disliked greatly the john f kennedy quote s not would your country can do for you but ask what you can do for your country and you write the following you say um friedman's association with university of chicago in his technical work in economics insulated him against the type of attacks rand endured close quote skeptical that claim i think friedman was often mocked and treated with disdain for a long long time uh would you change that sentence now that you're working on a free been biography it is interesting i think i think what i was getting it in that is um and so the figure of ridicule public figure ridicule and i do know now than a little more granny learn freeman your wise you know probably a decade or so in his professional life when he was seen to have so have turned away from them were interesting work in economics in really gone backwards on and then eventually he'll 100 reemerge as a force to be reckoned with that that people have to deal with and if they are still dislike his politics so i am i guess i'm going to meet with an asterix by that right now i still think that when freedom inserted appeared on tv in the media you he was treated as a series of congress the series ideas in some of the coverage of ran is chest very ad hominem attacks hash looks what she says her accent the people around her weird she's weird this whole thing is a joke oh my god had get nearly i don't think you see your i haven't seen in a need in that coverage of freeman yet i've seen him presented even when he's presented negatively it's sort of a a a dangerous foe we have to watch out for not a ridiculous person that it's unbelievable he will take seriously in as a along the tone of coverage around in the '60s is is really noticeable for that let's address i think it's family differs from the public.

friedman congress freeman john f kennedy university of chicago rand
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"You know a certain as her personality type of certain set of ideas this moment in people's lives on a certain piece of american political culture i mentioned when we started this conversation that i had gotten was that i was enamoured offers a teenager largely enamoured over in them got turned off by the the lack of recognition of the role that current furthers house in our lives and community and other things but in this spots important in i i mentioned earlier home her moral defence of capitalism i think it's really important uh you're at a story on i'm just speaking for my own personal perspective here i think it's incredibly important that somebody defends the morality of freedom and the morality capitalism and gotten so far away from that they're reading those uh quotes from our as it's a breath of fresh air reminds me of our i wrote a biography of maggie thatcher recently and when you read what thatcher said about liberty it's just so drawing because it's so out of step with p politician could say those things anymore and so i think it's incredibly important and i even have sympathy for rounds romanticism a business but i do also think that was dangerous i think it's unfortunate that she romanticised business 'cause i think she helped people become confused about capitalism and business so i'm pro capitalist but i'm not pro business and it she was pro both and i wished i was kind of shocked by how and i didn't know about this when al shrug how many business people were excited about it because it was he ha i'm an okay guy i'm okay i'm a good person it's okay to to just care about profit and although in a part of me rebels a little bit against that at the same time i understand that if he never defend that if no one's out there defending that uh freedoms could have a tough time flourishing.

maggie thatcher
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"Any argued egner sister defended communism i was and it's just terrible relationship fell apart and he went back to russian never slug again and so you know she had that moment later in her life that she has to reconnect and it was very clear that her ideology was more important than her any ties in a continent and clear adage sent miss mr moment and so i think that's also why he it that the rapid ran is a teenager you know on a teenager though all ages lower right but yeah there is it there is a very common hire people really feel strongly not rant at a certain point in their life and at later when it hind warm relationships more complicated a series is like it look back in a state not really capturing what i noted he true on any part of that puts however own biography and a really unusual personality and takes an unusual personality to sort of they history and to stay alive as an intellectual force it years you know 100 years in time but it also needs you're not really ordered or send your troubles feet vice area thoroughly it remind me a lotta steve jobs um walter isaacson spotter fee paints him i think in a very um mixed way which is that he's a very difficult purse had to get along with in you had people wanna be around him all the time and i filmed the same response here archer tarand before relief religion i just wanna add one s guitar but one more thing which really important i didn't know anything about which is uh she was um.

egner walter isaacson 100 years
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"It's it's just interesting to me how that intellectual that ideological purity test remains important to folks fifty sixty six years later on will could probably continue to do so but i wanna come back to your point about the kindergardner communism because i think it's a really interesting tie in diet given us didn't like high um are thought he was flawed which is so rand was an atheist she hated religion view that is a form of anti reason i assume was one reason she edited more than reasons which ousted like this moral imperative of of some religions to help other people uh and it's interesting that she saw christian morality is the kindergarten of communism it says it says in the old testament love your neighbors yourself opd that's not a randy in thought and what's what hayek argues in the fatal conceit is that we have this natural tendency to take the ethics of our family and extend them out into the larger extended a warder of society at large and i think that's what he saw i think correctly as the root attraction of socialism and of communism that the family is a pretty great thing and certainly in our family we we care for each other and we take care of each other and therefore we need to do that more widely and he said that's the road to tyranny and if you try to take the extended order of the marketplace are bringing to the family you're gonna destroy the family and so we need the living two worlds at wants a world of small group ethics which is the family or close friends and the large order strangers who we trade with an exchange with them interact with the marketplace and then he opposite that's incredibly deep.

hayek rand old testament fifty sixty six years
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"On the part that i would add and i'd love to get your reaction to what she how she would react to this the part that i would add is that commercial dealing is what we do voluntarily with each other we choose to contract with each other choose to buy or sell from each other that competitions were powerful protecting people and in creating excellence uh at the same time i would i would be a champion of people who want to voluntarily get together to help other people so to form charities foundations philanthropy and so on to me that's the other aspect of now what's off a called civil society it's the things that we do together but not through force down through the ballot box now through taxation but through every divisional choices of where we're passionate about and what we think helps make the world a better place would you say she would be opposed to that those activities when she talks about the virtual selfishness say or jiffy just not want people to feel compelled to do them now it's more the latter but it's a little bit tricky so she would say of course you are perfectly free gm to act in in altruistic manner or to support other people on your own time as long as it's free and voluntary choice but that's not the essence of morality and so people who considered themselves teachers of ethics and morality should not be emphasizing that eager and should not be holding data as standard of behaviour we have far too much of that what we should hold up as a standard of behaviour instead is people like the people in the books howard were john paul harragon of individualism we need to recognize that that is an ethical life and so she really.

gm howard john paul harragon
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"Yes she really it's true i actually a and just dump running out this episode our she gets in a big fight with milton friedman who has kind of talking about the efficiency of markets and she just thought this was a horrible way to go that you had to talk about the ethics of it and i think that comes you know more than anything from her experience at russia on so she was born on in a certain fours while russian family of russian jewish family and they were she is it out well he's twelve when the russian revolution unfolded around her and her family's livelihood was basically taken by the state on confiscated and she just thought that was the sort of ethical corruption in rock at the at the core of the modern world that you could say somebody need this morning you i'm going to take it or you don't really own necessarily ores i'm going to take it and it was to her she can drill down to what she thought was going on and it was to her a group of people the collective being placed against one person the individual and so that was the essence of it and the reason that happened liz with she called the best moral and social system that was built on the rights of the individual and it allowed individual to flourish and so any on any discussion of the ways capitalism is bad or needed eat moderated came back to her as potentially threatening that sovereign individual so for her capitalism you know she claimed it in its pure form had narrowed in known in his pure form it will be very close to anarchy that have of their nationals eight and it would allow individuals to sort out for themselves what they wanted out of life and she compete freely on you know in in a market economy and in on the contractual basis of appeared appear equaltoequal so i'm i'm very sympathetic to that view uh as you just stated it.

milton friedman russia liz drill down milton
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"Fitting end to this story it's a tragic end but it's the credibly fitting these people who thought through the only thing that matter was reason were torn apart by an emotional uh response to to their relationship yeah i mean it just blue sky high a home movement and it there was a giant schism and nobody was told the reason it was like unspecified like dishonesty in corruption of nobody knew people were having wild speculations that he still money to do this he that entities that eeking you took the brandon side or egypt iran side any families have split american people never spoke to each other again for the rest of their lives on and then a lot of people just watching from the outside looking in were like this whole thing is looney tunes crazy a cost ran a great deal credibility it basically brought her career to a screeching halt brandon took off the california inserted j knew each staff um you know objectivism kind role on is at south but that you're right that was really the cataclysmic moment and you know eight keen on this environment where you have to be reasonable and that that nancy in his in a culture pushing all of your emotions aside and then only did they come rushing back yeah i'd system in a way her personal life was a test case for at least a part of for a lab experiment for her part of her philosophy but let's move to the to the uh the economics part of it one of the uh got the throwing her later but one of the things that i found striking about reading your book was the being reminded of her moral defensive capitalism and how jarring it is to a modern era which has relentlessly utilitarian and a fish shannon impractical and she had with have none of that she of course are a remembered dow was i think back on it but she only cared about the morality shin care about the you told terry apart of.

brandon nancy egypt iran terry
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"And they had unearthed letter with twenty thousand subscribers which is a lot yeah it's a newsletter that rivals those little magazines we spent so much time reading about you know in they had other people doing affiliated lecturers any greenspan gave a lecture on business like you people doing all kinds of stuff it grew and grew and grew into this real on intellectual community and it had ties to the growing conservative movement and it was never conservative per se staightout you know positions that would be anathema to religious conservatives but it was it was an important heart of that 60s conservative moment and as it went on brandon became you know we became we need good money internet acting buffy but fairly you know this was his living he di he wellknown he became on sort of a celebrity within this world his whole world was built around i ran yet at the same time he was losing interest in not romantic relationship and he didn't know what to do and he basically decided he could tell rand and so he sort of december old in advocated at the same time as he began becoming involved with another woman but when show let's get to the punchline when she finds out she totally destroys his empire of of affiliated material uh threatened some legally and that whole movement the whole cult of personality is is jarred tremendously by this and for me as a um someone who's become more skeptical of the power of reason as i've gotten older is it's a it's an incredibly.

greenspan brandon rand
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"Human buried at the time and she was married at the time she was married to her opposite a lovely soft combines on yielding on path is now on artistic a man who you know basically he was the wife in the relationship according to the gender standards of the day you know he he didn't work he minded home he supported her he was very good for naturally she supported him an enzyme which he's a yeah exact she was a breadwinner but he was the one who win on you help her through her tough times with her writing and help her socially support for socially they go to the party he'd be at her side introducing people just making things flow well and and so at any rate near but it it in apparently lacks the passion that she wanted she's very johnston a thing you'll brandon on inland younger that she will much younger 25 years younger they first net and he sent her letter he actually center to letters he was at ucla 18 to visit heard he stayed up all night talking came back he brought proper brandon he stayed up all night talking may said embarked on this very intense intellectual relationship where she saw him as the person who would carry forward her ideas learn her ideas it moved to new york in large part the brandon's moved to new york to continue their education rand essentially followed she came out very shortly after.

ucla brandon new york 25 years
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"Yeah um i wish you probably talk about that i'll mention uh to parents listing with young children you may want to listen to sex powerbroker uaw continue listing with your kids if you're on your way to school but she she had she was married uh threw her entire life until the death of her husband uh but nathaniel and barbara brandon who were also buried uh they ended up getting divorced and presumed partly if not totally because nathaniel in iran had a longstanding quote secret affair but not secret to the to the people and their spouses that's what's what's bizarre about it and win brandon goes off to find a different woman later on in his life i ran totally uh trump we have to make it clear iran originally dedicates a atlas shrug to that they know brandon amtra her husband dan when when that the annual leaves for another woman leaves romantically uh i'd rand while by what happens it's it's kind of extraordinary and why it was so hard for her intellectually to deal with his defection romantically yeah we'll let me go back a little bit too connie set the stage for their relationship and you know one thing i uncovered in my research that was where interesting is as she became famous so she became famous without head she then spent some time in hollywood where she is working on the screen adaptation and she had fans her letters all the time and should often need them it looks like they were a couple of young men with whom she got close to navy having a romantic relationship never quite happen but looking back they said meet this list in the card somewhere.

uaw nathaniel iran dan connie hollywood barbara brandon
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"She demanded total loyalty uh which is ironic given her stress on individualism and an reason but our view was i'm reid everything else was wrong and therefore if you don't follow me and agree with everything i say i was with something wrong with your powers a reason but it it it has a um for it has a religious failed to it and she's an anti religious person has a cult feel torchy's individuals in the group called themselves the collective which is weird the guy he's not cheese out opponent of collectivism live it supposed to be tongueincheek right like ha ha and it eventually it's like well jokes on hugh if he he did it become very collected this day i i you know we as rangel back and forth on this any one issue the individualism cheese is an element there but a lot of it was this idea of rationality and his idea that she was going to create a new ethical system based on rational thoughts and colts have reason had happened before and no happen again i am and it was that that reason which he didn't joins to this idea of individualism but and you can imagine another version of individualism that would be sort of express it individualism or you know go if the flow or go with your geider in out on follow your intuition warmer rousseau he and romantic individualism in that was not her she was very clear on that rationality with defining feature of on humankind that was what separated us from animals that was what made us unique and that was what we needed to cultivate and she became very suspicious of on unemotional life human beings things that could it be controlled and so she really sat reason and emotion against each other and insistent that reason must win and then the final irony is that the whole seeing kind of blew up in his cataclysm of emotion.

rangel reid hugh
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"Uh she was i did not know until ridge brooke how extraordinarily charismatic that she is she was i didn't realize that with the help of an inner circle of friends m acolytes that she created a slightly frightening might say frightening america's a slightly a frightening cult of personality around her philosophy and her writing stock about her personality and the devotion impassioned followers and how that played out in the in the '60s uh politically and culturally yeah and it's interesting so she did have very powerful charisma she also had a very powerful negative charisma which i think is back to that bookshelf you know some people just hey iran really cannot stand her of mary this negative reaction and others especially those he met her at the right moment um just sort of fell under hurst foul and i think some of that goes to her very unusual personality where i mean she was what she wrote about in terms of being on a true individualist berry solitary doesn't mean she didn't care about other people are how strong emotions or want the high regard at other people that she absolutely did want that but she was free from a lot of the on serbs striding for status in power in positioning says she could have a very unique perspective on cement when she not than and she could have for all her difficulty reading other people's emotions she sometimes with get a very sort of deep n pure insight into your core and she could give that to a person and just when their their unending loyalty.

america mary hurst iran
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"And secondly i could divide that shelf in half basically two books it said iran is a terrible person who ruined my life and reflects if he is the root of all evil to iran is the most brilliant thinker since aristotle an occurred near hannity him little story summer between these two poles and at the same time i was in graduates lone in american history in historians new working in the economy were starting to think about conservatism were seriously starting to write about at starting to wonder about it and so these two things came together this growing interest a hat in this curious fate your i just wanted to learn more about and it is realization she actually ben quite influential in the conservative movement and that was as growing area scholarship in nydia could put this together and come up with a suitable topic for a dissertation had you read much for any of her work at that point you know i had a bad found heading haulage given the family member said yeah you're at that point in life for you should read the fountainhead and um you know it took a little bit and serve a curious way um i'm rent a whole book i didn't let it i felt like i didn't get no anxiety that part of that stick stuck with need like she's making references she's making allusions she's doing something here that i not quite getting and so am i actually felt a little resentful that this book had gone ahead is it was so long and amos must have read it and so i think as far away keen that to it and i had you know dipped a little bit into the virtue of selfishness which you know talked a lot about revolutionary morality kind of see the treaty to needs a college student but again they didn't.

iran hannity nydia amos ben two poles
"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer burns" Discussed on EconTalk

"We'll from the sun talk part of the library of economics and liberty i'm your host russ roberts at stanford university's hoover institution our website is econ talked out of work for you could subscribe to comment on this podcast and find links with other information related to today's conversation but also find archives reports reposted the every episode we've ever done going back to two thousand six or email address mail it he can't talk dot org we'd love to hear for today's october second 2017 them i guess this historian and author jennifer bonds of stanford university she's currently work on a biography of milton friedman her first book which is the subject of today's conversation is goddess of the market i and rand and the american right published a two thousand nine by oxford university press jennifer welcomed econ talk thanks for having me so on the surface a abok graphia vine ran seems like an unusual topic for the story on what true to the two to her and um and and why she important in history he knows a great question and i am started graduate school in the year two thousand and i was interested in intellectual history i was interested in religious history was sort of exploring and it just so happened that i kept coming across iran it was like this weird thing where you know i might get on the bus and summons buried in atlas shrugged or a negative friend's house hugh never ever reads and there she said at a shot by her bedside they started thinking what what's up with iran she's a historical figure she existed in history like i should learn about her and so we went to the library in it looked at it shelf of books on rand and they noticed a couple things first of all it was much smaller shelf annually fine for you know any other author um as widely bad is her.

russ roberts stanford university hoover institution milton friedman hugh jennifer bonds rand oxford university iran milton