6 Burst results for "Jennifer Viola"

"jennifer viola" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

06:46 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer viola" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"And today we are talking about music. And I'm happy to welcome my first guest who is the exact executive director of the Santa Fe Symphony, Daniel Crew be welcome. Thank you, Jennifer. Thanks so much for having me today. Yes. So you were at your job as the executive director of the Santa Fe Symphony for a year in March when Pope it hit right? That's exactly right. It was a wonderful anniversary. Eso what happened? How did you guys know you have a virtual concert? Siri's That has been you've had one of those. We're going to talk about the other. The concerts that air coming up. You also have had some live concerts recently during Coben. But at the time that covert started, How did how did you guys What did you D'oh? Yeah, I mean, it is. It's a memorable period of time. To be sure we were. We were about to launch this really exciting partnership with an incredible organization. That's that's regional and national in scope called WildEarth Guardians and Environmental Conservation Organization. And we have this first coup presentation of an incredible concert called Hope for the planet that was all going to be about of environmental conservation. And climate change. And it was gonna be the first of many collaborations with welders. And about two days before the concert cope it, really, you know, swung into full gear in Santa fan, You know the whole town shut down. So you know, I think I think all of us. I don't think anyone quite realized the scope of the virus and how long it was going to take for all of us to return to any semblance of normal. So we did what so many other organizations did. And, you know, try to reschedule programs for the concert for the summer. The fall, you know, thinking, surely by August will be beyond this. Um, And of course, you know, here we are. Here we are And as we as we were talking about before we started, we're all just doing the best that we possibly can under the circumstances. Yeah, that's right. And so you know very quickly. Once we realized the scope of this on DH saw its progression in other countries, and how long realised how long it's going to take to really adapt to this new reality. We decided very early to focus our efforts on producing Producing concept that was going to be possible no matter where we are in the recovery process or what phase we were in on it so that led us to treat to primary Siri's. In addition to our music education activities this year, the first Is something we just launched a one week ago on October 11th is our new virtual concert series where we're taking small symphony ensembles on DH, putting them into really iconic locations, all throughout New Mexico and in Santa Fe, including Ghost Ranch. That's where we were just right. Exactly. It was incredible and we had thousands of people tuning in from all over the world. We have people from Guatemala and New Zealand and the United Kingdom in France, and it was very exciting to see the reach, you know, which was significantly larger than what we could fit into the lenses. On. Everyone has been so excited by the content because you know, our players were out in the middle of the desert overlooking sheer cliffs and playing the music of Aaron Copland, which is just so Americana and inspiring. So we watched that last Sunday to great success. We have four more concerts in that Siri's day viewing away through December, right right, Well, so that's really interesting that people we do have this. This new Sort of thing. Now that virtual can connect us a little bit more with people all over the world as much as it's great to be in person to see people, especially, you know, musical events in performance performing arts centers. That kind of thing you know, there's nothing That can replace that. But these sound like they're really beautiful, Beautiful, visually on DH that you can reach people all over the world now, virtually so, that's kind of cool. Yeah. That is the truth. And that was kind of the goal. You know, when we when we started talking about this virtual concert, Siri's, You know, I did not want this to be a typical performance that you would see in a concert hall because you know, there's something distinctly different about Washington concert online versus being there in person. So I wanted to make this different, something compelling and and also give people a taste of Santa Fe in northern New Mexico from afar, especially since they probably can't make their their annual pilgrimage to Santa Fe like they Often do so We wanted to celebrate the community in a way. So we're working with historic sites Ghost Ranch for working with other nonprofits like the Children's Museum in the Botanical Garden. You know, we just filmed the concert in the cathedral for a Christmas presentation, so we're really excited about the series, and the community seems excited as well. That's great. And so let's talk about the the different events that are coming up. If you're just joining us, we're listening to coffee and culture here on Katie RC. I'm Jennifer Viola. And I'm speaking with Daniel Groupie who is the executive director of the Santa Fe Symphony. You are so you just did this Canyon echoes at Ghost Ranch and it's really beautiful. So I love you. That you were adding this really strong, compelling visual. That's such a great thing to be doing. So tell us about some of the upcoming concerts at different Siri's in the concert. Yeah, I'd be glad to. So we have four more concerts in our virtual Siri's almost releasing every other week. ATTN locations all around town, So the next one is filmed on the rooftop of Thornburg Investments, which overlooks the sea because the mountains of the foothills of the Sandia Crest, and so we captured these breathtaking sweeping vistas on were you know, the musical selections are are diverse and varied. Ah, lot of traditional rep that you're familiar with Beethoven's and boss of the world, but This year. We also really wanted to focus on representation, which is a conversation. We've been having diversity equity of inclusion conversation the organization's been having for several years. And this was kind of a prime opportunity to expand our traditional repertoire and make make sure we are earnestly representing minority composers and female composers. Eso you'll, you'll see a number of native composers on all of these programs Black Let's you know on a lot of female Composer's represented on all of these concerts. So the next one above the winds releases on October 25th that was filmed on the rooftop of Thornburg overlooking the mountains of our next one is on November 8th Sunday releases at four o'clock, filmed at the Santa.

Santa Fe Symphony Santa Fe Siri executive director Jennifer Viola New Mexico Santa Environmental Conservation Org Aaron Copland Daniel Crew Thornburg Investments Coben Sandia Crest Ghost Ranch Beethoven
"jennifer viola" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

05:53 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer viola" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"I'm your host, Jennifer Viola, and I'm really pleased to be welcoming the folks from vital space is we have a Hana Yo Holim, Who's the program director and Chalk and Boyd, the executive director. Welcome Thank you. So bios. Bases is a fairly new organization. You can tell us a little bit about how you all started the organization you your mission is to sustain and enhance Santa Fe DS cultural vibrancy by creating affordable spaces, artists working in all kinds of media. And so, Jonathan, How did the organization come to be? Sure I a long time ago, had a background, doing some real estate investment and then became a furniture maker and my experience as a sort of coming on to the scene and being a furniture maker and realizing how accessible downtown in market sort of spaces downtown are too young and upstart businesses and arts really made me aware of that. And that just post with all the vacancies that I constantly saw, rotating through a downtown This as 90 years. Well, we are in arts destination. Why isn't something taking advantage of these vacant spaces and bringing the sort of young and vibrant energy that Santa Fe wants to show its tourists to our city and that sort of seed that started and grew over time and Through talking to clients through talking to other organizations on the big steps that the problem at the trajectory of vital spaces took was connecting with Anita Durst, who runs an organization in New York that is basically Our model. I mean, she has been doing it for 25 years and she's flown out here and I threw out there. We used her model of engaging with temporarily spaces to create studios, and she helped us really get moving quickly. Yeah. So you do do you to create studios as well as exhibition spaces? It certainly started in my mind as more of an exhibition space because that's where I was in my thinking, But as soon as we got our first building on Otero Street The immediate need from the community Wass studio space, and I was envisioning this large exhibition space for artist showing their work and everybody just said, We don't have a space to create our work. We need a space tow have studios and so the project Being young and nimble, quickly responded to that and shifted our focus to creating mostly affordable studios. Well right now, that has to be really important for folks because I mean things have there were empty spaces before the pandemic. I can only imagine What is going Tio continue to be like during this, You know, really rough period of time. So it's a great thing that you all are doing. How many different exhibitions have you have handed her? The program director? Tell us a little bit a little bit about your role in the organization. Yeah, I came on in October, so I haven't been with the organization too long. But my role as weapons and weeds have been adapting to what's needed. So the switch from exhibition to studio. I think Jonathan then hopes that artists would just use the space and do their own work. We're realizing that we needed more. Public facing projects as well. So I helped organize exhibitions and workshops and events. And so we've had. We have Ah. When we could we usedto have opened studios. A number of one person shows in a storefront on state makes Andi We have multiple exhibitions planned, but of course, are waiting until we're allowed to be open. The windows on the future, which we get to shortly but is exhibitions installations in Windows across Albuquerque, Santa Fe and House in partnership with the physio project and by 16 arts, and that was a way to get Old money out to the artistic community because we're paying artist a statement for these installations and to also get work out invisible while our exhibition spaces are closed. Well, it's that's why I ended up calling you. Well. I saw one of the installations that is on Yana Street. And it's Janet both knees and use their name. Yeah, and that was just so incredible to see. And she has thes mannequins is sort of like a mix of Passion and color as well as they're all wearing masks. And you know, the kids have masks on that. Even the dog has a mask on and I thought that was really interesting. And so that's part of a larger exhibition that you're doing right? Yeah, So, Yeah, that's a great one. It's really the tongue in cheek. Her idea was that high fashion would quickly catch up with a future in which case we have to wear, not just masks that has not suits right. And so it looks light hearted but also fairly post about electric. And then that's one. Uh, 20 Windows today, So that's a lot of windows. So are they. Is there an official opening for Windows on the future? I mean, official opening date. It opened July 1st. Okay. So is open on and the windows will be open through at least a month of July. It depends on the spaces were hoping some of them can stay open after that. Right Mass on our Web site at vital spaces dot order that list all of the installations and have addresses so you could go find the great, That's great. So if you're just.

program director Jonathan Santa Fe Anita Durst Jennifer Viola executive director official Chalk New York Boyd Janet Albuquerque House
"jennifer viola" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer viola" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"On K. T. R. C. where it topped twelve sixty AM one or three seven FM I'm the host of this week's show Jennifer viola and I'm very happy to be joined today by two writers who have just recently moved to Santa Fe Ellie Duke and Shawn McCoy welcome Hey thanks for having us yeah thanks for having us yeah so Ellie do cure the news southwest bureau chief for the hype hyper allergic which is a very popular digital arts magazine ma'am yes that's right yeah and so in Yushan are a writer you all both men at the LA review of books right or you met each other I should say at the LA review of books and you have just recently and we've done to additions now of an online art and literary publication called Country B. Antonia yeah that's right call so it's interesting the business writer at the Santa Fe new Mexican last week whatever wrote about New Mexico being on the top ten places where people are moving to in the United States for the past like four years and so you guys are part of those numbers because you just moved here in October from LA right yeah it's a good change I like it a lot yeah is it good getting to the grocery store quickly I know traffic right yeah that's where late today because we think everything is ten minutes away which it usually is yeah yeah so what do you like what's been interesting so far about living in sanitation I think it's been nice to have you know in the mountains nearby remote sandals before and also and I have both have some experience in New Mexico before I moved here so it's nice to reconnect all the friends that we've met Ellie was actually born here and I worked in the state really four years before I before it moves so it's been really nice he worked here before you moved to LA so I worked not in Santa Fe but yeah in March the state outside corona really excited Newkirk outside the phone up on a ranch or something yeah I was working on ranches for a year and a half or so before coming in that's cool yeah that's awesome I'm from Alamogordo nice run is like kinda into your home I was like down the muscular reservation yeah oh that's so interesting and how you were born here I would where were you born in even as they are today Vincent yeah I are your parents still here they're not we do it when I was two okay but they have a lot of friends here and are very happy that we live here now they can visit to yeah well those are really cool sandy connections a lot of times when I have guests on the show they they would have the way they got here was they drove across the country and then they stopped here and then that was kind of like it yes we do that too yeah well let's talk a little bit about hyper allergic so I mean hyper there's it is a pretty well read it's like a million unique visitors each month right it's a very popular online arts publication and the Nieman reports in two thousand eighteen published an article outlining how hyper allergic came to rival print art journalism so it is a very very popular art publication digital publication and the art news editor in chief at that time said that hyper allergic.

K. T. R. C.
"jennifer viola" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

09:44 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer viola" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Where it topped twelve sixty AM one or three seven FM I'm the host of this week's show Jennifer viola and I'm very happy to be joined today by two writers who have just recently moved to Santa Fe Ellie Duke and Shawn McCoy welcome Hey thanks for having us yeah thanks for having us yeah so Ellie do cure the news southwest bureau chief for the hype hyper allergic which is a very popular digital arts magazine via yes that's right yeah and so in Yushan are a writer you all both men at the LA review of books right or you met each other I should say at the LA review of books and you have just recently and we've done to additions now of an online art and literary publication called Country B. Antonia yeah that's right call so it's interesting the business writer at the Santa Fe new Mexican last week whatever wrote about New Mexico being on the top ten places where people are moving to in the United States for the past like four years and so you guys are part of those numbers because you just moved here in October from LA right yeah it's a good change I like it a lot yeah is it good getting to the grocery store quickly I know traffic right yeah that's where late today because we think everything is ten minutes away which it usually is right that's true yeah so what do you like what's been interesting so far about living in sanitation I think it's been nice to have you know in the mountains nearby remote sandals before and also and I both have some experience in New Mexico before I moved here so it's nice to reconnect all the friends that we've met Ellie was actually born here and I worked in the state really four years before I before it moved so it's been really nice you worked here before you moved to LA so I worked not in Santa Fe but yeah in December to states outside corona really excited Newkirk outside either on a on a ranch or something yeah I was working on ranches for a year and a half or so before coming here that's cool yeah that's awesome I'm from Alamogordo next run is like kinda in the hole I was down the muscular reservation yeah oh that's so interesting and how you were born here I would where were you born in you want to start a Vincent yeah I are your parents still here they're not we away when I was two okay but they have a lot of friends here and are very happy that we live here now visit to yeah well those are really cool sandy connections a lot of times when I have guests on the show they they would have the way they got here was they drove across the country and then they stopped here and then that was kind of like it yes we do that too yeah well let's talk a little bit about hyper allergic so I mean hyper there's it is a pretty well read it's like a million unique visitors each month right it's a very popular online arts publication and the Nieman reports in two thousand eighteen published an article outlining how hyper allergic came to rival print art journalism so it is a very very popular art publication digital publication and the art news editor in chief at that time said that hyper allergic had reinvigorated art criticism which is pretty cool and it's also cool that you have been appointed the southwest bureau chief and that you are but you know located here in Santa Fe so tell us how that came to be yeah well I just started in on at the end of October so it's brand new position and they just really wanted to expand their coverage of the southwest you know that the whole team is in New York right for one west coast position and they just you know they know that there's so much interesting art stuff happening here and they just didn't have a you know a person on the ground so that you are the person yeah and there is so much I mean I got that I open the hyper allergic email newsletter this morning and there's two stories from Santa Fe the Navajo artist who's created the controversial pro Palestinian murals and then the Georgia o'keeffe museum receiving seven hundred fifty thousand dollars for the new campus yeah she written about a lot of people already profiling people in and New Mexico and so what's your what's your coverage area it's a it's a pretty huge internet yes so it's Arizona New Mexico West Texas Colorado Nevada and Utah wow yeah that is huge yeah so I've been trying to expand my reach and all of those states it's obviously easier to do here because I'm here and I'm meeting people all the time right and there's also so much happening here yeah yeah but I've had a few really helpful people in southern New Mexico and Martha and Arizona just like tell me you know where to start right and helpful young right I saw that you wrote about the director of the art museum at New Mexico State University armored stuff that I did not know that there was an art museum in New Mexico state yeah I have a really cool show actually this is a bring back what is labor about motherhood yeah that's interesting said there was birth project by Judy Chicago and mission up at the Harwood museum last year so that's that's great yeah so what's been something that you have reported on that you know that would really give you didn't know anything about before I mean maybe there are a number of those things but yeah there are so many of those things I mean I just moved here so every single thing I learned is brand new yeah every person I meet practically every artist you know all new yes right we're writing that story yesterday about the mural was fascinating because you know who knew arts reporting was going to be so you know play into so many important issues like it was yeah because so in Santa Fe so these murals are about they are about the Palestinian issues around around surrounding Palestine and they are their paper there's some kind of collage either shaping shape and their life size images taken from the newspaper of Israeli soldiers with Palestinian civilians right and they're created by novel heart Navajo artist name Remi and he wanted to draw a parallel between the indigenous struck right in Palestine and the indigenous struggle the United States right and so if you're just joining us for this thing to coffee and culture here on K. T. R. C. I'm speaking with Ellie do cruise the New South was bureau chief for hyper allergic and Shawn McCoy who is a writer you're both writers you just moved here and Sean is the editor of contravention and its the it is an art arts and literature online journaling so Ellie so getting back to the story about the Palestinian Meryl's the issues that are of there are so many and one of them that came up is the city wants to remove them because that of the historic preservation rules that are around Santa Fe so that makes it kind of we'll see what happens yeah I think the owner of the Wall appealed to the historic preservation board just today so interesting to see yeah well sure let's talk a little bit about contrave Anto so I'm I'm just it's so interesting that you we're working on the Mescalero reservation what were you doing down there I was working for an independent cattle company that leased land for the tribe and you just had an interest in working on I mean what led you to that sort of a bunch of different factors I've been living in LA and working at the LA review of books and I had gone on a reporting trip not too long before I started working there to New Mexico I was talking with a bunch of ranchers and kind of realized that I'd much rather get out of the city and be doing that sort of work instead of writing for a little while right it's so yeah that sounds that they since like a good change using your hands right kind of getting yeah I'm being sort of grounded in the earth and all that so winded you found contraband so we started the journal in its early stages about a year ago and published the first issue last June and it kind of emerged out of some of my time on ranches both myself and our arts editor Lucy Maud worked for the same ranch at different times and kind of had this idea that we brought together a sense included alley and a bunch of other editors and board members all right L. you're contributing editor yeah Cora to tell us about the kinds of stories and the kinds of pieces it's art and literature so you do you do you publish poetry poetry fiction non fiction and art of pretty much any kind the concept of rangelands is sort of a platform or diving board into thinking through a lot of different issues about the west or range like spaces across the world you know rangelands are vast encompass about one third of the world they can be anything from icy tundra to a you know flowing prairie and are often unified more by social characteristics marginality lack of people right thing else wow that's so interesting okay and we're gonna talk more about contrave into which is a journal for art literature because we're speaking with Sean McCoy who's the founder and editor and Ellie Duke who is a contributing editor and she's also the southwest bureau chief for hyper allergic which is really very well read arts digital.

Jennifer viola Ellie Duke bureau chief Santa Fe Shawn McCoy
"jennifer viola" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

09:45 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer viola" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"It talked twelve sixty AM one or three seven FM I'm the host of this week show Jennifer viola and I'm very happy to be joined today by two writers who have just recently moved to Santa Fe Ellie Duke and Sean McCoy welcome Hey thanks for having us yeah thanks for having us yeah so Ellie Duke you are the new southwest bureau chief for the hype hyper allergic which is a very popular digital arts magazine mia yeah that's right yeah and so in use on our a writer you all both men at the LA review of books right or you met each other I should say at the LA review of books and you have just recently and what you've done to additions now of an online art and literary publication called country be into yeah that's right call so it's interesting the business writer at the Santa Fe new Mexican last week whatever road about New Mexico being on the top ten places where people are moving to in the United States for the past like four years and so you guys are part of those numbers because you just moved here in October from LA right yeah it's a good change I like it a lot yeah yeah is it good getting to the grocery store quickly I know traffic right yeah that's where late today because we think everything's ten minutes away which it usually is yeah yeah so what do you like what's been interesting so far about living and sanitation I think it's been nice to have you know in the mountains nearby remote sandals before and also and I have both have some experience in New Mexico before I moved here so it's nice to reconnect to all the friends with Matt Ellie was actually born here and that worked in the state really four years before I before it moves so it's been really nice you work here before you move to LA so I worked not in Santa Fe but yeah in March the state outside corona really excited new Kerr so as a grown up on a ranch or something yeah I was working on ranches for a year and a half or so before coming here that's cool yeah that's awesome I'm from Alamogordo nice run as like kinda in the hole I was like down the Mescalero reservation yeah that so interesting and now you were born here I would where were you born in you want to start a Vincent yeah I are your parents still here they're not we away when I was two okay but they have a lot of friends here and are very happy that we live here now they can visit to yeah well those are really cool sanity connections a lot of times when I have guests on the show they they would have the way they got here was they drove across the country and then they stopped here and then that was kind of like it yeah well we do that too yeah well let's talk a little bit about hyper allergic so I mean hyper others it is a pretty well read it's like a million unique visitors each month right it's a very popular online arts publication and the Nieman reports in two thousand eighteen published an article outlining how hyper allergic came to rival print art journalism so it is a very very popular art publication digital publication in the art news editor in chief at that time said that hyper allergic had re invigorated art criticism which is pretty cool and it's also cool that you have been appointed the southwest bureau chief and that you are but you know located here in Santa Fe so tell us how that came to be yeah well I just started in on at the end of October so it's brand new position and they just really wanted to expand their coverage of the southwest you know that the whole team is in New York right for one west coast position and they just you know they know that there's so much interesting art stuff happening here and they just didn't have a you know a person on the ground so that you are the person yeah and there is so much I mean I got the I open the hyper allergic to email newsletter this morning and there's two stories from Santa Fe the Navajo artist who's created the controversial pro Palestinian murals and then the Georgia o'keefe museum receiving seven hundred fifty thousand dollars for the new campus so yeah she written about a lot of people already profiling people in and New Mexico and so what's your what's your coverage area it's a it's a pretty huge internet yeah so it's Arizona New Mexico West Texas Colorado Nevada and Utah wow yeah that is huge yeah so I've been trying to expand my reach and all of those states it's obviously easier to do here because I'm here and I'm meeting people all the time right and there's also so much happening here yeah yeah but I've had a few really helpful people in southern New Mexico and Martha and Arizona just like tell me you know where to start right and helpful yeah right I saw that you wrote about the director of the art museum in New Mexico State University yeah stuff that I did not know that there was an art museum in New Mexico state yeah I have a really cool show actually the delivering got put in labor about motherhood that's interesting so there was birth project by Judy Chicago and mission up at the Harvard museum last year so that's that's great yeah so what's been something that you have reported on that you know that would really give you didn't know anything about before I mean maybe there are a number of those things but yeah there are so many of those things I mean I just moved here so every single thing I learned is brand new yeah every person I meet practically every artist you know all new yes right we're writing that story yesterday about the mural was fascinating because you know who knew arts reporting was going to be so you know play into so many important issues like it was yeah because so in Santa Fe so these murals are about they are about the Palestinian issues around around surrounding Palestine and they are their paper there's some kind of collage either shaping Shelly AT and their life size images taken from the newspaper of Israeli soldiers with Palestinian civilians right and they're created by novel heart Navajo artist name rang me and he wanted to draw a parallel between the indigenous struck right in Palestine and the indigenous struggle the United States right and so if you're just joining us for this thing to coffee in culture here on K. T. R. C. I'm speaking with Ellie do because the new southwest bureau chief for hyper allergic and Sean McCoy who is a writer you're both writers you just moved here and Sean is the editor of contravention aux and its the it is an art arts and literature online journal yeah so Ellie so getting back to the story about the Palestinian Meryl's the issues that are of there are so many and one of them that came up is the city wants to remove them because that of the historic preservation rules that are around Santa Fe so that makes it kind of we'll see what happens yeah I think the owner of the wall appeals to the historic preservation board just today so interesting with the cat will show let's talk a little bit about country viendo so I'm I'm just it's so interesting that you were working on the Mescalero reservation what were you doing down there I was working for an independent cattle company that these land for the tribe and you just had an interest in working on I mean what led you to that sort of a bunch of different factors I've been living in LA and working at the LA review of books and I had gone on a reporting trip not too long before I started working there to New Mexico rice talking with a bunch of ranchers and kind of realized that I had much rather get out of the city and be doing that sort of work instead of writing for a little while right it's so yeah that sounds that they since like a good change using your hands rate kind of getting yeah and being sort of grounded in the earth and all that so when did you found country be until we started the journal in its early stages about a year ago and published the first issue last June and it kind of emerged out of some of my time on ranches from both myself and our arts editor Lucy Maud worked for the same ranch at different times and kind of had this idea that we brought together we sense included alley and a bunch of other editors and board members right the L. you're contributing editor yeah Cora to tell us but the kinds of of stories and the kinds of pieces it's art literature so you do you do you publish poetry a poetry fiction non fiction and art of pretty much any kind the concept of range lands is sort of a platform or diving board into thinking through a lot of different issues about the west or range like spaces across the world you know range lands are vast encompass about one third of the world they can be anything from icy tundra to you know flowing prairie and are often unified more by social characteristics marginality lack of people right thing else wow that's so interesting okay we're gonna talk more about country be into which is a journal for art and literature because we're speaking Machon McCoy who is the founder and editor and Ellie Duke who is a contributing editor and she's also the southwest bureau chief for hyper allergic which is really very well read arts digital arts publications that.

Jennifer viola Ellie Duke Santa Fe Sean McCoy
"jennifer viola" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

09:49 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer viola" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"At Santa Fe dot com I'm Jennifer viola the host of this week show and I am joined now by merry Scully the head of curatorial affairs and the curator of contemporary art at the New Mexico museum of art welcome thank you it's a pleasure to be here yet so merry we're going to talk about this exhibition that opened last night called Agnes Pelton desert transcendental left and it was originated at the originated at the Phoenix art museum curated by Gilbert Vicario it includes a wonderful catalog with essays by a number of people involved with Pelton's work over the years including Elizabeth Armstrong and that's okay so is this so anyway but as a wonderful catalog with it and others to other venues the palm springs museum in the Whitney museum of American art was going to the Whitney and palm springs after if yeah out I really so see it first exactly right exactly and IRA Santa Fe right second while so who was Agnes Pelton hang his belt and was an important modernist abstraction ist artist who live primarily in the west she has a very interesting personal story but she spent her last thirty years or so in cathedral does in cathedral city in the desert outside palm springs she has a special connection to the museum of art because she was very influential to the trance dental painting group so tell us about the transcendental painting group the transcendental painting group was a group of artists founded by animal distro and Raymond Jones who were both about ten years or so younger than Felton said they weren't they came to the house right we're about ten ten hours the transit on a painting group was artists from towers Santa Fe and Albuquerque okay so and destroy him and Jones and were the main leaders and their idea and a part of their manifesto was to create work that was beyond the physical and to you and to use the to use abstraction to express the non physical the imaginative the idealistic and the spiritual right and Pelton had already been doing that in her work yes so so in art there are you know looks like keep an eye no o'keefe and and Agnes politician they both studied under Arthur Wesley Dow and they both came to New Mexico because the mail Dutch lu Han right yes but yeah I think about a lot of keeps work you know at the sense of place that it brings itself a lot about New Mexico right and when you look at Agnes Pelton's work you see this theory all other worldly ness that is I think the metaphysical aspect of what these painters were doing yeah yeah there's definitely more kind of esoteric let they both smelled realism an abstraction but the realism in Helton's work in the works that we're talking about Bryce exhibition which are the more spiritual abstracted works there's been different there's different works in some quite realistic over the course of her career but these works are really more in the vein of the transcendental painting group that were that's are part of this exhibit right and and so these are early these are works at work she painted early in her life right all through her life throughout the really began with the abstraction in about the mid thirties and died in nineteen sixty one so for about the last three decades one of the earliest pieces we have in the Exif exhibition has a figure in it it's simple it's larger than the others much of the represented things that a representative in the work are surrounded by abstraction are things like vases or temples and things are also alluded to in terms of figures so they're quite mysterious nothing really as fully rendered as say us the skull and antler is right Keith right so there's a picture there's a a painting here called awakening and you can see and so there's the abstraction and then she's combining something that's representational and in this case it's about all right it looks like about right a kind of a trumpet flower that's actually one of the piece that's the piece that's from our collection that's part of the exhibition and it's called the weakening memories of father and you can see this beautiful atmospheric landscape and actually much of the alluded to landscape in her work looks almost like Mirage like that kind of heated water that you illusion that you see in the desert but this piece in particular the landscape begins to make the silhouette of a man the title awakening memory of father is thought to allude to her father who died of a morphine overdose when she was quite young and that trumpet flower could also be seen as a trumpet kind of calling her father right yeah to have and so that's really what you're saying very so so to speak very spiritual to right and so the transcendental lists were very interested in the asefi right in all kinds of esoteric symbols and philosophies ideas that were spiritual and beyond the kind of physical an actual and what we could think of as concrete fact interesting interesting and they used to color and composition which are the two. I merry modes of expression that you see in the paintings of Agnes Pelton right so if you're just joining us you listing to coffee and culture I'm Jennifer viele and I'm joined today by merry Scully who is the head of Kerr Terrel affairs and the curator of contemporary art at the New Mexico museum of art we are talking about Agnes Pelton desert trans and analyst and so each did she ever live in New Mexico or did you just visit she visited here and actually she came to visit Mabel Dodge Luhan I believe about ten years before o'keefe did because while we're interested primarily in these abstracted works she had a very important career at the beginning of the twentieth century was actually included in the armory show in nineteen thirteen so she had quite a respectable career and that's part of what how Raymond Johnson and able biz Stroman actually Dan rude yard who was another member of the transcendental group really established relationships with her and friendships because of their shared interest in the occult actually Dan Rutz yard developed a whole system of astrology was that he was that he is primarily known as an astrologer and a contempt and abstract modernist musician he also moved eventually to California but he was a member of the transcendental painting group interest and so he and Jones and I believe carried on the most correspondence and relationship with Pelton who as I said was about ten years older she was never in New Mexico after the trans dental painting group was founded but the transcendental painting group was a very short lived group but their impact on out on modernism particularly modernism in the west and in the southwest is significant so and I think there was a show at Addison row on about two thousand twelve do you do you are you familiar with that on the debt on the trip does your travel probably probably but there hasn't been that much I mean I in at least in my mind I haven't really seen that much this is a great exhibition to have come to the museum of art and so it was it originated at the Phoenix museum of art and it's going to go on to the Whitney and to palm springs springs so I want to mention one thing is to since we're talking about Keefe I wanted to mention that she renewed all will be giving a talk at the museum on Wednesday the sixteenth of October Agnes Pelton in Georgia o'keefe natural and mystical impulses so that would be great and what time is that at I think it's a one o'clock one o'clock okay we'll check the website if someone wants to hop on the website right now and see some of this information it's and am. NM museum dot org dot org NMR museum this is the thing I never really write down is the U. R. L. so it's easy to find you have Google out there begin on and look at some of these beautiful paintings by Agnes Pelton so they are all paintings tears rail tainting there are forty four paintings in the exhibition the largest kind of grouping of her work in one place since her there was a retrospective put together about twenty six years ago right so it's a nice opportunity to really see quite a lot of her work in one location right and this is Agnes Pelton desert transcendental west and she did have a lot more attention when she was first working yeah and like you said she was an army show and right she was definitely part of early twentieth century American artists you know there's some sad there's a sad story recounted in the exhibition that you know what somebody found one of her paintings at the garage sale of in Santa Barbara at the museum and when they went to go get the forty dollars to pay for it they came back and it'd been reduced in price to fifteen right so there's work suffers out there that had been destroyed theirs works of hers are there out there that we don't know where they are because the you know she was single and had no children right and so much of the work just kind of disappeared yeah we'll talk about that in just a minute we're speaking with merry Scully about the Agnes Pelton exhibition that just opened at the museum of the New Mexico museum of art you're listening to coffee in.

Agnes Pelton Agnes Pelton desert New Mexico museum of art museum of the New Mexico museu Phoenix museum of art Scully museum of art New Mexico NM museum Jennifer viola Raymond Johnson o'keefe California Jennifer viele Kerr Terrel analyst Dan Rutz Google Santa Barbara