9 Burst results for "Jennifer Lebar"

"jennifer lebar" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

08:59 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer lebar" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Special corona virus changed forever one of the problems that we're dealing with is feeding people it's normally a problem we deal with but millions of kids of course get fed at school lunches but there is no school so what's going on really sure is founder and chief executive officer of share our strength its national nonprofit ending childhood hunger in America and its campaign No kid hungry has gone into action here to help solve this problem Billy thank you for being with us thanks Phil thanks so much for having me so kids get lunch at school no school no lunch how big a problem is this and how do we deal with it well school children have never faced a situation like where and now I guess none of us have but school children are in some ways even more vulnerable than others we've got about fifty million kids in public school in this country and although schools are closed in most private schools as well the public school kids in particular are more likely to be part of the school breakfast or the school lunch program and those meals are no longer available to them their bodies are still growing they still have the need for the nutrition and so we've had to create a really almost like an alternate universe thousands and thousands of alternate sites where kids can safely get the meals that they used to get in school and that's as you can imagine a very hard thing to do the kids can come to the sites themselves social distancing makes it quite a challenge but but of all the issues that we face with corona virus this is the most solvable because we have the food in this country the amazing thing is how quickly some people have taken action yeah it's quite miraculous actually it reminds me of during World War two and there was the rescue of well the British troops at Dunkirk and thousands of small fishing boats went to went to get them on the British army and navy could not you know there's been this grass roots surge of individuals some from the school districts themselves some from food banks some from YMCA's some from other community organizations that have set up sites where these meals can be distributed so one share our strength first looked at this through the lens of its No kid hungry campaign we were thinking that how would we ever set up all these sites and get the food there the site's literally set themselves up our job now is to supply them to fund them to make sure that they have the equipment that they need so no kid hungry now Billy is sent eight point nine million dollars in emergency relief to hundreds of schools and community groups across all fifty states Puerto Rico and the district of Columbia that's helping them serve an estimated three point three million meals a day during this crisis and we're talking here about millions of kids who have now missed hundreds of millions of males but it's a huge number and we're we're basically taking the number of kids who get the school meals and you know multiplying it by the number of days that they're out of school so it adds up pretty quickly now fortunately I think a lot of families are able to you know make things work for a few days and so we had those few days to get these alternate sites set up saying that participation rates and these sites even not withstanding all of the obstacles created by social distancing and health concerns were saying that participation rates increased considerably we talk to a partner of ours who runs many of the YMCA's sites and they've seen a dramatic increase day on day now you've been talking with people in your podcast add passion and Stirk who are taking part in this effort we spoke with Stacy McDaniel who runs the nutrition services for the YMCA's she's their anti hunger nutrition expert and she told us that from one day to the next they've seen this really significant increase in families coming to get meals for their kids we note any just keeps growing we had a mother who is actually the irony of this story is actually pretty gut wrenching but it's the green at YMCA in New Hampshire and the schools god bless our school nutrition workers they have never worked so hard in their lives I think they're so under appreciated right here since they aren't true hunger heroes stepping out right now all across this country but you know schools are able to offer lunches at the designated time guess mother works in a grocery store and her peach trees bear it she wasn't able to make it in time she had at work during that service she was able to connect at that night at a YMCA soccer site and get dinner and a bag of groceries she was in tears she was talking about the extreme need better hearing and on top of not having enough to typically get your month's worth of groceries now you're dealing with food shortages and mom with a seven year old autistic son she identified the grocery stores trying to just get basic necessities and things were sold out so the problem is just compounding ask this time goes online we know that the need is extremely high families are struggling we've had so many moms that have been laid off from their jobs and help that need is only growing we also on at passion stir spoke to Jennifer lebar she runs food and nutrition services for the San Francisco unified school district thinking about my community I'm a northern California alone Clovis unified and are using their bus drivers to take an active role communities and it just it gives me so much joy and how much help sorry that we're all pulling together and doing this wonderful work at the heroes really are the food service workers who work in the field and they're doing this every day and they're putting these bags together and interacting with the families and it's so great because employees are recognizing all the children and now they're getting the parents were finding joy in the midst of this chaos in the midst of the sadness and so people are finding these connections and apple Inc good things are happening so how do you do this on a local agency let's say and this all sounds great but I don't know who to go to or how to access these grants well we're in the business of making sure that our school districts and emergency food providers principally food banks have the resources they need to feed kids during this a very difficult time and so we have a grant making process anybody can go to our website No kid hungry dot org find out how to apply for a grant we're literally making hundreds of them and supporting communities all across the country and those grants can be used to buy food that can be used to buy supplies they can be used to increase awareness for families were turning them around really fast faster than we ever have before literally within two or three or four days and getting the application there the good news here is we have witnessed an absolutely astonishing display of generosity we've had twenty nine thousand Americans make donations to this work to the No kid hungry campaign on our website and ninety two percent of them are new first time donors who had not been involved with the organization before I think people see this is a solvable problem they see kids is the most vulnerable they know that they can make a direct difference and have a direct impact okay let's talk about individuals not agencies now what can they do I think the best way to feed hungry kids right now is to go to No kid hungry dot org to go to our donate page R. R. corona virus response page and find a way that you can either donate or volunteer or and we might be asking you to write to your member of the house or the Senate there's lots of ways for individuals to get involved here but the impact is direct it's fast once you contribute to us you get notes about where that money went what grants were made with it and I think people will find out that you know this is a part of the corona virus tragedy that we can actually address and solve Billy shore founder and chief executive officer of share our strength in the No kid hungry campaign which is getting these meals to kids all across the country really thank you for being with.

"jennifer lebar" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer lebar" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Welcome back to the CBS special corona virus changed forever one of the problems that we're dealing with is feeding people it's normally a problem we deal with but millions of kids of course get fed at school lunches but there is no school so what's going on Billy shore is founder and chief executive officer of share our strength its national nonprofit ending childhood hunger in America and its campaign No kid hungry has gone into action here to help solve this problem Billy thank you for being with us thanks Phil thanks so much for having me so kids get lunch at school no school no lunch how big a problem is this and how do we deal with it what school children have never faced a situation like right now I guess none of us have but school children aren't in some ways even more vulnerable than others we've got about fifty million kids in public school in this country and although schools are closed and most private schools as well but public school kids in particular are more likely to be part of the school breakfast or the school lunch program and those meals are no longer available to them their bodies are still growing they still have a need for the nutrition and so we've had to create a really almost like an alternate universe thousands and thousands of alternate sites where kids can safely get the meals that they used to get in school and that's as you can imagine a very hard thing to do the kids can come to the sites themselves social distancing makes it quite a challenge but but of all the issues that we face with corona virus this is the most solvable because we have the food in this country the amazing thing is how quickly some people have taken action yeah it's quite miraculous actually it reminds me of during World War two and there was the rescue of a well the British troops at Dunkirk and thousands of small fishing boats went to went to get them on the British army and navy could not you know there's been this grass roots surge of individuals some from the school districts themselves some from food banks some from YMCA's some from other community organizations but it set up sites where these meals can be distributed so when we share our strength first looked at this through the lens of its no calorie campaign we're thinking that how would we ever set up all these sites and get the food there the site's literally set themselves up our job now is to supply them to fund them to make sure that they have the equipment that they need so no kid hungry now Billy is sent eight point nine million dollars in emergency relief to hundreds of schools and community groups across all fifty states Puerto Rico and the district of Columbia that's helping them serve an estimated three point three million meals a day during this crisis and we're talking here about millions of kids who have now missed hundreds of millions of males but it's a huge number and work for basically taking the number of kids who get the school meals and you know multiplying it by the number of days that they're out of school so it adds up pretty quickly now fortunately I think a lot of families are able to you know make things work for a few days and so we had those few days to get these alternate sites set up we're saying that participation rates and these sites even notwithstanding all of the obstacles created by social distancing and health concerns were saying that participation rates increased considerably we talk to a partner of ours who runs many of the YMCA's sites and they've seen a dramatic increase day on day thank you been talking with people in your podcast add passion and sister who were taking part in this effort we spoke with Stacy McDaniel who runs the nutrition services for the YMCA's she's their anti hunger nutrition expert and she told us that from one day to the next they've seen this really significant increase in families coming to get meals for their kids we note any just keeps growing we had a mother who is actually the irony of this story is actually he got reaching but it's the green at YMCA in New Hampshire and the schools god bless our school nutrition workers they have never worked so hard in their lives Peter so under appreciated thank here's a aren't true hunger heroes stepping up right now all across this country but you know schools are able to offer lunches at the designated time yes the mother works in a grocery store and her peach trees bearing she wasn't able to make it in time she had worked during that service she was able to connect at that night at a YMCA soccer site and get dinner and a bag of groceries she was in tears she was talking about the extreme need better hearing and on top not having enough to typically get your month's worth of groceries now you're dealing with food shortages and mom with a seven year old autistic son she had been defined the grocery stores trying to just get basic necessities and things were sold out so the problem is just compounding adds this time goes online we know that the need is extremely high families are struggling we've had so many moms that have been laid off from their jobs and it didn't help that need is only growing we also on at passion stir spoke to Jennifer lebar she runs food and nutrition services for the San Francisco unified school district thinking about my community in northern California local that unified and are using their bus drivers and food out to the rural communities and it just gives me so much joy intellectual okay we're all pulling together and doing wonderful work it the heroes really are the workers to work in the field and they're doing this every day and they're putting these bags together and interacting with the families so great because with employees are recognized all the children and now they're getting to meet the parents were finding joy in the midst of the chaos in the midst of this administration the people are finding these connections and operable and good things are happening so how do you do this on a local agency let's say and this all sounds great but I don't know who to go to or how to access these grants well we're in the business of making sure that our school districts and emergency food providers principally food banks have the resources they need to feed kids during this a very difficult time and so we have a.

CBS
"jennifer lebar" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

10:42 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer lebar" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"To the CBS special corona virus changed forever one of the problems that we're dealing with is feeding people it's normally a problem we deal with but millions of kids of course get fed at school lunches but there is no school so what's going on Billy shore is founder and chief executive officer of share our strength its national nonprofit ending childhood hunger in America and its campaign No kid hungry has gone into action here to help solve this problem Billy thank you for being with us thanks girl thanks so much for having me so kids get lunch at school no school no large how big a problem is this and how do we deal with it well school children have never faced a situation like we're in now I guess none of us have but school children are in some ways even more vulnerable than others we've got about fifty million kids in public school in this country and although schools are closed and most private schools as well but public school kids in particular are more likely to be part of the school breakfast or the school lunch program and those meals are no longer available to them their bodies are still growing they still have a need for the nutrition and so we've had to create a really almost like an alternate universe thousands and thousands of alternate sites where kids can safely get the meals that they used to get in school and that's as you can imagine a very hard thing to do the kids can come to the sites themselves social distancing makes it quite a challenge but but of all the issues that we face with corona virus this is the most solvable because we have the food in this country the amazing thing is how quickly some people have taken action yeah it's quite miraculous actually it reminds me of during World War two when there was the rescue of a well the British troops at Dunkirk and thousands of small fishing boats went to went to get them on the British army and navy could not it you know there's been this grass roots surge of individuals some from the school districts themselves some from food banks some from YMCA's some from other community organizations that have set up sites where these meals can be distributed so when share our strength first looked at this through the lens of its No kid hungry campaign we were thinking that how would we ever set up all these sites and get the food there the site's literally set themselves up our job now is to supply them to fund them to make sure that they have the equipment that they need so for example we've given out two million dollars in grants in the last five days to seventy organization seventy eight organizations in thirty states so that communities would be able to get these sites fully supplied now we're talking here about millions of kids I mean kids of already missed close to two hundred million meals are just a couple of weeks so it's it's a huge number and we're we're basically taking the number of kids who get the school meals and you know multiplying it by the number of days that they're out of school so it adds up pretty quickly now fortunately I think a lot of families are able to you know make things work for a few days and so we had those few days to get these alternate sites set up we're saying that participation rates in these sites even not withstanding all of the obstacles created by social distancing and health concerns were saying that participation rates increased considerably we talk to a partner of ours who runs many of the YMCA's sites and they've seen a dramatic increase day on day over the last three or four days now you've been talking with people in your podcast add passion and Stirk who are taking part in this effort we spoke with Stacy McDaniel who runs the nutrition services for the YMCA's she's their anti hunger nutrition expert and she told us that from one day to the next they've seen this really significant increase in families coming to get meals for their kids we note any just keeps growing we had a mother who is actually the irony of the story is actually pretty gut wrenching but it's the green at YMCA in New Hampshire and the schools god bless our school nutrition workers they have never worked so hard in their lives I think they're so under appreciated by here's the same they are true hunger heroes stepping out right now all across this country but you know schools are able to offer lunches at the designated time yes mother works in a grocery store and her peach trees bear it she wasn't able to make it in time she had to work during that service she was able to connect at that night at a YMCA soccer site and get dinner and a bag of groceries she was in tears she was talking about the extreme need better hearing and on top of not having enough to typically get your months for groceries now you're dealing with food shortages and mom with a seven year old autistic son she had been deprived grocery stores trying to just get basic necessities and things were sold out so the problem is just compounding as time goes on line we know that the need is extremely high families are struggling we had so many moms that have been laid off from their jobs and they need help that need is only growing we also on at passion stir spoke to Jennifer lebar she runs food and nutrition services for the San Francisco unified school district thinking about my community in northern California local this unified and are using their bus drivers to take throughout several communities and it just gives me so much joy into much help sorry that we're all pulling together and doing this wonderful work at the heroes really are the food service workers who work in the field and they're doing this every day and they're putting these bags together and interacting with the families and it's so great because employees are recognizing all the children and now they're getting the parents were finding joy in the midst of this chaos in the midst of the sadness and so people are finding these connections and if possible and good things are happening so how do you do this I'm a local agency let's say and this all sounds great but I don't know who to go to or how to access these grants well we're in the business of making sure that our school districts and emergency food providers principally food banks have the resources they need to feed kids during this very very difficult time and so we have a grant making process anybody can go to our website No kid hungry dot org find out how to apply for a grant we're literally making hundreds of them and supporting communities all across the country and those grants can be used to buy food they can be used to buy supplies they can be used to increase awareness for families were turning them around really fast faster than we ever have before literally within two or three or four days of getting the application there the good news here is we have witnessed an absolutely astonishing display of generosity we had twenty nine thousand Americans make donations to this work to the No kid hungry campaign on our website twenty nine thousand Americans in the last six days and ninety two percent of them are new first time donors who had not been involved with the organization before I think people see this is a solvable problem they see kids is the most vulnerable they know that they can make a direct difference and have a direct impact okay let's talk about individuals not agencies now what can they do I think the best way to feed hungry kids right now is to go to No kid hungry dot org to go to our donate page R. R. corona virus response page and find a way that you can either donate or volunteer or and we might be asking you to write to your member of the house or the Senate there's lots of ways for individuals to get involved here but the impact is direct it's fast once you contribute to us you get notes about where that money went what grants were made with that and I think people will find out that you know this is a part of the corona virus tragedy that we can actually address and solve people are saying that after this things in society will change forever what do you see changing well we probably can't foresee all of the ways in which our work in our society will be changed forever but there are clearly some for one I think the issue of child hunger is been imprinted on people's minds in a way that it just wasn't before I think there's going to be an elevated a sense of awareness and consciousness about it and that might be a silver lining to come out of this I also also think that we're going to find that we can do our work in ways that we didn't realize that we can be faster that we can be less bureaucratic that we can get assistance to people without the usual red tape and then up it's okay to make some mistakes and it's okay if you know maybe a few people get something that they shouldn't have have received in the interest of making sure that ninety nine percent of the kids and families who need our help get it right away so we're learning a lot I think it's going to make us a better ground provider and a better social impact organization you mention that podcast earlier and passion and stir can you tell us where you can find that well I'm glad you asked that question the best thing to do is to go to your favorite podcast app and find add passion and store and download it we've got an archive of so many great conversations with not only people who are doing amazing work in the community on behalf of children and families and we have people like Jose Andre S. like Mary sue Milliken Jody Adams Ming side you'll know so many of the shops will be many of your favorites and they're in conversation on a regular basis with people doing great work in the community Billy shore founder and chief executive officer of share our strength in the No kid hungry campaign which is getting these meals to kids all across the country Billy thank you for being with us thanks thanks for having me this is the CBS special corona virus.

Billy shore founder and chief executive of CBS
"jennifer lebar" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer lebar" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Corona virus but students in need of a meal will still be able to pick up breakfast and lunch at select locations starting today KQED Shannon Lynn reports on what San Francisco unified is doing students eighteen and younger enrolled in city schools can pick up free breakfast and lunch at eight sites across the city school officials plan to add six more site starting Wednesday the district's Jennifer lebar expects to serve over eleven thousand meals twice a day for the next two weeks the bar says one out of five students in the district rely on school meals we don't want to lose that so that's where we're moving as quickly as we can to make sure that these opportunities are opening provided to our kids and it is possible the district is exploring options to provide dinner as well as extending service through spring break to the end of the shut down I'm channeling KQED news KQED science takes us to a bio medical research lab to talk viruses and vaccines coming up at eight twenty two one KQED news I'm Brian what support comes from visitors coverage dot com covering travelers for travel and medical uncertainties in the U. S. and abroad learn more at visitors coverage dot com support for NPR comes from zoom zoom ties together communication tools into a single platform including video conferencing phone calls in group chat zoom as more information online at zoom dot com zoom meet happy and by the listeners and supporters of KQED public radio eight oh six the time that's traffic time once again.

"jennifer lebar" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer lebar" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dave Freeman it's six thirty live from NPR news in Washington I'm Louise Schiavone vice president Mike pence says more Americans will have access to corona virus testing in the coming days with the rollout of the new private public partnership NPR's Allison Aubrey reports the head of the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases Anthony found she says the US is moving into a new phase of testing in addition to state health labs commercial high speed testing is being rolled out making it possible to do thousands of tasks officials say priority will be given to healthcare providers and older Americans at higher risk so far there are about three thousand documented cases of corona virus in the U. S. though this case count is expected to go up as testing increases those unifies as Americans hunkered down to prevent the spread of this contagious virus Allison Aubrey NPR news Washington southeast Asian nations have reported a sharp uptick in corona virus cases over the weekend Michael Sullivan reports from Thailand the biggest jump over the weekend was in Malaysia one hundred and twenty five new cases reported today link to a religious event last week Thailand reported more than sixty over the weekend some local transmission some not Vietnam is dealing with a new cluster connected to an infected woman who returned earlier this month from London Europe now the epicenter of the virus Michael Sullivan reporting Wall Street another plunge expected the Dow down sharply this is NPR live from KQED news I'm Brian white San Francisco public schools are temporarily shut down for at least the next three weeks due to the spread of corona virus but students in need of a meal will still be able to pick up breakfast and lunch at select locations starting today KQED Shannon Lynn reports students eighteen and younger enrolled in city schools can pick up free breakfast and lunch at eight sites across the city school officials plan to add six more site starting Wednesday the district's Jennifer lebar expects to serve over eleven thousand meals twice a day for the next two weeks labarre says one out of five students in the district rely on school meals we don't want to lose that so that's where we're moving as quickly as we can to make sure that these opportunities are opening provided to our kids and it is possible the district is exploring options to provide dinner as well as extending service through spring break to the end of the shut down I'm channeling KQED news the Oakland west Contra Costa and Hayward unified school districts are also among those distributing food to students while schools are closed west Contra Costa superintendent Matthew Duffy plans to help distribute food at Richmond high school later this morning students can.

Jennifer lebar superintendent Contra Costa Hayward San Francisco Brian white KQED National Institute of allergy Louise Schiavone NPR Richmond high school Matthew Duffy labarre Dave Freeman Shannon Lynn London Europe Vietnam
"jennifer lebar" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer lebar" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Give me a three o'clock or just dining here at the first Friday of every month for talking about film with Jennifer lebar Tapia now the sole is in in the city county film office jointly run jointly financed to make sure that film that might be coming to New Mexico does as much production in city Santa Fe in county Santa fe's possible and Eric which he used to be doing that used to be the governor's office when the film industry really started to take root here in New Mexico and now I'm out of government I guess in working privately will you be still working with the biggest loser is that can you know on going if they pick it up and if they have me back yeah you know it was it was a very good experience if but it's like a one season contract you everybody yeah it's it's a one day contract everybody on that shows what they call a day player yeah really every every single individual on land the executive producers on them show show runners cool but every will never know are shown her cut we'll get a then yes nobody nobody escapes the I the smile yes it is that started last night right and last week or last week and it's on USA network Tuesday night Tuesday night yes and some other venues to I think it was it maybe epics of our encore something like right there and then shot in beautiful Gloria and then apparently makes New Mexico look fantastic unbelievable okay Andrea Jennifer you quoted extensively in in the in the stories about the film industry growing exploding in New Mexico and all the best ways about the need for more studios simply studios you know Netflix studios I twenty five studios the even shot of so a film Tom Hanks film up in as cities of gold the tradition but occurs is is filming they have a Ferris wheel down there for Roswell and they're shooting the JZ Idris all the the harder they fall western down there casting call for with the heart of the fall in Albuquerque next week in here in Santa Fe next week as well it's just crazy busy it is crazy busy so we're super happy about that as yes with the harder they fall in pre production right now it is a Netflix production hi and you mention with the Netflix studios down in Albuquerque were thrilled to have Netflix up in Santa Fe as we've had numerous Netflix productions in the past up here so they have it is a western so they will be out in a majority of our western sets over the next months some of the ranches bonanza eve's ranch those kind ranches I get schools exactly which ones but yeah they will be out at our our movie ranches Roswell wrapped Roswell wrapped last week for the season and they have been greenlit for a third season okay I read some of the actors and actresses uppity invent up the governor's mansion okay is really not and actually some of the producers actually came as well yeah really nice cast nice nice very nice people my screw nice producers the whole the whole show has a real fight to it Tom Hanks two films over a short period in New Mexico that's huge yes we love Tom Hanks in Iran and the flag in exile yeah and that he was so nice to everybody everybody had a Tom Hanks story he's he's exactly what you except for Rudy I think it to me you know all right well next time is up how to make that make that happen but yes I was fortunate to meet I'm on the last production he was here for and again in everything you would hope you would be he took about fifteen twenty minutes to sit and talk with myself and a few others that were with me and we reminisced about his career all the way back to boos embodies and and laughed about some things and and asked him what his favorite think about Santa Fe was and he said the sky's the loves New Mexico you love Santa Fe and he just absolutely love their skies and said I would like to just buy some property out here and put an airstream and disappear for a week or two this could be his I don't do we want him no no no no no no time Hanks is no room for him up in the mountains somewhere well that's good and nice as well yeah yeah so he had very nice things to say about New Mexico right and center but I mean that's off heard comments from artistic came here hundred fifty years ago to the current date the lighting this this guy it says that it's you know the fact that we can see a lot you know we don't you know we're not cramped in my mountains or OR skyscrapers or anything else you know the fastest of New Mexico and the lighting and Eric touched on this a little bit earlier and just the accessibility to to getting everywhere to either to set Sir two stages traffic like to do and so many different bigger cities so it's a nice even commute to work they're they're rested relaxed by the time they get on set right so so it's positive all right Eric can I used to love to talk about what's coming up and tease people as much as you can Eric you tease just once with a little TV series that was going to shoot outside New Mexico called succession which after two seasons garnered a whole bunch of attention on the golden globes yeah I didn't think it would yeah I didn't think it would have become really popular what kind of any kind of disorder ever lied to you would never lie but I watched the first season if I ever have would you have a minute K. but I didn't you know I I didn't think it because become such a big deal I guess kind of remotely vaguely theoretically about the Murdock family yeah right exactly you know you never know are you know the the the the hallmark show as it were breaking bad users nobody knew anything about that I remember the pilot coming in what was once only governor's office right what is this right this is crazy no I haven't I got an email from some actor by the name of Brian about how you wanted to write on a float in the rose bowl right and I said I'm sorry but we already have the writers on the on the flow for the Rose Bowl and then I got another email back about four pages it was C. C. to the governor and the specter of terrorism say dude you don't quite get it do you I had no idea who Bryan Cranston was right there he'd already won an Emmy and warn the Chiles and all that turned out I mean after I screwed it up as bad as I could screw it up it actually turned out really well and you know right we became friends yeah exactly and so in lovers but that's all the I notes of the segment whoa no wonder he bought a house I don't know what his motivation exact I mean who knew who knew and now we have now we have better call Saul and a lot of things that that you know you know certain things coming in like Avengers you know everybody's like okay yeah that's going to be huge terminator terminator right the big tentpole movies but we also a lone ranger do you know which was I thought a better film than most people thought but did not hit the box office many of things like the breaking bad better call Saul has been running longer than you know the the in the original series right succession like you're talking about we didn't know lane sign in plain sight that kind of stuff actually really cool series which is a very cool sinners you just have to keep making the other man that's why that's just in general you know why you keep making stuff in the business and that was always one of the strategic goals of the state was to have a a critical mass of production so that not everything is gonna hit rate but all right so Jennifer that leads up to when we come back you're gonna take care Extraliga teases about alter productions do you can't tell us about okay I could do that thirty one minutes after.

Jennifer lebar Tapia New Mexico
"jennifer lebar" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer lebar" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"About four minutes until three o'clock guest on the show tomorrow will be just dying the will include John warning John is the executive director of Wilder guardians there headquartered here in Santa Fe talk about environmental issues me we may have to talk to baseball also Joey temple and others from New Mexico school for the arts and talking about filled Jennifer lebar Tapia and Eric with city county film office and Erica has been working as a line producer on the biggest loser shop the latest season taught here in New Mexico and of course role in talk about Joe Sheila to talk about dancing Joe is it twenty eight oh one rodeo rug combining great food I'm sure the Pecos bill's going to show up because I owe him a fishing trip one from the Superbowl still bitter about have great food great coffee always a good time at Joe's I want to be on the show you mean email dot com do what we can to help you out non profit schools churches group education we'll get you on the show you're running for office any office in the party I don't care we'll get you on the show too many Mildred Santa Fe dot com back after the news or talk.

John executive director baseball Joey temple Jennifer lebar Tapia Eric Erica producer New Mexico Joe Sheila Wilder Santa Fe
"jennifer lebar" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer lebar" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Prep with two time Grammy nominee rattle made on we'll give you a ticket for that benefit concert a little bit later in the show Tom Udall at a nice a piece that he wrote for those that Friday was probably done high country news you want to go find it it's a nice piece about his death and about his book and his dad's book the quiet crisis and how his dad do you doll foreman treat and tears secretary for two presidents who wrote the quite crisis in nineteen sixty three his message is more important today than ever you can find that Tom Udall pieces tonight a very very nice bees all right and store Udall would have been one hundred years ago I wanted years old on Friday sure it would have been a hundred on Friday so Tom's pieces that high country news which is H. C. N. dot O. R. G. other guess we're gonna have on Friday beside John warning from Wilder guardians at Joe's dining we'll be Eric wit and Jennifer lebar Tapia were in talk about film did you see the peas Saturday in the domestic in in the Albuquerque journal is all over online as well that not only is there is a Santa Fe number three small city for making film Albuquerque is number one big city for making film that makes New Mexico pretty much number one overall for making film which is pretty darn cool but there are people who are gonna hate film till the end of their days are people going to write film we don't have to give these people money they'll make films anyway the come to New Mexico anyway you know the brother Paul guess seems like a real grand foundation we don't have to get money they can make their great products here New Mexico anyway which is not true but Paul you know Paul is not all that bright if you believe you know the hate found the ace of spades poor that hate that hate everything that is kind of innovative and new is not part of the old cultural history of New Mexico the uego but moviemaker magazine but after twenty twenty best places to live and work list on Friday they rank Albuquerque number one among big cities and Santa Fe number three among little cities but for some weird reason Santa Fe is ranked in with New Orleans is in Orland bigger than Albuquerque the population that's a question I don't know I should look it up anyway one can't be out is the list left off two most obvious which is in New York movie movie makers said it's not that they are great places to live and work as a moviemaker LA New York everyone knows they are and that's exactly the problem we'd rather tell you about an undiscovered cinematic Mecca you haven't considered before New Mexico is becoming a Hollywood Darlene with Netflix last year buying half the state's soundstages Albuquerque studios an NBC universal renovating and Albuquerque warehouse as a studio Greg Garcia is sold out I mean booked up the sound stages and a studios I twenty five studios cities of gold they want to turn in the old casino and film studio but occurs traditions the combination of great cultural opportunities and a consulate mean that is no where near as high as LA and New York according to the editor in chief Tim Molloy of a movie moviemaker magazine you don't have to live in New York or LA to have a rich cultural life and thriving career Mong is city the Albuquerque repeats as number one from last year back in twenty eighteen they were number six number six now number one New Mexico has incredible beauty incredible range of locales that can double for Vermont or taxes or Los Angeles Chicago was ranked number two in Vancouver was number three behind Albuquerque movie maker noted the New Mexico offers up to a fifty percent wage and reimbursement for on the job training and double the limit of its twenty five percent to thirty percent tax credit that increase to one hundred ten million dollars last session these top rankings are testament to our governor was made film and television a key priority Cornelius the keys from economic development single handedly responsible for being bringing Netflix in New Mexico movie maker compile the list through extensive questionnaire research visiting most of the locations and considering the film culture tax breaks and standard a living in the city we're gonna have on a new brand new filmmaker has a brand new production company on Thursday is name is Keegan Kerins has a new company called eight beat films so it's not only the old established it's the new an up and coming so the entire big cities list is Albuquerque Chicago Vancouver and Lana Serrano Austin Montreal Memphis Philadelphia and Boston and the little cities list is Savannah Georgia no all in Santa Fe Pittsburgh Richmond Virginia Ashland Oregon home of the Oregon Shakespeare festival Knoxville Tennessee Providence Rhode Island Wilmington North Carolina and Newark New Jersey Santa Fe number three on the small cities list I'm not pretty cool between film lot of publicity being generated and the space port big event at the capitol last week the end of last week on Thursday about how the spaceport will be generating about a billion dollars in revenue.

Grammy Tom
"jennifer lebar" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

08:52 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer lebar" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Fe. On phase news leader. We think we've talked no into talking about the program. But he's not sure. Because. Because Erica intimidating. The interviews that he does very quick is from the city Santa Fe and county film office. It is you still you in one other. You're an office of two I'm an officer to write you and him being Jennifer Lebar. The awesome. Jennifer. Okay. You need more. You could always use more really neat meeting and being able to get the money. The county or two different things. But we're doing fine. We're doing fine right now. All right. So we're talking about let's later says kicks off new next Tuesday. There have been at least a couple of bills to do away with the cap for the film industry, and Eric maintains than it is fact if they listen to him and listen to I don't know, I'm sure there are other people in the industry, including the new secretary designate for economic development department, at least the keys film office in Albuquerque responsible in part for bringing Netflixing New Mexico. Who will argue the same thing. Right. And there are people lived legislators that understand this backwards and forward, I hope so certainly the finance folks get it, you know, again, we're talking we're going to be talking. You know, they're going to be political. It's it's always a negotiation. You know, when you're talking to the state budget. You know, how what the cash flow is gonna look like the other thing that people don't realize is that because our program is one of the things people all my God. If you take off the cap you're gonna triple production tomorrow, it's just going to explode, and how are we going to account for don't have the studios. Don't have the crew we're gonna kill the industry just because people come expecting, and we can deliver. Yeah. That but exactly what you just said is the program is actually self limiting because we only rebate for the most part New Mexico resident crew businesses services vendors. So if we max out on that at our current production capacity, we have to take time to grow, you know, the internal crew base the internal business bay. So it's a self. It's not like if we just get rid of the cap tomorrow. Oh my God. You know, seventeen billion dollars in production is gonna show up or if it does though it'd be great. We just don't have to rebate we only have two rebate. What's on you know, it's based in New Mexico crew. All right. So right now, the impediments or what the impediments to removing the cat. App or politics or our fear or misperceptions with the issue. Yeah. You know, it's kind of that. There are a number of state priorities. You know, one of the impediments. Actually, you know, you mentioned there are some legislators at understand this. There are lot that don't the dynamics of the of the film business. And so we get slaughtered in which is fine with the rest of the priorities of the state. You did mention there there. There's a lot to do. You know, this time around we have issues of education general education public Ed higher. We have infrastructure we have public safety. We have health, you know, Medicaid Medicare. There are a lot of issues that are going to take precedent over the film business per se. Nonetheless as an economic development initiative, I believe this to be a priority of the incoming administration. And you know, we'll see and there's a lot of interest in the legislature because I think the industry has proven itself over these years now that that has been here sixteen years for for the most part the benefit to the state. All right. If you take seven studios in Greg Garson studios here locally, kind of what the the facilities that you're interested in and concerned with we also take a BQ studios. Now Netflix studios, you take twenty studios and twenty-five former warehouse, but you know, pumping out a lot lot of productions. If you take Las Cruces, they have film program down there. Now, San Juan county is now saying if they're given a million dollars is a lot interest in the four corners that they could they could host shoot films up there. They could they could open a studio up there. Yes. That is a very conservative political base up there. Now Republican legislators because they're all Republicans up. There are now saying film is cool. Well. You know, money's not red or blue green jobs, right jobs, have revenues revenues revenues revenues four corners are looking for revenue stream because of the power plants closing down. Yeah. And they have historically contributed tremendously to the general economy, the state of New Mexico. So anything that this industry can do to help support them? Is there enough work in the pipeline to keep everybody? Busy. No pun intended. No. Yeah. Point sorry about that. Sorry. There is down in Lee county. Yeah. Yes there. There's a lot of work in the pipeline. There's a lot of pent-up desire to come to New Mexico. I think if if the state aligns itself well with what it needs to do internally, some of the things we've been talking about streamline the program deal with the cap cetera and then positions itself, well, nationally and globally. I don't think that the Netflix announcement will be the last of its kind really here in New Mexico. That. So there are there are a number of individual productions that are looking to come here, including a return of some of these big ticket tentpole films that we have superman Batman, those kind of budget that kind of stuff right, the big summer, blockbusters, etc. But then all was that a big. A big budget. Creed was not a huge budget. But for New Mexico for New Mexico. They shot down so not. So there's another film right that shot down dumbing lawrenceburg. This one of the beauties of this industry, and which had heartened Farmington is that they should all over the place. You know, they've shot a lot of by Farmington Thor was shot up there. Who shot down? You know, damning lords Berg, they shoot wherever they need to go creatively. So in addition to individual productions coming in. There are some pretty big names that are looking at establishing a more long-term presence here in the state of New Mexico. You know, it's not just the it's not just the films in the crews in the lumber yards and in the limousine services in the dog sitters and all of that when we talked to LIZA the day after net flicks announced here coming in New Mexico on she's nice enough to give us a few minutes. I said, you know, so what does this mean kind of for Albuquerque? So we'll kind of one one example of what's going to happen is people in net. Flicks top people net. Flicks are saying find this a house you're talking about like Bryan Cranston when he was breaking bad buying moving living in New Mexico. Yeah. Absolutely. There are a lot of those general economic development and demographic impacts positive demographic impacts. That the industry brings to the state. Particularly if you're talking about enough flex and these other entities that may be interested in the longer term presence. We had the same thing happen Sony image works relocated to New Mexico. Post post production post production back in two thousand eight unfortunately, they pulled out in two thousand late two thousand eleven two thousand twelve but you know, they brought one hundred people from L A along with their families a good thirty forty of them when they left New Mexico, the Sony image works left, New Mexico and went to Vancouver a good thirty forty of them stayed behind in New Mexico because they really liked the lifestyle here. They had established family roots. That our kids were in school it up opening post-production specialty facilities down Albuquerque. So that the talent transfer. It's the exact reverse of what we usually talk about brain, drain and talent drain in New Mexico. It's it reverses that one hundred eighty degrees. Why did what did they leave? What what is Sony leave for Vancouver? I think there was some uncertainty is to the future of the program. Program in general. Yeah. Exactly. In those years, I've been partisan, but it came came about in in two thousand eight in two thousand eleven two thousand twelve. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. And you know, the those are big financial commitments on behalf of those companies as well as personnel. Come you know, it's a lot to tell one hundred or your top talent, you're moving from LA, you're moving from Culver because companies still exist. They still need a place to be and they could be lured back to New Mexico. I think so and and that's what I get back to say if the state plays its cards writes things are looking pretty good. I'll come back, and we'll talk more about the film industry. You have thoughts comments questions ideas or opinions that are contrary to Iraq in mind.

New Mexico Albuquerque Netflixing New Mexico Jennifer Lebar Erica Netflix studios Greg Garson studios officer San Juan county Medicaid Medicare Farmington Netflix Iraq Bryan Cranston Las Cruces Lee county Eric Vancouver