20 Burst results for "Jennifer Hillman"

European Commission Unveils Plan to Tackle Foreign Subsidies

The Daily

02:08 min | 1 year ago

European Commission Unveils Plan to Tackle Foreign Subsidies

"It block deals with foreign companies if those companies get unfair subsidies from their governments. You don't have to read too terribly closely between the lines to see the EU was talking about China here as the global search for leverage over the world's second biggest economy. Seems to be waning event marketplaces to replenish or has that one European leaders are increasingly worried that China's state heavy economic system is threatening their own companies. James Lewis is with the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He says China and Europe have a history here about a decade ago. The Chinese through a combination of industrial has been nauseous and economies of scale from the local market and huge government subsidies, basically ate the solar panel market and drove the Europeans out of the business. Europe's new rules are trying to level the economic playing field. Concern over human rights is another factor. Other governments also concerned President Biden is reportedly circulating proposals targeting China. The G seven summit David Dollar is with the Brookings Institution. We and the Europeans we can control who invest in our economy Who's able to do mergers and acquisitions in our economy that there lots of other areas where we just do not have any leverage. Anything that China does within its territory from subsidies to human rights is probably out of reach, he says Jennifer Hillman with the Council on Foreign Relations. Says China's growing influence as an investor and infrastructure through its international belt and road initiative has made it harder for some countries to confront him. And Hillman says the U. S is partly to blame. It's very hard when we're going around the world telling everyone don't use wall weighs five G when we do not have a five G alternative to offer we're concerned about the degree to which China is building all of this high speed rail around the world, but we do not have a high speed rail alternative to offer. Governments have called for a level playing field with China. But for now it is a moving playing field in the U. S and its allies are just trying to find their footing in New York. I'm sorry, banish shorts for marketplace.

China President Biden James Lewis David Dollar Center For Strategic And Inter Europe Jennifer Hillman EU Brookings Institution Council On Foreign Relations Hillman U. New York
"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"At the very beginning of his term. President Trump pulled the United States out of a big multilateral trade deal called the Trans Pacific Partnership, a dozen or so Pacific Rim countries aligning themselves to deal with growing Chinese influence in the region. Now, almost four years later come the consequences. China and 14. Other Asian Pacific countries, Korea and Japan among them have signed a trade deal. It covers a third of the global economy. Working places to replenish or has more on what it's going to mean for the United States. Long story short a group of Asia Pacific countries came together open their markets to one another. And the U. S. Is on the outside Looking in s a wake up call for the United States. Wendy Cutler is vice president of the Asia Society Policy Institute. The regional comprehensive economic Partnership. Rcep is as trade deals go modest, but it further connects powerful economies like Japan, Korea and Australia to China, and that's actually huge, says Jennifer Hillman, senior fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations. It is China getting solidified as the center of Asian trade and Investment. With more goods, services and investment than ever flowing through China, and I think the United States is going to have to respond to it. The U. S. Has responded to Chinese influence over trading partners before the Obama administration negotiated and signed the transpacific partnership that was a comprehensive trade deal with Asian countries that left China out. Trump torched that deal. Francesco see, She is a researcher at the People's University of China, this country with less found in the cold, and now they're moving toward the Leicester Agreement with China. Had bound senior fellow with the Peterson Institute says every time a major trade agreement leaves out the U. S. U. S businesses pay a price, Japan signed a free trade agreement with the European Union. European Union did one with Canada. United States has been falling behind, and this is just the latest example. He would advise the Biden administration to revive, modify and rebrand.

China United States President Trump Trans Pacific Partnership Japan senior fellow European Union Korea People's University of China Asia Asia Society Policy Institute Wendy Cutler vice president Obama administration Council on Foreign Relations Biden Peterson Institute Jennifer Hillman
"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KCRW

"Multilateral trade deal called the Trans Pacific Partnership, a dozen or so Pacific Rim countries aligning themselves to deal with growing Chinese influence in the region. Now, almost four years later come the consequences. China and 14. Other Asian Pacific countries, Korea and Japan among them have signed a trade deal. It covers a third of the global economy. Marketplaces to replenish or has more on what it's going to mean for the United States. Long story short, a group of Asia Pacific countries came together open their markets to one another, and the U. S. Is on the outside Looking in. It's a wake up call for the United States. Wendy Cutler is vice president of the Asia Society Policy Institute. The regional comprehensive economic Partnership. Rcep is as trade deals go modest, but it further connects powerful economies like Japan, Korea and Australia to China, and that's actually huge, says Jennifer Hillman, senior fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations. It is China getting solidified as the center of Asian trade and Investment. With more good service is an investment than ever flowing through China, and I think the United States is going to have to respond to it. The U. S. Has responded to Chinese influence over trading partners before the Obama administration negotiated and signed the transpacific partnership that was a comprehensive trade deal with Asian countries that left China out. Trump torched that deal. Francesco See, she is a researcher at the People's University of China. These country were less found in the cold, and now they're moving toward the Leicester Agreement with China. Had bound senior fellow with the Peterson Institute says every time a major trade agreement leaves out the U. S. U. S businesses pay a price, Japan signed a free trade agreement with the European Union. European Union did one with Canada. The United States has been falling behind, and this is just the latest example. He would advise the Biden administration to revive, modify and rebrand the Tpp. A tall order. Given everything else on the to do list in New York, I'm simply vanish or for marketing. One might think that Taylor Swift, mega star pop icon, pick your superlative..

China United States Trans Pacific Partnership Japan senior fellow European Union Korea People's University of China Asia Taylor Swift Asia Society Policy Institute Wendy Cutler Obama administration Council on Foreign Relations Biden Trump Peterson Institute vice president
"jennifer hillman" Discussed on The Big Show

The Big Show

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on The Big Show

"Be able to answer questions as well. We'll have a tool on the website here on Tuesday to That will let you walk through that. Fill out the form. Actually print out a form Potentially sign it. Take a picture of it Or Mail it in And that would be the application And it's a fairly straightforward process but those definitions are important. Yeah so then. What what What should we be doing right now? Bill Gathering Scale tickets and that sort of thing or her having been measured What's what's the best use of our time here. Now I think many producers know what they have on hand if especially for for grain You know what you had on hand. As of the first year you did that On a I looking at a balance sheet at that time and figure out what you've moved between that in January fifteenth That's what we need to know at the end of the day here. You don't need to bring in those sporting documents. He needs to have those. Because those help you determine how many bushels you had and and whether they were contractor a we need you to self certify what that number is so To the extent that you need together those that information to be able to determine what? You're going to certify. Please do that You can see the the kinds of questions. We're asking like comedy. How many feeder cattle did you so below six hundred pounds and above six hundred pounds between January? Fifteenth April Fifteen. I have some cattle that fit that category. You're going to want to know those numbers so go ahead and gathered those numbers but those questions are on the website payment rates around the website as well. That would suggest the kind of information and come come Tuesday morning. You're going to be able to actually see the form. They're more to on the website. Yeah and you guys did a tremendous video to that I shared yesterday and by the way I've got links to all of that on the the big show website and social media at big show farm in the little tutorial video kind of gives us an idea of what this process is going to look like to sell as as Mike said earlier bill. I think there's a lot of people and myself included that Thankful you're sitting in the chair that you're in and we appreciate your leadership and we'll get together. Maybe under better circumstances. Hopefully soon her shaded Andy. We're glad to be able to help you folks and appreciate you getting the word out to folks and we're certainly looking forward to enable to help a little bit there goes bill nor the USDA's undersecretary for farm production and World Conservation here Longtime Iowa Egg Secretary and And I will farmer of course as well today on the big show and if you missed any of that we'll get that podcast it out on the website here very shortly and social media at big show farm eleven forty three now on the big show clock. Three big things you need to know here courtesy of your Iowa soybean farmer three needing more as some of these specifics continue to filter out a USDA on the rotavirus food assistance program the payments will help no doubt acknowledged producers but some sectors are saying this is simply not enough for example national milk producers spokesperson. Chris Gaylon explains the formula for dairy producers rather complex. The water boils down to four a dairy farm production in the first quarter of this year. The payment is going to amount to six dollars and twenty cents per hundred weight and that's a combination of two different funding streams. But the bottom line is we already know what everyone's production was in the first three months of the year and you multiply that time. Six dollars and twenty cents and dad is your payment now there are also questions about say forward contracting and at least for milk. He says one of the things that they've tried to do is make sure other risk protection activities like forward contracting would continue to be eligible with no restrictions on the fat payment providing assistance. Bill fire filed by Senator. Charles Grassley would require. Usda to do four the ethanol industry it would require. Usda to reimburse producers for their feedstock purchases in the first quarter of twenty twenty through the Commodity Credit Corp which growth energy CEO. Emily score says would quote deliver immediately? Relief for biofuel workers farm partners and thousands of rural communities. Legislation follows numerous appeals from growth energy and other arm and biofuel leaders lawmakers and local governments for an industry that has been basically idled since the covert outbreak began making progress on the phase. One trade deal with China but more from a regulatory side than anything else. Jennifer Hillman is a senior fellow for trade. An international political economy with the Council on Foreign Relations and she says that as far as the egg purchase requirements in the Agreement Day are extensive agreement requires China to by twelve point five billion dollars more in agricultural goods this year than it did in two thousand seventeen and an additional one thousand nine point five billion dollars over twenty seventeen levels in twenty twenty one depending on whether you've used Chinese import numbers or US export numbers that mean somewhere between thirty four thirty seven billion dollars in total agriculture purchases. This year so far. She says imports are at five point. One billion dollars compared to a target range for this period about nine point one billion so thirty seven percent of the target requiring a lot of ketchup to be made I merely Peterson. Those are the big things you need to know attention. Farmers make your investment of the soybean checkoff yield big be an active participant in the Iowa Soybean Association at no additional cost. Just Click on. How can I join? Isa at a soybeans dot com and reap the benefits of Belonging. And we take a look at Midwestern weather did talk to Bob and This morning and he was noticing Similar wet North Central Iowa northwestern Iowa. I certainly saw quite a bit of wet to southeastern Iowa. Yesterday so nate. What are we looking at whether wise here brought to you by the Steph group selling land in the equipment format since nineteen sixty this weather? Update See some spotty showers today. Around the state of Iowa the high sixties maybe low seventies Then tomorrow we're GONNA see more rain Starting in the morning On Western Iowa reaching Central Iowa Bhai around noontime and moving on through eastern Iowa. Some heavy rain expected up to upwards of an inch in northwestern Iowa expected tomorrow and then we should hit the eighties for the weekend with a little more rain each day. That's a look at weather. Brought to you by the Steph EST group Bob put here my friends of the Steph. Group have been selling land and the equipment to farmers since one thousand nine hundred and you need to buy or want to sell go to Steph group Dot Com right now celebrating sixty years in business in two thousand twenty steps. They're the best fairly continue sorting out information. Here on the C-PAP program the latest details straight ahead on the show.

Iowa Iowa Soybean Association Bob USDA Usda Council on Foreign Relations Steph group Charles Grassley China Dot Com Bill fire Chris Gaylon Andy Jennifer Hillman Emily US Mike Peterson nate
"jennifer hillman" Discussed on The Big Show

The Big Show

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on The Big Show

"Well we've rolled around to a Thursday edition of the big show. Good Morning. Eighty Peterson in the big show. Today Nathan Fisher's alongside double duty as Bob is on the road today special assignment for him and so we get big show clock wound and taking care of here. Eleven seven is what it reads and We'll We'll chat amongst ourselves here. Although Bob would say come on in our tent is large rights and get out of the damp Overcast conditions across much of the state. North central looks like Northwestern Iowa finally seeing some sunshine and it looks like we need another day. Maybe a patience to get some warm weather around. Here's emergence continues of course on the twenty twenty crop planting virtually complete here. In the state of Iowa Corn Wise Soybeans. Still little ways left to go and it's hard to imagine much work getting done this week so we may push that back a little bit further but not much growth wants those little plants off the ground to say the least hey brought to you here in this segment to the big show by ag West Commodities Goal Agt West Dot Com until Paul and Matt and the folks that the big show guys were talking about him a little bit here to start off the program broadcasting from Western Colorado on through the Upper Midwest and down into parts of eastern Kentucky as well talking modern food fuel and fiber production for two hours each and every day on America's Premiere Farm and Consumer Radio Program opened up the pioneers text line. Here five one five nine nine nine fifty four ninety one. I'd like to see what you see out in your field if emergences taken place I would imagine Not much growth here To say the least by the way did want to give a huge shout out to Daryl in the folks at integrity builders down in New London Iowa hosted me yesterday. And you can see certainly in in my travels a little bit of You know emergencies Some places you can see the rose other places you can just kind of tell the The little green tips are starting to come out of the ground but Let's see here. Pioneer seats text line. Five one five nine nine nine fifty four ninety one a planet so that means April Twenty second and Corn April Twenty. Fourth can't row but hasn't can row but hasn't progressed much for the last. Three weeks seems like the movie. Groundhog Day has three weeks. So yeah that that is exactly right. Also this question coming in and he chatter on potential peel payments for Korn and twenty twenty yet. And there's a little bit of talk about that. Of course you're trying to predict the The market six months in advance which good luck but We'll talk all of that over. There also continues to be more information filter out on the rotavirus food assistance program that was announced in the week in terms of how this How this is going to go. And what the payments are going to be That'd be part of three big things that you need to know for example. The the milk folks. Chris Gaylon and the gang at the National Milk Producers Federation. Do such a great job Helping the Darris in dairy industry Eight point two billion dollars in projected losses for the dairy industry is the number. They've come up with but as far as the payment goes Six twenty per hundredweight. It sounds like a combination of two different funding streams but that The production that was shut down six twenty per hundredweight And they're working really hard and I know a lot of folks are working really hard here to make sure that Production that was already a part of other risk management programs already enrolled in risk management programs like forward contracting aren't restricted from the C-PAP payment. But that is yet to be determined as near as I can tell but anyway. We'll we'll talk all of this over with With good big show buddy bill nor the USDA's under secretary of course for farm production and rural conservation. I Wa Secretary of course for for twelve years also and a good friend as I mentioned of the big show actually one of two pioneer and agriculture award winners From the big show the most prestigious award that That we give out and he's been a part of both of them actually gave out the first one with us to Hayden Fry and he received the second one so look forward to hearing what bill has to say on the big show today. Don Rosa will be. Here's we're analyzing. Some commodity markets are going to talk with Rebecca Ditto as well. I was State University's extension agronomist in southeastern Iowa. A good friend of the big show as we go along right now though. Let's get started with some news coverage showy eleven eleven reads the big show clocking. It's time for the three big things you need to know needing more as some of these specifics. Continue to filter out a USDA on Meka rotavirus food assistance program the payments will help no doubt acknowledged producers but some sectors are saying. There's just simply not enough for example. National Milk Producers Generation. Spokesperson Chris. Gaylon explains the formula dairy producers formulas rather complex. The water boils down to for dairy dairy farms production. In the first quarter of this year. The payment is going to to six dollars and twenty cents per hundred weight and that's a combination of two different funding streams. But the bottom line. Is We already know? But everyone's production was in the first three months of the year and you multiply that time six dollars and twenty cents and data's your payment now there also questions about say forward contracting end at least for milk. He says one of the things that they've tried to do is make sure that other risk protection activities like forward contracting would continue to be eligible with no restrictions on the fat payment providing assistance. That's bill fire filed by senator. Charles Grassley would require. Usda to do four the ethanol industry it would require. Usda reimbursed producers for their feedstock purchases in the first quarter of two thousand twenty through the Commodity Credit Corp which Growth Energy CEO. Emily score says would quote deliver immediately? Relief for biofuel workers foreign partners and thousands of rural communities legislation follows. Numerous appeals from growth energy and other farm and biofuel leaders and local governments for an industry that has been basically idled since the Kobe outbreak began wine making progress on the phase. One trade deal with China but more from a regulatory side than anything else. Jennifer Hillman is a senior fellow for trade and International Political Economy with the Council on Foreign Relations and she says that as far as the egg purchase requirements in the agreement they are extensive agreement requires China to by twelve point five billion dollars more agricultural goods this year than it did in two thousand seventeen and an additional nineteen point five billion dollars over twenty seventeen levels in two thousand and twenty one depending on whether you've used Chinese import numbers or US expert numbers that means somewhere between thirty four thirty seven billion dollars in total agriculture purchases. This year so far. She says imports are five point. One billion dollars compared to a target range for this period about nine point one billion so thirty seven percent of the target requiring a lot of catch up to be made. I'm Amy Peterson. Those are big things you need to know in the tradition of. Who storytellers like Ronald Reagan? Van Harden. I'm proud that my show is now on. Who I'm Lee Habib and my show is called our American stories no politics no opinions just great stories listening tonight at ten on newsradio. Ten forty..

Iowa Chris Gaylon USDA Amy Peterson Bob Nathan Fisher China National Milk Producers Federa twenty twenty Ronald Reagan New London Iowa special assignment Don Rosa Charles Grassley Hayden Fry Daryl
"jennifer hillman" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"What will a trade deal with? China mean for businesses whose products are getting ripped off from marketplace in New York. I'm Sabrina Short in for David. BRANCACCIO A delegation of high-level representatives from China will be in Washington. DC This week. They are expected to head to the White House on Wednesday to sign phase one of a new U. S. China trade the deal the trump administration says the agreement includes structural reforms to protect US intellectual property enforcement though. That is an open question. Marketplace's Nancy Marshall Genzer has more the US and China made separate announcements on the face. One deal Washington was vague. Clear read with the Center for Strategic and International International Studies says there was a little more detail from Beijing including promises about strengthening trade secret protection working on an improving uncf arm a suitable related intellectual property issues. US companies say China's steals their trade secrets and ignores violations of US trademarks cheap Cheney's knockoffs of sneakers. Handbags ordered online then shipped out individually Jennifer Hillman at the Council on Foreign Relations. Says it'll be very hard to enforce enforce whatever. China has agreed to on this. Many many things that are coming in is trademark infringing items. Come in single envelope shipped through China Post host. And how do you stop cyber thieves. Who Steal Trade Secrets Helmet says talk is cheap? Effective enforcement is hard maybe even impossible in Washington. I'm Nancy Marshall Genzer for marketplace also meeting in Washington ministers from Ethiopia Egypt and Sudan. There is a real concern. Learned that war could erupt between Egypt. Ethiopia over water Ethiopia is building a four billion dollar dam on the Nile. Egypt relies on the Nile for ninety ninety percent of its irrigation and drinking water. The three countries are meeting to decide the future of the Grand Ethiopian. Renaissance Dam Africa's largest hydropower dam the BBC's Emmanuel reports from Nairobi. The walls longest river is at the center of diplomatic route that some fear could erupt into full. WHO'LL BLOWN WAR? Among countries change waters the mighty vinyl flows through eleven African countries including Egypt Ethiopia and Sudan which are now locked in dispute. Utah construction of Omega Dam on the river. Egypt depends almost entirely on the river for its water and fears. People could be at risk. Once four-billion-dollar billion-dollar damage completed by the end of the year. Utopia on the other hand says it has a Sylvan right to exploit the waters of the Nile and sees it as crucial for economic development opened. Four owns of talks have failed to reach a consensus with the two sides blaming each other. That was Emmanuel With editorial partner at the BBC. Let's do the numbers. The footsie in London is up. Four tenths of a percent Dow s and P and Nasdaq futures up in the three to five tenths percent range of the Dow future pitcher up one hundred and five points. The ten year Treasury yield is at one point eight five percent and the world spent more on movies this past year than ever ever before the global box office reached forty two point five billion dollars and movie ticket sales in two thousand nine hundred. US ticket sales actually fell more than four percent. But the rest of the world more than and made up for it. The highest grossing film of the year and ever avengers endgame which made two point seven nine billion dollars seven out of the top ten biggest movies the Disney.

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"An open question market place's Nancy Marshall guns are has more the US and China made separate announcements on the phase one deal Washington was vague clear read with the center for strategic and International Studies says there was a little more detail from Beijing including promises about strengthening trade secret protection working on improving pharmaceutical related intellectual property issues US companies say China steals their trade secrets and ignores violations of U. S. trademarks cheap Chinese knock offs of sneakers are hand bags ordered online then shipped out individually Jennifer Hillman at the council on foreign relations says it'll be very hard to enforce whatever China has agreed to one this many many things that are coming in his trademark infringing items come in in a single envelope you know shipped through China post and how do you stop cyber thieves who steal trade secrets Holman says talk is cheap effective enforcement is hard maybe even impossible in Washington I'm Nancy Marshall cancer for market place now trade deal or no trade deal the US is not letting up on pressuring other countries to ditch Chinese telecom giant why wait the US is sending a team to the United Kingdom today Reuters is reporting to persuade the British government not to use while way in upgrading its telecom networks marketplaces and yours been following this and joins us hi Andy Hey good morning so the US has been pushing this into the wall a line pretty hard what is the case again that it's making it in that's right the US is held for a while that Wally is a covert operation of the Chinese government and that any equipment that the firm uses to establish connection could be used for Chinese state spying against Britain's relationship with Beijing and honestly the woman's been a major part of a trade war the US wants to win sort of the race to five G. and while away the world's largest telecom equipment is the biggest competitor out there and so do we have any idea where Britain is on this it right said to that's a tough one for the U. K. the United States is the country's largest trading partner but people in the telecom industry say that cutting off one week would cost billions of dollars because that infrastructure is so instrumental in some British telecom companies are already using Wally equipment now British defense minister Ben Wallace admitted that president trump and his advisers have threatened to cut off some intelligence the U. K. if that country's National Security Council gives while a green light wow that seems like a serious threat what is widely saying it one way for for its part has consistently denied any wrongdoing a company spokesperson actually said U. K. lawmakers even confirmed that Wally equipment would not be deployed in networks use for intelligence sharing so that's sort of where they're at right now all right marketplaces and dealer in Austin thanks so much you got a three let's do the numbers the Dow Jones industrial average is up thirty points that is a tenth of a percent the S. and P. five hundred is up three tenths of a percent and the nasdaq is up four tenths of a percent marketplace morning report is supported by carbonite protecting small businesses from ransomware with attacks on the rise businesses need to protect themselves before their targeted.

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KCRW

"Is in the balance what you might call the global Supreme Court for trade disputes is out of order not functioning this is where the appeals go at the World Trade Organization there are enough members on this appellate body for it to do its thing because the US has been blocking replacements as the terms of judges expire three years ago there were seven judges they're down to one now market places Sabri Benesch or has more the trump administration is argued the WTO is infringing on rights the U. S. never agreed to give up when the WTO was created in nineteen ninety five you know there's generally an objection by the United States at the appellate body is going beyond its mandate kind of creating law Rachel Brewster is a professor of law at Duke she and other observers say the US has been vocal in its criticisms about hasn't been actively negotiating to reform the WTO because they say the trump administration believes it would be better off without it the trump administration is fundamentally opposed to the idea of you know rule of law system in trade the other one hundred and sixty three member countries who presumably still want the WTO to keep operating have a few options Jennifer Hillman is with the council on foreign relations and used to serve on the WTO appellate body it could be that the country's choose to exercise restraint meaning countries could give up their right to appeal lower panel rulings at the WTO just live with rulings they don't like instead of appealing them the other way that the European Union and Canada Norway and others are proposing is to use within the rules itself an arbitration process again a way to work around the fact that the equivalent of the Supreme Court for trade is shut down there are problems with that Richard whiner is an attorney with Sidley Austin one is that all the parties to the dispute including third parties have to agree the US is a party to about fifty percent of proceedings he says and could object to any work arounds and that would shut down that process meaning the W. T. O.'s ability to settle disputes could be damaged for some time again Rachel Brewster it looks like it's just going to go on indefinitely until a new American administration changes its policy and more trade disputes might be waged the old fashioned way through destabilizing trade wars in bare knuckled negotiation in New York I'm simply.

Supreme Court New York professor of law Sabri Benesch W. T. O. Sidley Austin attorney Richard whiner Canada Norway European Union Jennifer Hillman Duke Rachel Brewster United States World Trade Organization
"jennifer hillman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is in the balance what you might call the global Supreme Court for trade disputes is out of order not functioning this is where the appeals go at the World Trade Organization there are enough members on the appellate body for it to do its thing because the US has been blocking replacements as the terms of judges expire three years ago there were seven judges down the one now market places Sabri Bennett shore has more the trump administration is argued the WTO is infringing on rights the US never agreed to give up when the WTO was created in nineteen ninety five you know there's generally an objection by the United States at the appellate body is going beyond its mandate kind of creating law Rachel Brewster is a professor of law at Duke she and other observers say the US has been vocal in its criticisms about hasn't been actively negotiating to reform the WTO because they say the trump administration believes it would be better off without it the trump administration is fundamentally opposed to the idea of you know rule of law system in trade the other one hundred and sixty three member countries who presumably still want the WTO to keep operating have a few options Jennifer Hillman is with the council on foreign relations and used to serve on the WTO appellate body it could be that the country's choose to exercise restraint meaning countries could give up their right to appeal lower panel rulings at the WTO just live with rulings they don't like instead of appealing them the other way that the European Union and Canada Norway and others are proposing is to use within the rules itself an arbitration process again a way to work around the fact that the equivalent of the Supreme Court for trade is shut down there are problems with that Richard whiner is an attorney with Sidley Austin one is that all the parties to the dispute including third parties have to agree the US is a party to about fifty percent of proceedings he says and could object to any work arounds and that would shut down that process meaning the W. T. O.'s ability to settle disputes could be damaged for some time again Rachel Brewster it looks like it's just going to go on indefinitely until a new American administration changes its policy and more trade disputes might be waged the old fashioned way through destabilizing trade wars and bare knuckled negotiation in New York I'm Sabri Bennett short for market place and the Hollywood reporter says a TV projects in development about the great fall of the shared office space company we work this is the company that tried.

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KCRW

"The Skirball visit Skirball dot orgy this is market place I'm car result global trade is complicated we're just gonna stipulate that competing interests who finds a market for what and where and then sells it to whom at what price it gets messy in a hurry that long story may very short is what got us the World Trade Organization the generally recognized arbiter of what's fair in world trade until December the tenth that is after next Tuesday one of the most critical parts of the WTO is gonna stop working the appellate body it's called you can think of it as a Supreme Court of trade it's effectively going to be no more the trump administration has blocked appointment of any new judges to the appellate body in yes the United States in any other member do have veto power after the tenth when two judges terms expire there won't be enough of them left to keep it running market place's be better sure explains why all of this matters the US is basically about to starve the world trade organization's highest body to death it's a crisis not only of dispute settlement but it is effectively an existential crisis for the WTO itself Jeff shot is a senior fellow at the Peterson institute for international economics the appellate body is the highest trade court on the planet it's where cases from lower down in the WTO are appealed once it is out of the picture there will be no final say when one country suse another cases can be kept in legal limbo frozen in time that will have a corrosive effect on the I'd WTO as an institution without a court to settle things countries who don't like lower court rulings will just end up fighting it out through trade wars are bare knuckled negotiation and shot says not only will the WTO stop being a place for countries to settle disputes it won't really make sense for countries to go to the WTO for other things like negotiating new agreements on how to deal with modern issues like digital trader labor rights Rachel Brewster is a law professor at Duke so basically undermines the idea in the WTO that it is a rule of law system because no longer will they'll be a way to determine what the law is and how it should be applied to a certain case at least not in a blinding way so why is the trump administration doing this on one level the U. S. is mad over administrative issues it takes too long for cases to be decided certain procedures on always followed that the WTO but ultimately it comes down to sovereignty Jennifer Hillman is a senior fellow at the council on foreign relations and used to serve on the WTO appellate body the United States is basic complaint is that the WTO appellate body is not supposed to be able to take away rights that the United States had when the WTO agreements were put together in nineteen ninety five the U. S. loses about half the cases it's involved in in some of those cases according to the U. S. the appellate body infringed on rights the U. S. as it never agreed to give up in particular the WTO has at times tried to limit how the U. S. punishes countries it accuses of dumping cheap products into its markets a lot of the rest of the world looks on this and thinks well it's just the United States having sour grapes previous administrations had similar objections and some allies have expressed sympathy with some US procedural concerns but none have taken it as far as the trump administration in terms of crippling the WTO is ability to function and there's a reason for that says helmet there's no question that some of this is driven by the fact that I think the trump administration believes that the United States is better off under a power base system that is to say the US is the largest consumer market in the world it's better off the rational goes using its might to get what it wants rather than being subject to an international institution basically to go back to the world before the WTO existed that idea is a mistake says Jeffrey shot at the Peterson institute that system failed disputes that involve big powers like the United States and the European Union couldn't be resolved the administration has already started to conduct some trade policy outside of the WTO system the trade war with China for example according to the tax foundation the OECD and the I MF that's dragged down economic growth estimates for the US China and the entire global.

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:12 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KCRW

"China. Now only about a quarter of those are consumer goods, they do not include things like toys and footwear that were exempted by the Trump administration. They do include things like bicycles and pet food certain kinds of building supplies. These products can still come into the United States from China. Just like they always have. But they will face a a tariff or a tax of twenty five percent. Instead of the ten percent. They pay now, and this will have to be paid by the company that imports them at the port where they're brought in right importers now have to pay this big tariff. But how how exactly will they pay it? Well, anyone of three things can happen. I the importers can call their manufacturing China and try to persuade them to give them a price cut. The man you have right. The manufacturers in China. Of course, don't wanna lose business. So maybe they'll agree to that. Maybe not the second thing is they can they can have that can happen is that the importers just agree to absorb the tariffs themselves, which means, of course, they make less money. Which they are obviously reluctant to do the only other option they have those to pass the increase onto their customers. In in other words, prices will go up. So my be one of these or it could be some combination of the three we don't really know. But I did speak to Jennifer Hillman who is a professor at Georgetown Law Center. And she says President Trump imposed an earlier round of broader tariffs last year. And she says economists have studied the impact of those tariffs almost all of it a close to one hundred percent of it has been paid by US importers and then passed along in various degrees to US customers. So President Trump argues that these tariffs are good for the economy. They bring in money to the treasure US treasury. But and says, you know, these are ultimately passed on to consumers. So what Trump says may be true. But make no mistake importers are going to try to pass them onto to you. And me. Yeah. And when can you and I expect prices to start rising? Well, there are two points here. I these tariff. They only apply to products that were shipped from China after last night if something was shit before that, and it's still out there on a freighter heading toward an American port right now, it won't have to pay this higher tariff, and it typically takes two to three weeks four cargo ships from China to get to the United States. So we have kind of a grace period little wiggle room. The other point is about half the Chinese imports. Are that are facing these Terracar intermediate goods that go into making other products? These these are shipped to the United States and used in the manufacture of other products. Something like auto parts or electrical components buttons for coats shirts, the manufacturing process takes awhile. So it will take time for the items to show up in stores, and it will take time for customers to see price increases. All right. That's NPR's. Jim zarroli? Thanks, jim. You're welcome. Okay. Let's continue the conversation about Chinese tariffs without regular Friday political chat. Guests this week our JD on of the Washington Post and the Brookings Institution. EJ good to be with you and Bethany Mandel who writes for publications, including the Jewish. Daily forward and acculturated. Hi bethany. So the tariffs went from ten to twenty five percent on a bunch of Chinese goods just after midnight. So far, the trade war has not really been felt by most American consumers. Yes. Soybean farmers carmakers. But EJ, do you think that it could be felt more widely? If these hires tariffs stay in place. I think the short answer is. Yes, I mean, President Trump is not wrong to say that China engages in unfair trade practices, and he's not wrong to go after them. But he should not take steps as part of a pressure campaign that may well have higher costs to us than to China, and he should certainly not lie and say that these tariffs will be paid by China know, as Jim zarroli piece just suggested the tariffs are regressive tax that at the end of the line usually end up being paid for by consumers, and they could have a negative effect on the economy and create inflation. I still hope he gets a good deal. But so far it. Doesn't look like his great job of it Bethany. What do you think of this? Tactically trade talks seems to have been moving in a positive direction before. President Trump raised the tariffs from ten to twenty five percent. Do you think that was a smart move? No, I think that from from what I'm hearing sort of among people who have been have been following the story is that this this end of negotiations kind of caught the administration by surprise. And that they didn't necessarily realize that they were they were pretty much out of time. And what is worrisome is not necessarily this round of tariffs, but subsequent rounds of tariffs. That really will hit the American consumer quite hard and potentially President Trump's base voters. Absolutely studies that show that Republican areas getting hit harder by his policies democratic areas. So yes, voters another big standoff in Washington this week is between congress and the White House over special counsel, Robert Muller's report testimony documents. Let's listen to the voices of the top Senate, Republican Mitch McConnell house speaker, Nancy. Pelosi and also a House Judiciary committee chairman, Jerry, Nadler, all speaking this week case closed case closed some.

President Trump China. United States Trump administration Jim zarroli EJ Washington Post Bethany NPR bethany Jennifer Hillman Mitch McConnell Bethany Mandel Brookings Institution Senate Robert Muller Washington Georgetown Law Center House Judiciary
"jennifer hillman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:07 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Online at melvilletrust dot org and on Twitter at melvilletrust. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm ari. Shapiro chang. Talks between the US and China have ended without any agreement on trade. President Trump said in a tweet this afternoon that negotiations were candid and constructive. He also said the talks will continue into the future. But he didn't say when meanwhile, the Trump administration has made good on its threat to raise tariffs on another two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports. The US says it's taking this step because China renamed on commitments it had made an earlier negotiations to explain what impact all these tariffs will have we turn now to NPR's gyms Rowley. Hey, jim. Hi, also, just remind what kinds of products are affected by these tariffs. Well, this applies to about two hundred billion dollars in imported products from China. Now only about a quarter of those are consumer goods on. They do not include things like toys and footwear that were exempted by the Trump administration. They do include. Dude, things like bicycles pet food certain kinds of building supplies. These products can still come into the United States from China. Just like they always have. But they will face a a tariff or a tax of twenty five percent. Instead of the the ten percent they pay now. And this will have to be paid by the company that imports them at the port where they're brought in right importers now have to pay this big tariff. But how how exactly will they pay it? Well, anyone of three things can happen. I the importers can call their manufacturing China and try to persuade them to give them a price cut. The menu, right? The manufacturers in China. Forced don't wanna lose business. So AB, though agree to that. Maybe not the second thing is they can they can have that can happen is that the importers just agree to absorb the tariffs themselves, which means of course, they make less money on which they are obviously reluctant to do the only other option they have those to pass the increase onto their customers. In in other words, prices will go up. So my be one of these or it could be some combination of the three we don't really know. But I did speak to Jennifer Hillman who is a professor at Georgetown Law Center. And she says President Trump imposed an earlier round of broader tariffs last year. And she says economists have studied the impact of those tariffs almost all of it close to one hundred percent of it has been paid by US importers and then passed along in various degrees to US customers. So President Trump argues that these tariffs are good for the economy. They bring in money to the treasure US treasury, but home and says. You know, these are ultimately passed on to consumers. So what Trump says may be true. But make no mistake importers are going to try to pass them onto to you. And me. Yeah. And when can you and I expect prices to start rising? Well, they're two points here. First tariffs. They only apply the products that were shipped from China after last night if something was shipped before that, and it's still out there on a freighter heading toward an American port right now, it won't have to pay this higher tariff, and it typically takes two to three weeks of four cargo ships from China to get to the United States. So we have kind of a grace period little wiggle room. The other point is about half the Chinese imports. Are that are facing these intermediate goods that go into making other products? These these are shipped to the United States and used in the manufacture of other products. Something like auto parts or electrical components buttons for coats, the manufacturing process takes awhile. So it will take time for the items to show up in stores, and it will take time for customers to see price increases. All right. That's NPR's. Jim zarroli? Thanks, jim. You're welcome. Okay. Let's continue the conversation about Chinese tariffs with our regular Friday political chat. Our guest this week our JD on of the Washington Post in the Brookings Institution. EJ good to be with you and Bethany Mandel who writes for publications, including the Jewish daily forward and acculturated. Hi bethany. So the tariffs went from ten to twenty five percent on a bunch of Chinese goods just after midnight. So far, the trade war has not really been felt by most American consumers. Yes. Soybean farmers carmakers. But EJ, do you think that it could be felt more widely? If these hires tariffs stay in place. I think the short answer is. Yes, I mean, President Trump is not wrong to say that China engages in unfair trade practices, and he's not wrong to go after them. But he should not take steps as part of a pressure campaign that may well have higher costs to us than to China, and he should certainly not lie and say that these tariffs will be paid by China. No. As Jim zarroli piece just suggested the tariffs are regressive tax that at the end of the line usually end up being paid for by consumers, and they could have a negative effect on the economy and create inflation. I still hope he gets a good deal. But so far, it doesn't look like his great job of it Bethany. What do you think of this, tactically? The trade talks seemed to have been moving in a positive direction before President Trump raised the terrace from ten to twenty five percent, you think that was a smart move. No, I think that from what I'm hearing sort of among people who have been have been following the story is that this this end of negotiations kind of caught the administration by surprise. And that they didn't necessarily realize that they were they were pretty much out of time. And what is worrisome is not necessarily this round of tariffs, but subsequent rounds of tariffs that really will hit the American consumer quite hard and potentially President Trump's base voters, absolutely. There are studies that show that Republican areas getting hit harder by his policies democratic areas. So yes, voters another big standoff in Washington this week is between congress and the White House over special counsel, Robert Muller's report testimony documents. Let's listen to the voices of the top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell house speaker Nancy Pelosi and also House Judiciary committee chairman, Jerry, Nadler, all speaking this week case closed case closed some coding.

President Trump China United States Trump administration Jim zarroli NPR EJ Twitter Shapiro chang President Bethany Washington Post bethany Senate Mitch McConnell Brookings Institution Jennifer Hillman
"jennifer hillman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:03 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"At indeed dot com slash higher. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm ari. Shapiro chang. Talks between the US and China have ended without any agreement on trade. President Trump said in a tweet this afternoon that negotiations were candid and constructive. He also said the talks will continue into the future. But he didn't say when meanwhile, the Trump administration has made good on its threat to raise tariffs on another two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports. The US says it's taking this step because China reneged on commitments it had made an earlier negotiations to explain what impact all these terrorists will have we turn now to NPR's gyms Rowley. Hey, Jim, high also. So just remind us what kinds of products are affected by these tariffs. Well, this applies to about two hundred billion dollars in imported products from China. Now only about a quarter of those are consumer goods, they do not include things like toys and footwear that were exempted by the Trump administration. They do include things. Bicycles and pet food certain kinds of building supplies. These products can still come into the United States from China. Just like they always have. But they will face a a tariff or tax of twenty five percent. Instead of the ten percent. They pay now, and this will have to be paid by the company that imports them at the port where they're brought in right importers now have to pay this big tariff. But how how exactly will they pay it? Well, anyone of three things can happen. I the importers can call their manufacturing China and try to persuade them to give them a price. Cut the menu, right? The manufacturers in China course, don't wanna lose business. So AB they'll agree to that. Maybe not the second thing is they can they can have that can happen is that the importers just agree to absorb the tariffs themselves, which means of course, they make less money, which they are obviously reluctant to do the only other option they have those to pass the increase onto their customers. In in other words, prices will go up. So my the. One of these or it could be some combination of the three we don't really know. But I did speak to Jennifer Hillman who is a professor at Georgetown Law Center. And she says President Trump imposed an earlier round of broader tariffs last year. And she says economists have studied the impact of those tariffs almost all of it close to one hundred percent of it has been paid by US importers and then passed along in various degrees to US customers. So President Trump argues that these tariffs are good for the economy. They bring in money to the treasure US treasury. But and says, you know, these are ultimately passed on to consumers. So what Trump says may be true. But make no mistake importers are going to try to pass them onto to you. And me. Yeah. And when can you and I expect prices to start rising? Well, there are two points here. I these tariffs. They only apply to products that were shipped from China after last night if something was shipped before that. And it's still you know out there on a freighter heading toward an American port right now it won't have. Pay this higher tariff and typically takes two three weeks of four cargo ships from China to get to the United States. So we have kind of a grace period little wiggle room. The other point is about half the Chinese imports. Are that are facing these Terracar intermediate goods that go into making other products? These these are shipped to the United States and used in the manufacture of other products. Something like auto parts or electrical components, you know, buttons for coats church, the manufacturing process takes awhile. So it will take time for the items to show up in stores, and it will take time for customers to see price increases. All right. That's NPR's. Jim zarroli? Thanks, jim. You're welcome. Okay. Let's continue the conversation about Chinese tariffs without regular Friday political chat. Our guest this week R E J Dion of the Washington Post in the Brookings Institution. I j good to be with you and Bethany Mandel who writes for publications including the Jewish daily forward and acculturated. Hi, Johnny high. So the tariffs went from ten to twenty five percent on a bunch of Chinese goods just after midnight. So far, the trade war has not. Really been felt by most American consumers. Yes. Soybean farmers carmakers. But EJ, do you think that it could be felt more widely? If these hires tariffs stay in place. I think the short answer is. Yes, I mean, President Trump is not wrong to say that China engages in unfair trade practices, and he's not wrong to go after them. But he should not take steps as part of a pressure campaign that may well have higher cost to us than to China, and he should certainly not lie and say that these tariffs will be paid by China. No as Jim's rollies piece just suggested the tariffs are regressive tax that at the end of the line usually end up being paid for by consumers, and they could have a negative effect on the economy and create inflation. I still hope he gets a good deal. But so far, it doesn't look like his great job of it Bethany. What do you think of this? Tactically trade talks seemed to have been moving in a positive direction before president. Trump raised the terrace from ten to twenty five percent, you think that was a smart move. No, I think that from from what I'm hearing sort of among people who have been have been sort of following the story is that this this end of negotiations kind of caught the administration by surprise. And that they didn't necessarily realize that they were they were pretty much out of time. And what is worrisome is not necessarily this round of tariffs, but subsequent rounds of tariffs that really will hit the American consumer quite hard and potentially President Trump's base voters. Absolutely. There's studies that show that Republican areas getting hit harder by his policies democratic areas. So yes, voters another big standoff in Washington this week is between congress and the White House over special counsel, Robert Muller's report testimony documents. Let's listen to the voices of the top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell house speaker Nancy Pelosi and also a House Judiciary committee chairman, Jerry, Nadler, all speaking this week. Case closed case closed. Some.

President Trump China United States Trump administration Jim zarroli NPR Shapiro chang president Johnny high Bethany Mandel Washington Post Senate Mitch McConnell Jennifer Hillman Bethany Nancy Pelosi Brookings Institution
China's Close Government-Business Ties Are A Key Challenge In U.S. Trade Talks

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:46 min | 3 years ago

China's Close Government-Business Ties Are A Key Challenge In U.S. Trade Talks

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from CFA society. Washington DC does your wealth manager measure up a CFA charter holder. Does they have the investment expertise to unlock opportunities? Other advisers might not see learn more at the right question dot org. US trade talks with China face, a fundamental problem. The two countries are negotiating to end trade war was triggered by President Trump's demand for better terms. Now, it's easy for the Chinese to say promise to buy more US goods. They've got the money, but it's hard for China to alter a basic fact of its economy, unlike the US government, China's government owns half the country's largest companies and many receive big subsidies that is the advantage. The United States wants China to give up NPR's gyms rolling reports. Michael Korch, mar runs a company that makes travel bags and briefcases. It's been in his family for four generations over the years. He has watched one company after another in his feet. We'll go out of business, and for those that survive, or it means you lose I lived it. We lost. We had five hundred people employed in the US, and we went down to five Korch Marseille big problem for companies like his brutal competition from Chinese rivals. He says they can undercut his prices because they're subsidized by their government. And this is at the heart of the current trade talks the extent to which China props up its companies just last week. Massachusetts congressman Richard Neal who heads the powerful House Ways, and means committee spoke about it, the China that we trade with and compete with today is very different from the one that we had hoped would emerge. China's economy which has taken on some market characteristics remains fundamentally state directed. More than half of China's biggest companies are owned by the government. They include essential sectors, like railroads energy shipbuilding and telecommunications like government officials also maintained strong ties to. Private companies says Jennifer Hillman of Georgetown, University Law Center, they're able to direct resources and push resources into those industries in those entities that they are trying to favor Hellman notes that communist party members sit on the board of virtually every big Chinese company, the four largest banks are controlled by the government, Mark. Woo of Harvard Law School says even when a Chinese company is privately-owned it works hard to stay in Beijing's. Good graces people understand what the objectives are in Vail operate within those confines. It's especially true when the state exerts strong of control over the key elements of the economy as the Chinese economy still does it wasn't supposed to be this way when China joined the World Trade Organization in two thousand one it agreed to reform it system to become more free market, but Patrick show Vanik of Silvercrest asset management says events of the past decade have made China more confident about its own system in the wake of two thousand. And eight financial crisis. China took a different look at what it's economic model should look like and a model that was more state-driven looked a lot more attractive to them under president Xi Jinping, the government's role in the economy has only gotten bigger US officials say these policies violate the spirit if not the letter of trade law and they've pressed Beijing to stop subsidising businesses. But the ties between the government and business in China can be okay. So Vanik says Chinese officials know how to give preferential treatment of their own companies at the expense of outsiders without leaving their fingerprints anywhere. They will just say, well, there's a slowdown in inspections of this type of product from your country. It's for safety. It makes it hard for the you didn't turn around and say, okay, you're engaging in an elective because there's complete deniability Harvard's, Mark. Woo says the Trump administration needs to be realistic about what it can achieve too. The extent were expecting major fundamental structural reforms. That's going to be very difficult to obtain because they see this governance structure as having been vital for both their political economic successes. Woo says China believes it's economic model has served the country. Well, and it's not going to give it up easily. And that means US trade negotiators have their work cut out for them. Jim zarroli NPR news. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast.

China United States Michael Korch WOO Beijing Comcast Cfa Society President Trump Washington CFA Vanik World Trade Organization Congressman Richard Neal Massachusetts Harvard Law School Vail NPR Korch Marseille Jim Zarroli Communist Party
"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David green. And I'm Steve Inskeep. US trade talks with China face, a fundamental problem. The two countries are negotiating to end a trade war. They was triggered by President Trump's demand for better terms. Now, it's easy for the Chinese to say promise to buy more US goods. They've got the money, but it's hard for China to alter a basic fact of its economy, unlike the US government, China's government owns half the country's largest companies and many receive big subsidies that is the advantage. The United States wants China to give up NPR's gyms rolling reports. Michael Korchnoi runs a company that makes travel bags and briefcases. It's been in his family for four generations over the years. He has watched one company after another in his field, go out of business. And for those that survive where it means. You lose I lived it. We lost. We had five hundred people employed in the US, and we went down to. Five Korchnoi says a big problem for companies like his brutal competition from Chinese rivals. He says they can undercut his prices because they're subsidized by the government. And this is at the heart of the current trade talks the extent to which China props up its companies more than half of China's biggest companies are owned by the government. They include essential sectors, like railroads energy shipbuilding and telecommunications like government officials also maintained strong ties to private companies says Jennifer Hillman of Georgetown, University Law Center, they're able to direct resources and push resources into those industries in those entities that they are trying to favor. Helmand notes that communist party members sit on the board of virtually every big Chinese company, the four largest banks are controlled by the government. Mark rule of Harvard Law School says even when a Chinese company is privately-owned it works hard to stay in Beijing's. Good graces people understand what the objectives are. They'll operate within those confines. It's especially true. When the stated searches strong of a control over the key elements of the economy as the Chinese economy still does it wasn't supposed to be this way when China joined the World Trade Organization in two thousand one it agreed to reform it system to become more free market, but Patrick Chovanec of Silvercrest asset management says events of the past decade have made China more confident about its own system in the wake of two thousand eight financial crisis. China took a different look at what it's economic model should look like and a model that was more state-driven looked a lot more attractive to them under president Xi Jinping, the government's role in the economy has only gotten bigger US officials say these policies violate the spirit if not the letter of trade law and they've pressed Beijing to stop subsidising businesses. But the ties between the government and business in China can be opaque show Vanik says Chinese. Officials know how to give preferential treatment of their own companies the expensive outsiders without leaving their fingerprints anywhere. They will just say, well, there's a slowdown in inspections of this type of product from your country. It's for safety. It makes it hard for you didn't turn around and say you're engaging in an elective because there's complete deniability Harvard's, Mark. Woo says the Trump administration needs to be realistic about what it can achieve to the extent. There were expecting major fundamental structural reforms. That's going to be very difficult to obtain because they see this governance structure as having been vital for both their political and economic successes who says China believes, it's economic model has served the country. Well, and it's not going to give it up easily. And that means US trade negotiators have their work cut out for them. Jim.

China US Michael Korchnoi Steve Inskeep Beijing President Trump David green World Trade Organization communist party Harvard Law School Jennifer Hillman Xi Jinping Patrick Chovanec Helmand Jim Mark Woo president University Law Center Harvard
"jennifer hillman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:45 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm David Greene. It appears that North Korea has started rebuilding the facilities. It uses to launch satellites into orbit a missile engine testing stand in North Korea was dismantled last year. That was back when North Korea was promoting its interest in denuclearization. But last week a summit between President Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong ended with no deal and days later, satellite. Imagery is showing that stand has been rebuilt NPR's. Anthony Kyun is monitoring all of this from Seoul, South Korea. Good morning. Anthony. Good morning, David. So what's North Korea to here? So this launch site is known as so hey, also known as tombstone knee, and it's near the it's on the west coast of North Korea and previously they had launched what they claimed whereas satellites from there. The US said they were actually just rocket launch tests in basically, what it is is you've got buildings where they put the rockets together. There is a rail system that takes them to the launchpad test them up and launches them. And last year, Kim Jong said, we are dismantling these it's his show our goodwill, and you the US have to reciprocate by removing some sanctions now, San recent satellite pictures show that they are putting these things back together the buildings the rail system that launch pad. It's not exactly clear when they started. It could have started in mid February before the summit recent at work could have been going on as recently as over the weekend after the summit finished. Okay. So so the timing of this is a little tricky about whether this is North Korea responding to the summit talks falling apart. That's right. A couple of things to remember first of all they can launch missiles from mobile launchers. So this site is not that big a deal. Another thing is that when North Korea made these gestures and said, why don't you reciprocate people were just dismissing these as insignificant concessions? They were saying, you know, North Korea's just trying to hand just junk junk these sites are outdated. They're not worth much. Well, by that token, then people should not be too alarmed about them being reassembled. Okay. So I mean, but we've always talked about the that North Korea's nuclear capabilities are, you know, something to be reckoned with. So so explain exactly why we're not supposed to be so concerned about this one move. Well, the nuclear situation as opposed to the rocket situation is much more complicated. Isis sort of where where talks fell apart in Hanoi. What North Korea offered was their main nuclear site, which is called young beyond. But people are really divided on what that is worth how much of their fish. Sioe material capabilities are there. Some people say have some people say more there are other sites which US and South Korean intelligence know about but North Korea does not admit that President Trump. He said he asked for those to be dismantled. In addition to young beyond Kim Jong Lynn was reportedly surprised and would not do it. And that seems to be part of where the deal fell apart. So Anthony based on what we heard from the North Koreans after this summit and after the deal fell apart. Would it make sense that Kim would be doing something like this after he left annoying? Well, here's the thing. The North Koreans have not pointed their fingers at the US and say and said these talks fell apart because of you we have we haven't heard from them. Other people feel that Kim Jong UN is really highly invested in this process, and he's not going to go back the other way, but they have warned that if things don't go. Well, they could take a more hostile tack in. This is what it could mean it could mean going back to testing missiles, and you clear devices NPR's, Anthony Kuhn in saw Anthony. Thanks, sure thing. US trade talks with China face, a fundamental problem. The two countries are negotiating to end a trade war triggered by President Trump's demand for better terms. Now, it's easy for the Chinese to say promised to buy more US goods. They've got the money, but it's hard for China to alter a basic fact of its economy, unlike the US government, China's government owns half the country's largest companies and many receive big subsidies that is the advantage. The United States wants China to give up NPR's Jim zarroli reports. Michael Korchnoi runs a company that makes travel bags and briefcases. It's been in his family for four generations over the years. He has watched one company after another in his field, go out of business. And for those that survive where it means. You lose I lived it. We lost. We had five hundred people employed in the US. And we went down to five court says a big problem for companies. His brutal competition from Chinese rivals. He says they can undercut his prices because they're subsidized by the government. And this is at the heart of the current trade talks the extent to which China props up its companies just last week. Massachusetts congressman Richard Neal who heads the powerful House Ways, and means committee spoke about it, the China that we trade with and compete with today is very different from the one that we had hoped would emerge. China's economy which is taken on some market characteristics remains fundamentally state directed. More than half of China's biggest companies are owned by the government. They include essential sectors, like railroads energy shipbuilding telecommunications. Like government officials also maintained strong ties to private companies says Jennifer Hillman of Georgetown, University Law Center, they're able to direct resources and push resources into those industries in those entities that they are trying to favor Hellman notes that communist party members. Sit on the board virtually every big Chinese company, the four largest banks are controlled by the government. Mark of Harvard Law School says even when a Chinese company is privately-owned it works hard to stay in Beijing's. Good graces people understand what the objectives. Are they'll operate within those confines? It's especially true when the state exert strong control over the key elements of the economy as the Chinese economy still does it wasn't supposed to be this way when China joined the World Trade Organization in two thousand one it agreed to reform its system to become more free market, but Patrick Chovanec of Silvercrest asset management says events of the past decade have made China more confident about its own system in the wake of two thousand eight financial crisis. China took a different look at what it's economic model should look like and a model that was more state-driven looked a lot more attractive to them under president Xi Jinping, the government's role in the economy has. Only gotten bigger US officials say these policies violate the spirit if not the letter of trade law and they've pressed Beijing to stop subsidising businesses. But the ties between the government and business in China can be opaque show. Vanik says Chinese officials know how the give preferential treatment of their own companies at the expense of outsiders without leaving their fingerprints anywhere. They will just say, well, there's a slowdown in inspections of this type of product from your country. It's for safety. It makes it hard for you to then turn around and say, okay, you're engaging in lacked. Activity because there's complete deniability Harvard's. Mark Reuss says the Trump administration needs to be realistic about what it can achieve to the extent that were expecting major fundamental structural reforms. That's going to be very difficult to obtain because they see this governance structure as having been vital for both their political and economic successes. Woo says China believes it's economic model has served the country. Well, and it's not going to give it up easily. And that means US trade negotiators have.

North Korea US China President Trump Kim Jong South Korea NPR David Greene Kim Jong UN Anthony Steve Inskeep Kim Jong Lynn Anthony Kyun Beijing Seoul Mark Reuss Hanoi Harvard
"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Tuesday five March is always to have you along everybody we begin today with some metallurgy and some national security trade policy specifically section two thirty two of the trade expansion act of nineteen sixty two as amended there's a lot in that sense. So let me explain the aforementioned section to thirty two lets the president impose tariffs at his discretion on certain imports that he or eventually she decides are essential to national security, which is to say American national security demands this country have its own industries in the tariff items make sense. All right. That is the legal grounding for the president's tariffs last year on steel aluminum section to thirty two now to the metallurgy. The Commerce Department says under section two thirty two it's looking into putting tariffs on imports of something called titanium sponge, except this time it's not acting. At the behest of the White House. It's a company called time met that's doing the asking the only manufacturer of titanium sponge in the United States. Workplaces Marielle cigar takes it from there. Titanium sponge is a raw form of titanium that's used in a lot of military equipment helicopter, blades jet, airframes and engines tank armor, Jennifer Hillman, teaches at Georgetown law the companies that make those things imports sixty percent of the titanium they need from other countries anti met. Again, the only company in the US that makes titanium sponge is arguing because it's used in all of these military applications that is an essence a threat to the national security of the United States. If a Commerce Department agrees, the president could impose tariffs on titanium imports, but Barent Jansen a trade lawyer at aching Gump says, there's bound to be some pushback for one thing, the US gets most of its titanium from Japan and Japan, of course. Is one of the closest military allies of the United States timeouts argument is a little different from the one that Trump administration used to justify tariffs on imported steel and aluminum in those cases, the administration said the country needs healthy steel and aluminum sectors to have a strong economy. Johnson says that's a controversial reading of the law. What we're seeing? Now really is a is a stretching of the statutory concept of national security to include economic security. In other words, he says the administration has been using the national security argument as an economic policy tool. I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. Just because you can never have enough trade. All right. That's a bit tongue in cheek. But the news is the news. There is a meeting in Washington tomorrow with a European Union trade delegation. American officials about cars nominally in the Trump administration's demand that the EU cut its tariffs on American vehicles. As happen often times with trade, though, things have gotten mess. Easy as marketplace's Stephen beard reports from the European desk in London. These talks should be easy. I'm like China. The EU is not a geostrategic rival for the US. And it hasn't been ripping off American technology the spat. Oh, the call tariffs could be settled fast says Daniel gross of the center for European policy. Studies you could reduce its high tariffs on cars. The US a little bit on trucks. And then both sides could claim victory for were only about cars. There wouldn't be really a problem. The problem is it's also about farm produce like chlorine wash chicken and hormone-treated beef the US wants to sell the stuff in Europe. But analyst Peter Clapp says Europe won't stomach that because of protectionism and consumer irrationality. There's this irrational fear about American foods. Nobody seems to notice that Americans are eating it. So it can't be the end of the world nevertheless, says HOGAN schmead ING of the German Bank, berenberg this produce is political poison here. It would topple for instance, the German government if the government were to try to lower the German or European consumer protection standards for certain agricultural goods, the US and the EU want to avoid a trade war. Professor Allen winters of Sussex university thinks they probably will. But it is quite a significant John. I think that we really could have a major bus stop. And that would be really serious for the world at one on a quarter trillion dollars a year. This is by far the world's biggest trade relationship in London. I'm Stephen beard for marketplace. Wall Street today, flat flat, flat flat. We'll have the details. When we do the numbers. The oil industry in this economy is really a tale of.

United States EU president Commerce Department Stephen beard Trump administration London White House Daniel gross Washington Europe Jennifer Hillman HOGAN schmead ING Barent Jansen Johnson Professor Allen winters China Sussex university
US launches national security probe into titanium sponge imports

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:27 min | 3 years ago

US launches national security probe into titanium sponge imports

"Begin today with some metallurgy and some national security trade policy specifically section two thirty two of the trade expansion act of nineteen sixty two as amended there's a lot in that sense. So let me explain the aforementioned section to thirty two lets the president impose tariffs at his discretion on certain imports that he or eventually she decides are essential to national security, which is to say American national security demands this country have its own industries in the tariff items make sense. All right. That is the legal grounding for the president's tariffs last year on steel aluminum section to thirty two now to the metallurgy. The Commerce Department says under section two thirty two it's looking into putting tariffs on imports of something called titanium sponge, except this time it's not acting at the behest. Out of the White House. It's a company called time. It that's doing the asking the only manufacturer of titanium sponge in the United States. Marketplace's Mariel cigar takes it. From there Tatum. Sponge is a raw form of titanium that's used in a lot of military equipment helicopter, blades jet, airframes and engines tank armor, Jennifer Hillman, teaches at Georgetown law the companies that make those things imports sixty percent of the titanium they need from other countries and tie met. Again. The only company in the US that makes titanium sponge is arguing because it's used in all of these military applications that is an essence threat to the national security of the United States. If a Commerce Department agrees, the president could impose tariffs on titanium imports, but Barent Jansen a trade lawyer at Eakin Gump says there's bound to be some pushback for one thing, the US gets most of its titanium from Japan and Japan, of course, is one of the. Closest military allies of the United States tie. Mets argument is a little different from the one that Trump administration used to justify tariffs on imported steel and aluminum in those cases, the administration said the country needs healthy steel and aluminum sectors to have a strong economy. Johnson says that's a controversial reading of the law. What we're seeing? Now really is a is a stretching of the statutory concept of national security to include economic security. In other words, he says the administration has been using the national security argument as an economic policy tool.

United States President Trump Commerce Department Mariel Cigar White House Mets Tatum Barent Jansen Jennifer Hillman Eakin Gump Japan Johnson Sixty Percent
"jennifer hillman" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Tuesday five March is always to have you along everybody we begin today with some metallurgy and some national security trade policy specifically section two thirty two of the trade expansion act of nineteen sixty two as amended there's a lot in that sense. So let me explain the aforementioned section to thirty two lets the president impose tariffs at his discretion on certain imports that he or eventually she decides are essential to national security, which is to say American national security demands this country have its own industries in the tariff items make sense. All right. That is the legal grounding for the president's tariffs last year on steel aluminum section to thirty two now to the metallurgy. The Commerce Department says under section two thirty two it's looking into putting tariffs on imports of something called titanium sponge, except this time it's not. Acting at the behest of the White House. It's a company called tie met. That's doing the asking the only manufacturer of titanium sponge in the United States. Marketplace's Mariel cigar takes it. From there Tatum. Sponge is a raw form of titanium that's used in a lot of military equipment helicopter, blades jet, airframes and engines tank armor, Jennifer Hillman, teaches at Georgetown law the companies that make those things import sixty percent of the titanium they need from other countries anti met. Again, the only company in the US that makes titanium sponge is arguing because it's used in all of these military applications that is an essence a threat to the national security of the United States. If a Commerce Department agrees, the president could impose tariffs on titanium imports, but Barent Jansen a trade lawyer at Aitken Gump says there's bound to be some pushback for one thing the US gets most of its titanium from Japan and Japan, of course. Is one of the closest military allies of the United States timeouts argument is a little different from the one. The Trump administration used to justify tariffs on imported steel and aluminum in those cases, the administration said the country needs healthy steel and aluminum sectors to have a strong economy. Johnson says that's a controversial reading of the law. What we're seeing? Now really is a is a stretching of the statutory concept of national security to include economic security. In other words, he says the administration has been using the national security argument as an economic policy tool. I'm maryelle Sarah for marketplace. Just because you can never have enough trade. All right. That's a bit tongue in cheek. But the news is the news. There is a meeting in Washington tomorrow with the European Union trade delegation and American officials about cars nominally in the Trump administration's demand that the EU cut its tariffs on American vehicles. As happen often times with trade, though things have gotten. Messy as marketplace's Stephen beard reports from the European desk in London. These talks should be easy. Unlike China, the EU is not a geostrategic rival for the US. And it hasn't been ripping off American technology the spat, oh, the call tariffs could be settled fast says Daniel gross of the center of a European policy. Studies you could reduce its high tariffs on cars. The US a little bit on trucks. And then both sides could claim victory at four. If it were only about cars, there wouldn't be really a problem. The problem is it's also about farm produce like chlorine wash chicken and hormone-treated beef the US wants to sell the stuff in Europe. But analyst Peter Clapp says your stomach that because of protectionism and consumer irrationality. There's this irrational fear about American food. Nobody seems to notice that Americans are eating it. So it can't be the end of the world nevertheless says Hogan's meeting of the German Bank, berenberg this produce is political poison here. It would topple for instance, the German government if the government were to try to lower the German or European consumer protection stand that's for certain agricultural goods, the US and the EU want to avoid a trade war. Professor Allen winters of Sussex university thinks they probably will. But is quite a significant, Sean, I think that we really could have a major bus stop. And that would be really serious for the world at one and a quarter trillion dollars a year. This is by far the world's biggest trade relationship in London. I'm Stephen beard for marketplace. Wall Street today, flat flat, flat flat. We'll have the details. When we do the numbers. The oil industry in this economy is really a tale of.

United States EU president Commerce Department Stephen beard Trump administration London Mariel cigar White House Daniel gross Tatum Aitken Gump Jennifer Hillman Barent Jansen Johnson Europe Washington Professor Allen winters
"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer hillman" Discussed on KCRW

"To have your long everybody, we begin today with some metallurgy and some national security trade policy specifically section two thirty two of the trade expansion act of nineteen sixty two as amended there's a lot in that sense. So let me explain the aforementioned section to thirty two lets the president impose tariffs at his discretion on certain imports that he or eventually she decides are essential to national security, which is to say American national security demands this country have its own industries in the tariff items make sense. All right. That is the legal grounding for the president's tariffs last year on steel aluminum section to thirty two now to the metallurgy. The Commerce Department says under section two thirty two it's looking into putting tariffs on imports of something called titanium sponge except this time it's not act. At the behest of the White House. It's a company called tie met. That's doing the asking the only manufacturer of titanium sponge in the United States. Workplaces Marielle cigar takes it from there. Titanium sponge is a raw form of titanium that's used in a lot of military equipment helicopter, blades jet, airframes and engines tank armor, Jennifer Hillman, teaches at Georgetown law the companies that make those things imports sixty percent of the titanium they need from other countries and met again, the only company in the US that makes titanium sponge is arguing because it's used in all of these military applications that that is an essence a threat to the national security of the United States, if a Commerce Department agrees, the president could impose tariffs on titanium imports, but Barent Jansen a trade lawyer at Aitken Gump says there's bound to be some pushback for one thing the US gets most of its Taytay neom from Japan and Japan, of course, is one of the closest military allies of the United States tie argument is a little different from the one. The Trump administration used to justify tariffs on imported steel aluminum. In those cases, the administration said the country needs healthy steel and aluminum sectors to have a strong economy. Johnson says that's a controversial reading of the law. What we're seeing? Now really is a is a stretching of the statutory concept of national security to include economic security. In other words, he says the administration has been using the national security argument as an economic policy tool. I'm Mariel Sarah for marketplace. Just because you can never have enough trade. All right that's bit tongue in cheek. But the news is the news. There is a meeting in Washington tomorrow with the European Union trade delegation and American officials about cars nominally in the Trump administration's demand that the EU cut its tariffs on American vehicles. As happen often times with trade, though, things have gotten messy as marketplace's Stephen beard reports from the European desk in London. These talks should be easy. Unlike China, the EU is not a geostrategic rival for the US. And it hasn't been ripping off American technology. The spat of the call tariffs could be settled fast says Daniel gross of the center of a European policy. Studies you could recuse it's high tariffs on cars. The US a little bit on trucks and then both sides could claim victory at four hundred. We're only about cars, there wouldn't be really a problem. The problem is it's also about farm produce like chlorine wash chicken and hormone-treated beef the US wants to sell the stuff in Europe. But analyst Peter Clapp says your stomach that because of protectionism and consumer irrationality. There's this irrational fear about American food. Nobody seems to notice that Americans are eating it. So it can't be the end of the world nevertheless, says hogwash meeting of the German Bank, berenberg this produce is political poison here. It would topple for instance, the German government if the government were to try to lower the German or European consumer protection stand up for certain agricultural goods, the US and the EU want to avoid a trade war. Professor Allen winters of Sussex university thinks they probably will. But it is quite a significant challenge. I think that we really could have a major bus stop. And that would be really serious for the Pac one and a quarter trillion dollars a year. This is by far the world's biggest trade relationship in London. I'm Stephen beard for marketplace. Wall Street today, flat flat, flat flat. We'll have the details. When we do the numbers. The oil industry in this economy is really a.

United States EU president Stephen beard Commerce Department Trump administration London Daniel gross White House Mariel Sarah Aitken Gump Pac Barent Jansen Johnson Europe Washington German Bank Jennifer Hillman