18 Burst results for "Jennifer Cash Enka"

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on WWL

WWL

04:09 min | Last week

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on WWL

"Loan hears this weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka. How is it that you can borrow thousands of dollars for a student loan and end up going twice? A cz? Muchas you borrowed Katie Hill, executive editor at Milly has some answers. Katie, What made you take a look at this dilemma? So I was, you know, doing my usual nightly stroll up Twitter looking at cat videos in the bad political news, But I saw this really interesting tweet where this woman broke. He borrowed about $38,000 from a private lender to Goto College. He'd repaid about $31,000 of that. And yet she's still owed $47,000 and those numbers just Jumped out at me and I was like, Wow, you know, he's almost paid back what he actually borrowed and still owes $47,000. So I thought, you know it's possible called a bunch of student loan experts and it's like, Yeah, you know, this isn't an uncommon Scenario here, right? People just don't really quite realise how how much is one that really cost them? How did she get into such an awful scenario? So. So what happens right? Usually for every $1 that you borrow, you repay $2, and that's just an average. But let's say you know if he and I don't know her exact scenario, but let's say she this payment there, he's added on who knows what the private lenders mortgage rate is typically higher than federal mortgage rates. You start looking at that right? You could be You know, interest is getting capitalized when you're in school collection charges If you defaulted on loans, loan fees if you didn't pay for a long time, but all of that to add up and people think Oh, my gosh. I borrowed 38,000. I should I should repay a little more like know something You've repaid double what you actually borrowed and I think that's sort of eye opening to people. Katie, You talked to some experts as you mentioned and found that you pay less. If you stick with a 10 year repayment plan. Why is that? Yeah, I mean, because a lot of people what they do is that they're like, Oh, I don't know if I can afford the monthly payment, so they extended out to 25 years or 2 30 years, but actually, 10 years trying to get it done repaid him in 10 years if you can just order loan period, right? You're more aggressively paying at your monthly payments may be higher. But that is actually a smarter thing to do If you could manage to afford that, we're speaking with Katie Hill, executive editor at Millie Katie. Why are private student loans more costly in general, then federal student loans? They tend to have higher interest rates and federal student loans, which, by the way, federal ones really, really, really well right now, the private loans tend to be a little bit more expensive into of the life alone that is really adding up. Katie. How does the cares? Act? Ah, factor into all of this for people who owe money. Through the end of September that cares active, actually providing you can kind of pause your payments without penalty for borrowers and that was happening was growing the virus and people realized. My gosh, you know the government like well, people onto the other say they're students. You are able to pause your payments without penalty. This is by the way on federal loans and then also, if you have inside alone, it also will and you're like I can't repay. Right now. It is worth a call to the lender just to see what they can do. Should you repay as quickly as you can, If you can. Not always so lessening of high interest credit card debt. It's probably a better idea to pay that down because the interest rate on that fire fire than your student loan interest rate I would guess, Um and so you're looking at interest, right? If you have a debt that has very high interest rates, you're gonna want to focus on that, while, of course, always paying the minimum on everything but Again. Look at that insist rate, but I think people think you want to get rid of my student long, whatever, but you know it's a credit cards out standing there you want you want. Think about that one. Is there anything different about student loans that make them costlier than other loans? Or is this just something that we're focused on? Because it's so much in the news right now. Well, you know, you think about sumo's actually is that people think Oh, you know, if they're in really bad financial straits I'll just filed for bankruptcy. Those often or not discharged in bankruptcy, right? There are very, very tough to get rid of. Oh, well, you'll pay. You know you're straight you pay your credit card has a higher and just write actually than a student loans. But what happened to soon loans is that they're very hard to discharge and make up so people had really a lot of trouble. These will still probably stick with them..

Millie Katie Katie Hill executive editor Jennifer Cash Enka Twitter Goto College Milly Um
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:37 min | 3 weeks ago

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Old man is accused of hitting an 83 year old man with a vehicle also believe the suspect said two vehicles in a workshop on fire Tony back. W T M J News. W T. M J forecast looking to be a windy Thursday. Mostly sunny, warm to start off, but cooling off in the afternoon. Highs will reach around 80 by early afternoon for Friday. Mostly sunny, mild, still windy highs around 76. Saturday. Mostly sunny. The pick day of the week end with highs around 80 Sunday. Thunder showers likely. Breezy, remaining warm highs around 78 Monday. Mostly cloudy, breezy evening showers and cool eyes around 68. In sports. The Bucks tried to rally late against the heat Wednesday, but a game ending foul causes them to lose 1 16 to 1 14 there now down two games to none in the playoff series. Game three is Friday and the Brewers win against the Tigers Wednesday. 8 to 5. Today is a travel days they'll be heading off to Cleveland to start a three game Siri's against the Indians on Friday. I'm rusty Mellberg News radio w T. M. J. From companies. Media networks is America's first news thiss morning. Your host wouldn't deal fast Track approval. Good morning on Gordon deal along with Ross, A k Who's in for Jennifer Cash Enka on this Thursday, September 3rd pleasure with us and here's what we have for you this hour. The Centers for Disease Control is telling states to be ready to distribute.

Jennifer Cash Enka Bucks Brewers Centers for Disease Control Tony W T. M J Mellberg News Siri Gordon America Tigers Cleveland Ross T. M. J.
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

04:29 min | Last month

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Not you can control yourself. After all, you can't overcome a challenge, big or small without being disciplined. Yet many people are finding it harder to maintain their self control these days. Here's guidance from this weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka. The pandemic has made us feel utterly powerless over so many things in our lives, but there's one thing we can control ourselves. Elizabeth Bernstein of the Wall Street Journal is here with more Elizabeth. How do you define self control? Well, I believe the experts define its ability to manage your thoughts, feelings and actions to achieve a future goal. So to do something for Goa temptation in the present so that you could do something that's good for you in the future. What do we do when we lose control? What kinds of things? Right now, Losing control can be losing control of our emotions weaken, be yelling at people are just sitting and staring off into the middle distance snapping. It loved one snapping a stranger. We could be binging Netflix when we really should be working, you know, watching Netflix is good in and of itself is a stress relief. It can make you laugh a little or get absorbed by something other than the moment But if you're doing it to the point where you're not exercising, or you're not Paying attention to your kids or your work in trouble. So it could be all kinds of things that go on what we could be called Dune Glowing. Would you be looking at our phones constantly updating the thieves looking at the news, which is we really should be doing anything but that went now. Is there evidence that we are losing self control more over the past six months or so. There's anecdotal evidence. I think we can see it out there, and I talked to a lot of people weakened and week out from my job writing this column, and people tell me that all the time. They're just having a harder time just maintaining themselves their center Bailey and so I hear it all over, but again, we could see it in what's going on in the world. I assume there is a difference between people who slip up every now and again and people who are out of control all the time. Well, sure, I mean, there's all sorts of things. They're you know, people who just are jerks, right? There's just people who don't care about self control. But also we are all born with the ability for self control. Some people have AH, higher propensity for it. So some people are born with personality trade, the more conscientious they may have had an easier time. And then there's people who were born more reacted, You know, Think of reactive baby. Those people who may react quicker to any kind of triggers. So there are we have different abilities Sport. Going out there from birth. But also it's a lot of nurture how the environment around us what was taught if we have good coping skills, But the best news is we can all work on. It doesn't matter what stage alight doesn't matter how you approached it before we all could improve on herself. Self control skills, even during these difficult times when we really need it, we're speaking with Elizabeth Bernstein of The Wall Street Journal. All right, Elizabeth. Give us some hints on how we can get a hold of ourselves a little better. There's many ways Ah, good habits or one way. Go to bed every at the same time every night, maybe shop locally, so you can walk and get some exercise help you put in the Forgo the temptations and put in the good good work towards those goals. But I looked in this article. It's something called cognitive reappraisal, which is what you're thinking You could do it in the moment. It is a bunch of fun little hacks for this that I really like one of them to repairing the thinking. If you're getting absorbed in a problem, you're feeling yourself controlled sweat. Is to put some distance, psychological distance between you and the problem or your icky emotion. That's this weekend's Jennifer Kharchenko with Wall Street Journal columnist Elizabeth Bernstein. 30 minutes now after the hour on this weekend. Everyone. Let's all stop what we're doing right now and take.

Elizabeth Bernstein The Wall Street Journal Netflix Jennifer Cash Enka Goa Jennifer Kharchenko Bailey
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:27 min | Last month

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Yourself. After all, you can't overcome a challenge, big or small without being disciplined Get many people are finding it harder to maintain their self control these days. Here's guidance from this weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka. The pandemic has made us feel utterly powerless over so many things in our lives, but there's one thing we can control ourselves. Elizabeth Bernstein of The Wall Street Journal is here with more Elizabeth. How do you define self control? Well, I believe the experts define it. His ability to manage your thoughts, feelings and actions to achieve a future goal. Go to do something for Goa temptation in the present so that you could do something that's good for you in the future. What do we do when we lose control? What kinds of things Right now? Losing control can be losing control of our emotions weaken, be yelling it. People are just sitting and staring off into the middle distance snapping. It loved one snapping it strangers. We could be binging Netflix when we really should be working, you know, watching Netflix is good in another self. It's a stress relief. It can make you laugh a little or get a report by something other than the moment But if you're doing it to the point where you're not Exercising or you're not paying attention to your kids or your work. It was trouble so it could be all kinds of things that go on what we could be big called dune glowing. Just looking at our phone, constantly updating the thieves looking at the news, which is we really should be doing anything but that letter now. Is there evidence that we are losing self control more over the past six months or so. There's anecdotal evidence. I think we can see it out there, and I talked to a lot of people week in and week out from my job writing this column, and people tell me that all the time. They're just having a harder time just maintaining themselves their center Bailey and so I hear it all over, but again, we could see it in what's going on in the world. I assume there is a difference between people who slip up every now and again and people who are out of control all the time. Well, sure, I mean, there's all sorts of things. They're you know, people who just are Adjourned, frighten people who don't care about self control. But also we are all born with the ability for self control. Some people have ah, higher propensity for it. So some people are born with personality trade, the more conscientious they may have even easier time. And then there's people who were born more reactive. You don't think of a reactive baby people who may react quicker too. Any kind of triggers. So there are we had different ability before going out there from birth. But also it's a lot of nurture how the environment around us what we're taught if we have good coping skills, But the best news is we can all work on. It doesn't matter what stage alive doesn't matter how you approached it before we all could improve on herself. Self control skills, even during these difficult times when we really need it, we're speaking with Elizabeth Bernstein of The Wall Street Journal. All right, Elizabeth. Give us some hints on how we can Get a hold of ourselves a little better. There's many ways Ah, good habits or one way go to bed every at the same time every night, maybe shop locally, so you can walk, get some exercise help you put in the forego the temptation that put in the good good work towards those goals. But I looked in this article. It's something called cognitive reappraisal, which is with re framing your thinking You could do it in the moment, and there's a bunch of fun little hack for this, but I Really like one of them to re pregnant thinking if you're getting absorbed in a problem of your feeling was help control slept is to put some distance, psychological distance between you and the problem or your icky emotion. That's this weekend's Jennifer Kharchenko with Wall Street Journal columnist Elizabeth Bernstein. 30 minutes now, after the hour On this weekend. News radio time. 5 30 an alarming new development in the battle against the Corona virus,.

Elizabeth Bernstein The Wall Street Journal Jennifer Cash Enka Netflix Goa Jennifer Kharchenko Bailey
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:39 min | Last month

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"It's not you can control yourself. After all, you can't overcome a challenge, big or small without being disciplined get many people are finding it harder to maintain their self control these days. Here's guidance from this weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka. The pandemic has made us feel utterly powerless over so many things in our lives, but there's one thing we can control ourselves. Elizabeth Bernstein of The Wall Street Journal is here with more Elizabeth. How do you define self control? Well, I believe the experts define it, his ability to manage your thoughts, feelings and actions to achieve a future goal. So to do something for Goa temptation in the present so that you could do something that's good for you in the future. What do we do when we lose control? What kinds of things? Right now, Losing control could be losing control of our emotions weaken, be yelling at people are just sitting and staring off into the middle distance snapping. It loved one snapping at strangers. We could be binging Netflix when we really should be working, you know, watching Netflix is good in and of itself is a stress relief. It can make you laugh a little or get a divorce by something other than the moment But if you're doing it to the point where you're not exercising, or you're not Paying attention to your kids or your work? It was trouble so it could be all kinds of things that go on. What we could be big soon. Chloe, could you speak looking at our phones constantly updating the seed looking at the news because we really should be doing anything but that went now. Is there evidence that we are losing self control more over the past six months or so. There's anecdotal evidence. I think we can see it out there, and I talked to a lot of people weekend and week out from my job writing this column and people tell me that all the time. They're just having a harder time just maintaining themselves their center Bailey and so I hear it all over, But again, we can see it and what's going on in the world? I assume there is a difference between people who slip up every now and again and people who are out of control all the time. Well, sure, I mean, there's all sorts of things. They're you know, people who just are jerks right? There's people who don't care about self control, but also we are all born with the ability for self control. Some people have a higher propensity for it. So some people are born with personality trade, the more conscientious Peter's, so they may have even easier time. And then there's people who were born more reactive. You don't think of a reactive baby. There's people who may react quicker to any kind of triggers. So there are we have different ability for it. Going out there from birth. But also it's a lot of nurture how the environment around us what was taught if we have good coping skills, But the best news is we can all work on. It doesn't matter. What stage of life doesn't matter how you approached it before we all can improve on herself. Self control skills, even during these difficult times when we really need it, we're speaking with Elizabeth Bernstein of The Wall Street Journal. All right, Elizabeth. Give us some hints on how we can get a hold of ourselves a little better. There's many ways Ah, good habits or one way. Go to bed every at the same time every night, maybe shop locally, so you can walk and get some exercise These help you put in the Forgo the temptations and put in the good good work towards those goals. But I looked in this article. It's something called cognitive reappraisal, which is what was training. You're thinking you could do it in the moment, and there's a bunch of fun little hack for this that I really like one of them to re pregnant thinking if you're getting absorbed in a problem or your feelings or self control, sweat Is to put some distance, psychological distance between you and the problem or your emotion. That's this weekend's Jennifer Kharchenko with Wall Street Journal columnist Elizabeth Bernstein. 30 minutes now after the hour on this weekend. This is news radio 1200 W Away I San Antonio and I heart radio station. Use. I'm Karen McCue. Portions of Texas and Louisiana, racked by Hurricane Laura.

Elizabeth Bernstein The Wall Street Journal Netflix Jennifer Cash Enka Chloe Karen McCue Goa Jennifer Kharchenko Bailey San Antonio Hurricane Laura Peter Texas Louisiana
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:19 min | Last month

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on KOMO

"Said that it's a default principle which we should try to do. Yes, however there but, however, is that we've always got to make a primary consideration. Health safety on the welfare of the Children of the teachers. Now, having said that if you look at the country there are parts of the country with a level of infection is really quite low and has been maintained this quite low. Under those circumstances. I think you can't compare them to other parts of the country. I know what you said. There. Doctor felt that we have to take a look at one region at a time. But one thing we can do is look at the schools that have tried to open already. And you've seen those images out of high school in Georgia students in the hallways many not wearing masks, little social distancing when all over social media Now we've learned that nine students and staff have already tested positive in that school alone to those images concern you and should all students should all students in this country be wearing masks. You know, I'm one and I've said it for so so long, David. But I really do believe if you and and it's part of what I call it a comprehensive way to really avoid the things that you were just referring to. There should be universal wearing masks should be the extent possible social distancing. Avoiding crowds outdoors always better than indoors and being a situation when you continue to have the capability of washing your hands and cleaning up with sanitizes when I see sights like that it is disturbing to me. So when you hear this local guidance coming from some schools that mask wearing will be Voluntary for students in those schools. You disagree with that? You say Universal mask wearing I want to see that The issue is that you know it's going to be decided at the local level. I could give you my opinion, right? You just said you just said universal wearing of masks, I would I feel that Universal wearing a mask is one of five or six things. That's very important in preventing the upsurge of infection and in turning around the infections that we are seeing. Surgeons Dr Anthony Fauci, speaking with ABC is David Mirror Come on News times, 6 50 on its time to get to our propel insurance money update. Tax policy experts say you shouldn't be waiting for a windfall in your upcoming paychecks despite President Trump's executive order, deferring payroll taxes The order might not bump up TECO money all that much per paycheck. And that's assuming employers even pause. The tax withholding from September 1st to the end of the year, as the order instructs, the order differs the employee's obligation to pay a 6.2% Social Security tax per paycheck. Polity business is already shaping up to be more expensive for retailers. UPS plans to impose hefty fees on Lord shippers during the holiday season, testing the ability of merchants to pass along shipping costs. As they grow more of reliant on online orders, and that's your money now. Jennifer Cash Enka Comeau News to a pretty good start, especially for the Dow Jones average this morning. It's up 331 point, so the Dow is now above the 28,000 level. That's a gain of more than 1%. The S and P is up about 1/3 of a percent. The NASDAQ is the loser this morning. Down about 1/3 of a percent Come on News times, 6 51 Coming up. I'm her Weiss bomb with new test results about the most effective masks and those that really won't help stop the spread of covert 19 right now. Savings.

David Dr Anthony Fauci Jennifer Cash Enka Comeau Universal Georgia Weiss President Trump ABC executive
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

05:11 min | 2 months ago

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"With us. Who would have thought that the Kobe 19 pandemic, which has brought so much anxiety, frustration and misery to millions of Americans. Would actually deep in the bonds of many families and friends. This weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka has a look at the unexpected consequences. The pandemic has deepened the bonds of many families and friends and unexpected ways. Many have turned to zoom and other online platforms to reconnect with people they haven't talked to or seen in years. But will we still want to do this? When this thing's all over? Clara ans Berries with the Wall Street Journal, Claire. Why did many of us reach out to people we haven't talked to in ages. Well, Part of it was that everybody was stuck at home and they couldn't go out and see people in person. And then there was also the the real fear and uncertainty with the pandemic, not knowing when you might see somebody again and also concerned about their health and well being so There was a lot of people initially saying, Are you okay? What's going on? And for some families and friends that's continued, have the frequency of those communications lessened of since March. It seems to be that way. I mean, people who were meeting weekly have decided to do it every other week. People already looking at you know somebody where they started out with 12 people. Now there's seven people, and there's more of a Joining when people can join, but not feeling applicator did, which is actually a good thing because you don't want people feel obligated and to not want to do it. I also think you know there is that Just a teak soon fatigue that people are feeling, too, when they're having more meetings, work meetings and everything, but you know, for some people, it has continued on a weekly basis. We just don't know how long it's gonna last. In the future. When everybody starts going backto work, declare your story mentioned that people tend to feel more connected when they had a smaller group chat rather than inviting a lot of people in. Why is that? A bigger group is the It's kind of like going to a seminar. Somebody said, you know, you feel like you are You know, at work or something like that, And there's also there's You know, everybody takes turns talking, which is a good thing, But when there's so many people there, there's not as much Given take the feeling is it's not like a regular conversation. We're speaking with clear ants Bury the Wall Street Journal. Clear Your story also noted that some people actually like the old fashioned phone call rather than a video chat. Why is that? Yeah, that there's a sense of more intimacy with a phone call. It was really interesting because some families parents and, you know, Children want to see the face of somebody that they love just to make sure they're okay. But other people went. One study showed that after video calls that some people feel lonelier because they see that person and realize how much they miss them. And they're really not sure when they're going to be able to see them again. So it's really a lot of Personal preference. I do think the family that was talking about I really needed to see their face and make sure they're okay. They said, you know, especially when there was a big outbreak where their Children lived. So it was like, Oh, my gosh. Cases are spiking here. I just need to see them and make sure they're okay. I know you talked to a number of people for your story. What did you find out about what they found out about other people They didn't know before. Really? I mean, when a group of sisters they haven't seen their scattered all over the country, they haven't seen each other for seven years since her mom's 80th birthday. And, you know, they just said things like we started texting, book recommendations and TV recommendations regularly and that was something that they just didn't do. I guess you know people grow apart or, you know, just don't keep those connections, And she said that one sister was taking online art classes and was sharing what she had done and she you know, the sister said. I never knew she had that talent. This weekend's Jennifer Kharchenko with Wall Street Journal reporter Claire ends Berry. 30 minutes Now, after the hour on this weekend, coming up next, the newest version of back to school anxiety Fentanyl is a synthetic drug. You cannot see taste or smell yet so powerful. Just a small amount can be deadly. Fentanyl is being mixed into drugs like heroin and cocaine, and most people don't even know it. It's killing Marylanders at an alarming rate. Knowing what to do in case of an overdose can.

Wall Street Journal Fentanyl Jennifer Cash Enka Claire Clara ans Berries Jennifer Kharchenko reporter heroin cocaine Berry.
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:27 min | 2 months ago

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Hey, Siri Play Jr. These were spending part of your weekend with us. Who would have thought that the Kobe 19 pandemic, which has brought so much anxiety, frustration and misery to millions of Americans would actually deep in the bonds of many families and friends. This weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka has a look at the unexpected consequences. The pandemic has deepened the bonds of many families and friends and unexpected ways. Many have turned to zoom and other online platforms to reconnect with people They haven't talked to or seen in years. But will we still want to do this? When this thing's all over? Claire Ans Berry is with the Wall Street Journal. Clear. Why did many of us reach out to people we haven't talked to in ages. Part of it was that everybody was stuck at home and they couldn't go out and see people in person. And then there was also the the real fear and uncertainty with the pandemic, not knowing when you might see somebody again and also concerned about their health and well being so There was a lot of people initially saying, Are you okay? What's going on? And for some families and friends that's continued, have the frequency of those communications lessened of since March. It seems to be that way. I mean, people who were meeting weekly have decided to do it every other week. People already looking at you know somebody where they started out with 12 people. Now there's seven people and there is more of a joining when people can join, but not feeling obligated, which is actually a good thing because you don't want People feel obligated and to not want to do it. I also think you know there is that fatigue soon fatigue that people are feeling, too, when they're having more meetings, work meetings and everything, but you know, for some people, it has continued on a weekly basis. Just don't know how long it's gonna last. In the future when everybody starts going backto work. Declare your story mentioned that people tend to feel more connected when they had a smaller group chat rather than inviting a lot of people in. Why is that? Well, a bigger group is the It's kind of like going to a seminar. Somebody said, you know, you feel like you are You know, at work or something like that, And there's also there's You know, everybody takes turns talking, which is a good thing, But when there's so many people there, there's not as much Given take the feeling is it's not like a regular conversation. We're speaking with Claire and bury The Wall Street Journal, Claire. Your story also noted that some people actually like the old fashioned phone call rather than a video chat. Why is that? Yeah, that there's a sense of more intimacy with a phone call. It was really interesting because some families parents and, you know, Children want to see the face of somebody that they love just to make sure they're okay. But other people went. One study showed that after video calls that some people feel lonelier because they see that person and realize how much they miss them. And they're really not sure when there's going to be able to see them again, So it's really a lot of personal preference. I do think the family that was talking about I really needed to see their face and make sure they were okay. They said, you know, especially when there was a big outbreak where their Children lived. So it was like, Oh, my gosh. Cases are spiking here. I just need to see them and make sure they're okay. I know you talked to a number of people for your story. What did you find out about what they found out about other people They didn't know before. But really, I mean, when a group of sisters they haven't seen their scattered all over the country, they haven't seen each other for seven years since their moms 80th birthday. And, you know, they just said things like we started texting, book recommendations and TV recommendations regularly and that was something that they just didn't do. I guess you know people grow apart or, you know, just don't keep those connections, And she said that one sister was taking online art classes and was sharing what she had done and she you know, the sister said. I never knew she had that talent. This weekend's Jennifer Kostenko with Wall Street Journal reporter Claire Ends.

The Wall Street Journal Jennifer Cash Enka Claire Ans Berry Claire Siri Claire Ends Jennifer Kostenko reporter
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:24 min | 2 months ago

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Scrabble Go, which is riling up. It's for the fans of its predecessor as Valerie Bore line of The Wall Street Journal tells us the falling tile, sparkling jewels and chat function Sartre for everyone. Valerie. Why did has Ro update the game? Well, you know, the game has been around on mobile phones since the beginning of mobile phones. Right in 8 4009 The Scrabble has had an app and there it was there it was simple and it fell far behind some of its competitors in popularity. Particularly worked with friends. And so it has said It was time to just reimagine Scrabble. Go into this colorful, exploding baby dragon asked, Type app. Who'd it has Ro hook up with to make some changes? Well, there's the company and they originally were repaired out with the gaming giant Electronic Arts, which a household name for their they're expecting in console games. But in this case has branched out to a smaller outfit called Scope that focuses on noble aps and the ones that were, you know, probably familiar with that are free. The Gallo but but entice E with ads or perk speak about within the game and scope is growing player in the mobile gaming space. So, Valerie. What? Don't traditionalists like about this game, or do you want me to start? You know, Scrabble? The original act that's been around for a decade had a very loyal base of users with him may not have met players that they played regularly around the globe but regular game They liked that they paid $10.1 time for no ads, and then had this game to play Scrabble on and Cobble Go is sort of Totally different model to them. It's there is lots of abilities to Jim's out of sparkling treasure test his ability to get the three date Hyo went in by playing all these other kinds of games that aren't Scrabble kind of games within the game. That word games but aren't scrabbling. It's just a much more dynamic modern game than a lot of the people that have been playing a long time. Have a taste for we're seeking with Valerie Bore line of The Wall Street Journal in a dimension that board games have held up fairly well during this pandemic are companies that have put out original board games. Ever going to abandon them completely, or they getting enough out of them that they'll be around. You know, I only answer that by saying one of things that surprising in the story is there is strong evidence that mobile devices are the primary went play where we play games period. Far more than board games is, I think we probably could guess, but also for more PC games console games. It's replace games on your mobile phone, and that is how Gaming is down these days. So I do think there is evidence that board game sales are up and with a game of Scrabble that's been sort of an annuity for half has both in 1948 already there seeing sales of the physical game pick up After the rollout of the APP. So the Wolsey Wall Street Journal's Valerie Bore line with this weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka six minutes now in front of the hour on this weekend,.

Valerie Bore The Wall Street Journal Wolsey Wall Street Journal Cobble Go Ro Electronic Arts Jennifer Cash Enka Sartre Gallo Jim Hyo
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:10 min | 2 months ago

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"For spending part of your weekend with us. Who would have thought that the covert 19 pandemic which has brought so much anxiety, frustration and misery to millions of Americans. It actually deep in the bonds of many families and friends, this weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka has a look at the unexpected consequences. The pandemic has deepened the bonds of many families and friends and unexpected ways. Many have turned to zoom and other online platforms to reconnect with people they haven't talked to or seen in years. But will we still want to do this? When this thing's all over Claire ans Berries with the Wall Street Journal, Claire. Why did many of us reach out to people We haven't talked to in ages. Part of it was that everybody was stuck at home and they couldn't go out and see people in person. And then there was also the A real fear and uncertainty with the pandemic, not knowing when you might see somebody again and also concerned about their health and well being. So there was a lot of people Initially saying, Are you okay? What's going on? Um, and for some families and friends that's continued, have the frequency of those communications lessened of since March. It seems to be that way. I mean, people who were meeting weekly have decided to do it every other week. People already looking at you know somebody where they started out with 12 people. Now there's seven people, and there's more of a joining when people can join, but not feeling obligated, which is actually a good thing because you don't want People feel obligated and to not want to do it. I also think you know there is that fatigue soon fatigue that people are feeling, too, when they're having more meetings, work meetings and everything but You know, For some people, it has continued on a weekly basis. Just don't know how long it's gonna last. In the future. When everybody starts going backto work, declare your story mentioned that people tend to feel more connected when they had a smaller group chat rather than inviting a lot of people in. Why is that? A bigger group is the It's kind of like going to a seminar. Somebody said, you know, you feel like you are, you know, at work or something like that. And and there's also there's You know, everybody takes turns talking, which is a good thing, But when there's so many people there, there's not as much given take. The feeling is it's not like a regular conversation. We're speaking with Claire and bury The Wall Street Journal. Clear Your story also noted that some people actually like the old fashioned phone call rather than a video chat. Why is that? Yeah, that there's a sense of more intimacy with a phone call. It was really interesting because some families parents and, you know, Children want to see the face of somebody that they love just to make sure they're okay. But other people went. One study showed that After video calls that some people feel lonelier because they see that person and realize how much they miss them. And they're really not sure when they're going to be able to see them again. So it's really a lot of Personal preference. I do think the family that was talking about I really needed to see their face and make sure they're okay. They said, you know, especially when there was a big outbreak where their Children lived. So it was like, Oh, my gosh. Cases are spiking here. I just need to see them and make sure they're okay. I know you talked to a number of people for your story. What did you find out about what they found out about other people They didn't know before. Those really mean when a group of sisters they haven't seen their scattered all over the country. They haven't seen each other for seven years since her mom's 80th birthday. And, you know, they just said things like we started texting book recommendations and TV recommendations regularly. And that was something that they just didn't do. I guess you know people grow apart or, you know, just don't keep those connections. And she said that one sister was taking online art classes and was sharing what she had done. And she you know, the sister said. I never knew she had that talent. This weekend's Jennifer Kostenko with Wall Street Journal reporter Claire Ends Berry. 30 minutes Now, after the hour on this weekend, coming up next, the newest version of back to school anxiety This is news Radio 1200 W Away I San Antonio and I heart radio station. News. I'm carried McCue another noisy.

The Wall Street Journal Claire Claire ans Berries Jennifer Cash Enka Claire Ends Berry. Jennifer Kostenko McCue reporter San Antonio
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

05:00 min | 2 months ago

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Which has brought so much anxiety, frustration and misery to millions of Americans. Would actually deep in the bonds of many families and friends. This weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka has a look at the unexpected consequences. The pandemic has deepened the bonds of many families and friends and unexpected ways. Many have turned to zoom and other online platforms to reconnect with people They haven't talked to or seen in years. But will we still want to do this? When this thing's all over Claire and Berries with the Wall Street Journal? Clear? Why did many of us reach out to people we haven't talked to in ages. Well, Part of it was that everybody was stuck at home and they couldn't go out and see people in person. And then there was also the the real fear and uncertainty with the pandemic, not knowing when you might see somebody again and also concerned about their health and well being. So there was a lot of people Initially saying, Are you okay? What's going on? And for some families and friends that's continued, have the frequency of those communications lessened of since March. It seems to be that way. I mean, people who were meeting weekly have decided to do it every other week. Um, people already looking at, you know somebody where they started out with 12 people. Now there's seven people and there is more of a Joining when people can join, but not feeling obligated, which is actually a good thing because you don't want people feel obligated and to not want to do it. I also think you know there is that Tough fatigue soon fatigue that people are feeling, too, when they're having more meetings, work meetings and everything, but you know, for some people, it has continued on a weekly basis. They just don't know how long it's gonna last. In the future. When everybody starts going backto work, declare your story mentioned that people tend to feel more connected when they had a smaller group chat rather than inviting a lot of people in. Why is that? Well, A bigger group is the It's kind of like going to a seminar. Somebody said, you know, you feel like you are You know, at work or something like that, And there's also there's You know, everybody takes turns talking, which is a good thing, But when there's so many people there, there's not as much Even take the feeling is it's not like a regular conversation. We're speaking with clear and bury The Wall Street Journal. Clear Your story also noted that some people actually like the old fashioned phone call rather than a video chat. Why is that? Yeah, that there's a sense of more intimacy with a phone call. It was really interesting because some families parents and, you know, Children want to see the face of somebody that they love just to make sure they're okay. But other people went. One study showed that after video calls that some people feel lonelier because they see that person and realize how much they miss them. And they're really not sure when there's going to be able to see them again, So it's really a lot of personal preference. I do think the family that was talking about I really needed to see their face and make sure they were okay. They said, you know, especially when there was a big outbreak where their Children lived. So it was like, Oh, my gosh. Cases are spiking here. I just need to see them and make sure they're okay. I know you talked to a number of people for your story. What did you find out about what they found out about other people? They didn't know before. But really, I mean, when a group of sisters they haven't seen their scattered all over the country They haven't seen each other for seven years since her mom's 80th birthday. And, you know, they just said things like we started texting, book recommendations and TV recommendations regularly and that was something that they just I didn't do, I guess you know people grow apart or, you know, just don't keep those connections, And she said that one sister was taking online art classes and was sharing what she had done and she you know, the sister said. I never knew she had that talent. This weekend's Jennifer Kostenko with Wall Street Journal reporter Claire Ends Berry. 30 minutes Now, after the hour on this weekend, coming up next, the newest version of back to school anxiety Hey away. NewsRadio time is 5 30 as the year's first US hurricane moves towards the Hawaiian Islands this weekend, residents.

The Wall Street Journal Claire Ends Berry. Jennifer Cash Enka US Jennifer Kostenko Hawaiian Islands reporter
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:51 min | 2 months ago

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"I'm Chris Foster. Fox needs Contractor lessons to a two way want to a to a way to canning. It's can. What's the deal with the flashlight? What do you mean? Like on our billboards and on our trucks and stuff? That kid with the flash latest mean? Zack, explain that to me? My dad was a big time expert. So back when I was in grade school, he would always take me with him on repair calls at night made you hold the flashlight. Yeah, And he would always explain to me how a diagnosis that's a good dad. That's what that is. And then he would show me the right way to fix it. Not the easy way. So that flashlight is a symbol, huh? That flashlight says an expert will always see the problem that the other guys can't see. That's why you make sure all our guys are experts. Yeah. And when you repaired things the right way, Not the easy way. You're like that beam of light. Always doing the right thing for the customers. That's what the flashlight mean. Zack. Thanks for telling me can get Joey T t. L way know our business and we know it well. From companies media networks. This is America's first news thiss morning with your host wouldn't deal In support of masks. Hi. This is Gordon. Deal with Jennifer Cash Enka on this Wednesday, July 22nd. Thanks for being with us, and here's what's up this hour. President Trump is now urging Americans to wear a mask, saying the beast coverings have an impact. He also wants a younger people to avoid crowded bars. 14 people have been hospitalized in Chicago after a shoot out between people in a speeding car and others attending a funeral. State Department says.

Zack President Trump Chris Foster Jennifer Cash Enka Fox State Department Chicago America Gordon Joey T
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

01:33 min | 2 months ago

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Street stock features or down the day after the NASDAQ rose to a record high again. I'm Dave Anthony, and this is Fox News. Making your way through La Mesa westbound side of the just before the 1 25 conked out pickup truck That's in the far right lane. National City North Found 805 Benita Road 50 for its Caltrans work with the two right lanes. Air ConEd off until five. Brian Duggan with a look atyour San Diego traffic. Do you own appreciated investment real estate? Are you tired of property management in tenant's etiquette issues? Are you concerned about New California rent controls and other government interference? Would you like to learn exit strategies for your property? What is your best move today? Learn many exit strategies for appreciated real estate, including property Management Free Delaware Statutory trust with webinar workshops online on your computer. Wednesday, July 22nd noon in Saturday, July 25th at 10 AM, registered by calling 619 43 10 31 4 rental owner workshop dot com. San Diego's news traffic and Weather Station news radio. 600 Kogo. From companies Media networks. This is America's first news thiss morning with your host Gordon. Deal. Risk Closing schools. Good morning. I'm Gordon Deal along with Jennifer Cash Enka on this Friday, July 10th Thanks for being with.

Gordon Deal San Diego Fox News Jennifer Cash Enka Dave Anthony Caltrans La Mesa Brian Duggan California Weather Station America
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:01 min | 3 months ago

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Pandemic has accelerated a years long shift in bargaining power away from colleges and toward families. Which are quite prepared to treat tuition as they would a car's price, something toe haggle over. Here's this weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka When it comes to higher education, bargaining power, is shifting away from colleges and universities and toured families. Josh Mitchell has written about the shift for the Wall Street Journal and joins us now. Josh, What did you find out about tuition, while the pandemic has given families more leverage to bargain for tuition discounts when they are getting their offers from from schools. This was actually a trend that had Ah been going on before the pandemic. So this is a Preexisting friend that the pandemic has accelerated, But basically, schools are in a tight position. Right now. They Are expecting a possible enrollment decline. You know 11 reason, for example, is fewer international students are going to be going to school next year. On DH, You know, families are more price conscious. They've either lost jobs or their businesses of fan businesses. Their businesses have Um, been hurt by the pandemic. And so right now, you have this normal negotiation process that happens to clean family school and family find themselves in a better position now. Teo Archy for reduced to tuition. Josh, we talking about mostly private schools, or does this encompass, um public universities as well? But we are talking mostly about private schools, but this type of negotiation process is increasingly happening. At public schools and the context here is that For years and years. Uh, mostly private schools have turned to consultants to determine how much parents are are able and willing to pay. And so one of the things that's been happening for a while now is schools will collect a lot of data data on perspective. Students. Um this data includes, you know, sex race Where where they live. You know the exact address of where they live, whether their parents are college graduates or not, And this is in addition to what there. S a T scores are and what their high school deepa is. And then they send that data to consultants. You think crunched the numbers and come up with an algorithm to determine how much the next year's class will be willing to pay. And this is how schools for awhile now, particularly private schools have have come up with individual discounts for different students to again extract the most money they can. They're trying to figure out how willing How able you are to pay public colleges are now getting into this because public colleges you know, some of them are struggling, and so they need to figure out You know, how can they extract the most money from the next year's freshman class on DH? The schools will say, Look, this is not just for us to, you know, make money. This is also for us to determine You know which students need the most financial aid, But there's you know, several things going on here. They do want obviously maximize the money they're making. And they also want to determine how to help students that need help. The most. We're speaking with Josh Mitchell, The Wall Street Journal, Josh. Obviously, things air rather chaotic in the world right now, including what will happen in the fall or even in August, when colleges open up again. How far are families going and deciding or not deciding to enroll? Also, that's a good question, because one of the things that's going on this year there was a a consent decree between the Justice Department and one of the main trade groups for colleges that was signed. Late last year, and basically that consent decree said that colleges are now able to recruit students beyond May 1. There used to be this hard deadline where if a student had committed to a school, then other competing schools could not dangle offers, if it was beyond may want will that That industry rule has now been scrapped. Which means there are a lot of students who have even right now have not committed to a school where in prior years they would have done so by now. And so you're seeing a lot of bargaining and negotiation. Between families and schools go on far later in the year, then we would see in prior years and you know, some of the consultants for these families that I'd talk to, you know, are saying this could go on for another few months? Because I think there is a lot of uncertainty, and I think you know families. Not only are they trying to bargain lower tuition, they're also trying to decide whether they're going And there Kids to score whether they're adult Children are going to go to school. Given that they don't know if they're campus. Is there going to be open? They don't know what the experience is going to be like, so there is still a lot of uncertainty.

Josh Mitchell Pandemic The Wall Street Journal Jennifer Cash Enka Teo Archy Nitze For Bluestar Justice Department reporter
Tuition Price Resets in the Age of the COVID Recession

Rosie on the House

05:01 min | 3 months ago

Tuition Price Resets in the Age of the COVID Recession

"Pandemic has accelerated a years long shift in bargaining power away from colleges and toward families. Which are quite prepared to treat tuition as they would a car's price, something toe haggle over. Here's this weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka When it comes to higher education, bargaining power, is shifting away from colleges and universities and toured families. Josh Mitchell has written about the shift for the Wall Street Journal and joins us now. Josh, What did you find out about tuition, while the pandemic has given families more leverage to bargain for tuition discounts when they are getting their offers from from schools. This was actually a trend that had Ah been going on before the pandemic. So this is a Preexisting friend that the pandemic has accelerated, But basically, schools are in a tight position. Right now. They Are expecting a possible enrollment decline. You know 11 reason, for example, is fewer international students are going to be going to school next year. On DH, You know, families are more price conscious. They've either lost jobs or their businesses of fan businesses. Their businesses have Um, been hurt by the pandemic. And so right now, you have this normal negotiation process that happens to clean family school and family find themselves in a better position now. Teo Archy for reduced to tuition. Josh, we talking about mostly private schools, or does this encompass, um public universities as well? But we are talking mostly about private schools, but this type of negotiation process is increasingly happening. At public schools and the context here is that For years and years. Uh, mostly private schools have turned to consultants to determine how much parents are are able and willing to pay. And so one of the things that's been happening for a while now is schools will collect a lot of data data on perspective. Students. Um this data includes, you know, sex race Where where they live. You know the exact address of where they live, whether their parents are college graduates or not, And this is in addition to what there. S a T scores are and what their high school deepa is. And then they send that data to consultants. You think crunched the numbers and come up with an algorithm to determine how much the next year's class will be willing to pay. And this is how schools for awhile now, particularly private schools have have come up with individual discounts for different students to again extract the most money they can. They're trying to figure out how willing How able you are to pay public colleges are now getting into this because public colleges you know, some of them are struggling, and so they need to figure out You know, how can they extract the most money from the next year's freshman class on DH? The schools will say, Look, this is not just for us to, you know, make money. This is also for us to determine You know which students need the most financial aid, But there's you know, several things going on here. They do want obviously maximize the money they're making. And they also want to determine how to help students that need help. The most. We're speaking with Josh Mitchell, The Wall Street Journal, Josh. Obviously, things air rather chaotic in the world right now, including what will happen in the fall or even in August, when colleges open up again. How far are families going and deciding or not deciding to enroll? Also, that's a good question, because one of the things that's going on this year there was a a consent decree between the Justice Department and one of the main trade groups for colleges that was signed. Late last year, and basically that consent decree said that colleges are now able to recruit students beyond May 1. There used to be this hard deadline where if a student had committed to a school, then other competing schools could not dangle offers, if it was beyond may want will that That industry rule has now been scrapped. Which means there are a lot of students who have even right now have not committed to a school where in prior years they would have done so by now. And so you're seeing a lot of bargaining and negotiation. Between families and schools go on far later in the year, then we would see in prior years and you know, some of the consultants for these families that I'd talk to, you know, are saying this could go on for another few months? Because I think there is a lot of uncertainty, and I think you know families. Not only are they trying to bargain lower tuition, they're also trying to decide whether they're going And there Kids to score whether they're adult Children are going to go to school. Given that they don't know if they're campus. Is there going to be open? They don't know what the experience is going to be like, so there is still a lot of uncertainty.

Josh Mitchell Pandemic The Wall Street Journal Jennifer Cash Enka Teo Archy Justice Department
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:34 min | 3 months ago

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Pandemic has accelerated a years long shift in bargaining power away from colleges. And toward families, which are quite prepared to treat tuition as they would a car's price. Something toe haggle over Here's this weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka When it comes to higher education, bargaining power, is shifting away from colleges and universities and toured families. Josh Mitchell has written about the shift for the Wall Street Journal and joins us now. Josh, What did you find out about tuition, while the pandemic has given families more leverage to bargain for tuition discounts when they are getting their offers from from schools. This was actually a trend that had been going on before the pandemic. So this is a Preexisting trend that the pandemic has accelerated. But basically, schools are in a tight position right now. They Are expecting a possible enrollment decline. You know 11 reason, for example, is fewer international students are going to be going to schools next year. On DH, You know, families are more price conscious. They've either lost jobs or their businesses. Fan businesses their businesses have Been hurt by the pandemic. And right now, you have this normal negotiation process that happens between family school and family find themselves in a better position now. Teo Archy for rig reduced to tuition. Josh, we talking about mostly private schools, or does this encompass, um public universities as well? We are talking mostly about private schools, but this type of negotiation process is increasingly happening. That public schools and the context here is that For years and years. Mostly private schools have turned to consultants to determine how much, Uh parents are are able and willing to pay. And so one of the things that's been happening for a while now is schools will collect a lot of data data on perspective. Students. This data includes You know, sex race Where where they live. You know the exact address of where they live, whether their parents are college graduates or not, And this is in addition to what their s A T scores are and what their high school g p A is. And then they send that data to consultant to thank, crunched the numbers and come up with an algorithm. To determine how much the next year's class will be willing to pay. And this is how schools for awhile now, particularly private schools, have, um, have come up with individual discounts for different students to again extract the most money they can. They're trying to figure out how willing How able you are to pay public colleges are now getting into this because public colleges You know, some of them are struggling, and so they need to figure out You know, how can they extract the most money from the next year's freshman class? Um and the schools will say Look, this is not just for us to, you know, make money. This is also for us to determine You know which students need the most financial aid, But there's you know, several things going on here. They do want obviously maximize the money they're making. And they also want to determine how to help students that need help. The most. We're speaking with Josh Mitchell, The Wall Street Journal, Josh. Obviously, things air rather chaotic in the world right now, including What will happen in the fall or even in August, when colleges open up again. How far our family's going in deciding or not deciding to enroll. Also, that's a good question, because one of the things that's going on this year there was a a consent decree between the Justice Department and one of the main trade groups for colleges that was signed. Late last year, and basically that consent decree said that colleges are now able to recruit students beyond May 1. There used to be this hard deadline where if a student had committed to a school, then other competing schools could not dangle offers. If it was beyond may want well, that That industry rule has now been scrapped. Which means there are a lot of students who have even right now have not committed to a school where in prior years I would have done so by now. And so you're seeing a lot of bargaining in negotiation. Between families and schools go on far later in the year, then we would see in prior years and you know, some of the consultants for these families that I've talked to, you know, are saying this could go on for another few months? Because I think there is a lot of uncertainty, and I think you know families. Not only are they trying to bargain lower tuition, they're also trying to decide whether they're going on there. Kids to score whether they're adult Children are going to go to school. Given that they don't know if they're campus. Is there going to be open? They don't know what the experience is going to be like, so there is still a lot of uncertainty. That is a Wall Street Journal reporter Josh Mitchell with this weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka 21 minutes after the hour on this weekend, coming up next tech products to add life to your home office. If baby could talk, she say a lot. You know what she's thinking? And what makes her happy. But unfortunately, baby can't talk or remind you. You were the one taking her to daycare today, and she won't speak up..

Josh Mitchell Pandemic The Wall Street Journal Jennifer Cash Enka consultant Teo Archy Justice Department reporter
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

05:18 min | 3 months ago

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"You got the day off. Gordon, deal with Jennifer Cash Enka coming up this half hour, the hot selling hidden vault that conceals guns and money in your car. Also the Facebook friends that moms do not want Plus who avoids showing their face on video calls, And here comes a penumbra ll eclipse tomorrow night will tell you about it in about 20 minutes. One of the hottest selling accessories right now for SUVs and pickup trucks, is a hidden vault that's installed in the centre console that can hold wallets, phones and guns. It's a story by Phoebe Wall. Howard, who reports on the auto industry for the Detroit Free Press. Part of the U. S A today network. Phoebe, take us through this. Kind of an amazing Ah, development here. Where, Because of coded as we know, the FBI data showed many, many more people are using conceal carry weapons these days, So you've got a company that is making the vault and they've been around for quite a while. Your wallet and things like that, but frankly, they're encouraging people to put their guns in these faults. In the console in jeeps and trucks and cars. And the reason why this is significant is law enforcement says that gun fact is really a problem. Now, the more concealed carry permit. There are the more guns are being stolen. People pop them in the glove box. They put him under the seats. They go surfing. They go swimming. They go hiking and they leave weapons in the car. All right. So as one guy you spoke to obviously loves the top down and you know the windows dropped or whatever you call it on a jeep on me, and he says, everything is exposed on me. If you stick something in the glove box that's easily popped open with maybe screwdriver, Crowbar. What's incredible Two? Is that the Jeep Wrangler? Obviously that that the buyer that you're talking about But the Jeep Wrangler is it such a popular vehicle, and it's increasingly popular selling more and more. And if he said, you know, you're stuffing your pockets full of stuff. I mean, just going into the gas station, you know, going to think you can't leave anything because people convinced what you know, Walk by and take anything but you also have situation for people are doing jury duty. You can't take in phones now. Ah lot of this where you have smash and grab, you know, we track in San Francisco in particular. Someone called me and said, you know, am I promoting gun you or this company targeting gun users. In fact, this company specializes in automotive used for vaults. There are many good vault company's But this one specifically meet back for all these different car companies. And and that's why there seems to be a great desire for the product. Right, so the product is called the console vault. How easily is it installed? It fits inside and existing Consul, I guess. Yeah, you pop out the existing one. It gives you some easy directions. I talked to you. I cold called people who were cut from Earth. I didn't know what they would tell me. I didn't know any of the background and I talked to women who said they surprised the men in their lives. One of fiance want husband and and put that in there in 5 to 7 minutes with very little stress or anxiety or trouble. So it's bull pit Ian. But it provides instruction on how to do that. And again, I thought it would be much more complicated and intimidating, but it doesn't seem to be on again. This is just for security. Like why worry? I go paddling all the time. I go hiking, but I leave all my stuff. One hiker called me and said nobody should be leaving anything ever. And, uh, but But the fact is, people do, you know, especially when you go to the beach? Speaking with Phoebe Wall, Howard, she covers the automotive industry for the Detroit Free Press. Part of the U. S. A Today network. Her pieces called driving with a gun, hidden vault, concealing guns and money. His hot selling accessory for pickups and SUVs. The vault I'm guessing is just for handguns. No, In fact, no no people if if you're in the entire every vault built for that particular vehicle, it's not standard side. So when it is ordered you give the make and model of your vehicle, a jeep, a truck, a Toyota Camry. And they designed it for that. So it fit very tightly and securely and then you know, it just stays in the car and for everything again, the original use of this was for papers. I spoke with one Woman hey, works in immigration and for work, and she has to carry passports and highly sensitive documents. And she said, it is frightening. How much people lewd path port, you know, travelers and things like that. Phoebe Phoebe Wall Howard reports on the auto industry. For the Detroit Free Press. It is 20 minutes now. In front of the hour on this morning, America's first news Capital One knows life doesn't alert you about your credit card. Okay. Catch surfers. We've.

Phoebe Phoebe Wall Howard Detroit Free Press Phoebe Wall Wrangler Facebook Capital One Jennifer Cash Enka FBI Gordon San Francisco Toyota America Camry
"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:52 min | 3 months ago

"jennifer cash enka" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Nuggets closing their team's practice facility after initially reopening the players and staff on Saturday. Meanwhile, N BA commissioner Adam Silver says he remains confident about the league's returned to play plan. But he also tells time 100 talks a large number of cases would cause another league stoppage and some unfortunate news for minor league baseball. They have officially canceled their season in 2020. I'm Kevin Welles News radio W T. M. J. From companies Media networks. He's America's first news thiss morning with your host Gordon deal 100,000 cases per day. Good morning. I'm Gordon Deal along with Jennifer Cash Enka on this Wednesday, July 1st pleasure with us. And here's what we have for you this hour country's top infectious disease expert is warning that Corona virus infections could get worse that people continue ignoring mask and distancing guidelines. More states reporting restrictions in place. Ahead of the July 4th weekend, For example, Delaware is closing beach bars on Friday with an assist from a government stimulus package during the pandemic stops completed their best quarter in more than 20 years and food banks bracing for a second wave of demand related to Corona virus, layoffs and furloughs. What's happening hooping for being demand that they've never seen before. And these air food think but have Around from for 30 years and before the pandemic one pantry, too. They were serving about 91,000 people a month that jumps about 123,000 people a month. Elizabeth Buchwald and Market Watch on how food banks expect higher needs. His federal unemployment benefits expire. The country's top infectious disease doctor.

Adam Silver Gordon Deal T. M. J. Jennifer Cash Enka Nuggets commissioner Elizabeth Buchwald Kevin Welles baseball Delaware America