35 Burst results for "Jennifer A"

COVID vaccines saved 20M lives in 1st year, scientists say

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 2 d ago

COVID vaccines saved 20M lives in 1st year, scientists say

"A new study estimates that nearly 20 million lives were saved by COVID-19 vaccines during their first year Scientists at imperial college London used data from a 185 countries excepting China to create their model The main finding was that a catastrophic 19.8 million COVID-19 deaths were prevented by the vaccination effort in the first 12 months That includes 1.9 million people in the United States alone The model was based on estimates of how many more deaths than usual occurred using only reported deaths the number saved to still a staggering 14.4 million lead author all over Watson We estimate that one in 5 deaths that occurred due to COVID-19 in low income countries would have been prevented if those targets had been reached Out of Ben with the university of Bristol medical school says the findings underscore both the achievements and the shortcomings of the vaccination campaign We can't just say oh well we've learned what to do now and just give them access to everyone and be fine It's more complicated than that I'm Jennifer King

Covid University Of Bristol Medical London China Watson United States Jennifer King
At Pride, celebrations amid a darker national environment

AP News Radio

01:05 min | 2 d ago

At Pride, celebrations amid a darker national environment

"LGBTQ communities across America are celebrating Pride Month but activists say this year feels different Big crowds are expected Sunday at pride events in places like New York City San Francisco and Denver In a return to large in person events but organizers describe a renewed sense of urgency commemorations that in the recent past have felt like victory parties for civil rights are grappling with a darker atmosphere that includes a rise in hate speech online legislation in Florida and Texas a more conservative Supreme Court in the arrest of 31 members of a white supremacist group in riot gear accused of plotting to disrupt a pride event in Idaho Their real life consequences real people who are affected by this At a Trebek a film festival pride event earlier this month Emmy winning trans producer and actor Laverne Cox talked about the struggle We have to draw on our ancestors and transistors in these moments to know that we can and will overcome Michael Adams is an advocate for LGBTQ elders He says a tax going on around the country are about trying to make them invisible which makes this year's pride events especially important I'm Jennifer King

New York City Denver Laverne Cox San Francisco America Supreme Court Florida Idaho Texas Emmy Michael Adams Jennifer King
US coach makes dramatic rescue of artistic swimmer at worlds

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 3 d ago

US coach makes dramatic rescue of artistic swimmer at worlds

"A quick thinking coach prevented tragedy at the swimming world championships in a dramatic rescue Artistic swimmer and two time Olympian Anita Alvarez lost consciousness and slipped to the bottom of the pool after completing her solo free final at the world aquatics championships in Budapest on Wednesday Her coach Olympic medalist Andrea Fuentes dove in fully clothed to pull the 25 year old swimmer to safety Fuentes told a Spanish radio outlet that when she noticed something was wrong she shouted at the lifeguards but they didn't seem to understand and the few seconds that passed before she jumped in felt like an hour Alvarez was not breathing when she was rescued but Fuentes says the swimmer is doing well after getting some water in her lungs The coach compared swimming to other endurance sports saying we push through limits and sometimes we find them U.S. artistic swimming tells the AP the swimmer has been evaluated by medical staff and will continue to be monitored I am Jennifer King

Swimming World Championships Anita Alvarez Andrea Fuentes Fuentes Budapest Alvarez Swimming AP U.S. Jennifer King
1/6 panel to hear of Trump's pressure on Justice Department

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 3 d ago

1/6 panel to hear of Trump's pressure on Justice Department

"The select committee investigating the capitol riot will hear from former Justice Department officials about an Oval Office showdown as Donald Trump sought to overturn the 2020 election The 5th committee hearing will shine a light on a turbulent stretch during president Trump's last days in office as he tried to bend the Justice Department to his will Lawmakers will hear from Jeffrey Rosen who was acting attorney general on the day the capitol was breached as well as top deputy Richard Donoghue and Stephen engel who was the assistant attorney general who ran the Justice Department office that provided legal advice to the executive branch According to Donahue's handwritten notes made public last year Trump directed Rosen over the phone to just say the election was corrupt and leave the rest to me and the Republican congressman during a tense meeting on January 3rd the officials threatened to resign en masse when Trump proposed replacing Rosen with loyalist Jeffrey Clark the acting head of the civil division who supported Trump's bogus claims of election fraud in Georgia Jennifer King Washington

Justice Department Jeffrey Rosen Donald Trump Richard Donoghue Stephen Engel Oval Office Rosen Donahue Jeffrey Clark Jennifer King Washington Georgia
Tennessee GOP leaders urge delay of toddler COVID-19 shots

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 d ago

Tennessee GOP leaders urge delay of toddler COVID-19 shots

"Some state lawmakers are taking aim at the distribution of newly available COVID vaccines for children under 5 Top Tennessee Republican House leaders are urging governor Bill Lee to delay the state's health department from distributing and promoting COVID-19 vaccines that are now available for infants toddlers and preschoolers In a letter sent Wednesday to the Republican governor State House leaders including Tennessee House speaker Cameron Sexton and House majority leader William Lambert said they had too many concerns surrounding the vaccine for those under 5 years old the lawmakers claimed that the COVID-19 emergency has long passed in Tennessee though that statement is disputed by public health experts The letter comes just days after Florida raised eyebrows for being the only state in the country not to pre order the vaccine for its toddlers Florida's Republican governor Ron DeSantis said he wouldn't facilitate their distribution but the shots are available to those who want them I'm Jennifer King

Top Tennessee Republican House Governor Bill Lee Tennessee House Cameron Sexton William Lambert Covid State House Tennessee House Florida Ron Desantis Jennifer King
Catastrophic Security Failure: Joe DiGenova on the Events of January 6

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:12 min | 3 d ago

Catastrophic Security Failure: Joe DiGenova on the Events of January 6

"Brad raffensperger many others appear in front of the January 6th. I'm going to use a phrase one of my code is used inquisition. It's either a star trader or an inquisition. Give us your take to date in the last few weeks, judge Jennifer in terms of your experience working as U.S. attorney for the district, working as a special counsel for the DoJ as a lawyer to date. Your description of this event. On January 6th, we were in your studio. Yes. When this happened and my immediate response after watching it was this was a catastrophic security failure. And everything to date that has come out of these hearings has confirmed that. It shows that they purposely did not want to be prepared. They had insecure fencing. They had insufficient number of police officers, no National Guard, no U.S. troops, the fencing that exists at the Supreme Court in anticipation of the road case, the Dobbs case is the kind of fencing that should have been up. It wasn't. What they had upward bicycle racks and all sorts of things. They had their civil disturbance, 50% of them were on leave that day.

Brad Raffensperger DOJ Jennifer U.S. National Guard Dobbs Supreme Court
Powell: Fed will decide on rate hikes 'meeting by meeting'

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 4 d ago

Powell: Fed will decide on rate hikes 'meeting by meeting'

"Federal Reserve chair Jerome Powell is underscoring the fed's determination to slow inflation Price pressures have spread to a broad range of goods and services Addressing the Senate banking committee Jerome Powell says the Central Bank is keenly aware of the problems dogging the U.S. economy as it struggles to recover from the pandemic We understand the hardship that high inflation is causing We are strongly committed to bringing inflation back down Powell came under fire from both sides of the aisle senator Elizabeth Warren got the fed chair to acknowledge that raising interest rates won't reduce gas or food prices Rate hikes won't make Vladimir Putin turn his tanks around and leave Ukraine After blaming President Biden's $1.9 trillion stimulus package for exacerbating inflation senator Tom tillis is North Carolina accused Paolo of taking too long to raise rates The fed is largely boxed itself in to a menu of purely reactive policy measures Jennifer King Washington

Jerome Powell FED Senate Banking Committee Senator Elizabeth Warren Central Bank President Biden Powell U.S. Senator Tom Tillis Vladimir Putin Ukraine Paolo North Carolina Jennifer King Washington
South China floods force tens of thousands to evacuate - The Associated Press

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 4 d ago

South China floods force tens of thousands to evacuate - The Associated Press

"Major flooding has forced the evacuation of tens of thousands of people in southern China Floodwaters from heavy rainfall have collapsed roads submerged houses and factories and swept away Carson crops in the manufacturing hub of Guangdong China regularly sees flooding in the summer months but this year is considered the worst in decades officials have suspended school office work in public transportation in the South China province amid rising waters Chinese state TV showed city streets waste deep in water In neighboring junkie rescue crews and inflatable boats evacuated residents trapped in their homes in inundated villages storm warnings have been issued with more rain expected in eastern provinces including the capital Beijing I'm Jennifer King

China Guangdong Carson South China Beijing Jennifer King
Nobel sold for Ukrainian kids shatters record at $103.5M

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 5 d ago

Nobel sold for Ukrainian kids shatters record at $103.5M

"A Nobel Prize sold off Monday night raised a staggering amount for Ukrainian charity The Nobel Peace Prize auctioned off by Russian journalist Dmitry muratov to raise money for Ukrainian child refugees sold Monday night for a $103.5 million shattering the old record for a Nobel No word on who bought it muratov said in an interview after the auction I was hoping that there was going to be an enormous amount of solidarity but I was not expecting this to be such a huge amount muratov has said the proceeds will go directly to UNICEF in its efforts to help children displaced by the war in Ukraine just minutes after bidding ended UNICEF told the auction house It had already received the funds I'm Jennifer King

Muratov Dmitry Muratov Nobel Prize Nobel Peace Prize Unicef Ukraine Jennifer King
Production at bedeviled baby formula factory halted by storm

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

Production at bedeviled baby formula factory halted by storm

"Severe weather rolling through the Midwest has led to more problems at Abbott's baby formula factory in Michigan Production has halted at Abbott nutrition's large baby formula factory in Sturgis Michigan less than two weeks after it started up again Abbott spokesman Jonathan Hamilton says they need to assess the damage and re sanitize after severe thunderstorms and heavy rain late Monday led to flooding in a few areas of the facility The plant was shut down in February after the Food and Drug Administration began investigating bacterial infections among infants and found numerous violations at the plant The company was allowed to reopen when a severe shortage of infant formula drew nationwide attention Abbott says they are at 95% of their pre recall formula output from different factories and had prioritized ramping up production of its elika specialty formula so it can meet that need for now I'm Jennifer King

Abbott's Baby Formula Factory Abbott Nutrition's Large Baby Jonathan Hamilton Michigan Sturgis Midwest Abbott Food And Drug Administration Jennifer King
WHO: COVID-19 deaths rise, reversing a 5-week decline

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

WHO: COVID-19 deaths rise, reversing a 5-week decline

"Global deaths from the coronavirus are back on the rise In its latest weekly assessment the World Health Organization says 8700 people buy globally last week from COVID-19 a 4% increase coming after 5 weeks of declines The largest jump in deaths were centered in the Americas and the western Pacific coronavirus infection cases in general continued to fall with about 3.2 million new cases reported last week but large regional spikes of infection were seen in the Middle East and Southeast Asia The organization says the figures are likely an undercount because so many countries have reduced testing and surveillance hosting a meeting of the COVID-19 global action plan in Washington U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken warned health officials about relaxing their guard as the detailed plans to send additional pediatric vaccines to nations like Nepal and Mongolia I'm Jennifer King

Covid World Health Organization Western Pacific Americas Southeast Asia Secretary Of State Antony Blin Middle East Washington U.S. Nepal Mongolia Jennifer King
What we know about how Pence's day unfolded on Jan. 6

AP News Radio

01:00 min | Last week

What we know about how Pence's day unfolded on Jan. 6

"Today's January 6th committee hearing will focus on former president Trump's last ditch efforts to pressure vice president Mike Pence to overturn the results of the 2020 election Mike Pence won't be testifying at this afternoon's hearing but he will be in the spotlight as the focus of the committee turns to former president Trump's attempts to persuade his vice president to somehow reject the electoral count and deliver him a second term so that committee vice chair Liz Cheney The select committee will examine president Trump's relentless effort on January 6th and in the days beforehand to pressure vice president Pence to refuse to count lawful electoral votes As a federal judge has indicated this likely violated two federal criminal statutes The committee is expected to hear from Greg Jacob former council vice president Pence and pence's informal adviser J Michael Ludwig a retired judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals who called the plan incorrect at every turn The session is also expected to divulge new evidence about the dangers Pence faced that day as the mob stormed the capitol Jennifer King Washington

Mike Pence Donald Trump Liz Cheney Greg Jacob Michael Ludwig U.S. Court Of Appeals Pence Jennifer King Washington
Retail sales in May slip 0.3% amid surging inflation

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last week

Retail sales in May slip 0.3% amid surging inflation

"The government reports that retail sales fell unexpectedly in May The commerce department reports that Americans trimmed their spending last month with retail sales unexpectedly slipping .3% the fall was led by a sharp decline in auto sales and the figures look worse when you adjust for inflation and exclude sales from gas stations showing how higher prices at the pump are accounting for more shoppers overall budget The national average for a gallon of gas is up 56 cents from a month ago and 60% since last year retailers say customers are also turning away from pandemic priorities The government report found sales at food stores and restaurants were up but building and garden supplies are slowing furniture home items electronics and online sales in general fell roughly 1% despite a record job market Andrew hunter with capital economist tells the AP surging prices may be finally taking their toll on real consumption I'm Jennifer King

Commerce Department Government Andrew Hunter AP Jennifer King
Republicans gain House seat in special election in Texas

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | Last week

Republicans gain House seat in special election in Texas

"A Latina House candidate is being hailed by Republicans after beating her nearest democratic challenger in the heavily Hispanic and soon to be redrawn 34th congressional district of Texas In the Rio Grande valley of Texas Republican Myra Flores narrowed the House democratic majority by getting over 50% of the vote in a special election to serve the remaining months of a seat vacated by a Democrat She'll have to run again in November Speaking to supporters in San Benito Texas after her victory Flores talked about a conservative wave and thanked Donald Trump We can not accept the increase of gas of food medication we can not accept that And we have to save the facts that under president Trump we do not have business in this country Audio courtesy KRG She made history flipping the district red as well as becoming the first Mexican born woman to be elected to the U.S. House I'm Jennifer King

Latina House Myra Flores Texas Rio Grande Valley San Benito Flores Donald Trump House U.S. House Jennifer King
GOP's Rice loses, Mace stays on after challenges by Trump-endorsed candidates

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last week

GOP's Rice loses, Mace stays on after challenges by Trump-endorsed candidates

"I'm Jennifer King reporting South Carolina splits the difference between two Trump targets and Tuesday's primaries 5 term U.S. representative Tom rice who supported the second impeachment of Donald Trump was defeated in the GOP primary for South Carolina's 7th congressional district which includes Myrtle Beach This see doesn't belong to me It belongs to the voters right And so it's what they want not what I want Audio courtesy WPD Rice lost a state representative Russell fry who was backed by Trump but U.S. representative Nancy mace who criticized the former president over his role in the January 6th insurrection held on to her seat in South Carolina's first district defeating Trump back challenger Katie arrington Maestro endorsements from high profile Republicans like Mick mulaney and Nikki Haley Trump did congratulate mace on her victory and predicted she would win in November To see that unity come forth is a really big deal to keeping our party together and moving forward in the low country and winning in November Audio courtesy IV I'm Jennifer King

Jennifer King Tom Rice South Carolina Wpd Rice Russell Fry Nancy Mace Donald Trump U.S. Myrtle Beach Katie Arrington GOP Mick Mulaney Nikki Haley Trump Mace
1/6 panel to hear Trump campaign manager, probe election lie

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | Last week

1/6 panel to hear Trump campaign manager, probe election lie

"The House committee investigating the January 6th riot at the U.S. capitol will hear from more witnesses Monday The select committee delves deeper into former president Trump's unsupported claims of mass voter fraud and his effort to overturn the election today Trump's 2020 campaign manager Bill stepien who according to a subpoena oversaw the conversion of Trump's presidential campaign to a stop to steal effort is likely to face questions about what those in Trump's inner circle were telling the president about the election results The committee will also hear from a former Fox News political editor Chris stirewalt who stood by an election night decision to declare Biden had won Arizona A second group of witnesses will be made up of election officials investigators and experts including a former U.S. attorney who resigned after Trump pressure Georgia state officials to overturn his defeat committee members are saying they have uncovered enough evidence for the Justice Department to consider a criminal indictment against the former president Jennifer King Washington

Donald Trump Bill Stepien House Committee Select Committee Chris Stirewalt U.S. Fox News Biden Arizona Georgia Justice Department Jennifer King Washington
US: Pfizer COVID-19 shot appears effective for kids under 5

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last week

US: Pfizer COVID-19 shot appears effective for kids under 5

"Federal health officials have taken a step closer in the emergency authorization process for coronavirus vaccines for younger kids In an analysis posted Sunday the Food and Drug Administration said that Pfizer's child sized coronavirus vaccines for children under 5 appear to be safe and effective The FDA is expected to make its official decision shortly after an all day meeting Wednesday by an independent panel of experts then it goes to a CDC panel Last week the FDA also gave the thumbs up to Moderna's shots for children under 6 White House virus response coordinator doctor Ashish jha detailed the government's preparations for the expected approvals We could see shots in arms of kids under 5 as early as the week of June 20th Millions of doses have been pre ordered but it's not clear how many parents will get their kids vaccinated right away Government data shows that less than a third of those ages 5 to 11 have already gotten the two recommended doses Jennifer King Washington

Food And Drug Administration Ashish Jha Pfizer Moderna CDC White House Government Jennifer King Washington
WHO: COVID origins unclear but lab leak theory needs study

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 weeks ago

WHO: COVID origins unclear but lab leak theory needs study

"The WHO says the origins of COVID need more study The World Health Organization is recommending in its strongest terms yet that a deeper probe is required into whether a lab accident may be to blame for the coronavirus pandemic The WHO concluded last year that it was extremely unlikely COVID-19 might have spilled into humans in the city of Wuhan from a lab many scientists suspect a coronavirus jumped into people from bats possibly via another animal yet in a report released Thursday WHO's expert group said key pieces of data to explain how the pandemic began were still missing The scientists say the group will remain open to any and all scientific evidence that becomes available in the future to allow for comprehensive testing of all reasonable hypotheses I'm Jennifer King

The World Health Organization Wuhan Jennifer King
"jennifer a" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

Checking In with Michelle Williams

01:48 min | 11 months ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

"Checking in with michelle. Williams is a production iheart radio and the black effect for more podcasts. From iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcast or wherever you listen to your favorite shows looking for great entertainment sign up for peacock the free streaming service from nbc universal watch thousands of hours of hit movies and shows including current series and exclusive originals. Plus get live sports. Wwe kids entertainment and more and with tons of always on picot channels. You can stay connected. Twenty four seven with live news sports talk and so much more. Find perfect pick for any mood on peacock. That's why you can't not watch sign up for free at picot. Tv dot com at state farm. They're focused on the belief that diversity makes safer stronger smarter neighborhoods. Were all are welcome. Neighborhoods that are reflective of the culture maker. Shakers move up tomorrow to make a better world for our future generations. We must amplify celebrate and empower black creative today and that's why state farm is committed to providing services platforms and longstanding actions to help build strong neighborhoods for the black community. They don't just provide a policy..

"jennifer a" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

Checking In with Michelle Williams

05:50 min | 11 months ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

"But i know they still are recorded. Because you don't you don't know what gym you're gonna catch right. Even though they caught cuts right is like ni- they might still be record. We went over. Production sounds so many times because we couldn't come out of things especially the church scenes. Yes i wanted to speak on that. And those church scenes in a few other scenes that i'm i'll get to after this question. You went to some deep emotional spaces in the film. Respect right And i know sometimes for actors. Doing film is therapeutic in quite healing. Because maybe if you're not an emotional person in or you don't have anybody to imo to on a daily basis. Sometimes this you're able to do it in your art right. And i know you are extremely careful about what you give to the public regarding your private life as public figures. Sometimes our private lives are made public. You're not able to grieve certain losses. The way someone else would be able to write. So i would like to ask with some of that. The vessel for some of the emotional places you able to go to in the film you know is a lot of things to me like sometimes you as an actor. You don't realize how much you're going to be affected are how much you have to give a what it requires of you until you're in that moment you know and then i i like i like real things and so i wanted to come from the most and real plates and i felt it was necessary because it's like her story is vulnerable to in order to tell her story in the most careful respectful way and i need to bear myself as well. Do you find yourself able to bare yourself in real life. I feel like it may come out vulnerable. Yes and no yes and no hands varies but after like it comes out most through my artistry you know which can still be healing but it costs so much like like each tiered. No that's real. That comes from somewhere within that act. I'm telling you jennifer. I said this is so real even as audra mcdonald who is brilliant. Who plays your mother who plays a wreath mother. The way she was holding you on amazing grace now. I don't have to ask. Because i believe. I know i just wanna say i saw you and it made me marvel at your grace and poise. Even more i promise you. This is what i wrote. Well well i said. I marvel at your grace employs even more because i know what it costs you costs. Thank you thank you michelle while like it's real and you know. What can i say this. It was that moment for me.

audra mcdonald jennifer michelle
"jennifer a" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

Checking In with Michelle Williams

03:24 min | 11 months ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

"It's it's yeah. And i sit back and look at it like okay. Adam saint john's work so many times not to be able to recognize this time around. And so i said i'm in awe of god. What i'm like my work. Yes yes yes yes. I'm so happy for you and your entire team. I pray that you can just of course we have to do the promo work of at all and let everybody know about it but you really can really sit and rest. No is gonna do amazing just because of the divine timing of it all it lets you know god is in this and so i wouldn't worry about a thing. I'm just go tell you if you haven't already you probably the one doing the dustin but somebody do the dust in on your shelf to make room for a few extra pieces of metal. Alright make room. Wow thank you brought up the song. We come this far by faith. And i feel like you shine whatever genre of music. You sing right. You could do country. Bluegrass gospel rb pop. You probably can do opera. Actually i'm getting ready to go. Come on somebody when you get back to your roots and sing gospel. How is that for you will. It's always the base of everything for me. you know. it's it's who i am is what i am is what a made up of so. It's the foundation of it. All and the same is franklin. That was most important to me in the film. Like i don't care what jump she saying. The gospel is always the premise in the base of that. And it's the same for myself. Yes yeah and. I've never seen you change every now and then i'm like okay. Well maybe jennifer. She didn't put as much vibrato hubert. I've never heard you change like what you do out in your music. Never have you ever had people to tell you you. I need you to real that in. This is our embi. I need judah come. Actually one of the first memories of net or experiences was actually american idol was okay jal like you gotta let the gospel jog. What what does that mean. But you know when his in us eu. And as i say born in the church y'all alma godmother's lab in the choir stand while the adult hers six days a week. So wow you know. That's all. I know i didn't start even singing secular music and said i was in high school in my family. Didn't hear me sing it. Until i was on american idol. Named like you know. We never heard things music and i'll site. Wow that's we had a family truck church so it was always in church that they heard me say well know. I mean we've seen throughout the years. If i'm not mistaken the church rally behind you your church specifically. I've seen things where you've gone back to your church or you've introduced to us your musical foundation and so i know they're proud and once they see respect i i just i just think they're gonna be even more overwhelmed. I know i was i was. You're speaking tone in the movie. Aretha hat this this year. Every.

Adam saint john dustin alma godmother hubert franklin jal judah jennifer eu Aretha
"jennifer a" Discussed on Crime Junkie

Crime Junkie

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on Crime Junkie

"Notes. All of my god. She'd leave the house and pretend she was going to class but in reality jennifer was spending her time with the boy she'd loved for years. Daniel wong police are stunned as they sort through. All of this information. Because like i said this is years worth of lie after lie after lie until finally in two thousand nine jennifer's parents found out the truth and they went basically nuclear in truly. That is when her dad gave her the ultimatum. It's daniel or it's us and she chose her parents. But jennifer didn't break up with daniel so the psycholgist repeated arguments demands tears restrictions. But here's the thing. Jennifer just wasn't lying to her family. Her lying extended all of her personal relationships. Police learn that she'd lied to her friends and told them her. Dad hired a private investigator to track her every move which he didn't after daniel broke up with her. Once in started a new relationship. Jennifer came up with a way to get him back. According to court documents and christie. Blandford's piece in the montreal gazette. Jennifer told daniel that several men disguised as police officers tricked their way into her house and gang raped her. We whites yet. And that's not all she said. Jennifer told daniel that her rapists were sent by his new girlfriend and then she claimed these people again instructed by daniels. New girlfriend stuck a bullet in an envelope a few days after the alleged rape in mail to her house as another warning to stay away from him so once again when the truth was in with jennifer wanted. She lied to get her way. So i keep coming back to jennifer's age not that what she did would have been more justifiable if she still been a teenager. But i was moving out. Just not an option right. I don't know don't get me wrong and clearly. There is some deep seated mental health issues. She needs help for. I mean the fact that she was self harming his incredibly concerning but she wasn't a child anymore. I feel like she'd options available that i don't know murderer. Well throughout the rest of twenty ten and into the spring of twenty eleven with jennifer in custody. Police focused their efforts on identifying the men jennifer hired to kill her parents. According to that. Same montreal gazette piece. I just mentioned police use cellphone records and banking records to tie three. Met named david mylvaganam. Eric cardi and linford crawford to the attack. David and eric who are already in police custody on an unrelated murder charge are arrested. On friday april fifteenth and linford. A couple of weeks later in early may all three are charged with murder attempted murder and conspiracy to commit murder all connected not just through jennifer but to daniel to what you see. Even though daniel wasn't one of the intruders police learned that he was the go-between for them and jennifer and he helped devise the whole plan. So daniel wong to ease arrested the pretrial proceedings go on for years and the trial finally starts on march nineteenth twenty fourteen almost three and a half years after the murder of beca- pan according to cbc news all five defendants jennifer. Daniel david eric. Lanford are being tried together. One count each of first degree murder and attempted murder. The ground prosecution alleges that with her parents out of the way jennifer stood to inherit half of their estate which according to the red deer advocate was worth around a million dollars at the time of the shooting. So that would have been more than enough for to set up a new life with daniel now. Jennifer actually testifies and she sticks to her story that the whole night with a suicide attempt gone horribly wrong but the jury doesn't buy it in the end after intense trial lasting almost nine months. Jennifer pan is found guilty on one count of first degree murder and one count of attempted murder. Daniel david and linford are also found guilty. But we what about eric. So i guess eric's lawyer got sick during the trial so eric's case was severed from the others but instead of going to another trial he ends up pleading guilty. In december of twenty fifteen to conspiracy to commit murder remember. He is already doing time for a separate murder so his sentence for his part in jennifer scheme as eighteen more years on top of what. He's already the serving out his sentencing. He admits that he did indeed help. Plan to murder jennifer's parents and driving linford and david to the pants house but he denies ever going in the house. He died in prison in two thousand eighteen and to this day none of the men have ever admitted who actually pulled the trigger for trying to kill her parents. Jennifer pan is sentenced to life in prison with a minimum of twenty five years before she'll be eligible for parole. The soon as she can apply is twenty thirty five when she'll be forty nine years old and she's banned by court order from contacting her father or her brother a jennifer sentencing. Her younger brother felix used his victim. Impact statement to tell the court about how her actions shattered his life his happy memories of his mom his childhood or too painful to even talk about now forever tainted by big hawes. Brutal death felix recounts how as a result of what jennifer did. He's lost most of his friends. He can't find work because people hear his last name pan and automatically assume the worst and he describes coping with his new reality as being quote like a dark shadow. It's something i can't hide from in hans victim impact statement. He tells the court about the lasting burden. The crime has put on his life. He can't work anymore. Yes take all kinds of medication. Every single day and he's rocked by nightmares anxiety and post traumatic stress disorder. He also has depression and constant chronic pain from the shooting that have sucked the joy out of his hobbies like gardening and working on old cars while grief every move that he makes the not just grief for his wife but grief for jennifer too and the family that he feels like you lost at the end of his statement han talked to jennifer directly and he told her quote. I hope my daughter jennifer thinks about what has happened to her family and can become a good honest person someday. I've said it before. And i'll keep saying it as long as we do this show when people show you what they're capable of pay attention. Obviously jennifer pan is a very extreme case. Not everyone who grows up. Demanding parents tries to have them and not everyone who tells ally is capable of planning a murder but when there is not just one lie but a complicated web of deceit that spans back over a decade and creates almost an alternative reality in the process that is concerning if someone can lie that much to so many people for so long than what else can they do. It's not easy or pleasant to ask these questions about the people you love but the truth is.

David Jennifer eric Eric cardi Daniel david daniel Daniel david eric two thousand linford crawford twenty five years friday april fifteenth jennifer christie david mylvaganam Jennifer pan december one count david twenty thirty five daniels
"jennifer a" Discussed on Crime Junkie

Crime Junkie

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on Crime Junkie

"This episode is made possible by grove healthy plant based nontoxic cleaning products work and the good ones are actually more enjoyable to us. But where do you start in. who do you trust. that's where global collaborative comes in grove. Collaborative is an online marketplace. That delivers natural home. Beauty and personal care products directly to your door. I use their trash bags detergent pods and they're glass containers for my cleaning products and they are everything. Making the switch to natural products has never been easier for limited time when my listeners. Go to grove dot o slash crime junkie. You'll get to choose a free gift with your first order of thirty dollars or more but you have to use our special code go to grove dot co slash crime junkie to get your exclusive offer. That's grove dot. co slash crime junkie according to karen. Kay whose article. He was shot twice once in the shoulder and once in the face as a result he's got broken facial bones bullet fragments in his face. That can't be removed and a shattered bone in his neck. Or the bullet grazed hans carotid artery got so he's lucky to be alive let alone wake. Yes and police are super eager to talk to him but han can't actually talk yet. Duda severity of his injuries. So police will have to wait to get a statement from him in fact his injuries are so bad that he can't leave the hospital to go to his wife's funeral even during the funeral though. Police still have surveillance on and jennifer doesn't show a lot of emotion during her mom's funeral which strikes police as odd. Okay here's the thing. I feel like a broken record. Because i feel like in every single episode but people have expectations for what they think. Grief looks like and. I think that gets lost a lot when we talk about stuff like this. We as outsiders don't know what kind of behavior is taught in any person's upbringing or home like Some families like mine like they feel very big and they feel very big out loud to each other and that's incredibly healthy to my family but others just don't sometimes it's cultural sometimes it's just personalities but when i remember back to listening to three of counter clock a which if you haven't yet you absolutely need to listen to that a seizure this episode nor your house in percent but a no spoilers are jeff and jackie pelley talking about how their dad taught them and their siblings. Crying was not an option. Do not cry no matter what yes so to your point. I mean a lot of how people respond in those moments. How were they raised to respond in those moments because we by all means we're not only reason that same box anyways however she was acting however they felt about. It doesn't matter what they needed. More than anything was hans statement and amazingly just a few days after coming out of his coma. He's able to talk to police. He remembers every terrible thing that happened on the night of the shooting and he tells law enforcement a truly incredible story according to christie blotch for peace in the leader post on details a pretty normal monday he tells officers he went to work then. He went to home depot with his brother-in-law before going home for dinner with big hot in jennifer and he said he was asleep in bed by eight thirty. Everything seemed fine until suddenly han jolted awake to find a strange man in his bedroom pointing a gun right at his forehead and demanding money. Honda's police how the intruder hurted him out into the hallway. But just as he was about to go downstairs hans as that he saw something that turned his fear into utter shock. Bear standing in the doorway to her bedroom was jennifer not tied up not at gunpoint but speaking quietly to another one of the intruders as han tells police it was as if jennifer was talking to a friend that gives me full body chills for shore from mayor hahn says the man forced him downstairs at gunpoint where he saw his wife big hough sitting on the couch with yet another strange man behind her holding a gun on her according to han she hadn't even had time to take her feet out of the tub she'd been soaking them in. The gunman then heard it. Han and big hough down to the basement. Hans says big hob begged for the men to spare jennifer's life and instead of telling her to shut up or demanding money like they've been doing all along one of the intruders said something strange he said quote. Don't worry your daughter is very nice. So i won't hurt her and quote the next thing on new. He blacked out from being shot in the face. As jeremy de reported for the markham economist and sun hung tells police that when he woke up he was bleeding and big hall with lying on the floor next to him. She didn't respond when he said her name or moved when he shook her. That's when he ran out of the basement screaming just like we heard on that nine one one call. I mean at this point. I'm still in awe. That not only. Is he alive wake but he was able to run for his life after being shot in the face. It's a miracle. It is truly incredible so hearing this suddenly all of the polices suspicions about jennifer those little nine feeling that something wasn't quite right with her story. They all click into place. Jennifer wasn't able to call nine one one because she'd miraculously contorted her body to get her phone out. She was able to call because she had helped. Nothing was taken from the pans home because the invaders weren't there to commit a story. They were there to commit murder and they didn't leave jennifer as a witness because they were incompetent. They didn't shoot her because she wasn't there. Target just like that police name jennifer as a suspect in her mother's murder and mind you. This isn't publicly. But in italy among police jennifer is now their prime suspect on november. Twenty second exactly two weeks after the murders police call jennifer back to the station for a third interview. According to court records detectives once again have her walk them through her version of events. They talk about jennifer's relationship with her family and her boyfriend daniel and then about an hour and fifteen minutes into the interview. They switched tactics instead of asking her. What she remembers happened. These start telling her what they think happened that instead of being a victim like she's been claiming they think she's involved what they don't know though and what they want her to tell them is exactly how over the next couple of hours. The police keep pressing her. Just tell us the truth. Jennifer do the right thing jennifer. Get it off your chest. The hurt and pain and secrets. Go all you have to do is be honest more than once jennifer asks. What's going to happen to her. But detectives reiterate that until they know the truth about what she did. There's no way of knowing what happens next. Finally after over three hours of questioning police watch as an emotional jennifer benz forward in her chair almost in the fetal position. She stays quiet for several long minutes and then finally she starts to talk about what really happened that night. And no one. I mean.

Jennifer daniel thirty dollars Hans Honda jeremy de jeff jackie pelley italy twice november karen Twenty second monday third interview christie blotch Kay once three fifteen minutes
"jennifer a" Discussed on On with Mario Interviews

On with Mario Interviews

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on On with Mario Interviews

"Pretty much herself into the group. Pretty hard working single mom got it got it. Got to respect that and jen. How do you like Like all the dynamics right there at the show is it is it kind of tribute with the drama or or you kind of have fun with it or which approach into it. It was a whole different. It was you think for me. So i just kind of like tip toe my way round everybody on the now i think are a little more comfortable in france. Happy valley get along with everybody. I just kind of go with the flow seal Not so much drama. He i. I mean i'm with my husband all the time i i do some girls nights handouts but the most part i think you know i keep it cool. Let me ask you something. Because my wife was i was conversation with you. You say you do some girls nights. What are you average on girls nights. He's got a couple of kids and and like you say like. How often do you have a girls night. It's not so often so when so like not but what once every other month or like once a month. Maybe i mean a lot of my friends have kids. Yeah it's hard to get together once a month once every other month and you guys dinner and the whole thing. And you're and frank is supportive of that and cool and mom needs a break right and and i'm sure probably actually set her up as long as she like her. That obviously is not as more like specifically during the pandemic is more like come over. The she goes over to their house. Glass of wine or two. You know it's it's it's nothing. Like what.

france two frank once a month single mom jen Glass of wine once couple once every
"jennifer a" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on Women and Crime

"To make this right so she reached out to the lead detective and arranged to meet him at a nearby church so ronald and his wife and jennifer and her husband and you had like a victim advocate and the detective. They all got together and she said she wanted to just ronald and his wife separately and she said when he came into the room. She said quote. I'm sorry if i spend every day for the rest of my life telling you how sorry i am. It would not come close to how i feel. Oh yeah me too. And jennifer is baffled at his response. And i think most people would be because you know what he says jennifer. I forgive you. I am not angry. You do not want you to be frightened. The may i will never hurt you. I want you to be happy. And i want you to have a good life. How good person right talk about like redemption and it's at chills again now the to talk for about two hours. They talk about their pain being victims of a flawed system. And about how. They're both victims of bobby pool and they continue to spend time with each other and they became closest of friends. This is like real restoration. You know yes. And that's actually a very nice segue to jennifer's doing now which will get to in one moment now jennifer and ronald. They're not just friends. They travel around the country telling their story. I actually heard them speak together at a conference. And there's not. There's not a dry eye in the room. They're both just the strongest. Most amazing people jennifer says that ronald has taught her about forgiveness healing and faith and he has taught her to not feel like a victim anymore but she's helped him in many ways to she lobbied to help change law so that would be entitled to more than the five thousand dollars. The state originally offered as compensation five thousand dollars for eleven years five thousand per year with a cap which still isn't enough not even close..

ronald jennifer eleven years five thousand dollars five thousand per year both one moment more than the five thousand do about two hours
"jennifer a" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on Women and Crime

"They're using what's called relative judgment. Which picture looks the most like the person to looks like him but three looks a little more like him before. You're comparing each picker to each other. You're not using what's called absolute judgment by comparing each photo or person to your memory. So they use the simultaneous array for both the photo lineup. And also the live lineup. That's how it was done them. Pretty much sequential wasn't really Adopted or a introduced until much later. Here what i find interesting is research is now saying that sometimes. It's actually better to use a simultaneous because of position effects and because of cases when someone has a distinct feature. So we're kind of you see this a lot in research at say one thing out. Newer research is kind of questioning the older research. But when you have the quench lineup. You're showing one picture at a time. So some research says the position of the suspect or the potential perpetrator could lead people example. That the person is in position. One of a sequential versus position three versus position six. That's going to lead people to make less accurate identification. I see they're giving weight to someone who comes up first versus the middle. Okay got it either way. I think there's more of a consensus that's quench will is still the way to go. Then there's the weapon focus effect. Oh i heard this one before. Yes so this is when a witness and even more so happens when it's a victim to a crime. Diverting their attention to a weapon rather than who is holding the weapon this could be because we have high in stress responses and our memory doesn't work as well in these situations. You're focusing more an item that is novel so someone who doesn't have a lot of experience with a weapon this is going to affect them more because they're focusing on the weapon more we know in jennifer's case there was a knife so this is something that we have to take into consideration although like other witnesses. Jennifer had the opportunity to see her perpetrator for a longer period of time but remember he was not in the direct light and he would not turn to her when there were lights on thought. Then we have the cross race effect. Jennifer is a white woman. Her attacker was a black man. So meghan what does the cross race effect and we make poor eye-witnesses when we have to identify people of other races were better at identifying people interests within our own no matter what the races. You're absolutely right in almost half of wrongful convictions. That are based on this. Identification are cross racial and a majority of them are white victims and african american perpetrators got and this is not intentional and this is not related to someone's level of racism or bias because researchers have looked at that to see if the cross race effect is stronger for people who hold racial views. And it's not so it's not something that we can say a victim or witness is doing on any conscious level. Yup so this is really the perfect storm of eyewitness issues. We have the unconscious transference. We have the lineup array. Being simultaneous not sequential. We have cross race. We have weapon focus. This is not looking great so on august first nineteen eighty-four just days after the attack. Ronald cotton is arrested..

Jennifer Ronald cotton jennifer meghan both three each picker one picture each photo one thing august first nineteen eighty-f One first each african american six one days position
"jennifer a" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on Women and Crime

"For law enforcement on procedures that can help them obtain more accurate eyewitness evidence and these types of instructions were included now today. Most jurisdictions have adopted jennifer was able to discount a few of the men automatically but she says when she looked at ronald continents photo. The fear came flooding back and that made her feel confident that this was the perpetrator now. A few days later she was brought back into do a physical lineup. She was informed that that this was not going to be typical lineup. Where you have suspects behind a one way mirror. So they wouldn't be able to see the victim. They actually brought this victim to a room with nothing separating her from these men except for table why from what i understand they were in the middle of doing construction on the police facility. And because of that they didn't have the capabilities to do this. One way. mirror. Jennifer describes this as being the most frightening. And can you imagine not only. Is it frightening. Not only does it. I feel like victimize her so much so but it also i would think would produce inaccurate results. Exactly this is setting us up for lots of issues with this eyewitness identification procedure as i mentioned. Jennifer says this scared her. She started shaking her head in her heart pounding. She felt like she was gonna throw up. The men were also instructed. Of course turn left. Turn right they had to do. Avoid presentation where they had to repeat some of the lines that jennifer her that night. Such shut up. Or i'll cut you. And jennifer had remembered that her rapist had quite a distinct voice so she felt that this was she had told that detectives have i hear them speak. I'll be able to better figure something out here. Ultimately when it came down to choosing jennifer said that ronald ins quote distinct notes. And his quote. Almost smug and arrogant attitude is what helped her ultimately decide that it was him who had raped her that night. I want to stop to discuss a few of the procedures that were used to make this identification because eyewitness memory can become unreliable as a result of influences introduced by the legal system and we see a lot of issues here first of all. Let's talk about the fact that jennifer i viewed a photo lineup and then viewed alive lineup. Now ronald was in the photo lineup and then ronald was in the live lineup. So that means you. Isn't that like a confirmation bias or something like close unconscious transference okay. So unconscious transference refers to an eyewitness misidentification of an innocent bystander. Because of the witnesses exposure to that person in another context and it wasn't just any context. It was a mugshot. So this is very relevant. Because jennifer sees ronald's photo during the mugshot. So he then seems like only familiar face the her from what i understand. He was the only one that showed up in both the photo and the live lineup ago. Setting it up for failure already absolutely and then the lineup array. There's a little bit mixed evidence on this but historically speaking research has consistently shown that lineup tight matters so we can show line of sequentially or simultaneously sequentially one at a time. This is picture one. Is this person. Yes or no before you move forward. This is different simultaneous which is seeing all say. Six people are six photos at once when people see a simultaneous lineup..

Jennifer today Six people six photos One way jennifer A few days later one way mirror both first picture one one that night ronald
"jennifer a" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on Women and Crime

"It turns out she knew them to see far so she was able to see him probably clearer than he believed. she could also referred to her boyfriend who being in germany. Which in fact was her brother who sent her postcards but clearly. He went through her personal items to have even known this after the attack. The perpetrator told jennifer that he needed her to come down and she told him that she was very much afraid of nice and asked if he could please put the knife outside. Wow so was trying to find a way to obviously get him out of the bedroom. How can i escape this situation. He actually did listen and he put the knife right outside the door but not there wasn't enough time that she could escape. She also s at this point if she could use the bathroom and he allowed her to do so but may turn off the light when she was in the bathroom she was looking around to see. What can i do. Fortunately there was a window unfortunately that when there was much too small for jennifer to escape she then asked if she could get a drink and she also offered him a drink again. This very smart. She's able to stay calm and just kind of play his game. She went into the kitchen and she was making lots of noise. He was in her living room. He turned on the stereo. Made some comment about being ready to party. He thought that this was going to be a good time. At the same time. Jennifer's planning her escape. She knows there is a door in her kitchen. So a member. I said she's making lots of noise hoping to kind of have him not notice what's about to happen. She also knew that if she turned on the lights he wouldn't go near her because he made sure to stay away from any light because he was trying to protect themselves from being identified so she made sure to turn on that kitchen light as well at this point she musters up the courage to run..

Jennifer germany jennifer
"jennifer a" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on Women and Crime

"How are you today. I'm great what's going on with you. How nothing i'm excited for. Today's case as usual as usual. Yep i want to thank 'em and natalie baleno further help with today's research. Oh excellent thanks girls. yes thank you in. Today's case inspired my master's thesis o remember member. Whatever with on it. i do. It's wrongful conviction. It'd be eyewitness identification. You really do. Listen yes do you know what. I wrote my thesis on. I know your dissertation was bail. Yes sorry okay. Paid attention meghan before we jump into today's episode. Let's thanks of our supporters. Sounds great pay. So i we have meghan m. Hey like your name is very cool main and we also have kelly from austin. Oh thanks kelly. We might be an austin this year. Crime con- yes fingers crossed. Yes we'll be virtual. Hopefully if not in person so stay tuned for that and kelly. Hopefully we'll see there and making. I want to quickly read a message as somebody left us on instagram. Oh okay we love hearing from you all we love your emails. We love when you write us on facebook on instagram on read it. We just really love hearing from you. So this person with such a cute dog as their profile picture says that we are both in inspiration to the true crime world and for the criminal justice system and as a woman pursuing a degree in this field. I am thrilled to have found to intelligent. Knowledgeable people who handle each case with integrity in-depth thought and respect. Thank you for being a source of positive energy to my life and a reminder of why my own path has been led to this field. Wow it's one of the nicer things. I've read anxiously. Nice god in a couple of people who are in this field who have felt some and have reached out to us. Ask us questions. And we're always happy to help. Advise and we're i think it's so great to inspire people to go in this field because we're so passionate about it. Yeah thank you all so much for your support. In any way whether it's social media leaving a review telling a friend becoming a patron whatever it is. We really appreciate you. Thank you everyone. So this case inspired my thesis and my interest in wrongful convictions with specifically in the area of eyewitness identification issues. So let's talk a little bit about the background here. In one thousand nine hundred four jennifer thompson was a twenty two year old college student with a four point zero attending ilan college in burlington north carolina. It was her senior year and her goal was graduate as valedictorian of her class and she was looking forward to a teaching assistant position where she planned on getting her master's degree in exercise physiology. She was a really smart girl. She was working two jobs during the day. She was teaching a women's health and aerobics class. In the evening she worked at a restaurant she also had a serious boyfriend who was attending nearby university and the two were talking about getting engaged. Things were going well for this young woman and meghan. I'm not spending too much time on her background here because there is a lot to cover in this case a lot has happened since the crime as well. Okay july twenty eighth. Nineteen eighty-four was a typical day for jennifer. She was attending classes and studying for final exams. She had gone to play tennis with her boyfriend. And then afterwards they went out to eat at a restaurant around nine o'clock jennifer came down with a pretty bad headache so her boyfriend took her home and he took care of her until around eleven pm when she fell asleep..

kelly today Today meghan two this year two jobs july twenty eighth facebook austin natalie baleno around nine o'clock twenty two year old instagram each case both around eleven pm burlington north carolina ilan college one
"jennifer a" Discussed on Virtually Amazing

Virtually Amazing

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on Virtually Amazing

"So by collaborating with other v as you can offer your clients better service. Everybody wins that way and i. I think that's best so great. Jennifer has been an absolute pleasure. Having you on. And chatting with you. And i'm sure this is going to be a very much listened to episode. They all seem to be at the moment. I keep saying this has been a fabulous episode. But then they've all been abused exits. I'm really enjoy myself than anybody else. I'm having fun. So that k then isn't it. It's any last words. Joe no apart from look forward to catching up with you on friday and our next month's divine but yes no it's it's it's really really lovely to be part of a you know a mastermind with jennifer and the other ladies and i totally recommend to our listeners to find their tribe. Whether that's just you know a weekly fortnightly check in with another. Va that they trust. Who can share those things with them because it is making a huge difference to us. A- groups i absolutely and it's funny. It's something i believe in so much that i've now now now. This week nord shane. Meyer muster minds for french-speaking expense signing up people at my memphis eight space says it looks like pretty much when we're gonna be folk last night about super exciting and it's something but i've cooled at the section of not yet site i. It's my way of giving back. That's brilliant absolutely brilliant and kudos. That you can do it in two language that you can. You can manage it infringe. Yeah how cool is that. I mean yeah. Brilliant having said that. I could do the same in everett so but it is definitely a skill. I just ask you a an anguished thing. That i found recently because we live in a very anglo area and we with english speaking people most of the time my husband doesn't speak the language I find although. I can't translate anything. Unlike can read anything out of socities newspapers to up my reading level. But i'm finding translating. I seem to be stuck in one language or the other. Does that happen to you jennifer. Not so much. I guess because i switch between which old ryon everyday. Yeah yeah. I find when..

Jennifer friday Joe jennifer next month This week english last night Meyer one language two language memphis anglo nord shane ryon french
"jennifer a" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

08:24 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"It's really helpful. I think to gather as much information as you can try to figure out how many not so for example. My sister had a checking account at one day. She actually three different version ships. This crazy which Sushi went into I waited a little bit to see what else might show up in the mail and then that I found out there was like an inherited. Ira there her then. So once I started getting various pieces I could make one trip to the bank. That one place in how much more efficient use of my time is as far as giving figured out when you get there. You're right here's the SOCI- Kurdi number. Is there anything are there any other couch. You're out on our about and So I think if you can step back a little bit and get organized consolidate by Institution or you're even Type of accounts. It's easier to consolidate in clean up So that was pretty helpful for staff and available to eventually get everything down for my sister now. Her husband whose sole beneficiary it into one banking relationship in one custodian birds investment assets. That makes it easier to take care of his financial life because his it's help life is getting much more complicated so it does help a lot by the makes a big difference in in your situation. is definitely unique in a way. Although it's not like it's not happened before where you know if you lose a loved one and if you have a special needs child so you're a uh your niece or nephew and Now you're now you're the designated Guardian for this individual coordinate all of that especially if there's external journal supports that come in from different agencies or governmental bodies or whatnot making sure that those assistance Come through through in all of those things and it's I think again. A lot of people go through life say wellness set up this account. Everything's good okay. I know where everything is. That's great well. You may not be here tomorrow and you want if you want continuation of things for your loved ones uh-huh and for people to be able to take care of your loved ones then Y- this is definitely a a big exercise to undertake and yes it take some time but you do it once you do it right and then you just updated as things need to be updated in swallows things where a upturn the book you You you comment about you know how frequently should do it but I would think just for myself very similar to the smoke detectors. It's like when daylight savings time changes. Okay swap the batteries out and and do all that kind of stuff although in my building. They're they're hardwired but I still. I still do the task. Of course they do the test to but you know I do it as well as or something out of the ordinary. But it's again those things where you think about so cut That will you schedule. You know you're going to do it you know so. has there been any changes in my in my financial picture with accounts or retirement accounts her any anything just again to have you know that Disaster recovery thing and and something. I did several years ago. Is I I bought Red Folder and basically. I have that you know in a secure space where if I need to grab that immediately I we know to grab it Some people may want a pink water purple or blue. It doesn't matter what color it is just so you know it's different than than other things. Oh you do and unless you have oh see that might really bug you to have a different colored by again. Think of it in a way that it's just a little a bit different. You remember to grab it cause a scene. I do scrap the wrong folder when you need something. Emergency crafter unusual organization invasion. That's great. I've got well. There's a poster that I have it says I have CDO which is OCD but the letters are in alphabetical order. It's it's and anybody that knows me. Well completely relates to that and they see that's completely completely you. I eased up over the years but still it's there's there's certain things that I'M A. I'm a little What's the phrase anal about? I think what people told me so I you know I am Chinese up as I get older but no promises. Look the-there's fruit from that treats right. It'd be a hyper organized than I. That's great taking care of that. I still I agree organization organized person. I I struggle a little bit with that notebook thing because the thing I had meantime which is ridiculous is go get cotton's involving t's and fitted manure and it's because I don't want to order. I don't like to shop doc. I rented other. Aaron though is a huge thing I ran into with my sister. I pat we found probably fifty keys and we couldn't and find the ones we need it. We try walks. You know dozens of. He's a time and you just you don't think about that anyway. Ah My my struggle with. Oh we definitely all have those little things that we struggle with and Even seen a lot of times too with people in various professions where they're really good at their profession but they have to apply the lessons that they teach people people about for themselves. Sometimes it's you know I it. It's problematic because it's like It's just feels like work and it's like yeah but you're you know you're helping. Oh you know your your best client which is yourself so should focus on that. So factor of loved her conversation today as a Jennifer obviously have fun in chatting with the Working People. Find out more about you and the awesome work. You're doing thanks. I enjoyed it to the a wet my website my firm is and summit on the actual partners are va dot com and you know my email and my phone number and everything around there for Richmond. Virginia revered So yeah that released lanes my background in contact contact information and this has been really fun. I think you got a lot of great perspective on all this and actioner. Yeah that's awesome and audience. I'll have that information and the link to the book as well in the shouts Jennifer appreciate you and all all the great things you're doing We'll definitely keep in touch and thanks for being on the show now my pleasure until next time everybody be he will pay. It's Michael again. Thank you for listening to the PODCAST. I really appreciate it surely committee people you're dealing with some significant stress and possibly approaching. Burn out I know how you feel in two thousand nine. My burn out led to a year for his case scenarios. Do not want that to happen to you if you go to breakfast leadership dot com Tom. You can register for a free Webinar burnout prevention as well as good as a free checklist to have successful mornings. Start off each day the right way again. That's breakfast leadership ship Dot Com. Also since you are loyal podcast listener. I'm asking you to lake rate and review my podcast on itunes. I look at all the reviews and appreciate your comments. It helps other potential listeners. Discover the content. I have on the show. I appreciate you and thanks again for listening..

Jennifer Ira Working People lake rate Virginia OCD Richmond Aaron t Michael
"jennifer a" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

HIT Like a Girl

09:29 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

"Pathogens. They produce energy for us like microbes are incredibly valuable. So it's a book that tries to kind on a balanced the lake <hes> infectious disease stuff growth with the whole wow turns out. There's whole hidden microbial universe around us and it's actually incredibly cool and interesting so it was really fun to write and i actually got a second one coming out. I turned in the draft for it. <hes> fairly recently <hes> <hes> and this one is a walk through the human digestive system so starts with the food entering your mouth and ends with the poops that comes out and and <hes> what happens in between fifty fun to write. I don't know how many more view <hes> they're not as much work as writing a book for adults. They certainly do take shakeup a lotta time but <hes> definitely they're funded to do and i love seeing <hes> letters or pictures reactions for young readers. It's just so so so gratifying so i have to tell you something. I actually did not know who you were until i got this book. Our our son caught a very well caught in probably a bad uses. The word was diagnosed with their really verge of these that very severely turns his his life upside-down it had known ideology no understanding of the genesis of this disease obviously and he asked a question about a year and a half later about about how that can be and so <hes> i read him your book it's catching and he he appreciated the young boy the growth colleges actors you pay <hes> but also the humor you have something in there about the super sneeze <hes> there was something about not which that word probably belong but he just really appreciate. It and i said no oh carter when they figure out what's going on. It's it's gonna be something like this from the i._t. Side of what. You said they just don't know any of that stuff right yeah. There's not a scientist or researcher that know or understand and so i started following on twitter and then i saw that she went went to work for the bill and melinda gates foundation and i was recently at a c._d._c. meeting with someone from your organization doctor john mclaughlin and <hes> and so i just want to say that i really appreciate your work and you know he had to g to to <hes> so when i hear you of a book about human digestive disease and thinking about all the time in that can you it'll be another little one more about uh because there's so many complications that come with that but i just wanna say thank you i know you did it and you wrote what you knew but it also had to really unique place in in my life and that's how i started following you. It's actually part of the reason we made. Our social. Media being dragged down <hes> so thank you thank you for doing that. I know i know you did that and i know you just you know. Talk about kind of interesting on premise behind it but i wanted to share with you you know getting to do that about even supersede knees and not in the genesis of infectious disease in a way that he could understand. It wasn't one hundred pages and this is really smart little kid <hes> it. It just was really relatable so thank you thank you. I sharing that those stories are why you do this and those stories are why you work in public health and global health <hes> making sure that we can answer are those questions and when your son has a question why why did this happen we and science we had medicine want to be able to provide those answers. It's like curiosity curiosity. It's that discovery but more than anything else is that desire to help and make sure that everybody be happy and healthy and just secure on that note we are building a meeting list and we're trying to kind of value our listeners to quick start some of their learning if they're going in a healthcare a._t. Direction so i'm curious from you if there are any books that you would recommend our listeners read if it's connection non-fiction you know something that you prefer to listen to versus trade or if it's a blogger podcast that'd be but we would love to know your recommendations. If you're willing to share oh for sure <hes> there's a bit of a tough one because <hes> you know i always make sure to maintain work life balance. They have pretty crazy work life so generally have the policy that <hes> when i'm engaging in leisure time pursuits like reading or listening to a podcast generally try and keep it as far away from work work as possible that there's a couple of great in out there i personally i find information visualization really really fascinating and <hes> the principles behind why we communicate <hes> information particular ways like what are the best way to visually represent data yeah <hes> and so there's quite a few info that i really really like a lot <hes> my friend sarah literally wrote the textbook on information visual gruesome so her book is a great resource and there's a buyer for magicians. How does it a statistician that i follow on twitter twitter. I've been following for agents close wilkie <hes> and he just wrote a very simple <hes> primer and introduction data visualization and the entire is available billable free online so i really like those two reasons a lot <hes> actually fine no matter what you do in life <hes> your job probably probably involved presenting data or communicating data so it's still that we can all level up on <hes> certainly one of my favorite books in the infectious just movies safe and i still have this book on my bookshelf bought it back in my teenage years and that that's awesome outbreak infatuation phase but still i love it. <hes> a book by laurie garrett called the coming leg. It is basically a walkthrough of many of the emerging infectious actions that appeared in twentieth century. <hes> from you know fairly well known each age evola vira <hes> legionaires disease to more obscure statements like than nineteen hundred swine flu outbreak or toxic shock syndrome is even with tampon <music> <hes> really interesting book not only because it tells you the science and considers epidemiology behind these things but more importantly talking about the people <hes> <hes> that were at the center of the stories you have to d- miala gist in disease detectives the doctors who really on the frontlines trying to figure these things out so i think it makes a really riveting ingred about infection. Those are probably a couple of my favorite <hes> cropper reading resources and then i do have to let's say <hes> on whether some of my favorite accounts are aggregate her account to collect mentioned around particular themes and sure that i always and when we interesting <hes> there's one account dedicated to open science and there's one other account dedicated to public beta. I and i find that the tweets that have retweeted and shared by those accounts are fascinating one so i'm always favored. I always say look this up later. <hes> so nice little little surfaces come easily digestible information but yeah oh compliance and feed them my reading list. I'm feverishly taking notes and i i think you said it was going up and then he's yeah no all that yeah <hes> so jennifer if people you want to find out more about you the work the gates foundation or you know what are your social handle with a place to connect with. You find more information definitely the best place place to find out what i'm up to professionally on twitter. I'm at jennifer gardy g. e. n. n. I s. e. R. g. r. e. y. <hes> i'm pretty regularly tweeting and yet it's a whole mix so like malaria epidemiology data science the occasional using about academia and research in general and i'm not you can lie <hes> sometimes you get some cat and dog videos in there too <hes> i allan instagram as well but honestly that would not be very interesting as far as science go about largely pictures of where the traveling and it'd be eating and drinking so <hes> twitter. It's the best place to find me. <hes> and yeah reach out any any time on the internet <hes>. I have a pretty busy life these days. It seems that you can always make time for a bit of twittering and you know the coffee shop line earlier waiting to get on a plane. Oh he's happy to reply back to some interesting messages excellent. Thank you so much for sharing about what you're doing your background around. Thank you for being so articulate insurance with our listeners. Oh it was my pleasure because it was such a fun conversation to have. Thank you so much jennifer. This has been a a real treat and.

twitter jennifer gardy digestive disease gates foundation laurie garrett melinda gates carter wilkie sarah g john mclaughlin scientist s. e. R. g. r. e. y. researcher
"jennifer a" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

HIT Like a Girl

13:47 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

"Next level <music> you hit a really important word you said the word accent and it don't wanna talk about how your access for a patient i wanna talk about your access is a brilliant smart woman coming from the canadian c._d._c. To the gates foundation. I would imagine bolden resources at your disposal granted the c._d._c. really big organization. That foundation has some cooler stuff. Could you tell us about some of the things you've gained two and working for such <hes> an organization that may have access to resources that quite correctly a lot of a lot of places. Don't yeah you know the really amazing thing about the gates foundation. We're a people organization. We're not we're not a stuff organization where people organization and we invest in people and we invest in ideas so when we're <hes> going out and you know eliminating malaria. It's not my team. That's going out there and doing it. We're not there <hes> <hes> setting up the bed nets and and doing the framing and doing these mass drug administration. We're working with partners on the ground some punks that is an n._g._o. Partner sometimes it's another funder a lot of the times it's academic labs and sometimes even industry but we are working with the people that are out there actually doing and where our rule of and <hes> we're really sort of a convener and supporter so we have this very privileged position in that because we're such a well known entity <hes> we can really take a look at everything that's happening in a particular. We're speaking. We're we're very familiar with the academic research. That's happening in the malaria world. We're very sim- familiar with the different companies that are are working with things like satellite data or developing mobile apps or <hes> healthcare workers to go out and do surveys in sealed or very familiar with the ngos ngos and organizations that are out there in countries that have very strong connections and very strong in age with national healthcare systems with <hes> community health clinics with the private clinics that are often a place where many people go to access care the pharmacies or you even a local healer. We can kind of see the whole landscape from where we fit so we we work. Is we sit down and tank with our technical pinkel expertise on the malaria team. We think about okay if we wanna get to malaria elect nation by twenty forty. What do we need to do in the next five years. What are the key strategic actions that we need to take so we map out that's very evidence based strategy and it might <hes> cover aspects option of developing new drugs or vaccines or ruling out bednets in a larger area or getting a better understanding of why we can't in the last few cases in one particular setting so we sit down and come up with a strategy then based on our knowledge of who who out there in world. We basically sort of assemble these crack teams to say all right. You know you're on your task for the next two years or three years or five era we need you to do this. We know that you are the world leading experts in this area that nobody has better connections into this country than you do. <hes> like go forth fourth and and do this work because it's going to help advance our strategy so it's a really interesting position to be in that you get to take that very big kind of fly over <hes> look at you get to one of my favorite things which is connecting people and building relationships and putting together these multidisciplinary teams where he might have you know community health workers. You might have <hes> mobile app developers. You might have clinicians you might have policymakers all working together around the same problem all right so let's transition to our next question which is going to require you to put your magical hat on. Thank him for the dog. Pack business distress all right good. We wanna we wanna think about some sort of utopian future and basically you could snap your fingers solve any problem <hes> <hes> at this juncture worldwide and health or health i._t. What would it be and why <hes> the one problem that i would solve in how <hes> in-house would be ensuring that. Everybody on this planet has a safe home a safe sturdy. <hes> you know high quality quality dwelling <hes>. I really think that when you look at all of this oh determinants of health definitely one of the biggest ones is access to adequate adequate housing <hes>. This is huge. I spent the last ten years working on timber kilos and we know that t._b. Transmission what happens in a police lake british british columbia happens seattle chicago a lot of that is among vulnerable populations that don't have access to housing but you look at the degree of the problem uh-huh elsewhere sub saharan africa or parts of south america where <hes> a lot of individuals are living in slums poorly ventilated slumps <hes> t._b. Maybe transmission is obviously going to be huge there but also any other infectious disease when you're living in a sort of shantytown or slum environment where no sewage sewage <hes> any sort of diarrheal disease anything that's carried <hes> the fecal oral transmission routes. You're going to have high rates of that anywhere. You've got standing water because you don't have you know covered sewers or covered water sources. You're gonna have mosquitoes and create a risk for malaria for eka for dan gay. Hey for all of these things that you've got rats running around in a slum. You've got a risk of lassa fever <hes> really adequate housing and <hes> a well planned community for that house where there is access to sewage where there is access to clean drinking water you solve that problem and that you've solved about a thousand more or by extension i can yeah that's definitely that's about the loftiest answer that we've heard date and <hes> that's a great one and actually what's coming to mind my husband actually from the country of venezuela which has been in a blackout for the days and he's thinking when i hear about you know people's access to food or water shelter like absolutely those are the necessities and so curious you know you know what would it be like whose responsibility ability to make sure that everybody has <hes> a safe place to call home and i don't know just get new. I mean politically when you when you like like go on a global scale like oh. I wanna make sure that everyone is okay but how do you. How does one do that. Who who get to take accountability for making that happen yeah you know that's a great question and i think it's maybe one of the reasons that we have it. Achieved dissolution is because there's no one the answer <hes> i mean i. I think the answer is orders. Everybody i mean it seems like it needs to be something that federal governments are looking out for <hes> the way countries are structured. Oftentimes federal governments will offload responsibilities to provinces or states <hes> and then at universal levels as well. You'd be simple governments ensuring whatever region they're looking after <hes> as adequately reserves. You've got multiple tiers of government that need to be committed to this and the reality is that's just not going. That'd be the case <hes> right now a lot of governments that just aren't in a position at all three of those levels to ensure that their citizens have adequate access to housing so i i think you really do see a place for ngos and other organizations <hes> really stepping in and helping to <hes> work together and yet inch <hes> kind of kick start the process you know if you can get a country on the way to a place where people are adequately housed if you can get them far enough i suspect there will be a point at which <hes> local or state or provincial or federal government is eventually able to take over <hes> but that's where you see a lot of these philanthropies surpise <hes> working is kind of try to be that catalyst trying to be the spark <hes> and make those initial early investments <hes> really help get things going get the proverbial ball rolling in the hopes that you know we do this. We do this well. It'll be a lot more sustainable over time and you can transition control of if something like that over to the the many tiers of government who really ought to ultimately be responsible for it. I totally agree and it's it's interesting to. Let's see <hes> things on a much smaller scale right now. There seems to be a little bit of going around about around the hashtag something along the lines of trash cleanup and people are getting inspired to go take you rivers and dirty rivers and dirty prices oliver like nepal and india all the way to south america where they're like taking take picture of how chachi place was and then all the trash bags that they're clean it up and it's inspiring more and more people to go clean up the place around them and i know him the same as far as like talking about housing but getting people invested in their own <hes> you know communities to to help clean them him up and making sure that you know places are good for their neighbors and you know uh their surrounding villages cool you know it it starts in your own backyard backyard and the reality is that you know some of us are very privileged to get to travel the world for our jobs and go all over on one continent that i haven't hung out on yet ed much antarctica. I'm sure i'll end up there sometime and soon as they get malaria which will be the result of climate change for house but the thing is most people don't get to travel the world and most people spend a lot of their lives very very close to home and you want those people's make sure they're they can be a part of making a global different too and it really does start in your own backyard. You can get out there and make change <hes> so i live mostly mostly in chicago and i've been so impressed with. There's a really strong civic technology instead of civic hack space going there where on on a weekly basis people from all over the city get together. It's every tuesday night <hes> they have this hacker night event where they take local data sets data at and use them for good. <hes> things like bad thing making a little app so you can easily find where the nearest place to get. A flu shot is near. You sometimes really sophisticated projects. Come out of that as well like projects like can we'd be better at ogling <hes> when our our beaches in chicago are gonna have high e. coli levels so it was really interesting example of just citizens from the community coming together to tackle local local problems in this case going and cleaning up trash using data to to build out systems that make the city a better place so there's it's a lot of civic engagement happening a bunch of different levels and <hes> yeah. It really needs to see more of that. I think the more digital world we live in the more. We're connected to each other digitally. <hes> the more we feel a sort of shared responsibility to take care of place that we live in so speaking of sharing you have shared knowledge in a different way really about your expertise and disease in a book and before we ask you about your favorite reads or less than could you tell us a little bit about your book. It's catching yeah. I wrote a few years ago. You know i've done a lot of science television work a back lane native canada and i would get requests from publishers. Hey we like you went t._v. We'd love to see right. A science book for adults and i waited turned them down down because the writing is a lot of work and writing a book for adults is a lot of a lot of works and i never really felt like i had turned down these requests but talk doc one day i got an email from our kids books and our kids our children science book publisher children's book publisher <hes> growing up they had two magazines what cult chickadee for very young readers and one called for slightly older readers that really introduce kids to the world old science and nature and i grew up loving these magazines so when our came calling beloved publisher of the magazines i i adored so much as a kid i could say no so of course you know. You're supposed to write what you know. The adage says and i know infectious diseases <hes> so basically put together this kid's book. It's geared for eight to twelve year. Old readers <hes> called. It's catching the infectious world of jerks microbes and kind of walk walk through the microbial world. There's obviously a focus onto the interesting germs that are out there. 'cause i find fascinating plus kids like that kind of new york. Grow grosso's sorta thing <hes> but it also talked about something that i think is really important to communicate and it's that we are surrounded by microbes. They're in a they're on us. <hes> they're everywhere and almost all of them are either harmless or actually beneficial. You know they help us. Digest our food actress different nutrients. They help keep us safe from other pathogens..

malaria gates foundation south america chicago bolden Partner publisher seattle grosso venezuela new york nepal india three years twelve year
"jennifer a" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

HIT Like a Girl

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

"We integrate all these different and disparate data types together in order to figure out how best to deploy our resources. You've got bednets. We've got drugs. We've got insecticide sprayed but we can't. I use them everywhere all the time. We have to be smart about how we distribute those resources into data and advanced analytics. It's really one of the tools that we use to figure out okay. What are we going to prioritize where we're going to put our interventions and <hes> do we think where where do we think they're going to give the best thing for the bucks jennifer this journey great. Can i ask a couple questions for one thinks so okay. I'm looking at different different. Regions and malaria cases in it seems that the african and region bears you know the majority of the cases world wine and it's it's bringing up their me. Okay well. How much do environmental issues issues come up like potentially climate change and then the other big you know key words that we hear our social determinants of how maples people's access to health so when you're looking at your data and collecting all this information of being affected and and how how much ah that is actually outside <hes> healthcare organization but looking at some of these maybe like somewhat intangible or less tangible <hes> variables. I'll go into it. Oh yeah oh fantastic questions both so the first one around <hes> environment it plays a huge role in epidemiology amy all aji and for the study of infectious disease when you talk about the epidemiological triangle and so every dizzy is a function of three things it's a function of the pathogen self assumption of the host of that pathogen lives in and its function of the environment so with malaria. Ah obviously you've got the parasite itself and you've got parasite dynamics playing a role <hes> drug merge systems that might becoming in one strain of the parasite but not the other. There's host is obviously a huge issue if somebody <hes> doesn't have access to <hes> insecticide bug spray <hes> bednets to keep them safe from bombay. It's at night <hes> that's gonna make that hosts more vulnerable but environment is a huge thing and it really contribute to you the the presence of the mosquito vector so we know that in areas that are heavily forested. We're going to find a lot of mosquitoes and there's there's some pockets hanging on particularly in southeast asia. You've got countries where in urban areas malaria's being completely eliminated. You could go to a city anywhere eh east asia and you'll generally be fine but if you get into the forested regions <hes> they're very very high burden areas like lots of malaria cases in these particular fourth regents and we also know that the way we interact with the environment changes our vulnerability to infectious diseases so and what you're seeing right now <hes> in places like bianca for example is you've got these heavily forested regions but people are now entering into those spaces his and doing logging <hes> they're doing mining and other activities that are bringing them into regular contact with these mosquito populations that were previously just sort of hanging out in this <hes> remote for us that hardly anybody ever visited so environment very much <hes> affects our susceptibility upped ability to infectious diseases with climate change. <hes> we know that the what we call the distribution of the vector the the places that mosquitoes can live in where it's warm enough and wet enough those are changing <hes> <hes> very interesting paper just came. Take a week ago. <hes> many of our friends and colleagues were involved in doing analysis writing it up but it shows how the vector the mosquito population nations in the united states is going to change over the next forty years as a result of climate change as a result of changing cuba for ability and it shows just how far north mosquitoes like type it spreads zico virus or then gave jeff how far north those are going to spread to the second part of your question around around the social determinants of health yet. This is huge <hes> it malaria and many other diseases are very much <hes> issues uh of access to care access to interventions. There's a lot of things that you can do to prevent malaria. We have pills..

malaria southeast asia east asia bombay united states jeff cuba forty years
"jennifer a" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

HIT Like a Girl

12:38 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer a" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

"So let's get started. Where's home base for you. I it is technically chicago. Go now <hes> from vancouver originally we've down to the states and not very long ago. Take this decision with the gates foundation and although they're based in seattle u. Bin awad wadi your life to traveling around on the road and so you can really kinda work remotely so i picked chicago for my partner lives so that's pretty awesome solution. That's really yeah yeah. It's fantastic new job. I love it. It's senior leadership team but it is really it is beyond busy. I don't think i've ever been at the university of professio- playing about how busy are and <hes> yeah the university of just like oh. You thought that was bad. Let me show you something <laughter>. Wow are you traveling more than seventy five percent at a time. I'd say it's probably about <hes>. Maybe about sixty percents at this point. That's impressive in my partner. Kinda does the same thing. He's a consultant so he's on the road all the time it's like. I don't think it would work otherwise not a not. A lifestyle continued you already now. Actually we're both robert in familiar with it that company that we were with the score had this on the road probably have heatedly close to eighty eighty percent of the time and now it's crazy for me like three years and you're like yeah that'd definitely disruptive but it's not not them who yeah yeah what. What did i will ask you where you're living your answers american airlines. That's never a good yeah. No kidding my twitter bios call goes on a plane. You know all right so jennifer. Thank you so much for being with us today. We are a really excited to speak with accomplished woman in health and health a._t. Enter kind of on a journey to help other people learn about the industry because even by being part of it for the last decade or so. We ourselves realize how complicated healthcare can be in bill both robin. I feel like we have a pretty good handle on our own piece of the health health i._t. Puzzle but we're talking to women all over to try to understand earpiece to see if we can start putting more and more together so if you wouldn't mind could you please take this through a little bit about your career journey where you are now and how you air and maybe you know some stories or anything colorful that you want to add into it. It would be my pleasure so i'm jennifer gardy. I am currently the deputy director of surveillance data and epidemiology with in the malaria team at the bill and melinda gates foundation and what i do that rule is really a culmination of all all the areas that i've spent the last <hes> fifteen years of my scientific career investigated so i'm looking at things like how do we use computational biology and genome sequencing as a tool to understand pathogen evolution and pathogen transmission. I'm looking at how do we take aac different types of disparate data and integrate them in order to derive really actionable insights <hes> in the public health and in the global health space and doing things like building out dashboards and using techniques from information visualization and user centered design <hes> and pulling it all together for in this series of fast paced innovative agile organization where we're always looking for it then that she knew cool bit tech so how i ended up here <hes> if you wanna go right back to the beginning it starts with the dustin hoffman movie a probably not. I love this interview already you. It's not how you should use your job. I do not recommend this to people in general. I think one and two thousand people for who walked worked out properly but i remember being a teenager in the mid nineties and seeing outbreak. Do you remember that one with the <hes> the infected monkey and yep hemorrhagic fever outbreak. I saw that that and i thought that looks so cool. I wanna be dustin hoffman tracking infectious diseases chasing this monkey around and so i went to university. He's thinking that i'd studied microbiology infectious diseases. They started off about half <hes> but then i found that genetics would just as interesting this was right about the time that the very first genome of a free living organism had been sequenced bacterial genome buffalo's influenza the human you know when still about <hes> six years off at this point but there was this emerging field of <hes> looking at genomes looking at all of the genetic instructions the code a particular living thing to get clues a you know how that organism pet so i started to think a combination of microbiology and genetics i might be in the fall and i kind of ended up in my career somewhat accidentally after that point i take an graduate you program of sort of an interstitial thing that you could do between your bachelor's degree in moving onto grad school and you had to choose your courses for this program review that with the course advisor this was in the year two thousand. I selected my courses sat down with the advisor and she said you know we've got this new. Course that starting up this year. It's in the brand new field something that we don't really know a lot about it but we think it's going to be really big so you should think about taking his course and <hes> what's it called a. o. bioinformatics and so i said okay well you kind of interesting like computers bioinformatics. If it's going to be a big thing might as take the class and and see what happened and i found it fascinating <hes> it was one of the only classes that i take in as a university student where every time the problem would ask a question. I would say that i had to into the class. She's like <hes> does anybody. Besides jen onto answered this question so i thought going forward as a student wanting to go to grad school <hes> i wanted to find something that would combine this new found interest bioinformatics and computational biology with with pathogen microbiology and infectious disease so was lucky enough to find a lab that were just starting up the p._i. The principle investigator she was recruiting her first grad judge students and she wanted them to work on computational biology project studying the genomes of infectious pathogens so ended up going back active in cougar <hes> drake university and studying under this amazing curfew that brinkman and doing a p._h._d. And computational biology where it was the mix of techniques from machine learning we called it data mining back <hes> <hes> some other straight up cross go bioinformatics techniques a lot of web up design a little bit of user interface design as well <hes> that really kind of set me on my permanent pass from there. I did a post doc where i focused again on bioinformatics bioinformatics methods development in the infectious disease base. It's network visualization influences stuff and then i was recruited in two thousand in and nine to join the british columbia center for disease control so eventually after take very long detour into computational biology and through academia now equipped with a p._h._d. He h d. I got to come back to a c._d. Organization and kind of clues the loop on that dustin hoffman dream so i spent the last decade working rare air and really sort of pioneered this emerging discipline in public health coach you know make epidemiology where we sequenced the genome of pathogen or a series of pathogens from particular outbreak or epidemic throw a whole bunch of computational biology at it we can start to make inferences about who transmitted images whom we can reconstruct the oath break we can understand that transmission dynamics at work in the epidemic and those are all insights that are really important to understand what's what's happening in terms of disease transmission and go in and control that outbreak and we prevent future ones sort of a mix of <hes> computational biology ed bouchette romantics genomic skills <hes> but all the other stuff that they did along the way i work analysis information visualization user centered design all of those bits of the i._t. Kinda got rolled up in there too and then there's the straight up day-to-day exciting stuff you know high performance computing cluster so we did that for ten years then got a little anxious for change. I was really excited to find a position where instead of doing that of research that seems to move it a bit of a glacial pace as things often do in academia wanted to join an organization that was a little more faster paced <hes> something where instead of kind of doing the work in carving out that are small research projects that can take a bigger look bigger picture view <hes> and really be all about strategy and relationship building and putting lots and lots of different parts of the puzzle pieces is together <hes> so when i was offered an opportunity at the gates foundation i jumped to and yeah it's <hes> it's now the coronation of everything i did over the last years <hes> and i still kind of feel a little bit like up in hoffman and outbreak on the <hes> instead of the acuity hemorrahagic seaver. We're just trying to the nate malaria so that's my career and that's very big nutshell. I feel like you gotta get rid of the just because you're just trying to eliminate malaria you know <hes> the the canadian c._d._c. right and now you have this opportunity to make major global impact with it's really unique hybrid breed background of all things healthcare health i._t. Science research you have a great deal of knowledge experienced through your educational and professional expertise. What is it like to be there on this global mission yeah so it's really exciting working on the global health scale may work over the last ten years when i was based on the british columbia center for disease control it was really fun and it was fantastic and we're working with great people but it was very limited in geographic scope. I was basically weekly looking after tuberculosis transmission in british columbia <hes> that was my portfolio that i worked on so i always wanted to do something a little bigger a little better bluer exciting <hes> and so now working with the gates foundation or malaria team. We have a goal of eliminating the area around the world by twenty forty the and that is not long. It's twenty one years from now so if we want to do that i missed that there'd be many many places where malaria has been successfully eliminated needed and it takes a variety of intervention but once you can stop one transmission cycle humphry your listeners that aren't malaria aware <hes> malaria is read by a abyss kito vector so those ghetto bites an infected person they pick up the malaria parasite and they can then when they feed on somebody else <hes> they contract at that pathogen to that individual so if you can break that transmission cycle either by getting malaria out of your people so that when when the mosquitoes bite people and take a blood meal. They're not sucking up any parasites. There's just no more disease there or by interfering with the mosquitoes somehow you actually have a chance dance to eliminate disease within your region so we've realized that <hes> one size fits all doesn't fit all when it comes to malaria control different regions agen's and different regions within a country to different pockets you know different states or provinces <hes> really need their own bespoke tailored approach so so what a lot of my role is is using data some about genomic data from the parasites of data from the mosquito a lot of it it just data data. <hes> case counts <hes> things like that. How many paces the malaria did we have in this area. What's the temperature in this area. The rainfall all mosquitoes we're seeing <hes> and even way more interesting data type work using satellite data identify where villages are located where we might need to get in <hes> and provide bed nets or the spray that we used to try to get rid of the mosquito vectors..

malaria dustin hoffman gates foundation partner jennifer gardy chicago vancouver awad wadi seattle twitter advisor fever university of professio melinda gates foundation consultant robert british columbia center