18 Burst results for "Jen White"

"jen white" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"jen white" Discussed on KPCC

"Is one, eh? I'm Jen White in Washington. It's November 4th. And when we help this conversation earlier today, we still didn't know who won the presidential election. The story is changing by the minute but today we wanted to take time to talk to you. We asked what you're thinking about the results so far. In what questions you still have. Reid Wilson joined us from Arizona, He's national correspondent for the Hill and author of Epidemic Ebola and the Global Scramble to prevent the Next Killer outbreak. It is great to have you back. Hey, Jin, How are you doing? All right, are most important Guest today, though, is you? How are you thinking about the results so far? What questions? Do you still have Give us a call? The phone lines are open. 8552361 a one A. That's 8552361 to 1 to read at this stage. We should probably start with what we know. I don't know. What are we still waiting on? While we're still waiting on vote counts from a couple of key states here actually, a significant number of key states. We're looking at states like Michigan, Wisconsin. Pennsylvania, which remain UN called North Carolina and Georgia are still on the table. Though. President Trump leads there by a decent margin and then state like Nevada, which is always pretty slow to counted. Votes vice president by former vice President Biden is likely to win there. But we have yet to get some actual results and we're probably not going to get the final results from Nevada until tomorrow. But this thing the Biden campaign at least, is pretty confident that they're going to start adding to their lead substantially today. They expect Michigan and Wisconsin to be called in their favor. Pennsylvania may take a little more time, but what we're going to see over the next 24 hours is this race closing for Former vice president Joe Biden. What we've got Suzanne from Madison, Wisconsin on the line Now, then you have a question about polls and and whether they reflect what's going to actually happen during an election. Go ahead. It's not actually question is comment. I, um I do not believe that people who vote for Trump For who are conservative or perhaps even independent and have different reasons for their voting. What would easily publicly state so because off the social pressure, there's so much anti Trump Pressure. I didn't vote for Trump mind you. I um However, I do. Read a lot. I read the national review Every guardian. Ah Washington Post. I stay very informed as kind of a thinker and I was even accused at one point because I read some concerns. Uh, um public matter that that I Waas, a trump supporter. I think we are really doing each other. The service we're afraid to talk about. Issues or we don't know how to talk about. If you we don't know how to face conflict. There's such a great deal of anger, and that's why the Poles aren't going to get it because they're not going to hear from any continent thinkers. And they're not going to hear from people afraid to state the okay in publicly Suzanne. Thanks for that call. Let's go to Christine. Christine, You're in Maryland. What's on your mind? Hi. Yes, I'm hearing a lot of confusion about how this election, you know, could be so close in the polls be so wrong, And I think one major part of the dynamic that isn't being spoken about. Is our nation's investment in white supremacy. And I don't mean just be over in a white militia type of racism, but really like the desire of so many voters to see white people. Remain in power in an increasingly diverse and non white nation. I think it's more comfortable for white people, and I include liberal white people in conservative white people in that, Christine. Thanks for that call. Reads that you hear from two callers there one saying that, you know, she doesn't think the polls reflect voter sentiment accurately because people are afraid to share their thoughts. And Christine there saying that you know she thinks white supremacy. Plays a role in how people are voting your thoughts. Well, let's let's address the poll question First. I'm glad we got this in the first five minutes of the show. Um the Poles were very, very wrong in a lot of these swing states. Now they might not be wrong on the national level. In a repeat of 2016. Joe Biden is goingto have a substantial lead in the popular vote. But of course, polls don't know Poles measure the popular vote. But the popular vote isn't what decides. Who the president is going to be the fortuitous that the first collar was from Wisconsin, where some of the polls were. I mean outlier doesn't begin to describe it. The Washington Post had Joe Biden up 17 points last week. The New York Times had him up about 11, 11 or 12 in the last few days, and if Wisconsin goes the way we think it will. It's going to be a race of a few 1000 votes here, or there s o the in talking to my democratic and Republican friends this morning. They are all furious at their own pollsters. It's not just the public polls like it's the private ones that peak in all the campaigns pay a lot of money for That that whiffed seriously on this. I took a look at the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee's internal How's polling and I mean, they had Biden leading by huge margins in district that he ended up losing, so there's going to be a serious sort of a second..

Joe Biden Wisconsin President Trump Christine vice president Jen White Pennsylvania Michigan Suzanne trump Democratic Congressional Campa Washington Nevada Reid Wilson Arizona Washington Post president Jin Madison
"jen white" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"jen white" Discussed on KPCC

"This's one, eh? I'm Jen White in Washington. Armed men at polling places post election violence. These air, not scenes we typically associate with American democracy. But that's exactly what security officials and election monitors are warning could happen on or after November, 3rd. And with President Trump continuing to cast doubt on the integrity of the election process, armed far right groups are paying attention. We know you've been paying attention to What will law enforcement due to prevent voter intimidation? What can they do? That's what we're talking about today, and we haven't reporting to share from Heath. True. Isn't Heath is reporting fellow for the guns in America Project at Boise State Public Radio Heath. It's great to have you back on one a Great to be here. So you're based in Boise. Tell us more about your reporting and who you've been talking to. Yeah, based on Boise and Idaho is kind of Ah, kind of the the center of this this anti government universe. So I talked to a lot of these groups in general. And recently I was talking to some members of the three percenters. And that's Ah, It's kind of a loosely loose association of national groups, some identify as militias. Some don't experts certainly say that they are on DH there, probably the most prominent national group of militias out there. So you had this conversation with them, And I know you have some tape for us. Talk us into it. Yeah, That's right. So a couple weeks ago, I went to a gathering organized by the Washington 3%. It's a very prominent militia in the country. I was under a white tent to grassy, empty lot on Washington's would be island about an hour north of Seattle. Are you guys gonna kneel to a tyrant? You stand for God. The clouds were low on a typically gray fall day in the Pacific Northwest about 150 people,.

Washington Boise Heath Boise State Public Radio Heath Jen White President Trump Pacific Northwest Idaho Seattle America
"jen white" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"jen white" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Org and Americans for the Arts. Two years ago, Florida voters overwhelmingly ended the state's lifelong voting band for people with felony convictions. I have paid my debt to society and now maybe the boat. So why is the state still keeping many from voting? Unbelievable What these people will go through the stop from bones, also the latest on the president's health on the next morning edition from NPR News. Morning edition Tuesday till nine AM on 90.3. Tha This is one, eh? I'm Jen White in Washington. There are many numbers that define us throughout our lives, for better or worse. GPAs test scores maybe our age, but probably one of the most important ones is our credit score. It's that three digit number that determines whether or not we can buy a house, take out a loan or open a credit card. For a number that's so important. It's really easy for it to go bad. I was stuck in 2007 with a house that I paid way too much for and consequently my credit went bad. I could not claim bankruptcy, but I worked through with the IRS, and it took about four years to get back to a fair credit score of 700 range. Listen, Banking with same bank for over 25 years we've had our mortgages. There are all of our car loans from.

Jen White NPR News IRS Florida Arts president Washington
"jen white" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"jen white" Discussed on KPCC

"Australian singer Helen Reddy, who died this week. Her biggest hit was I am Woman. They've reached the top spot on the charts. In 1972 it peaked is the women's liberation movement was making big headlines. It was the year the Senate passed the Equal Rights Amendment and saw Shirley Chisholm run for president. I'm Jen white. This is one woman here in numbers too big to signal No too much to go back. Is it all done up in down there on the floor? Yes drives can do. I am strong. On the next fresh air. Underwater explorer and photographer Jill Hein Earth has dived into underground waterways deep in the earth beneath a giant iceberg. She's seen hidden creatures as old as dinosaurs and witnessed scenes of surreal beauty. Her work is so dangerous 100 of our friends and colleagues have died in dives. Her book is into the Earth. Join us now on weeknights at eight on 89.3 kpcc..

Jill Hein Earth Helen Reddy Shirley Chisholm Jen white Senate president
"jen white" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"jen white" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Jen White. Today On one a block the vote misinformation and disinformation. Thiss month, Facebook and Twitter busted a Russian group peddling fake stories. Online intelligence officials say that's likely a drop in the bucket. Foreign actors don't hold a candle to Americans when it comes to spreading misinformation. Postal service has sent mailers with wrong voting rules. The president has said you, Khun Bow twice to stress test the system. How did you sort fact from fiction Online and from official sources comment on our Facebook page or tweet us at one, eh? Live from NPR news. I'm Shea Stevens. Democrats are weighing their options as Senate Republicans make clients to confirm a new Supreme Court nominee before Election Day, Hawaii Senator Mazie Hirono, who sits on the Judiciary Committee. Tails. NPR's all things considered. She will not meet with the nominee before the hearings. I have taken the position that with this president, all of his nominees, Supreme Court nominees and judicial nominees Whatever they have to say to me should be said under oath. And that's what I expect Todo so I want them under oath before a committee president Trump says he'll make an announcement Saturday until he wants to replace late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. President says it's a shame that the US has reached the great milestone of 200,000 Corona virus deaths. Trump says his administration's actions prevented even more casualties and again blame China for the pandemic. This, despite revelations that he deliberately downplayed the seriousness of the health crisis. President Trump is again pushing back against racial sensitivity training that mentions white privilege or critical race theory. NPR's Aisha Roscoe reports. The president has signed an executive order expanding his band on that type of training to include contractors as well, A speller employees. President Trump says the executive order is meant to stop efforts to promote quote, divisive and harmful sex and race based ideologies. Trump tweeted that Americans should be taught to take pride in their country. The order will apply to those doing business with the federal government and those receiving certain grants. The measure is specifically aimed at trainings that would teach about white privilege or critical race theory. Universities and corporations have long used racial sensitivity programs to fight against racism and workplaces. Trump has repeatedly questioned whether systemic racism exists in the US and said the issue should not be taught in schools. I saw Roscoe NPR news evacuees near Oregon's massive holiday farm fire are returning home as KLCC is Brian Bull reports, Residents of one of the most ravaged communities are facing severe hardships. A small rural town of Blue River was mostly annihilated when the fire blaze through late Labor Day. Tim Lowey with a local community development corporation, is working of several agencies, a coordinate shelters up and down the river. And with utilities to get water and power restored, Lali says the challenges are far from over. We're gonna have issues with mudslide, falling trees all went along. We have about 30 generators that we're distributing to people who are sheltered in place on the basis of need and highest priority. Roughly 100 homes and businesses were destroyed. Officials expect the fire won't be fully contained until late October. For NPR News. I'm Brian Bowl in Eugene, Oregon. This is NPR news. Vice President Mike Pence's returned to Washington from New Hampshire was briefly disrupted Tuesday night. Air Force two struck a bird during take off from an airport in Manchester, The pilot made an emergency landing out of caution. In. A White House official says neither Pence nor any members entourage was in any danger..

President Trump president NPR News NPR Facebook Senator Mazie Hirono Supreme Court Vice President Roscoe NPR Jen White US Oregon official Mike Pence Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Blue River Twitter Shea Stevens Aisha Roscoe Khun Bow
"jen white" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:15 min | 2 years ago

"jen white" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is one, eh? I'm Jen White in Washington. For some voting is seen as the bedrock of our democracy. People fought and died for the right to vote, and some are still fighting to protect that, right to this day, even get a sticker for showing up to the poles. So why? Then did nearly 100 million eligible Americans not vote? What we asked you, And here's what you told us. I'm George from Seattle and also tell you why I don't vote in elections. The way I used to. I still vote for an issue. Did that thing where I have direct comment. Direct impact on the result. But the district I live in and most states are so Jerry mattered that it doesn't really ultimately matter who's in charge. My name is Thomas. I am early fifties. I've never voted today in my life, and it is due to religious reasons. This is Lee Wilson out of stressful Alabama. I myself and the millennial. And find the area that I live in is so Jerry Mander. It fills frivolous to go cast a vote. Besides that, just of the process of finding a fine time to get off of work, and voting is not a holiday. Hi. This is Bill from Philadelphia. And I'm actually calling in response to asking the question. Why we don't vote. I don't vote And the reason I don't vote is because nothing ever changes. You know, it just makes it worthless. It really does make it worthless. It really doesn't matter. A study published by the Knight Foundation earlier this year was one of the biggest to look into the habits of non voters. What they found was that this group is just a cz diverse and complicated as the rest of the country here to talk about why so many people are choosing not to vote and what it means for not just 2020, but for our democracy is Colin Woodard, contributing editor for Political magazine and author of Union. The Struggle to Forge the Story of United States nationhood, Colin. Welcome to one, eh? A pleasure to be here also with us. Bernard Fraga, associate professor of political science at Emory University and author of the Turnout, Gap, Race, Ethnicity and Political Inequality in a Diversifying America, Professor Fraga welcome. Thanks so much for having me so column We just heard from some folks there about why they're choosing not to vote. But why? What are some of the other reasons people don't vote? They expressed some of them. I mean, the broadly speaking, there are a lot of reasons that non voters don't vote and they sorted into clusters. But you hear time and time again, a combination of either A lack of enthusiasm or belief in the candidates and that the candidates will affect change for them or that the system itself, broadly speaking, no longer is able to deliver the sort of changes and policies that they might want or that the system itself is corrupted or that they don't understand it either their lives or too busy, or they're just interested from it. To feel that they can put in the time to make the educated choices to decide which candidate they might vote for what policies they might be voting for something that many people find get is getting more complicated. As the media environment has fractured and become more polarised for people who don't you know, in quotes followed this stuff all the time. I think it's getting harder and harder to know how to sort you know fact from fiction and and to be able to sort of figure out just what is going on. If you're not following the stuff regularly, combination of reasons when we talk about a non voter, how are we defining that? Well. The Knight Foundation study, which is the most comprehensive look yet off nonvoters defined it as a person who's at least 25, who on Lee voted in one of the election cycle, since 2008 essentially wanting to make sure that you've been an eligible voter long enough to Confirm your track record as being a non voter and that you're very seldom vote professor of Praga. You've looked at voter turnout by demographics, which group turnout, which groups rather turn out to vote, the most and which turn out the least. Sure so the patterns we've seen historically and the trains were likely to see in 2020 indicate that older Americans more wealthy Americans, more politically interested involved. Americans are far more likely to vote than younger people than racial, ethnic minority groups and then people who are just disengaged from the political process. Why are young people so much less likely to vote? There's a number of reasons and we heard some of them earlier from the collars right. One part might be because it's difficult to register to vote for the first time. Some states are very stringent about their requirements for Documents you need to produce in order to register. In addition, young people are very mobile population. They're moving around a lot changing residency, and each time we need to re register to vote. Every state has different rules, different requirements, and those are difficult to navigate, especially for a young person hasn't voted a lot. And I'm wondering Colin whether that might haven't even deeper impact this year with Pandemic and people maybe not having access to the normal means by which they'd register to vote. Yes, well, the pandemic throws a wrench into everything of the the data and understanding and scholarly studies we've done all predate the pandemic. And so the fact that actually going to your poles to vote could endanger your health and that of those around you, and it's also perhaps causing a further consolidation of polling places. There may be a shortage of polling workers that compels even fewer polling stations because many polling volunteers are older and therefore on high risk groups. So, yes, it it compounds things a great deal, and to the extent that They're segments of non voters that don't vote because they feel like it's few child or that it doesn't matter The fact that we're now worried about thie security and effectiveness of mail and voting. Because of the delays in the Postal Service, and the president's remarks on it is probably only increasing the sort of cynicism so yeah, there's a lot of factors that play that.

Colin Woodard Jerry Mander Knight Foundation Lee Wilson Professor Fraga Jen White Seattle United States Alabama associate professor of politic Washington Postal Service Political magazine Thomas Philadelphia Emory University Praga contributing editor president
"jen white" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:46 min | 2 years ago

"jen white" Discussed on KPCC

"One, eh? I'm Jen White in Washington. The man suspected of shooting and killing a right wing activist in Portland has been shot and killed himself. Protests continue to Rock Rochester, New York After police there suffocated a black man in custody. And in the background of all of this, the presidential election is just two months away, and both candidates have officially hit the campaign trail. We'll get to that in a whole lot more on the Friday news round up today. So let's jump in Jane Coast and is a senior politics reporter at Fox Jane. It's great to have you back. Thanks for having me. Also with the Shane Harris covers intelligence and National security at the Washington Post. Shane Great to have you here. Thanks, Jen. And also Kimberly Adams, the hosting correspondent with Marketplace Kimberly. Thanks for joining us Nice to be here. So let's start with some big pandemic related news. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued an order this week to protect renters from eviction. Jane, Why is this coming from the CDC? And what does this order due for tenants? So it's coming from the CDC. And it's what LA lot of people have said. It's a ground breaking test of the CDC is power, and it basically uses a 1940 for law and a very broad interpretation of that. That gives the CDC power to take whatever not action it deems necessary to stop the interstate transmission of an infectious disease. Thea argument being but if you are Evicted from your home, you would be forced to move in with someone say who lives beyond state lines say you need to move back in with your parents or with family members that could help to spread the disease. And so the CDC would essentially prohibit landlords from kicking out tenants solely because they can't afford to pay and it covers any renter who can expect to make less than $99,000 this year who seeks Federal housing aid or would fall in the homelessness if they were evicted. The challenge is that this order looks like it was put together fairly carefully. But most landlords are themselves smaller entities, so it might be someone who just runs out of room in their own home. And so as we facing a continuing economic crisis, this could put landlords who up for understandable reasons. Of a very bad reputation in this country. They could put them at economic risk as well and can really put this into context for us how big of a problem have evictions become during the pandemic. Well, they weren't really allowed to become that big of a problem because you had within the cares Act a moratorium on evictions. After that ran out. Several states and local governments have their own eviction moratoriums. And now, with this being rolled out, landlords have put a lot of these evictions on pause. But you have a potentially millions tens of millions of people who could be evicted in this current economic climate and something interesting about this order, and I'm sure it will be subject to legal challenges for All the reasons that were just mentioned, But it doesn't stop landlords from charging fees, back rent, interest or any of these other things to the people who are not evicted, which means that come January unless something is done by by Congress. People who are at risk of event evictions could find themselves with a giant bill. They're not able to pay. Shane. Some people are saying this order doesn't go far enough. What would critics like to see? Well, I think that they would really like to see is something put into a new stimulus or a relief package, which is still being debated in Congress that would help subsidize this. So that's that what Kimberly was saying The potential outcome of a big bill come down the line that some of that could be subsidised or even covered by making payments to a landlord or potentially giving renters subsidies. The stopgap measure that we're dealing with now keeps people in their home. It doesn't forestall the economic pinch. That's going to be coming for them. And of course, when they do get back on their feet as we hope they will. They might be like, you know, facing double rent payments potentially. So I think people would like to see money put in and set aside specifically for this housing crisis, and that is still being debated as lawmakers tussle with What will or will not go into a relief package and how big it can be ending with the understanding that this order is really testing. The limits of the CDC is power. How is it being enforced? Well, I think that that remains to be seen. I think that this is going to expect a lot of challenges. So the order it's there's also previously issued federal protections. This order is going to be challenged in court and whether or not this actually ends up happening, especially because there could you if this order goes into place or doesn't go into place, we could face a housing crisis in the beginning of 2021. So how the government expects to enforce this. That will be a question that I think will be raised in the courts. Will. The CDC also alerted states this week to be ready to distribute a Corona virus vaccine as early as November? 1st. That's two days before the presidential election and Kimberlee. I've got to say that's auspicious timing. How much concern is this? Raising that the process is politically motivated? Obviously a lot of concern. And you know if you want to be optimistic, you, Khun say, hey, that It's also around time for flu shots. And so maybe this infrastructure could be used for that. But President Trump has long promised that we would have a vaccine much earlier than health officials said that we would and the state of the trials as they are right now. Sure, there are some really encouraging trials happening right now. But the idea that we will have a vaccine ready for a nationwide rollout a couple of days before the election is not realistic based on what I've seen, and there are a lot of people very concerned about the political timing of it. That said, I mean, having infrastructure in place is very different than having a baby. Scene Well, there is debate within the Trump administration over whether the Food and Drug Administration should use its emergency authority to clear vaccine before it's approved. That would make it easier to roll out of vaccine before Election Day. But this comes as concerns continued to grow over the politicization of the FDA. Jane. First off is the administration putting political pressure on the FDA. I think it's fairly clear that they are you've seen even in Trump's tweets, where he talks about the deep state getting involved with the FDA and the FDA. The FDA is Dr Stephen Han has essentially said he was asked if he would be ready to go if you would resign. If you were pressured to release the vaccine before he feels one is ready, and he said Quote. All options are on the table. And so you've had numerous people who have essentially said that the FDA is being put under a lot of political pressure, but I think it's important to be clear here that it's it's understandable political pressure you've heard from both Democrats and Republicans that if there were to be a workable Corona virus covert 19 vaccine As soon as October. That would be fantastic news and that the ability to do so that would immunize between 20 and 25 million people. That would be fantastic news not just for Thehe Merican economy but the American populace as a whole..

Food and Drug Administration CDC Jen White Kimberly Adams Jane Congress Jane Coast Portland Fox Jane Washington President Trump Rochester Shane Great Shane Harris Washington Post LA reporter
"jen white" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"jen white" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Back Phyllis Wheatley. She stared down at the paper beneath her hands, and her thoughts burned and flared with memories of times past. To think this is who she was now a master wordsmith. Oh, she had been born and told she was enslaved. She found freedom in words. And the way they could conjure creation out of nothingness and spend the truth into the light. Phillis Wheatley dipped her quill into the inkwell and nibble that it's feathered end. Stared for a moment of the lines that creased her hands. Stories told in the wrinkles of her face in the ridges of her body. Ground it deeply in her Christian faith. Phyllis wondered how her white peers get Professor love of God. While holding her people. People who skin saying with the same tenderness as the rich brown earth in perpetual unceasing bondage. There could be no freedom. All black people were enslaved back spent beneath the brutal glare of the overseer. So she put pen to paper. And wrote But how presumptuous shall we hope to find divine acceptance with the almighty mind? Yet O d'd on generous, They disgrace and Holden Bondage, Africa blameless race. Let virtue rain and then accord. Our prayers be victory ours and generous freedom. There's She had survived. What was she truly free? You're listening to our audio docudrama based on the fight for women's suffrage at the turn of the century, this year marks the Centenary of the 19th amendment. Our journey continues in a bed. I'm Jen white. This is one act. Since 2017 1 has.

Phillis Wheatley Phyllis Jen white Africa Professor
"jen white" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:48 min | 2 years ago

"jen white" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Jen white. We're talking about the crisis of missing and murdered indigenous women. According to the FBI, nearly 5600 Native American women were reported missing last year. And according to the Urban Indian Health Institute, murder is the third leading cause of death among American indigenous women here to tell us why is Margo Hillman? She's a member of the Spokane tribe, where she formerly served his tribal attorney. She now teaches at Eastern Washington University and directs the school's tribal planning program. Margo. Welcome to one, eh? Yes, Thanks for having me. Also with us from Eureka, California is Anita Lucas. She's the executive director of the Sovereign Bodies Institute, which tracks cases of missing and murdered indigenous women. She's a Cheyenne descended Anita. It's great to have you Thank you for having me. So needed. We just heard about the unsolved murder of K. Sarah stops pretty places. How common are stories like hers? Unfortunately, case Sarah's story is very common. I've been fortunate to get to work with K. Sarah's aunt Grace, who heard from earlier a swell as other members of Sarah's family and other families in the region. It's important to know that Sarah is one of 32 cases of missing and murdered native women and girls in Bighorn County on one of 62 cases in South eastern Montana. So while her story is heartbreaking in so many ways, it's part of a broader landscape of injustice. Not just in Montana we've documented over 4000 cases of missing a murdered native women and girls throughout the U. S and Canada. Over what period of time? Well, we document from 1900 to the present, but over 80% of that data is post 1980. Not necessarily because the violence is increasing. But because the data is so hard to access of the easier are the more president. You get, the easier it is together. Marco, Can you explain how the prosecution of crimes works on tribal land and how that relates to this crisis? Yes, The complicated jurisdiction jurisdictional scheme in Indian country makes it very difficult to protect native women. There are a number of factors that come into play. You know, federal Indian policies like the Allotment Act opened up reservation land, so we had more non Indians settlers coming onto the reservation. We have statutes in the United States Supreme Court cases, but what it comes down to is a number of factors. It depends on the land tenure is the is the property where the act was committed. It matters. Is it trust property owned by tribe or is it feed property on DH? Then it also matters who is the perpetrator? Are they native or not native? This determines who has jurisdiction And then? Lastly, there are statutes like the major crime Major Crime Act. If it's a major crime, like murder, rape, arson, then the feds come in and do the prosecution's so then we're dependent upon federal actors who are responsible to prosecute these crimes. You have FBI agents that come onto the reservation, and you have the U. S attorney's office that prosecute these violent crimes. And Theo US Attorney's office doesn't always prosecute these crimes. I served as the tribes attorney for over 10 years and I can tell you I received letters a declination, where they declined to prosecute very violent crimes on our reservations. When you were spoken tribal attorney Can you give us an example of a of a case you worked on or or you followed so that we have a better idea of how this works in real time when you're trying to solve one of these cases. Okay, so there's a whole range of cases it goes from, you know, molestation of young Indian Children where we worked with Casey Family partners to have forensic interviews. We worked really hard to have good cases for the U. S. Attorneys to prosecute. And they would decline to prosecute. Sometimes they were one more violent acts of sexual assault in sodomy on DH. Those cases weren't prosecuted. I can tell you now the U. S attorney's office is working to prosecute cases, but for many years Indian country was ignored. How much investigation goes into cases like a Sarah's, which is right now it's a it's a mysterious death. It hasn't been called a murder. As I said the autopsy wasn't able Tio Cone into a cause of death, but how much investigation actually goes into these cases? Well, it's difficult to say when whenever there's a domestic violence or a homicide. We have to rely on our are outside partners. Maybe if it's domestic violence, and it's a non native, we do not have criminal jurisdiction over those individuals. There is a United States Supreme Court case, all font. Um, that states tribes have no criminal jurisdiction. So we have to rely on local county sheriff to come on and do investigations or to do wth e. The investigation for a simple DV and again if it's a major crime, we're we are calling FBI agents they can be very, you know hard to solve. Because we can't get anybody to come out to the reservation or as was mentioned by the and it's just not a priority, so just to be clear if An act of violence is committed against it. A woman on tribal land by someone who is not part of the tribe. You're limited in the degree to which you can actually prosecute that person. Except for in specific cases of domestic violence. Is that accurate? So, yes, it's very complicated, not even in acts of all acts of domestic violence. You know, In the past, we had till oa the Travel on Order Code Act that expanded the punitive abilities of tribal courts across the nation. But travel courts are very limited in scope of what they can punish the what they can hand down a CZ faras punitive measures, so we're treated like the impression is Irving that were a lower, less serious court. And that causes a lot of challenges for tribal governments for tribal communities to protect their women and Children. For that matter, there's you know, ah, range of violence against women and Children. Whether you're on the reservation, or you're even in the urban areas, it's difficult. These investigations don't always happen because of the stereotypes there's victim blaming as was mentioned. Oh, she, you know there's allegations of drug use. When main when we seen here in the city of Spokane, that there was somebody that untended Jenise woman that was found in an alleyway in she didn't use drugs at all. On DH. She later died of her assault wounds. A NATO for you. What do you think, are some of the root causes of this crisis of so many indigenous women going missing or being murdered?.

murder K. Sarah attorney FBI United States Supreme Court Margo Hillman assault Urban Indian Health Institute Spokane tribe Eastern Washington University U. S Montana Jen white Theo US Attorney Eureka Spokane Indian Children Canada Tio Cone
"jen white" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"jen white" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Hi. I'm Jen White. Today On one A. Our first ever TV club takes a trip to the lower decks when it premiered in 1966 Star Trek was a three season flop. Now it's boned 13 films, nine TV series comics and more. Now it's gone, where few trekking orations have gone before into the world of animated comedy, and for some Trekkies, it's a step in the wrong direction. We talked about the 50 year legacy of Star Trek and the future of the enterprise. But first Republicans promised an RNC full of optimism have they delivered? We want to hear from you comment on our Facebook page or tweet us at one, eh? Live from NPR news. I'm nor Rahm. The second night of the Republican Convention kicked off with an eclectic lineup of speakers, including members of the Trump family. NPR's Barbara's front reports. The first night of convention programming largely centered on speakers painting a dark picture of what the country would look like if former vice President Joe Biden wins in November. But Tuesday night attempted to shift that focused to a more optimistic realm, with speakers like Trump's top economic adviser, Larry Kudlow, praising the president on his policy decisions and remarks from two of Trump's Children. Eric and Tiffany. There were also elements designed to humanize the president and add to the drama of the evening, including President Trump Holding a naturalization ceremony for five new citizens and granting a pardon to a man who started a program to help former inmates after he was released from prison. Corbisprint NPR news Protestors demonstrated in Kenosha, Wisconsin, again Tuesday night over the shooting of a black man by police Sunday night. Ben Crump, an attorney for the family. Says the police had no reason to shoot Jacob Blake think for a second.

President Trump NPR president Trump vice President Jen White Republican Convention RNC Larry Kudlow Joe Biden Facebook Ben Crump Rahm Jacob Blake Kenosha Wisconsin economic adviser Barbara attorney
"jen white" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:59 min | 2 years ago

"jen white" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Jen White back, Not our conversation on the making of Senator Kamala Harris, Joe Biden's VP pick. I'm here with Robin Givens, staff writer at The Washington Post, and Cornish, a grant, political science professor at Howard University. Robin. Let's get back to Mike's question about those years in Canada and how they shaped Senator Harris's outlook. Well, I'm not as first in her time in Montreal, but what I can say about that is you know, One of the things that you know she has talked about is the challenge of landing in this new country where she had to learn French. On and that that was a high hurdle for her. And it was also you know, again, an instance in which she wass sort of the odd duck out. She was very much in the minority it wass. She went to a predominantly white school and she was also you know, the American But I do think that, as is often the case with as people who spend some their formative years abroad, it does. It broadens your sense of the world and it broadens you understanding that, you know, the place that you occupy in it is a bit more humble. That one might presume if you spend your time always being in the majority in this, you know, in the thick of it. What's the significance of having the first Hbcu grand on a major political party ticket? Well, I have to say that during my time reporting on her experience at Howard, I got a really sense of the incredible devotion and pride. That the alarm have in their institution. And in many ways, I think what it really speaks to is this philosophy of black excellence. And the reality particularly coming out of Howard, You know, in the late eighties that you didn't necessarily have tio up and the system in order to find success that you could strive and be successful within the system. And you know, it was also a period soon after he threw the first generation of post civil rights kids who whose parents felt that every possibility was open to them. And that it was almost a moral obligation to take advantage off those all of those possibilities on so I think when you see her you you do see some of that sort of Howard swagger and confidence and pride in the way that she carries herself. And you also, I think I see the reflection of being a member of a K, which is sort of bound up in both public service and history on pride in black womanhood. Commissioner. You have as close as we get to a front row seat thes days to the response of Howard University alumni and students. What are you seeing in hearing? Are absolutely over the moon. As I think alumni of all HBC news are we often get questions about whether the hbcu experience is sufficient to send people out into the real world. The quote unquote real world, given that The real world has more racial diversity. And the response that hbcu grads usually give is that the experience there is diverse that there are black people from all different types. Of backgrounds from all different walks of life, and that the education is on par with elite education around the nation in the world. And so we now have a shining example. And I think Hbcu GREss everywhere have been pointing to Senator Harris as a shining example of what can happen coming from an hbcu. Education. I think students are a bit different. I'd be remiss if I didn't miss. If I didn't tell you that. My students have questions that many of them are activists that many of them are progressives and are on the left side of the political spectrum and that they have questions about Senator Harris's record. Of questions about some of the things that happened while she was a prosecutor and attorney general. And so some of them will be presenting those questions, both to her anti vice president Biden as they think about where they want to put their votes. But I think there is still ah, large number of students to who are just very proud. To be associated with Howard University at a time where one of its graduates is making history in the nation. Well yesterday, Senator Harris gave her first speech as Joe Biden's running mate. Here's devoted a good amount of time in her speech, going after the president as you'd expect, but says in her darkest moments this year, she drew inspiration from her parents who took around protest marches in the sixties as a toddler. And those taking to the streets today, all across this country, a whole new generation of Children. Is growing up hearing the cries for justice and the chance of hope. I was raised. Some strapped into strollers of their own. And trust me, It's a song you'll never forget. What can you tell us about the role of black women in politics that helps us understand? Biden's pick of Harris Black women have been very loyal and active participants in the Democratic Party for many years, even when the Democratic Party was not Responsive to black people or two black women, in particular thinking here about Fannie Lou Hamer, who talked about being sick and tired of being sick and tired because she wanted to participate in the Democratic Party convention and was not able to do so fully. And so there's a very long history of black women not only giving their individual votes to the Democratic Party and doing so, in in accountable or ways that we know Democrats count all, but there is also a history of black women doing the organizing. Of black communities. When we think about the black vote as a dependable vote for Democrats, we think about how those things happen is not always because Democrats are doing where the Democratic Party is doing. The work of getting people out often is people in our community and black women in particular. Who are doing the work of organizing black communities. And so I think it's a very, very big deal to see the Democratic Party and Joe Biden, in particular, respond to that long history of work their long history of contribution by putting a black woman on this ticket as the vice presidential nominee. That's Ganesha, grand professor of political science at Howard University, also with us. Robin Givens, staff writer at The Washington Post. Another key point in Kamala Harris. Life is her career beginnings as a prosecutor in California to learn more about that we're bringing another voice into the conversation. California Attorney General Javier Becerra, attorney general, but zero It's great to have you here. Thanks for having me. So what can you tell us about Harris early years as a prosecutor? Well, you have to put it on perspective. She was a pioneer. She was blazing trails. She was not expected to become the district attorney in San Francisco. She took on incumbent she was not expected to win her raised for attorney general. I mean, all the way through that campaign, I recall Republicans expected that the district attorney from Los Angeles Steve Cooley, would be the victor and they were they were getting ready to take over that city and all of a sudden Come on, Harris..

Senator Kamala Harris Joe Biden Howard University Democratic Party Robin Givens Harris Black Howard prosecutor attorney The Washington Post staff writer Canada Jen White Montreal HBC Mike professor of political science VP professor
"jen white" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

07:01 min | 2 years ago

"jen white" Discussed on KPCC

"Thiss is one, eh? I'm Jen White in Washington. The hard drinking detective. The thrilling heist the eye candy fem fatale, who, in a stunning twist turns out to also be the story's big bad. These are some of the tried and true and some might say, formulaic elements of crime novels. Police are usually the heroes and characters of color are often absent or presented as cliches. All of that got one of you thinking. I'm test Garretson and I write the Rizzoli and Isles crime novels. My heroine is Detective Jane Rizzoli, and she's a cop who tries to do the right thing. If she sometimes bends the rules, it's for good reasons. Like most mystery novelists, I write about cops primarily as heroes. I'm Asian American, and I personally never had a bad interaction with the police. But that footage of George Floyd's murder by the police and all the other videos of police misconduct. They just kept playing and replaying in my head. I had to stop writing for a while. It forced me to reconsider every scene I right between a cop and a suspect. Now I ask who is really the villain and who was the hero? Well, we decided to check in with a panel of black crime writers on how they see their genre. Grappling with that tough question from California is author Rachel How's L. Hall, creator of the Detective Liu Norton. Siri's, Her latest book is called They All Fall Down, Rachel, Welcome. Thank you. I'm happy to be here. Also with us from California, is prolific, bestselling author Walter Mosley. He's written more than 50 books, including the Easy Rawlins. Siri's. His latest is called Trouble is what I Do. Welcome, Walter. Thank you. And also with us from Virginia is s a Cosby, author of Blacktop Wasteland. And my darkest prayer essay is his pen name will be calling him. Sean. Hi, Sean. Welcome to one, eh? Thank you for having me. I'm happy to be here. So show him your new book. Blacktop Wasteland was released A couple of weeks ago did to stellar reviews. The New York Times called it a roaring, full throttle thriller crackling with tension and charm. Introduce us to the story and its main character, Beauregard, or or Bug. All right. So basically Beauregarde bug mon th is an African American man who lives in rule himself. Eastern Virginia. He is a former getaway driver who went straight opened a small auto mechanic shop. And is trying to live. His version of the American Dream, However, unfortunately, is the book opens, He's under intense financial pressures. A new auto mechanic shop was open in town and is taking his business. His terminally ill mother is about to be removed or kicked out. I should say over nursing facility because of a clerical air with her Medicaid. He has a daughter from a previous relationship who just graduate from high school. It wants to go to college needs mind for tuition, and he's married and has two young sons. And he wants to give them a better life. A CZ. Well, as he says in the book he wants to you. Have his wife have a home That's not on wheels as actual foundation and so As the book opens. He is an extra bleed drawn back into the criminal life in a little faded jury, Heiss and as it is want to do in these types of novels that jewelry heist doesn't go as planned. And so But, ah, a lot of bull regards. Issues are are tired to his poverty, his race and where he lives at in Virginia in the role self Well, Rachel, what did you see other crime and mystery writers getting wrong when they write stories about policing or about race? I think it's ah, It's a problem when things are just kind of black and white on both sides when cops are either good or evil when the community members are either good or evil, I believe We're all kind of these various shades of gray and our interactions with each other are weighted with these shades of gray. I I write stories and characters who are connected to the community there, primarily mostly African American. And even in our dealings with the cops, we want them and we don't You know, it's a very strange relationship black communities have always had with law enforcement. Where we want them to do their jobs, But they we don't want you know them to, uh, basically do what they've done to many blacks. Throughout history from Nis on neck, two dogs to fire hoses to all of it and so literature we're we're committed to making sure that those kind of nuances are there in our stories because it is very complicated. Well, you created the Detective Liu Norton. Siri's. She's a Los Angeles homicide detective. She's a black woman. How does she capture some of that new once you're describing, um, see the child of the eighties. So like me, she grew up in Los Angeles under the Daryl Gates, LAPD Force so that force had a lot of a lot of problems. There are gangs within the cops system. There are places in l A that we as black kids and teenagers could not go. You know, being driving while black. That was a thing. And so Lou Norton grew up. You know, in that kind of air where you'd go see, do the right thing and you come out and they're riot cops. So her turning to the LAPD for this sort of belonging that she needed. She brings with that the sensibility at that black women tend to bring two things knowing what it is to be the other. Knowing how to speak the language, having been educated and gone away to school and coming back to share that and how you know how she deals with her community, seeing her as a savior and as an interval per S o. She brings that kind of every woman to her job, and she can talk to the people She grew up with better than someone who grew up on the West side and as a wife. White male, So she's a She's a boon to the LAPD. But she can also be seen as problematic because, you know, like a lot of women and black women. She's seen as Cassandra. You know, the myth of Cassandra know what Cheats. He's saying the truth, but no one believes her. So she boxes against the waves as he tries to make you know her community. Better than what it can be. Well, Walter, your first published book, The Classic Devil in a Blue Dress, features a black private investigator. Easy Rawlins. It came out 30 years ago. How have you seen the crime genre evolved since you first published that book who hasn't a hard question to answer that? I think that.

Liu Norton Siri Rachel How LAPD Walter Mosley Detective Jane Rizzoli Virginia Cassandra Los Angeles Sean Jen White Thiss California Garretson George Floyd Beauregard Isles Eastern Virginia Washington Rawlins
"jen white" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"jen white" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I there? I'm Jen White today on won a fight for equality. John Lewis was the last speaker at the march on Washington still alive before he died last Friday at the age of 80 CT. Vivian was known as Dr King's Filled General. How might their depths act is a galvanizing force at a moment of national reflection will share your ideas about how the country Khun Best Honor the legacies of both men, and we'll look forward and hear from those ready to carry the torch as ever were looking forward to hearing from you. Email us at one. A. W A. N ew dot org's or tweet us at once. Live from NPR news. I'm Shea Stevens, The Justice Department inspector general is investigating how federal agents dealt with protesters in Portland, Oregon, as NPR's Carrie Johnson reports. The review follows allegations of abuse. Inspector General Michael Horowitz only has jurisdiction over federal agents who work for the Justice Department, which includes the FBI, the DEA, the ATF and U. S marshals. He's going to coordinate with his counterpart at Homeland Security. Horowitz will launch a broad review and have a Justice Department responded to protesters in Portland and at Lafayette Square in Washington. The review will consider the use of chemical agents and rubber bullets. The has called on Attorney General Bill Bar to appoint a special prosecutor to look into alleged civil rights violations at Lafayette Square, but Bar hasn't responded to that demand. Carrie Johnson. NPR NEWS Washington A federal judge is ordering the release of former Trump attorney and fixer Michael Cohen, who's serving a three year sentence for fraud, campaign finance violations. And lying to Congress. As NPR's Ryan Lucas reports, Cohen filed suit challenging his recent return to federal prison. The decision from U. S District Court Judge Alvin Hellerstein is the latest twist in Michael Cohen's legal Odyssey. Cohen was released from federal prison to home confinement in May because of concerns about the Corona virus. But then, earlier this month he was taken back to prison after refusing to agree not to speak to the media or published a book a condition of his release that Cohen says violated his First Amendment rights. Cohen is writing a tell all book about his many years working for Trump. Now Judge Hellerstein has found that the government's decision to return going to prison was indeed retaliation for his book and the violation of his rights. And he has ordered that Cohen be released back to home confinement. Ryan Lucas. NPR NEWS Washington Senate Democrats are trying to block President Trump's plan to sever ties with the World Health Organization. NPR's Jason Beaubien has details. Chris Coons of Delaware and Patrick Leahy, Vermont have introduced a bill called the No W H O Withdrawal Act. The bill would block any spending for a U. S departure from the organization. Earlier this month, President Trump notified the World Health Organization that his administration is suspending ties with the group and will formally leave the body in July of 2021. One year notice is required on the original congressional authorization to join the organization. Trump is accused of bungling the global response to Cove in 19 and of being controlled by China. Planned departure of the US has been a major blow to the global.

Michael Cohen NPR Judge Alvin Hellerstein Washington President Trump Inspector General Michael Horo Justice Department Trump World Health Organization Carrie Johnson Ryan Lucas John Lewis Lafayette Square Portland Bill Bar Jen White attorney Vivian
"jen white" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"jen white" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"There. I'm Jen White. Today on one a policing to for first President Trump is threatening to deploy federal law enforcement to Chicago and other cities. That's after agents in Portland, Oregon, snatched protestors off the street put them in unmarked cars and throughout probable cause along the way. What's going on. And is it even legal, then Baltimore about to fix its police department after the death of Freddie Gray, but it didn't go as planned to reporters. Tell us the story. We're looking forward to hearing from you. Email us at one A at W Am you dot or or tweet us at 18 J. Stevens. President Trump is continuing his law and order push ahead of the November election. As NPR's Giles Snyder reports. Trump says he's expanding a federal crackdown on violent crime in cities around the country. The president confirmed the expansion during a Wednesday event at the White House, saying his administration is surging federal officers to Chicago and Albuquerque. He unveiled the plan, with Attorney General Bharat his side urging other cities to ask for federal help and accusing the movement to reduce police Department budgets for what he claimed is a wave of violent crime administration says Operation legend is separate from the controversial deployment of Portland, Oregon. NPR's Gile Snyder. California now has the most corona virus cations of any state in the country, with 13,000 new infections confirmed in the past 24 hours, details from NPR's Nathan Rock Corona virus cases are surging in parts of the nation's most populated state in Los Angeles County, where residents are nervously waiting to see if there will be another state home order. Many of the new cases are being found in people under the age of 41. Health officials earlier this week said it's a tragedy that some younger people are not taking the threat seriously putting others at risk. Although California has now surpassed New York for having the most confirmed cases of any U S date, it's number of deaths is still far lower Weekly death tolls are increasing in California, though, as they are in a number of other states. Nathan Rot. NPR NEWS. Southwest Airlines will soon test thermal cameras that can spot travelers with fever beginning early next month in Dallas. The idea is to evaluate the cameras where they should be placed and whether the technology will slow screenings at security checkpoints. United Airlines requires passengers to wear masks at ticket counters and in airport lounges. All major U. S carriers require passengers to wear masks during flights. The Trump Administration's proposing new greenhouse gas emission standards for airplanes as NPR's Jeff Brady report. The rules are modeled after international standards that environmentalists say are two week most of the Trump administration's focus has been on rolling back environmental regulations, but this one would reduce the carbon dioxide emissions from airplanes that are changing the climate. Aviation accounts for about 2% of all human caused greenhouse gases. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler says this proposal will make it easier for domestic manufacturers to sell their planes to other countries. This regulation will help ensure that older, less efficient airplanes.

President Trump NPR Trump Administration president California NPR NEWS Oregon Chicago Portland Jen White Administrator Andrew Wheeler Gile Snyder Giles Snyder Southwest Airlines Nathan Rot Attorney General Bharat EPA Freddie Gray
"jen white" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

07:22 min | 2 years ago

"jen white" Discussed on KPCC

"For Jen White. Our trip around the world this week will take us to China, Turkey and Siberia. But again, there's one story that eclipses all others. The global fight against Cove in 19 there have now been more than one million confirmed cases in India, two million in Brazil. Here. The daily total of new cases hits another record, and has Russia been trying to steal the research That's going into finding a vaccine. Our guest this week are David Lawler, World News editor for Axios. Hayes Brown, Co host of Buzzfeed Podcast News o clock. And Jennifer Williams, a senior foreign editor at box and the co host of the podcast, Worldly thanks all for joining us. Now. Once again, the World Health Organization is not happy if governments do not clearly communicate with their citizens and roll out a comprehensive strategy focused on suppressing transmission. And saving lives is going to get worse and worse and worse, The head of the W. H O told reporters this week that to many countries, air quote headed in the wrong direction when it comes to the pandemic. Hayes is he right? The trend lines on a lot of countries are extremely worrying, including here in the United States. The fact is, he's right. A lot of countries are doing this dance where they're trying their best to tamp down populist disagreement with the fact that people are having to stay home to prevent the spread of the virus there, Having to contend with the fact that You're economies are hit hard by the fact that people can't go out to work or spend money as normal and they're trying to balance all this in the face of a virus that has no cure at this point and no vaccine. So I, the World Health Organization is absolutely correct and urging government and people to take this virus as seriously now as it as they did back in April, say, But it's it's an uphill struggle right now, which is baffling to most observers. I feel like who have been wanting this story closely on who care. About their lives and livelihood. I mean, the fact that governments are still in the process of trying to roll back the restrictions and get people back to work even as Protective equipment is not available. Even as the virus caseload continues to grow in hospitals continue, Tio grow more overwhelmed. It's baffling. Jennifer the W H O itself has come under some scrutiny lately, mostly from the U. S. What's happening? Yeah. So the W H O has basically become a target of the Trump Administration for a particular reason, Mainly early on in the outbreak of you know, before even became a pandemic. W. H O was seen at least by the Trump administration but also by Sun outside observers as being a little Tio willing to accept China's explanations except China's kind of resistance to letting out you know, outsiders come in in the early kind of outbreak in Wuhan. And you know, it's part of this kind of broader issue that we're seeing with the Trump administration that you know, started a few months ago, but we're continuing to see which is basically instead of, you know, working hard to try to address the actual issues of lack of testing capacity. You know problems with reopening schools coming up his plans. The Trump Administration has decided to essentially turned outward and look for scapegoats. Tio, deflect blame from themselves and China is target number one and I would say probably Target number two would be the late show. But it's more about China itself. In terms of the Trump administration. Kind of trying to make this, you know, they call it the Chinese virus. Trying to make this look like this was something that was unleashed by this, you know, bad foreign adversary that it's not the Trump administration's fault, etcetera and then More recently, the W H O has also come under criticism for some of the decisions that they're making in terms of guidelines and the science particularly around things like mask wearing, you know whether or not They are mandating and saying people should be wearing masks to to to prevent the risk of spread of the infection. Um and other things like that, in terms of like viral. Droplets and, you know, aerosolized. You know whether the virus can be spread and stay in the air for a long time. So no, you chose really coming under fire for several reasons on dawn, all sides and I think to some degree You know, some of the criticism is legitimate. And then you know on it. On the other hand, some of it is is very clearly political, you know, from the Trump administration. Countries around the world are reimposing lockdowns and social distancing measures as covert 19 continues to surge, India just past a 1,000,000 cases, and it's slapped a two week locked down on part of the country in response. David, we say locked down, but what does that actually entail? Right. So we saw this big wave earlier in the spring of nationwide lockdowns where people often you know you couldn't travel within the country. You were told not to leave work unless you leave unless you have an essential job or you had to go grocery shopping or something like that. What we're seeing now is both more targeted geographically and in India there there are in some cases, states In some cases, cities in some cases, city blocks there particularly hard hit that there are additional restrictions being placed on. So we're not seeing these big nationwide lockdowns like we saw before. And also in some cases, it's it's it's. It's a matter of rolling back what had been opened up rather than going all the way back into full, You know? Can't leave your house locked down. Yes. So I was going to ask you. How's India handling the pandemic on hole? So India had this, You know, they went into nationwide locked down. They were criticized because there were all of these migrant workers who were stranded in cities and then traveled out to the countryside, and the fear was that they would bring the virus with them because it had been concentrated in cities to that point. That does seem to have happened. The outbreak has spread really around the country. Testing is still very limited in India, but the caseload continues to rise. It's now the third The daily, You know, Case count, there is is the third highest in the world behind the U. S. And Brazil, and it's likely to continue to climb throughout this summer. So the situation in India is quite worrying a CZ you mentioned They're trying to add the footsteps into place to slow the spread without going into this really economically crippling lock down Hey is nearly 2.5 million migrant workers were stranded during India's first round of lockdowns. Could that happen again? It could because thie Indian government, it's interesting the way the parallels between Indian the Grand States right now are kind of fascinating both large and populist countries with unfortunately weak health infrastructure in place right now to deal with this virus and what India is seeing eyes. Very close to what the U. S. Is saying in terms of the virus is popping up in various parts of the country. We're seeing spikes grounds country they're basically chasing after these new flare ups, try and tamp them down, but in the process They're not really addressing the rural committee. The number of people in rural communities who are possibly going uncounted and the virus continues to spread there..

India Trump Administration China W H O World Health Organization Hayes Brown David Lawler Jennifer Williams U. S. And Brazil Jen White Axios Russia World News Buzzfeed United States Cove editor Brazil Turkey
"jen white" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:13 min | 2 years ago

"jen white" Discussed on KPCC

"One, eh? I'm Jen White in Washington. It's been quite the term for the Supreme Court, and it's not done yet. In normal circumstances. The justices would have packed up for the summer by now. But in the days ahead, we can expect some blockbuster decisions covering birth control, religious rites and the president's efforts to keep his financial records private. Taken together. These final opinions could rewrite a narrative that expected the court to be more conservative after the addition of two Trump nominees Joining us is the president of the National Constitution Center Jeff Rosen, Jeff, It's great to have you back. It's great to be here. So let's start with one of the rulings. The court just made one involving faithless electors. Give us the background on this case. So the question in the faithless electors case is whether states can penalize electors who vote for people other than those who are pledged to vote for And the court unanimously said Yes, it's a striking opinion, not so much for the result because it was unanimous but for the playfulness of the prose, justice Kagan wrote the majority opinion and she's describing the election of 17 96 when John Adams comes in first and Jefferson second, and they both become president and vice president. And she says, when I think of this a spotter for a new season of veep, so there's a kind of playfulness to the decision, which suggested she said, Jen, and it's such an honor by the way to your on your first day on the on the show that for the decisions that are coming down The big question is whether teach justice Roberts will continue to create these bipartisan majorities that were so striking in that case involving LGBTQ rights and also in his really important decision about abortion as well and for people who may be less familiar with those cases just remind us what the decisions were there. Sure, just just recently. The court in a 16 re decision said that the title seven of the Civil Rights Act of 1960 for which forbids discrimination because of sex includes discrimination because of transgender status or sexual orientation, who was written by Justin score a schedule of huge implications for the future of LGBT rights. Some people think it's even More important than the marriage equality decision in terms of its practical effect, and the fact that was written by a conservative appointee, Justice Gorsuch and joined by Chief Justice Roberts was really significant. And then just last week The court by a 5 to 4 decision with Chief Justice Roberts joining the Liberals said that Louisiana could not impose admitting privileges on doctor's books. Were they perform abortions. In doing so the chief justice voted to affirm a decision. 2016 that he had originally disagreed with showing that he really cares about precedent. And that's very important because it signals that he might be less likely to overturn Roe v. Wade than many people thought. And and it's and then, of course, just two weeks ago, the chief joined the Liberals in holding that President Trump could not repeal Dhaka, the Dreamers program by executive order. So, as you said, the huge question about whether, at the end of this very significant term The court will be less conservative them people thought and if it is, it's largely due to the efforts of Chief Justice. Roberts, who's determined to maintain a nonpartisan legitimacy of the Supreme Court at a time when Congress and the president and the country of the whole are more polarized than any time since the civil war, well, looking at the ruling around faithless electors, as you said this was a unanimous ruling. That's pretty rare. I mean, what can we extrapolate from the fact that all the justices agreed Well, uh, it is rare, and it suggests both. The justices thought case wasn't that close, Although there was an interesting concurrence by Justice Thomas joined by Justice Gorsuch, who would have parsed the result a little bit differently, and said that on ly States that imposed the find as a condition of appointment can have their pleasures. Upheld, but that legalism aside, it suggests the chief justice Roberts cares deeply about unanimity, he said, when he was first appointed chief back in 2006 that he thought The court should speak unanimously as often as possible with narrow, unanimous opinions that avoided sweeping constitutional rulings because he thought that was good for nonpartisan legitimacy. And he said he was gonna make that his mission as chief justice. Often, of course, the court has fallen short of that. But what's so significant about this term is that we're seeing more of that than ever both in unanimous decisions like this in decisions not to hear a certain cases like the Second Amendment cases of the Supreme Court turned away broadly, the chief justice seems to not want to get involved in Politics. He also pushed till past the election. Another case about the president's tax returns, so to the degree that he can avoid interjecting, according to the center of Electoral politics, he's going to do that. And this is just one dramatic example of that goal. Well, another thing that sort of out of the ordinary is the fact that the court is sitting so late into it's summer term. Why is this happening? Because of the coded crisis. The court for the first time in history, both met through telephone aural arguments and also broadcast those arguments live and it was so exciting to hear the arguments live to hear. The justices asked questions in order of seniority rather than just jumping in and out as they usually do here, Justice Thomas speak frequently and vigorously. And as a result of that the schedule just got impact Scratch. And although the court historically has always ended its term by the end of June because of that new schedule there into July, did they manned up this week or they could even go into the following week. But as you said, a bunch of the biggest decisions of the term still have to be decided, including those involving Religious exemption for contraception in health care on the religious exemption from anti discrimination, employment laws, and also the trump subpoena cases. Measures and Vance run us through some of the specifics around each of those cases..

Chief Justice Roberts president justice Roberts Justice Thomas Supreme Court Justice Gorsuch justice Kagan Jen White President Trump Washington Jeff Rosen vice president National Constitution Center Roe Vance
"jen white" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"jen white" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Jen White, the new host of one A right now We've got a lot to talk about. Let's write our next chapter together. I hope you'll join me and my great guests next time on one a One a coming up tonight at nine o'clock. Right now. In the half Moon Bay. It's 64 degrees 73 Valeo and in Napa, the current temperature is 84 degrees. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm married Louise Kelly. It is one of the most intimate and complicated relationships around and for many women, and yes, it is mostly women. It's an all important one. I'm talking about the relationship between a mother And her child's caregiver, and that is the relationship at the heart of author J. Courtney Sullivan's new novel, Friends and Strangers. Jaye. Courtney Sullivan joins us now welcome Thank you so much for having me Why this particular relationship at the heart of your story? Well, I as a young woman as a teenager, I was a baby sitter and my senior year of college in particular, I took care of a little baby whose family had just moved to western Massachusetts from New York City and her mother and I grew very closed. But as tends to happen with those relationships, we did fall out of touch and 10 years later, I was back at Smith to give a reading from one of my books and I came out to the street and I was standing at the crosswalk. The car pulled up and behind the wheel of the car was this woman Who I had been set for, and I was waving frantically like, hi, It's me, and she had no idea who I wass. Ah, I went back to New York that night was telling a friend the story who is also a novelist, and she said, Oh, that should be your next book. But I wasn't really sure what I say. And it wasn't until several years later, when I was pregnant with my first child that I started thinking I might want Teo write it because suddenly I had been kind of both women, the mother and the baby sitter. Right. Well, that's so interesting because I thought you were going to tell me how much you identified with one of the central characters in this book with Elizabeth, who is the older one. Who's the mom and the writer. On. She's just moved from Brooklyn. And I will note that you are a mom and a writer and you live in Brooklyn, and I thought that was going to be where you where you identified with it, And that's interesting. You're telling me that the initial kind of noodling on this in your head was going on based on your experience. As the younger woman is the baby sitter in this relationship in your book, It's It's a young woman named Sam, who's a student at the local college and you identify with both of them. It sounds like in very different ways. I absolutely dio. You know, In some ways, I think when you have a friendship between women of different ages, there's a sense of wanting to help the younger woman. Avoid the mistakes you've made. But they're not those kind of mistakes. They're the ones you have to make on your own to really figure out. What is coming, all right, so themes. They're a friendship of motherhood. I want to shift you to another one that struck me throughout the book, which is the theme of Priviledge Elizabeth comes from money on and it blinds her makes her insensitive in some ways to Sam. And what Sam needs also makes her blind tio her in laws and the financial troubles they face. But why was that something you wanted to explore? Well from the very beginning of thinking about this book. I knew that class would play a big role in the story. And, you know, in many ways, this is a book about the gig economy, the shrinking safety net sort of weight of student loan debt and other forms of economic hardship on young people, and certainly also the notion that privilege takes many forms. So Elizabeth is someone who comes from a lot of money. She has not accepted her family money and therefore feels that she's sort of really above it and views herself actually, as cells made, even though she really isn't But even Sam, you know, sort of wrestles with the fact that Although she is saddled with a lot of student loan that and a lot of other things, her education is a form of privilege. Her citizenship is a form of privilege, so I think both of them really kind of wrestle with that. It really resonates this theme in this moment when so many of us are examining the blind spots that are privilege might create whether it's class, whether it's race, and that is an uncomfortable thing to do. I wonder. Was it uncomfortable too, right? I don't know that it was uncomfortable because it is so much a part of our culture right now. So you know, I feel like I couldn't have written anything else in this particular moment. Really, You know, there's a real push back in the book from Elizabeth's father in law, George that This country has been emphasizing now for so long, the individual and if you've lost your business, as George has in the book, you must have done something wrong where, Actually it's the systems of power and wealth that are very much stacked against the average person. I think we're seeing that come to bear when this pandemic occurs, and for people who have A great job and a salary and a health insurance. They may be. They still have that even though they're working from their kitchen table, But there are millions of people who just lost their jobs in a blink. I mean, one thing I love that you play with so is that it's not just Elizabeth Sam..

Elizabeth Sam J. Courtney Sullivan Moon Bay NPR Jen White Napa Massachusetts writer Elsa Chang New York City Brooklyn Jaye Teo New York Louise Kelly Smith George
Even have any doubts to ready now. Now,

Making Obama

01:00 min | 4 years ago

Even have any doubts to ready now. Now,

WBZ Barack Obama Producer Executive Producer Tricia Opie Colin Mcnulty Stefan Gomez Brinton Benazech Mattel Jen White James Edwards Candice Chicago Editor Joe Zome