16 Burst results for "Jemima Wilkinson"

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:38 min | 3 weeks ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"It was a revolutionary new way to experience religion and to the one that we see is one of the hallmarks of evangelicalism. And this idea that conversion is something that could be known an instantaneous what ministers that trailed in Whitfield's wake would often say you could know the difference between the difference between midnight and noon day light that instantaneous transformation. People started to look for it, and once they begin to see it in their experiences, they begin to look forward in their neighbors and when they found it lacking. That's when they began to split away from their churches formed these separate churches and that purification movement that gives rise to a lot of the A lot of the controversy that I'm talking about today. Interesting. Um, I have a question from Neil's. Who says Did these separatist views? Did these separatists view their ideas as new revelation, or were they grounding this in prior movements of Christianity? So I think it depends on whether you ask were able to ask them or they're asking me, they probably would say so. There's a lot of rhetoric during the with healing revivals and in New England religious culture during the 17 forties that people had never seen anything like the outpouring of the Holy Spirit. Since the days of apostles, and many of them turn to metaphors or ideas or imagery derived from the book of the acts of the Apostles that they're Pentecost. The outpouring of gifts of the holy Spirit upon the disciples and the earliest followers of Jesus. So New Englanders really felt like they were living in a really heavy time when almost anything was possible Things like speaking in tongues, Dreams, trances envisions and new revelations from God. So while in some ways the separatists who are at the sort of the most radical edge of the wit, fielding revivals would have seen themselves living as if they were living again in Apostolic Times. The things that they were doing were revolutionary for New England Congregationalists. Most Puritan ministers would have argued that revelation had closed at the end of the apostolic Age. That things like miracles, Faith healings speaking in tongues. Those things don't happen in our world in the 17 forties, but their radical revival congregants really did. So It's a kind of a little of both as I think the way I'd answer that question. Yeah. Interesting. Um, I have a question from Brett. Was there any sense that spiritual witchery was somehow it can't Catholic sacramental ism and suspect in that way, Sort of like this is a set. You know word. We're breaking the sacrament by I don't. I don't think so. It's a really interesting question. Um yeah. The New England is obviously especially during the time period we're talking about here. The 17 forties 17 fifties and seventies sixties are locked in a series of political struggles with Catholic New France. So there's a lot of anti Catholic rhetoric you'll see it administers sermons, particularly political sermons, and they're just sort of a hatred of of those papers up north. In French Canada, But I don't see any calf anti Catholic language appearing in any of the documents that survived from the controversies I'm talking about today. Douglas when he ask e, discussing what he calls the religious awakening in the 18th century New England, his book, Darkness Falls. On the land of light. That's really interesting, but we actually have some questions that are Moderator Karin Christiansen, bringing some of this up to the to the present. But I think I'm going to wait until after the second part of your talk to bring some of those up. Um so I know that you have more to tell us. So let me let you go ahead and take that that on and we'll see you again in a few minutes. That sounds good. Okay, so And we will get to that. We will get to those larger issues because I think they're important. But first, let me tell you then a little bit about the bigger picture. Uh, and I'll spread spread out These cases that I've been talking about, spread them out a little wider for you. So far, we've been looking at a rather narrow range of new light adultery cases from relatively short period of time. So, to what extent did these mind body issues continue to shape? The experiences of the people called new lights in the decades that followed the Whitfield in revivals of the 17 forties. To answer that question. I'll try to trace this distinctive logic as it spread throughout what we might call Greater New England. So consider the case of Mary back. It's a distant relative of the famed Baptist leader Isaac backers. She was censured at Canterbury for usurping and gain thing. The church's decision to excommunicate John Smith Mary back is defiantly declared that she would continue to hold communion with Smith even after he'd been cast out of the Canterbury Church, even though he brazenly admitted that he had been embroiled in an adulterous affair with Mary Smith. Even after he had been tried for murder. The stated reason of her dissent, which Canterbury Elder Solomon content Uh Solomon Pain condemned as a dangerous heresy offers a fascinating glimpse into an emerging sectarian strain within the new like movement. Back is held that an elect soul could never sin. John Smith may have yielded to carnal temptations when he conspired with Mary Smith to poison his wife, but back is assumed those bodily transgressions did not taint the purity of his converted soul. And for this reason, she concluded, the Canterbury Church had no grounds on which to excommunicate him. Believe that elects souls were spiritually perfect, immortal and incapable of sin. Whatever the failings of their mortal bodies surfaced repeatedly during the late 18th and early 19th centuries and here I'll just cite one example among many This one comes from the provinces of Maritime Canada, where, interestingly enough, a disproportionate number of the earliest Nova Scotia planters hailed from families in towns in southeastern Connecticut. During the new Light star of the 17 seventies and the new dispensation movement. Two decades later, perfectionist ideas surfaced alongside controversies over spiritual marriage. One charismatic female profit in Cornwallis denounced marriage as being from the devil and vowed in the presence of the local Presbyterian encouragement. John Payzant, who you can see in his portrait here to live apart from her unconverted husband. It was as much a city for her to have Children by him as by any other man. Other new light creatures in Nova Scotia denied even the possibility of true saints getting drunk or committing acts of murder or adultery. For they held it. Only the bodies of the sense not they're converted and perfected, souls were capable of sin. Believer is like a nut thrown into the mud. Explain the prominent itinerant preacher Henry Line, which made dirty the shell but not the colonel. Meanwhile, in Cumberland, Rhode Island, the congregation that Ebeneezer warrant had organized in 17 48 evolved into a separate Baptist church under the leadership of a combative minister named Daniel Miller. Among its earliest members with James Baloo. During the 17 sixties, Blue moved his family to Richmond, New Hampshire, where he fell in with a group of zealous perfectionists led by a Baptist elder named Moses Hicks. Six, and his followers had recently exchanged what they called their old flood wives for spiritual lives. In 17 81. The Massachusetts Superior Court sentenced several members of fixes group to be whipped and sit on the gallows. Wearing in good Nathaniel Hawthorne fashion garments simply is in with the letter a as punishment for their adulterous indiscretions. Baloo and most of the hits faction eventually rejected the principle of what they called spiritual whispery. Instead, they moved on to become the founders and leading members of the nascent Universalist denomination, which swept across the northern New England Hill country early in the 19th century. Another notable member of Miller's separate church. In Cumberland was Jemima Wilkinson, whom you see here in the bottom Left corner. A young woman from the neighboring town of Smithfield, Rhode Island, languishing.

Daniel Miller Mary Smith Moses Hicks James Baloo Smith John Payzant John Smith Henry Line Cumberland Karin Christiansen Jemima Wilkinson 18th century Douglas 17 seventies Mary Maritime Canada Jesus Nova Scotia 17 48 Six
"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on What'sHerName

"This exodus narrative is one that. Is used over and over and over I leave the boundaries of society so that you can be truly free. Sadly, it doesn't really work any better for friends friends than it does for than it does for the colonists, and it does for the. Society. View. and. The. Problems come with you. And, eventually even in this community owned society, people began fighting over land. Trend gives friends final sermon eighteen eighteen. And begins to suffer from a series of diseases that in retrospect, they didn't have name, but it looks like congestive heart failure. So friend actually dies at the age of forty, three, hundred I eight, thousand, nine hundred. I love you know. I love when history happens through detective. The reason that we can diagnose what friend died of is because we have records of what herbal treatments friend was using Oh to try to combat this process, and these remedies are ones which were intended to calm the hearts. Reduce swelling. Fresher on the chest so this does seem like congestive heart failure..

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on What'sHerName

"Dollar say that that friend was literally taking words of Paul to Heart. Paul says that in Christ there is neither June or gentile male nor female. But I think what what makes the most sense to think of this is that if you think about America at this time, right? America's pulling away. From great, Britain, it really invented cell from the bottom up. And is really inventing along with everything else like democracy, a government to Constitution. Of Independent type. Is, actually rather intend on. Culturally breaking away from Great Britain and bending a national literature national. Theatre a national school of art and a new version of gender, so there's a huge. Impulse across the country to after we check British masculinity which is seen as And of them. Even though all of our founding fathers were rather fruity looking. So in America, we really. Reinventing gender and we come up with over the next decade. Davy Crockett Daniel Boone strong American man who was option wilderness and. conquers wilderness, unfortunately, also killing indigenous people. And the American woman is also conceived right. I mean people don't realize that. Abigail Adams beside writing those incredible. John Adams demanding freedom for women, as well also ran the farm, and was a may dress. Fester in New York investment houses during this. So the the new American woman is as much of an invention as the new American man. I think if we put friend pretty much inventing a presentation of gender that is completely new. It makes total sense in the context. so even this. What looks like we look back and go? Wow, that's wild that someone is doing this. Gender play in Seventeen, seventy six. It wasn't this was an odd extreme of it. But the idea of breaking down these gender norms, and who should wear what and who should do what it's totally normal. Friend is inventing an entirely new form of American religion. That polls from all of these known forms. But also create something new. But isn't just a conglomerate. It is a new way of thinking about what religion is four about what your responsibility is as a member of a religion. So it's a really fascinating. Mixture of all of these religious movements that are happening around friend at this. And really innovative and creative and influential, because friend has many followers and friend is extremely well known. This is an important religious move. Mike how many followers thousands day it's a big deal. Friend Dusty Connecticut Massachusetts Pennsylvania the entire family is this own by the quakers who began seeing them sort of competition and friend to preach on street corners in meeting houses and people's homes. Large groups of people would come. There are a lot of first hand news report. Many contradictory, but friend was getting a lot of attention at the time. The revolutions going on friends, actually preaching British soldiers and to American soldiers. So it's a radically inclusive community, this itinerant preacher again is very common for the time. But outside of this quaker community. Anybody. Who is not a man? Doing that is extremely unusual and Auden. And followers start amassing very quickly. This is a message that appeals to people who. Are In the midst of what has to be an absolutely terrifying war, and it. Probably feels like the world is falling down around your ears. And such a time of upheaval, political and social. Sometimes as we are seeing around us today, it was going to say are ready to go. WHOA, okay start for half scratch. What do we know and they're open to all kinds of radical new ways of structuring life? Now once you've opened the door. To the idea that you could just. Change the ASS. You could just do differently than it allows access to the idea that you could just change. We could just stop wearing powdered. We yeah. And where Coon skin-care is. We're casting aside our Britishness. Also casting aside are gendered. Miss, let's decide are Christian. What else can we just cast aside while we're dumping things, yeah. Especially when all of those things are innately linked with your Britishness. So friend eventually move to Philadelphia. Again amassing huge number of followers. That's so interesting. Yeah, so so friend is in Philadelphia like the same time as all the founding fathers yeah. We're like Continental Congress we're talking regimen. Frank right in the middle of all of this and tastic. Benjamin Franklin. quaker in Philadelphia Philadelphia the friend is really. Fascinating and that public. Then they had to have yeah I. Mean You. You know that Thomas Jefferson was interested in. Yeah, right I mean. Of course he found this. Even for a quaker, who friend is an extremely early adopter of abolition strongly encouraged. This is sort of a quaker south. Friend is not the boss of this community. There is no boss of this community. Yeah, FRIEND IS A A. Voice that people listen to you, but friend isn't making laws. And friend strongly encourages anyone who joins friends religion to free their slaves. And the entire community is doing active work protecting indigenous people. And that's not making them super-popular -an among the people who hold slaves. That's why we can't take any of these reports at face value, because so many of these newspapers were allied with. Pro Slavery Forces or Anti Native American forces, and so it's to their benefit to claim that this. Is a person who claims Jesus. By the mid Seventeen Eighty S, the group decides they really want their own land and their own place in the world that they travelled around the colonies enough, and they really start as religiously as an exodus from civilization, using the biblical notion of the Exodus, interestingly right is what exactly what the puritans labeled. They're coming to the American continent as an executive and not a surprise in the exodus. They actually saw their new home is the new Jerusalem..

America Philadelphia Paul national school of art New York Britain Abigail Adams Great Britain John Adams Dollar Davy Crockett Dusty Connecticut Massachusett Thomas Jefferson executive Daniel Boone Continental Congress Auden Mike Jerusalem
"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on What'sHerName

"Friend addressed a manner that would perceive. As drudge to some degree. More on the masculine side. We have to remember that by clothing was very gender. He. Was Unisex. Trend essentially war, a long coat, usually filled in around the neck with a scarf or read. It looks like an ascot. Along preacher robe, kind of thing that male preachers would have worn, but again there aren't quaker preachers, so this isn't coming from a quaker. Influence, this is friend polling. Yeah, aspects from different societies. A wide brimmed hat. Almost identical I suspect with the hat. MONZ. Never wore the requisite. That women were. So. Friend begins preaching. which is odd in and of itself for quaker? But begins holding meetings anywhere. As is very common for the time. Meetings are happening outdoors in churches and meeting houses meetings are happening in homes anywhere. Friend can find people to listen. Friend is preaching. and. People love it Oh friend is a fascinating public figure as the newspapers get a hold of the story, her yeah lots of people were. Doing. But. Many people were very drawn. To, friends, religious teachings and became followers. What was friend teaching? Friend Begins Preaching and. Following friend apparently. We only have secondhand reports for a number route sermons in apparently would be for two and a half hours off the top of said. Friend had a large range of biblical references. That friend us. Friend favored the book of revelation. From the Gospels, which is actually fairly apocalyptic. And was the end of the world was coming very soon, which was happy, not an all out of step other religions at times. Even in a fairly civilized place like Rhode Island during the revolution. It's impossible to the end of the world. Fairly soon. Was Friend Preaching Room Room Room for all? Yes and again for a quaker, less surprising quaker meetings are open right. quakers are committed to social justice as one of their core principles friend. Takes that and carries it. One step farther. Meetings are open to anyone of any race including indigenous people, which was extremely unusual for the time, and that is something that ends up getting friend trouble. The colonialist do not want people listening to and championing the causes of the indigenous people. They are trying to push out of The land they want and friend is still extremely committed to social justice to caring for the poor to hospitality as a virtue. Everyone, who attends any friends? Meetings gets fed no matter why they're there. Anyone who would like to come and eat can come and eat much like seek religions now that one of the core principles is feeding. People is making sure everyone has material needs met before you tend to spiritual. Friend had rather conventional morality. An emphasis on absence from sex fare. We following the dictate of Saint Hall that is better to marry than burn. And sexually okay if you were married. Many people probably have heard of the shakers. Who are another offshoot from quaker's at this point that believe in abstinence friends sort of midway point. Absences best, but if you must, you can marry. It is a very quaker ish. Communal good kind of society and they do eventually. Form! Communities Friends followers purchase a large amount of land in New York State. There's some arguments. They think it's in Pennsylvania. It ends up being in New York state. There's an argument between Pennsylvania and New York state hand, the British government and the indigenous people whose land it really is about who owns this land, but they do form a city called Jerusalem. And they own all of the land in common, but it isn't a commune people on in quotations, individual pieces of land, and they have their place on this land, so it isn't like shakers where there are giant communal. Structures. And the question of what we've been. What is? The. An anomaly is friend I mean many people then and even some people. Later history thought. A huckster. Good Gimmick. There are again these newspaper reports, and that's mostly what we have to go on. and. Many newspaper reports are claiming that friend is a huckster con person. Know just in it to. Profit. Although then falls apartment. That friend never benefited at all except getting a lot of publicity for trend. Friend owned nothing. Friend would not sign legal documents, and therefore had literally no material property, and any land or anything that friend ever did. Purchase was held by friends friends in their names. Because friend would not sign legal documents under the name of Wilkinson..

New York State Pennsylvania Rhode Island Wilkinson Saint Hall British government New York Jerusalem
"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on What'sHerName

"It's most likely that. Friend saw this as more of a spiritual rebirth. Instead of physical rebirth, and this is one of the things that is. Again to talk about because in looking from now. We mostly want to be surprised at the wrong things. The things that we find unusual and surprising about friends. Life were completely normal for the culture and time. So, this is a rather typical conversion story. Friend began preaching this and I converted friends family, and then began to convert other people. This is all extremely normal. Normal communing with God is normal. Prepare for the second coming. All of this is Cheryl and completely unremarkable specially in new. England during the great making. It's the thing right this is. This is not anything that anyone would raise an eyebrow. uh-huh, that's the part that we now want to go. Oh, wow, visions of God! That's odd us now, whereas for many of us now. We just go. Gender sure yeah, and at the time. That would've been the. Now. How what? Right, that's not. That's an auto thing. In colonial New England with the visions of angels and things like that. And again US wanting to put. Terms backwards, my first impulse was to say Oh friend is non binary? We can't say that that wasn't a thing. We don't know what French was. Yeah, and we can't apply where it's backwards, didn't. So over and over in the story we have to reset worried ourselves and remember where we are and what to be surprised about. There is definitely this idea that you have some sort of deep religious conversion, experience and become. A different person sure. What we can state for sure is that friend was very clear. That friend was not Jemima Wilkinson. Friend refused to. Sign any documents. That had that name on it, and when absolutely forced legally to sign or in any way acknowledged. Jemima Wilkinson. Life Would sign an ex yeah. Let's pause for just a second to thank our sponsor. Girls can create girls can create is a unique subscription box inspiring girls to believe that they can be and do anything. Every crate features inspiring women and her own unique story of why she's awesome. A twenty eight page activity book push everything you would need to complete two or three.

Jemima Wilkinson New England Cheryl England
"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on What'sHerName

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on What'sHerName

"I've never met anyone who has heard of public universal friend. I had not heard a friend until. Last year when reading Michael, Brodsky's book. Friend has just been completely erased from not just. Women's history or queer history, but also from religious history, which is really strange, because friend was so important. To the religious movement and the religious. Changes that happened in colonial new, England and early America You mean friend was like famous and influential extremely, so a friend was a hugely influential and important preacher in colonial New England interesting. And so today we get to delve into not just issues of. Gender identity and sexuality, and all of those really interesting things about into the religious culture that was being as revolutionized as the political culture. Of this brand new nation was. So, I wanNA talk about one of the most. Curious figures of the American colonial period particularly around this person. And being very careful with my pronouns this person. Really important questions about religion and about gender in early American history. Wilkinson was born into a very large white quaker family in Rhode Island in seventeen, fifty, two, how she was the eighth child and the fourth girl out of twelve kids. Was a quaker mother was not a quaker, but attended quaker meetings. If our listeners know a bit about quaker ISM. There's no expectation of membership. Everyone is welcome any meeting and they're especially at this point. There's absolutely no push to proselytize or missionary anybody. It is just an open society. We'd love to have you if you'd like to come, and if not, that's fine. We don't know a huge amount about to my moluccan since childhood. was very yet. Horse Rider! She received a good. Education able to put large parts of the Bible. Both Hidden Bible, and the Gospels at length as well as quaker texts. That's fairly unusual because. Especially at this point, quakers are not Christians. Now quaker ISM is more associated with Christianity, but at this point, the Bible is one of the many texts they use. It isn't seen as a central religious text which is different now, but it's an interesting thing that she is getting a broad religious education. She apparently was very good with plants, which many women were at that time it it which explains to some degree. Her ability as a healer later on. All. Folk medicine, not as happy herbal medicine. which as Michael Brodsky points out then. They called medicine yeah. So she is a medical practitioner and well known for her herbal cures and remedies. Her family is very devoted to the quaker ideals of peace and community and service, and they're good quakers. who embody those values of. Very, devout quaker quakers do not proselytize, but what they do is they give witness, and they allow anybody to speak right so from the beginning. Your mind was used to everybody men and women at a meeting being able to speak. In quaker meetings, there is not a preacher. There is not a leader. Anyone can speak you. Sit in silence and anyone who would like to stand up and testify can testify. She is used to a much more egalitarian gender balance in all aspects of her life It's interesting because we think of that as a new thing like UNMODERN movement but really. Not Just quakers, but During the enlightenment that was a major movement. A lot of people were living that way three hundred years ago. Yeah. She's growing up in what we now would be very tempted to call a progressive community or a modern community, but it's not modern at all. There have always been communities like this in every culture that pushed back. Any sort of strict gender construction yeah. When she has teenager, she starts becoming interested in another religious group called the New Light Baptists. Would really emerges in America coming out of the first awakening. and. They really are even Jello. Colds in many sense. They, go up preaching, so she becomes very interested in that. The Baptist were essentially a rejection of dourness of calvinism. It is very much a sort of hopeful legitimate. They are another sort of dissenter group that comes from England like quakers like the shakers. Breaking off from the Church of England and very conversion oriented healing, oriented and charismatic. But they differ from a lot of the other evangelical groups that are coming to the colonies at this point in that they're very. The word that I keep reading is joyous. Humankind can be saved. Share the good news, so it's a much more upbeat kind of. Religious message then many of what we associate with sort of fire and brimstone. Early evangelicalism. This is also an interesting combination for teenage quaker girl to be combining these two things in her life. The age of eighteen or nineteen, Jemima comes down with a very bad case of typhus for Colts Columbus disease. In Rhode Island, because the ship, all the Christopher Columbus brought it to the colony seventeen seventy six right so literally she is coming down very ill during the revolution and to my Wilkinson is severely ill. She is in and out of consciousness. They are very afraid that she is going to die. In this many days of fever Mima Wilkinson began having visions..

Mima Wilkinson Michael Brodsky England Rhode Island America New England Church of England Colds Jemima New Light Baptists Christopher Columbus
"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on What'sHerName

"Think this time the most interesting and most useful way to start this episode. is to kill our subject. Maybe. Maybe okay. So! We're going to start with the death of the woman that we're talking about today. Jemima Wilkinson died. In Seventeen, seventy six, oh, in colonial new, England England from typhus. Oh. which was brought? to Her town, a worship, arriving Oh for the American revolution, which is just kicking off. This worship is called in the peak of all ironies the Christopher Columbus. Columbus just never stops. Pandemic to the United States. So in this area of new, England this disease is known as Columbus Disease. And it is a mass outbreak that kills and sickens huge numbers of people. Now. We only have conflicting newspaper and second hand accounts of what happens here, so we can't be exactly sure what happened to Jemima Wilkinson. Okay. But, according to many friends and supporters of Wilkinson, what happened, is this. Jemima Wilkinson died. And the person who rose from Dilemma Wilkinson sickbed. was named Public Universal Front. Oh. In Jemima Wilkinson spotty well. That's a very quaker. Rename right? Yeah, friend, meaning quaker Jemima Wilkinson was a quaker. And this is one of the most fascinating and crucial. Characters for understanding colonial New England, religious culture I'm Olympia Michael and I'm Katie Nelson and this is what's her name? Fascinating women you've never heard of. So to learn more about Jemima, Wilkinson and public universal friend I talked to Michael Brodsky. My Name is Michael Run ski. Practice in media and activism and Harvard University in Women Veterans Sexuality Program I have been an lgbtq activists since nineteen sixty nine, a freelance journalist was organizer I've been a professor for the last twenty years. First Dartmouth College now at Harvard University and I've written a bunch of books. He wrote a history of the United States and acquire history of the United States for young people, both which are fantastic and I highly recommend..

Jemima Wilkinson England England Wilkinson sickbed. United States Christopher Columbus Columbus ski Public Universal Front New England Harvard University Michael Brodsky Michael Run Dartmouth College Women Veterans Sexuality Progr Olympia Michael professor Katie Nelson
"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on Throughline

"She was sort of charismatic. Glue that held the whole thing together and once she is gone. The kind of rapidly devolves you know the enthusiasm is just worn off without the friend. Obviously it's pretty hard to keep that going by the eighteen thirty s and eighteen forties. The group is just a shadow of its former self and by the mid eighteen forty s it it basically fades away. Tricia knowle's in Penn Yan New York the Finger Lakes region of the state right where the public universal friend established the religious settlement. A lot of the followers of the from stay in the county and their descendants are still here. And that's really why we have such a wonderful collection of items that were connected to the friend. Tricia is the director of the Yates County Historical Center which houses a major collection dedicated entirely to the public universal friend. You walk into a room full of the puffs personal belongings. There's a Bible. Of course it is a British printed. Seventeen sixty nine. A mahogany desks would have been pretty expensive spoon. Even the medicine kit actually still has liquid in the vials. And some real live puff. Dna there is a lack of of the friends hair. Which is there's also a portrait of the public universal friend in all his androgynous glory. I think that almost every family that you research here is got some connection to the friend. The friend was a very important person about you. Know a very powerful person in their ancestors lives. The friend was one small person from one. Small town who at the end of the day had one small religious following and so as interested as I am in this story. It's still made me wonder why. And if it's really all that important Paul Moyer was quick to say yes because that's the very power of a micro history and the whole premise of micro. History that you focus on a figure not because they unto themselves are necessarily that historically significant. I mean you might write a biography of Thomas Jefferson because you think Thomas. Jefferson has its transformative impact on American history. I don't think that's the case. That drama will continue right but nevertheless I think her story is a great way to kind of shine light on the American revolution and to see it in a different light that is not just the story of political and constitutional change. That's happening in statehouses. It's not just a story of of the battlefield and the revolutionary war. There's also this sort of social and religious and gender dimension to the American Revolution. People are rethinking social relationships. Rethinking what it means to be a man and a woman. They're thinking rethinking a religious faith. Religiosity these are the things that were on pause. Mind when he set out to write his book on the Puff Not Gender. I wasn't so much interested in Jemima Wilkinson as some sort of you know transgender figure but after I wrote the book and I was talking to people about it. A lot of them really keyed into that people have tuned into that in a way that they had in the past so both within the academic academy and outside of it there is a growing interest in kind of transgendered identity and I think it's almost natural that people begin to think okay. Well where does this come from like? Has this happened before in the past? I think that there is a belief that these issues have. Just come up last couple years but really there have been people who are transgendered or nine non binary forever and I think this is an early example of someone who lived that life in the eighteenth century publicly in the West. Were used to having this. This binary gender system traditionally and yeah other cultures in certain native American cultures. They have three four five or six. Different recognized gender categories. That generally wasn't the case you know in Eighteenth Century Rhode Island. So yeah the Jemima. Wilkinson is pushing the boundaries. That way you know. I think that there might be someone who is questioning their gender or confused and I think hearing about this would make them feel less alone and also that this is a person who dealt with this over two hundred years ago you know and I think it will also help people understand that this is not a new thing you know like I said it's it's wasn't accepted in Western culture at the time. Certainly but that doesn't mean it didn't happen. Yeah and I wonder like you're saying in in Yates County. If there's any little pondering gender Queer Trans or non binary kid who gonNa come to the collection and have their mind blown. I certainly hope so..

Jemima Wilkinson Thomas Jefferson Tricia knowle Yates County Finger Lakes Penn Yan New York Yates County Historical Center Paul Moyer Eighteenth Century Rhode Islan director statehouses
"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on Throughline

"Hi this is this Hudson from Karachi Pakistan and I'm listening to NPR this message comes from NPR sponsor. Better help a truly affordable online counselling service out a questionnaire online and get matched with a licensed counselor best suited to your mental health needs whether it's depression anxiety or trauma better help will help you overcome. What stands in the way of your happiness learn more at better help DOT COM and get ten percent off your first month with Promo Code through line? Better help get help anytime anywhere. Part three the wilderness. It had become painfully clear that the puff was not welcome in Philadelphia after travelling around the northeast for almost a decade. It was time for the Society of Universal Friends to carve out a space for themselves. A place where they could live in peace he wants to leave behind her detractors and naysayers and starting late seventeen eighty S. Her followers begin to send out expeditions to the frontier. And at that time what is today? Central and western New York was the frontier. Why do they go there? Well it's very isolated Some sort of a utopian idea that they're sort of imagining there's something that is truly queer about this idea to just go set up shop in the Wilderness. You know what I mean. It's there's almost like a lesbian to that act. During the women's movement in the seventies there were all these gay women who went to Arkansas. And we're just like you know we're going to just live in the mountains and so that's kind of what the public universal does yes? It's like the late eighteenth century version of AD. We're going to go out and we're going to separate ourselves from all these centers in Naysayers. You know. Wait for the second coming yeah. It doesn't turn out that way but that was that was the idea you know. It's it's hard at first. It's very very hard for them. There were no towns. There was no food. They're very hungry for awhile and people are also becoming very sick. So it's a. It's a very hard time for the people who do come up here. Slowly over time the society set up shop they built mills. Harvested crops established on land trust but once the settlement got settled. Everything started to go downhill. The SEC begins to fall apart emerging factionalism. There's an emerging sort of insurgency. There are some early followers including James Parker and judge potter. They start pulling away from the front. I think there's a gender context to this the American revolution. The seventeen eighty and seventeen ninety is growing association between citizenship and manliness. Men are citizens. Women are not men. Run the show. No women do not. So you see this resistance. Betrayal manifests itself in a number of ways. And the friend is accused of blasphemy in court. By these former followers the charge was that your Mama will with claiming to be Jesus Christ and the state of New York ruled. Well she's not breaking any law claiming that the case gets thrown out almost immediately. The judge reminds everyone that lasts me is not illegal in New York state. So the puff defectors looked around to see what type of legal argument they did have and they realized it was right under their noses. The estate roughly fourteen thousand acres of land. People like William Potter James Parker. They are instrumental in purchasing this land and unfortunately when the deeds were written out for this land the deeds were written in their names. The friend refuses to use her legal name Jemima Wilkinson. The friend can't legally own property because the law does not recognize universal friend is being.

New York James Parker William Potter NPR Society of Universal Friends DOT COM Jemima Wilkinson Karachi Pakistan Philadelphia Hudson Arkansas SEC
"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on Throughline

"Maybe it was hitting the big time that encouraged the friend to formalize his following to incorporate so to speak the society establishes itself as an official religious group in seventeen eighty three. They were the society of universal friends and as per usual the more legit you get the more shade you get thrown and once she's in Philadelphia. That's where we begin to see evidence of of real pushback against her. There are people who write into newspapers and magazines complaining about this woman. She's a fraud that she the blasphemer you know. Who are these crazy people? Coming into our city there are now in this city. A number of the disciples of a certain Jemima Wilkinson a native of Rhode Island. A person who professes that she is. Jesus Christ come again. In the flesh a second time without sin unto salvation though it should be noted that her followers do not admit she is a woman and they therefore of consequence deny her name and appeared to resent it as an affront when she called Jemima Wilkinson and declare in the most solemn manner that they know. No such person during one public sermon. An angry heckler confronted. The friend had on yet at one point. Somebody asked what are you what are you? This is actually where she's asked pointblank if she's male or female and she replied. There is nothing indecent or improper in my dress or appearance. I am not accountable to mortals. I am that I am. They don't understand that aspect dinner so it's I think it's just a. It's a lack of understanding ignorance and leads to a really negative reaction. It reaches quite crescendo. Ultimately they're even accused of attempted murder. Pennsylvania Gazette April fourth. Seventeen eighty seven observing a piece in your last paper relative to a pre concerted plan by a number of Jemima Wilkinson deluded followers of murdering Mrs Sarah Wilson in January. Last too many already have fallen victims. Be reason of their opposition to the cause and interest of Jemima Wilkinson..

Jemima Wilkinson fraud heckler Philadelphia Mrs Sarah Wilson official Rhode Island Pennsylvania
"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

09:59 min | 1 year ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on Throughline

"After she had uttered a few words France stood up and desired her. Sit Down but she not submitting the same request was repeated by another and then by another and another until no less than five friends required her to desist but she said as it was the Lord who spoke by her she could not be silent unless they applied their hands to her mouth. They quickly reject her and then she begins to kind of widened her orbit of preaching she goes to Baptist meeting. She goes to any meeting house any religious group that all hear what she has to say and she basically laid out. I'm no longer Jemima Wilkinson on the public universal friend. The end of the world is coming soon crisis returning. You need to repent your sins. Follow me I'll lead you to. Salvation is a relatively simple message. There's not a kind of an elaborate theology but what does stand out is that Indra Janice can't quite put your finger on it. Look and that's actually a very important element of drama Wilkinson's mystery or I should say mystery ministry. There's a lot of mystery to her ministry. She's not clear about stuff. She's not clear about what the friend is. And I think that's one of the appealing aspects of her ministry. This lack of clarity created confusion around how to refer to the Prophet to my Mo- Wilkinson Aka the public universal friend. Or the puff as I like to call her or him for Short. First of all the puff. Yes second of all her or him. It's this whole issue of pronouns. If you use female pronouns consistently both went Jemima Wilkinson Jemima Wilkinson later when the puff emerges. You're sort of denying this transformation that happened. The puff tried to avoid pronouns altogether but if you look at the writings of the French followers whenever they use those pronouns the vast majority of time are male pronouns. He and him and his. So there's this kind of transformation from machine to a heat by the way Paul and Tricia do use various pronouns. Throughout this story you will still hear them. Say She and her a slip up sometimes by. I've made a more concerted effort. They're working on Bhakta. Paul this not just the way the dresses but the very fact that this young woman who's no longer a young woman whose universal friend is preaching in public. That is a masculine behavior. So it's like this dual thing right because it's like a we can perceive you as a woman who's preaching to the public. That's not supposed to happen but beyond that you're a woman who's telling us you're not a woman right right exactly exactly so it must have been quite head trip for people at the time but there was something appealing about this mysterious enigmatic vibe. I think people expect profits from God to be mystical to speak in allegories to speak in metaphors. And that's what she does and I think it annoys some people and it seems to attract other ones. And how did the friends family respond to this? They were religious. How did the family respond? The family responds very supportively. Actually father becomes one of her followers. Several of our sisters and brothers also joined her group if they had an already by that point this is when the Wilkinson Siblings got expelled from the quaker church. According to appointment we visited Mercy Wilkinson the account of her neglecting to attend our meetings for worship in going to those of her sister. Elizabeth and Deborah Wilkinson daughters of Jeremiah. Who have for some time attended the meetings of their sister. Jemima the friends appointed to Labor with Jeremiah. Wilkinson report that they have again visited him and find no encouragement. She now being gone with her sister. Jemima as was expected. It is our judgment that she denied as a member of society. Quite possible that everyone of Jemima Wilkinson's immediate family members are ejected from quaker's at some point in the seventeen seventy s clean sweep. And what's most interesting I think is? There are a number of people who accept your message. It's not just the puffs. Immediate family other people start taking two puffs message. People who have also been rejected by the quakers. A lot of these converts are these wayward quakers who are sort of looking for a new spiritual home and Jemima Wilkinson. Religious message is not shocking. Actually draws a lot upon quaker belief in quaker theology within a lot of these quakers who are at loose ends find new home with the universal friend. They may have been at loose ends with the church but they were far from the fringes of society. The people who are accepting her message are not marginal figures. Some of these people are pretty wealthy. One of her earliest converts is this guy. William Potter. He's very wealthy. He at one point served as a judge in the Rhode Island Supreme Court. Another one of her converts. It was a captain in the continental army. James Parker another convert James Hathaway the son of the very very wealthy Massachusetts shipbuilder. So there are are are wealthy respectable people joining her. That's a real interesting mystery to her story. Why is it that these people who are again are successful? Why are they kind of taking the risk that comes along with joining ranks with the universal friend? Reason number one she offers salvation. She offers a path to heaven. Reason number two. She offers this message of universal salvation. And that's not generally accepted in late eighteenth century protestantism in America. So that's attractive reason number. Three she offered spiritual empowerment. Now she herself or I should say himself. The friend engaged in prophecy Engaged in faith healing but not only did. The friend engage in these behaviors. The friend sort of empowered his followers to do the same thing so for example. Sarah Richards becomes One of the universal friends chief Lieutenant. She engages in prophecy. She engages in public preaching to. There are a number of men and women within the friend. Sacked who basically become spiritually and religiously empowered by joining her group as his local following grew. The puff started to travel around Rhode Island to spread the Gospel a lot of which sounded very familiar to the quaker Gospel. But there were some aspects of his message that were even more radical for example. She promotes the idea of celibacy. She doesn't require it but she argues that it is a spiritually superior state of being and in fact all the evidence is once drama. Wilkinson becomes the friend that the friend lives entirely celebrate life. Well there are a number of women her sect who become known as the faithful sisterhood. Who embrace this idea of celibacy and we have to understand once a woman in the late Eighteenth Century embraces the idea of celibacy. You're shutting the door to what are seen as the traditional female roles of wife and mother so right there that religious decision has profound social and gender impacts so no subtle ways. The universal friends faith opens the door for her female followers to kind of break out of some of the restrictions that women face late eighteenth century and again this builds upon quaker and New Light precedents but I think universal friends Kinda take it to another level. Hundreds of people flocked to the public universal friend and his message but for every bit of support there was just as much pushback. The friend is so polarizing that people loved them or hated them. Obviously there are people who are opposed to her ministry. They think that either she's insane or she's this upstart woman. Largely the detractors of the friends seemed to use female pronouns. They just don't buy it in fact I should point out at one point. She travels to Newport Rhode Island actually passes through the military lines. Newport is occupied by the British army at that point and they want nothing to do with it at all but the friend was not deterred. He left the comfort of his Rhode Island home and set out into unchartered territory. In seventeen eighty two. She makes the decision to travel to Philadelphia. Pennsylvania to try to expand from ministry and strategically makes a lot of sense. Philadelphia has one of the largest quaker populations at that time including the ones who had been thrown out. So if you're looking for a large population of quakers what better place to go than than Philadelphia and its environs.

Jemima Wilkinson Wilkinson Mercy Wilkinson Rhode Island Jeremiah Philadelphia Rhode Island Supreme Court Indra Janice France Newport Rhode Island Deborah Wilkinson quaker church continental army quaker Gospel Paul Pennsylvania Bhakta British army Newport America
"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on Throughline

"Attending religious meetings of local evangelical sect known as the new lights what they call the New Light. Stir which is a little leftover part of the first grade awakening stressing that you can be in control of your own salvation and that sort of a different idea. This time it's pretty controversial. And these are the revivals that Jemima Wilkinson becomes involved in. And why do we think Jemima was going to these New Light meetings? I think during the revolution nothing was certain so nobody knows. British are we American There's a lot of violence going on. There's death from these horrible diseases that are going around. It's completely unstable and I think it was sort of an outlet for her stress and she wanted to see what else is out there and there was a lot out there. It was like a religious marketplace with pop up churches and denominations and people redefining what religion and its leaders could look like because of all that tumult uncertainty. This was a time when a charismatic person could easily attract believers looking for meaning in all that chaos whether it be a revolution or a whole new religion. The problem was if you were a quaker. You weren't allowed to see what else was out there. You weren't permitted to attend other religious denominations and She's actually kicked out of her local quaker meeting because of that behavior She's expelled in October of seventeen. Seventy six and she's not alone. The quaker membership expel the Wilkinson children. One by one yet to her elder brothers. Stephen and Jaffa dare kicked out of the quaker church for participating in military preparations associated with the American revolution. The quakers were pacifists so they drew a very firm line against participating in the American Revolution. One of older sisters is also kicked out of the quaker meeting. Minutes from the Smithfield Rhode Island quaker meeting August. Twenty ninth seventeen seventy six patients. Wilkinson has been labored with on account for having an illegitimate child and not appearing in state of mind suitable to make satisfaction. They're this meeting. Disowned her for membership It didn't seem like Jemima wanted to leave the quaker church but she like her siblings ignored their warnings and paid the price. The church was very important and I think quaker doctrine was very important to her. I think being expelled from the church was actually devastating. There's some descriptions that almost sound like she was on edge of breakdown really because I think she was so distraught about being expelled so about a month after he's expelled to my becomes sick. As the story goes a continental navy ship. Columbus comes in to Providence Harbor and it has a number of British prisoners and in addition to kind of disgorging. Its human cargo. Apparently it also brings disease so tomorrow becomes very sick and has a fever and goes into sort of like a coma and gets worse and worse and worse to the point that her family fears that she's going to die The family was concerned enough that they got a doctor to travel several miles. Her family fears that Jemima. Wilkinson is in the last throes of life but instead of dying as the story goes she sort of Miraculously from her sickbed gets up and says that Jemima Wilkinson has died and that at that moment of her death. Jemima's body was reanimated by genderless. Spirits sent from heaven the Public Universal Front.

Jemima Wilkinson quaker church New Light Smithfield Rhode Island Public Universal Front Stephen fever coma Columbus Providence Harbor
"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on Throughline

"I am from the Dominican Republic eagerly to rain from N. P. R. Support for this podcast and the following message come from squarespace their website builder dedicated to providing customers with easy to use professionally designed. Templates join the millions of graphic designers architects lawyers and other professionals using squarespace to promote their business visit squarespace dot com slash. Npr for a free fourteen day trial. And when you're ready to launch us the offer code NPR to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain hi I'm unusual summer od and I am the new host of NPR's Ted Radio Hour. I am so excited because we are working on. A bunch of new amazing episodes were exploring big ideas about reinvention making amends and the psychological effects of climate change our first show drops March thirteenth. Please join me part one. The transformation colonial New England in the late seventeen hundreds was one wild ride. This is a really transformative period for American general. There's a lot of experimentation a lot of instability. A lot of anxiety. This is Dr Paul Moyer on a professor at history at Suny Rapport at the State University of New York. Br Port where he teaches early American history and the American revolution. When this country's thirteen original colonies took on the world's greatest military power Great Britain in the fight for independence but before there was any bloodshed. There was over a decade of political dissidents revolt. You've got no taxation without representation and the stamp act in seventeen sixty five news about political change. You've got the Boston Tea Party. In seventeen seventy three inches about constitutional change and by seventeen seventy five. It was all about the people behind Jefferson and Franklin and John Adams and these great political leaders and one thing that we know is Jemima. Wilkinson is in the center of all that.

Npr Dr Paul Moyer Dominican Republic New England State University of New York Suny Rapport Boston Tea Party Wilkinson N. P. Jemima John Adams Britain Jefferson professor Franklin
"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on Way Too Broad

Way Too Broad

15:32 min | 1 year ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on Way Too Broad

"You mentioned that your friend the one who called about the bean pot lives on Bainbridge island interesting but not something I think much about until I read an article today about pickle ball turns out this newest sport that is growing quickly in popularity was invented. Did on Bainbridge island in nineteen sixty five. This sport gets his name from the inventors dog pickles. What does pickle ball? I've heard of pickle. I've never heard of pickle. Michael Ball pickle ball pickle ball pickle ball oh it kind of looks like tennis but smaller. You're it says it's one of the fastest growing fastest growing sports in the USA. This from two thousand seventeen. It looks like tennis. But but there's like there's more lines on the court and there's four players with a wiffle ball used scully holes in it again. The paddles different too and and there's like bouncing. I don't know how you play tennis out. The net is lower as interesting. I'll oh gosh. I wonder if I wonder if because it looks like the court is smaller than in tennis. I wonder if it's like was partially invented on an island because they just didn't have enough room. I love it. Hit another one your regular discussions of non binary gender informed this next tidbit also noted an article titled The genderless Prophet in Seventeen seventy six articles about an historical figure. I'd never heard of public public. Universal heard their name. Okay basically a young quaker woman born Jemima Wilkinson who fell terribly ill and when she recovered covered proclaimed that she had been resurrected by God as the public universal friend traveled as a preacher and developed a strong following embracing distinctly non binary gender identity auditor throat about them with real interesting staff by for now on Brown. Wow fascinating public universal friend now. I wonder if the public universal friend is is in any books that illustrations. You've got. Oh Yeah I should check check it out if that Artists has put out any more of their Heroes Their series. Let's let's write. It looked like they were going to do like a a whole like non binary heroes and other kind of hero books. Or they were from Cumberland Rhode Island fascinating very cool well. Thanks Brown's Brown Beckham. You heard pickle ball but a snow. That's neat. We got some voicemail from awesome so okay so in our continuing in series on beans. Oh my God. We should mention by the way in between the last episode. And this episode Carl Alley Music put out a Bone apetite put out a video of Crowley music making beans. They're like and it was like looked great and she talked about how important Horton was for beans to be cooked gently and she did not use a bean pot. She's like just a big pot but I could. Let's see exactly why it would be useful to to cook beans in the way that this that this mixed tekere bean pod does like to point out a couple people reach out out to me to tell me how much they enjoyed exway smell about the bean pot I we. The three of us were all completely enthralled and then I heard additional people liked being really enthralled that the about the pot in the description of it so yeah and aunt Brown ordered beans also which is you know it means means if she paid attention to that I also just or order a lot of Gordo and I'm seeing that. This voicemail is all about recommendations in what visas to get which is bad timing for me but let's see any overlap in the actually purchase. Seattle I have. I have not ordered beans yet. So this'll be a good a good voice mail for me. Okay here we go pressing play now. Hi Aaron Hannah. And then the suspect is back again. And I'm calling you to answer your question about Rancho Gordo beans and which ones I recommend trying so. I don't know why that I think five bags of beans is the way to go so I went through the list and I picked my five that I would highly recommend Erin. You're you're right on and looking for Lila's I think that is a go to Being Rancho well basically for anyone but wrenching quarter the line is the one to really hold out for is the Royal Corona and looking on their website and is sold out right now so if it's still sold out when okay try. I would recommend probably the Christmas Lima The other one. That is just amazing. And it's very special. Has this nice little story behind. That is the Marcella Bean And so that one. You shouldn't pass up getting that Just because it's creamy and delicious and kind of this beautiful beautiful stories that you can read about on the website and then The lentils They're actually both great. I have a slight preference for the French style. Green lentils opposed to the black caviar. But they're both really good And I think they're a good wind hole for when you wanting to lintel to stay intact and not be just a type of dish particularly like treat it like almost like Taco seasoning And TACO feeling rather was talking seasoning is particularly Then I think the Pinto's are great Definitely yeah good thing to go with but I- courage you to maybe has. Do Indian woman being try See how he likes that. Compared compared to the Pinto's great but I just wonder what you think SUPLIES good mother Stallard is like very good they go with Creamy kind of cranberry. Like just depends like special and then all this has an Astra staticky like red beans and rice. Then you need to go with the Domingo Rojo that being the softest like super thick sauce and so then in cook the rice and that sauce. Incredible the Black Bean says they sell are also really saucy and super fresh. So they don't need to be soaked or anything being like that and we'll get to be cook even drive the other thing. I wanted to tell you I'm going to run out of time so quickly is lit for my pot. It's actually a bold and I've got to tell you that it's very special and you put water in it and while the the pot of steaming he's at the waters if you need a toffee toffee is in hot water clever and then the cook we got another one. Don't worry guys don't worry everybody. This is cute. I love it. That's a lot more than five being totally here from. They have so many notes. See if this works this time. Oh okay all right. You didn't hear that. She a little frustrated noise and now she's back again present Klay now so the the older you get Smith the cook gets to eat out of that bowl and the ball was made out of the same places seems superficial. Okay and the last thing I'll say for sure I'm sorry for going on so long. Is that Hannah's by expires on your mind. Like a Jack in the box in my heart. Actually we've started racing came in and interrupted me anyways. Thank you again opinion during the beans by do you have. How little custom message for when the the voice mail gets cut off? Sounds like whatever voice cuts off cuts. Her off on the voice smells very startled me. I don't know I made the anyway. This is amazing so unfortunate that I put my large being order I buy. We'll give free shipping certain being count so I ended up getting thing at eight pounds bane eight pounds of being so there is some good overlap. I did get both lentils. Garbanzo Zagat does like cow vercoe bear cobain's and I dig it. The Christmas Lima beans and black beans. Two varieties of black beans. So I'm excited also the TACO lentils. We have a friend in common. Who who has this great Lentil Taco dish wonder if we make the same lentil Taco Dash because that is a familiar concept to me that sounds great and shit like to use them in place that the meat is we Corn Ground Beef which is nice. But it's not like there's no like when you're dealing with fake meets. It's not like they're that much healthier for you than real. Meet my have that recipe handy out. Sent you guys all voted in our flat so anyway amazing absolutely amazing love it great also the both the top. That is really cool. 'cause I was just reading on the Rancho Gordo website about how you're being waters running low. You're supposed to pour boiling water water from the Seattle. So that's why it's so clever. Could you can go out there. And then he gets eat at. That's really cool. I love everything about this. I'm really excited. This heavy heavy foreshadowing from my upset. I do one also let the listener. Listen are now that I was taking notes. If you heard any I was trying to do it quietly but if you heard any tips to be tapping that's what I was doing And I will put into the notes vex vex been`recommendations for the show her show her quote unquote five. I'll do it with links. Even I'll get really fancy about it. I find this really interesting. In the voicemail transcript when she says five did a capital V. Yeah that's weird right. It's weird silom. Historians crisis into a Roman numeral. Four years is probably the number four met. You prefer wow. This is weird. I just just got an email from New York Times cooking which they never subscribed to but they send me emails all the time that is called Nineteen Creamy Dreamy White Bean recipes the year the bean. I don't know why funny everyone all editor about beads hitter. It's twenty twenty year the beaten the bean. I do declare it it out. There is a theme from The macro brothers as well I think the year of the bean is just as good if not better they also when they were. I don't know if the if you know this. But they they every year like pick a slogan for the year. Yeah with that kind of ties into the to the name of the year. Yeah like last year was Frankenstein teen become the monster. I love this series Kylie really wanted funny honey I wanted twenty twice. 'cause I'm going to start calling it that because that's a good pay over twenty funny. Fill your life with laughter and love the life of laughter. Love love it. I'm like they released merch and and it looks like those like shitty ironic like little pieces of wood with platitudes on them mugs. That have done sayings. But it's yeah it's it's it's like ironically varied like sappy. But if you don't know them it's just gonNA look like yeah. Yeah but that's cool. I like travelers. Wanted it to be funny. Honey fill your life with laughter in Bees. It also very good but it's also the air the being in the at probably more importantly the Say That we are talking about Mike. CATT Komo who recall Mr Bean or being or the bean. So you're Komo's I'm just saying that it's his year. You know he's really gonNA make it this this year. Yeah anything really. We got a beanbag recently. And I've been using it a lot also coma recently started sleeping on it now calling. It bean's bag argon. Yes folk you want is truly it is the really and I am pleased while back. Thank you so much that was delightful. I'm sorry I startled startled. You allowed. It happens it happens to me. Earth to people around me a lot As Dr Going job so busy but jobs good. I'm enjoying it. It's it's just very busy but I learned recently that there's like a a The nature of this job especially the like half of it involves Helping with classes is that it can be very very busy at times. There are times where it's not as busy eh ebbs and flows kind of and right now. I'm definitely in a time. Where like very busy going to work every day next week? Also just because I have helped Intensive course but of course everyone who goes to Harvard so extra islands have to work every day next week then every day. I said late every Monday Wednesday Thursday and I gotTa tell you this. I knew it was going to happen but this week felt like it lasted two fucking weeks because the two weeks before we didn't work five days but because because of there's like a system in place with my boss and my department for like when you get out of one of those search really busy that you can like useless extra hours hours to take days off Officially taking vacation time so I'm taking extra day off will y'all mlk up. Yeah me saying skiing next weekend. Yeah what's use it..

tennis Marcella Bean Seattle Bainbridge island Aaron Hannah Brown Beckham Michael Ball Rancho Gordo Pinto USA. Jemima Wilkinson Cumberland Rhode Island New York Times Domingo Rojo aunt Brown Carl Alley Horton Gordo
"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:25 min | 2 years ago

"jemima wilkinson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of the form program on Michael Krasny later in this hour we're gonna talk about bart's controversial new double decker fare gates which is in the testing stage in Richmond but first the history of messianic leaders in the United States author Morris's new book American missiles traces a lineage of French evangelical figures he joins us this hour to talk about the book and how these radical movements from the shakers of the seventeen hundreds to Jim Jones disastrous people's temple of influence than been shaped by American culture welcome our Morris thank you I'm happy to be here glad to have you here and let me just say also for this is this is a pretty new ones picture of six leaders would be messiah's spiritual profits healers con men and con women and people who many of whom you haven't heard of father divine for example is one was fastening figures AT profiles here everybody's heard of Jim Jones would if you remember who father divine was part of the reason in reading this book I think it's safe to say you wanted to put the lotus figures back into history because they've been ignored except for Jim Jones that's right and it was actually with father divine that the whole project began I was living in Philadelphia as a intern between two summers of college long ago and I spent a lot of time walking around the city and at that time Philadelphia have experienced a lot of population decline and there are lots of parts of the city that were you know showing evidence of that decline in a lot of abandoned buildings that had a story to tell and one of these was this beautiful ten story tall bills arts apartment building on north Broad Street that had only been a band for nine years at that point but had belong to father divine's peace mission and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has a plaque out front informing search by that that's what it was and I did a little research into it and discover that father divine who led this coast to coast movement immediate precursor to the modern civil rights movement and it had been completely deleted from the history of civil rights in spite of the fact that it was inter racial and father divine campaign for things like anti anti lynching laws father divine was professing figure I was going to begin with the figure you begin with the gym I'm a little concerned that let's talk about father divine charters nineteen fifteen ms sort of when he got on the radar he was a son of a former slave you proclaim themselves god and had a huge global following it with a fifty thousand fall yes so it's hard to estimate exactly how many followers the peace mission had because they didn't keep those kind of records father divine claimed at times have over two million followers I don't know how plausible that is time magazine and I believe it was the nineteen fifties estimated that the movement peaked at around twenty thousand to fifty thousand you talk about him really as a civil rights leader which to a great extent he was absolutely and yet the fact of the matter is well for that matter many African American organizations are certainly civil rights leaders did not exactly embraced father divine because he was seen I suppose a somewhat of a charlatan and well as a faith healer and all the rest of those kinds of things but it was his theology that really bugged I think many of the civil rights activists yes especially Marcus Garvey who had already departed the scene by the time father divine becomes very famous we should mention Marcus Garvey was head of the Negro improvement association that's right back to Africa movement yes and he had been supported by the time father divine was a huge celebrity and we really can't underestimate the scale of father divine celebrity he was known all over New York City because he was chauffeured around in expensive cars he had several including rolls Royces and Cadillacs he had a liveried chauffeur are and it was really quite something to see this short by most accounts are fact black man in a luxury vehicle being chauffeured around during the depths of the Great Depression and he made front page headlines across the country well he also had a lot of property he was arrested a number of times finally I guess they got him in New Jersey for wasn't imprisoning amici or something along those lines well he was convicted in absentia for that he was only really nabbed out on Long Island tour and this was what catapulted him to fame they the peace mission was out on Long Island minding its own business really father divine was running in the early days of the depression what was essentially a qualms I communistic work home he took in people who are seeking his guidance or his shelter people who needed a job and because his household was known to provide trustworthy domestic staff he was easily able to place these people that live with him in jobs with families that were doing all right in the Great Depression and so this slowly in large is following and the other thing that really made him quite famous was the Sunday banquets you give food to so many people and it was like glide memorial church on a much far larger scale in many ways exactly and I mean helping people get jobs helping people get food there was a lot there but this is a guy who believe that the sun was in the middle of the earth and also thought that Jesus came from what Mars or Jupiter I mean there were some pretty wacky ideas here to put it mildly you shouldn't say the word hello because hello hello hello that's right it was father divine so in the end also followed by an extraordinary number women this is something that you point out of of many these false messiahs or would be the size is the disproportionately women were the followers of women with his supporters in women with the the centrally labor group that supported them that's right and first we should pause to remember that women at least in North America are the predominant in every faith tradition but it's especially pronounced in these groups because each one of them going all the way back to the seventeen hundreds as you mentioned with the shakers and Jemima will consent they advocated gender equality and this was pretty radical of course in the late eighteenth century just as it was in the nineteenth century even the sorts of gender equality that father divine and Jim Jones were pronouncing in the twentieth century were ahead of their time well let's talk about your mama Wilkinson since you began your book with her and she was I don't know how we describe where I guess a woman who felt that women should be ignored I mean in a sense of course he would align the Sir Methos missiles were emancipator is of women feminists I guess you could call them by today's standards but she was also a gender Bender she was and this was the very unusual taxi took towards promoting gender equality she when she was a young woman in her early twenties she was one of already been considered an old made by the standards of a revolutionary war era America and women did not have access to education and she was sort of stuck taking care of her younger siblings because her mother had died during her last child birth and rather than you know as as some of her detractors would say rather than end up an old maid Jemima Wilkinson gets very involved as a preacher and the way that that happened was really legendary in her case she in October seventeen seventy six after the hostilities with the British had already begun to model Wilkinson's family discovered her struck with a fever that October probably scarlet fever it's they they called it some kind of typhoid Columbus fever was the local name for it because that was the name of a boat that had transferred some contagious British sailors to shore as prisoners and your models fell by this illness and seemed to die her body legendarily cooled in death before arising in resurrection but after her family rejoiced at the apparent salvation of their daughter they discovered that it was no longer to mine the Wilkinson who was responding to their greetings and increased but a spirit who occupied Jim I'm as body calling itself the public universal friend which size you alluded to did not acknowledge the female sex and she was instances throughout the shaker later as well they were pretty much anti sex yes they both preach celibacy and Lee much more strongly than Jemima will consented but in fact many of the groups including father divine's peace mission also upheld celibacy guidelines soon we should mention sit one separation German locus and wanted a has stabilised a new Jerusalem in New York and of course the shakers well known for their furniture of course also had a commune what amounted to was tantamount to a commune yes the shakers had up to eighteen different communs all across the eastern and midwestern United States at their peak and there is still one functioning shaker village so they have proved the envy of all of these other groups at least in terms of longevity and we also was a celibate and both were in that sense really proponents of celibacy and there was also sexual trauma in both cases a family came from Britain and she heard her parents having sex in that seem to turn around to such a degree read that defenseless her whole life yes and she lost every child that she bore which also I'm sure played into it you know you can't help looking at these people psychologically but you look at them more from the standpoint of the kind of American historical tradition that's right people often what they really thirst for psychological interpretation I didn't take that route I don't have access to these people's minds I was looking more at the evidence of the things they left behind both the followings and their accomplishments well there was it with a lot of them authoritarianism even violence I mean Jones being of course you know the worst case of the of all the six pack why the six and two companies so these there were many more when I started looking into how many Americans had proclaimed a clause I divinity status or claim to be god reincarnated there are quite a few more these are the most successful they gathered the largest followings and I stopped with nineteen seventy eight not because the history of American messianic thinking or tendency stops there but because that was a very dramatic inflection point I'm sure we'll talk about that later we will indeed good are their California connections with this call some of the still operating well there certainly California connections two of them that both of the nineteenth century groups that I profile in the center of the book the caressing unity and the brotherhood of the new life had outposts here in the bay area we're talking if you just joined us without remorse he's a San Francisco based writer and he's a translator is the author of American missiles false profits of the damn nations also written a lot of stuff about up to St Clair which I found fascinating maybe for another time we can get into that who's a kind of a cult in its own way too and I'm thinking in reading your book that in some ways this may sound strange to people but Donald Trump has become kind of a cult leader really has in the I mean the word cult is used advisedly here but you know a lot of the evangelicals feel that maybe he is the incarnation of some or at least the vessel of.

Michael Krasny bart Richmond United States Morris nine years