34 Burst results for "Jeffrey Toobin"

New Yorker fires Jeffrey Toobin for exposing himself on Zoom

Chicks On the Right

04:00 min | 2 weeks ago

New Yorker fires Jeffrey Toobin for exposing himself on Zoom

"Jeffrey Toobin. Was the guy who was on a zoom call right? He's works at CNN. He's a staff writer at the New Yorker magazine. And he's on a zoom call. And well, he's on to zoom calls raison. Assume call with CNN talking about the last election, but he's on another zoom call with I'm not a not 100% sure. But, uh, hey, kind of forgets where he is. It kind of gets out cameras work on a computer and he ends up tilting one of the cameras down. And it turns out that that Jeffrey Toobin Was Hmm. Not wearing Pants. And Jeffrey Toobin, You know he's on the zoom call. He was on another zoom call. But the first zoom called talking about the election was aware of what was going on on the second team calling to the camera got panned down, And then they saw the Jeffrey Toobin was Um He was. How does one say zooming himself? Hey, crazy. What else would I say? The best I could do under the circumstances. Tony Katz, Tony Cats today. So good to be with you. Yes, he was zooming himself. And New York magazine. New Yorker magazine has come out to say that we finished our investigation and he's fired. And he put out a tweet saying I got fired after 27 years. Love the magazine. I love the people maybe a little too much and And that's not have a nice day. I'm out. But he still has a job at CNN. My question, of course, is How How does he still have a job? I mean it if I did that. I can't imagine I would have a job now. Here's what's really weird, Ari. Let's say you did that. Okay, So here's where I'm Here is my oddness, I guess. That someone is that Foolhardy. Is the fireable offenses that somebody was doing? That isn't so. So Here's Here's the difference When this all happened, he said was I thought I had logged off Zoom. I didn't realize you were still on. Well, that's the firing a fence because you don't think that you're being recorded every second your computer's open. I am the guy who has tape. On my cameras. If you look at my I have two laptops. I have three screens, two laptops, and then I've got extra cameras, right? I'm doing Newsmax. I've got the camera for Fox. I've got a whole set up here. It's kind of made and by the way that we're adding another TV on there's another whole computer system coming right? We are. We are like command center. Here we are. We're the NORAD of the Midwest. We're ready. We're ready to launch the missiles do the whole thing. Of course, I tape over the cameras on my computers on my laptops. I don't trust them. Don't trust anything or anyone anywhere. What are you crazy? Not in the slightest And that you thought that, um you did it, And that's enough. You had that much faith in the in the usability of technology. You thought that was okay? That's the firing a

Jeffrey Toobin CNN The New Yorker Tony Katz Tony Cats New York Magazine Newsmax FOX Midwest
Fresh update on "jeffrey toobin" discussed on Mike Allen

Mike Allen

01:24 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jeffrey toobin" discussed on Mike Allen

"From some democratic mouthpieces, they repeat it repeat a phrase and then with a few out within a few hours, the talking heads on CNN and MSNBC and the hacks at The Washington Post, The New York Times start repeating the phrase ad nauseum. You know phrases like mostly peaceful when describing riots and arson. Phrases like manufactured crisis when thousands of migrants stormed the border and again we could do an entire show just on this topic alone. You know, we've seen it a million times. Nancy Pelosi will put out a talking point on Good Morning America. By the time Anderson Cooper comes on at 8 P.m.. It's on every single teleprompter in America. And you know, Republicans, and for that matter, libertarians Have slammed the media is biased for decades there beyond bias bias gives him too much credit. They're basically just obedient lap dogs. You know who roll over and sit on the man to get their treat. What's reality is there is a legal process that has to play out. We've never had just full blown mail in vote before. This was completely unprecedented. And frankly, this is just can never happen again. You know people want to talk about civil one rest. Imagine doing this again. And again 70 plus million people thinking the elections a scam that's not going to be pretty. This in and of itself is a form of voter suppression. And you know why vote if I don't believe the elections legitimate and don't think that's not by design. But instead of characterizing this is what it actually is a legal process. With the goal of ensuring integrity of the election, because you know on Lee Democrats are allowed to do that, You know, C 2016. But this was an unprecedented, disorganized mess of an election. And instead, the media's characterizing this is quote an unprecedented attack on democracy, unquote. I mean again, I feel like I've heard that before. You know, Remember three years the same fools repeatedly said Donald Trump's stole the election. Those same liars. We talked about how vulnerable are voting systems are well, I know he was a huge shock. Now those same idiots they're saying it's impossible to steal an election. And again. I'm not debating the truth or falsity that statement. I'm merely pointing out the undeniable hypocrisy in that statement. Again. Al Gore held out for 37 days. I mean, this fact alone, the fact that they won't even acknowledge that Al Gore held out for over a month and arguably Did a disservice to America when it came to intelligence regarding 9 11. The mainstream media has literally zero credibility at this point, I mean, if they can't even acknowledge that Al Gore did the exact same thing. They're done. And as I've said, and many have said, if Donald Trump accomplished one thing, one thing he laid bare for the American people, just the absolute bias and undeniable hypocrisy of these hacks. And frankly, I think this country is going to owe him a debt forever, whether we realize it or not, just for that. But it's called the legal process because it's a process. It's not illegal to challenge the election. By the media's account. The entire republic was going to crumble. Because Donald Trump is an evil fascist who will refuse to leave the White House. And the reason they have to say this is simple. It's because they have totally set fire to what credibility they had. It goes a little something like this. So what happens if Trump loses the election? And then just peacefully leaves. Which it looks like is probably gonna happen. It would completely undermine the narrative. It would undermine the excuse that they've used for years to just go after him and all of his, um, his Supporters incessantly. Again. It goes a little something like this. Trump is Hitler. We are unbiased defenders of democracy. Trump will hold on no matter what Well, Trump isn't holding on no matter what Therefore, they have to catch a legal process is destroying democracy. I mean, this really isn't hard. I'm not some genius. I just have a brain and eyes and an Internet connection. They have to continue maintaining this myth just like out, you know, maintaining the myth that the Robert Mueller report dispelled. It's just become apparent that Democrats in the media just can't acknowledge reality. How do they continue? The myth that Donald Trump is Hitler and his like Maduro in Venezuela, and he's going to refuse to leave the White House even though he has authorized The G s A. Which you know the government services process of Starting the transition. How can they say all this? Well, the answer is the media saved the country from an impending coup by tweeting about it by writing about it by talking about it. On CNN and MSNBC. Here's an example. David from he's a former Bush speechwriter and leader of the one person Jeb Bush Fan club. Tweeted this and this is par for the course. Quote Trump failed to overthrow an election. No previous American president ever dared try. Or even imagine trying Only after Trump's scheme went irretrievably wrong. Did Trump's party unambiguously declare against the scheme? Many and right wing media are promoting the steam still Perhaps some excited person did overreact to something. Jeffrey Toobin, I'm looking at you. That happens. If you're one of those belittling with the country just went through this. I mean, any says this with a straight face, the people who worried they saved your country without you. Do what.

Donald Trump Al Gore America CNN Nancy Pelosi Msnbc Anderson Cooper White House Arson Jeffrey Toobin Robert Mueller Hitler Jeb Bush President Trump The Washington Post The New York Times Venezuela
New Yorker fires Jeffrey Toobin for exposing himself on Zoom

Retire with Integrity with Brian Bowen

00:20 sec | 2 weeks ago

New Yorker fires Jeffrey Toobin for exposing himself on Zoom

"USA. Jeffrey Toobin has been fired by The New Yorker following an investigation into last month's incident in which he exposed himself and other improprieties on a work zoom call to been announced his dismissal in a tweet on Wednesday, a spokesman for The New Yorker also confirmed Toobin's firing two variety of the spokesperson said. As a result of our investigation, Jeffrey Toobin is no longer

Jeffrey Toobin The New Yorker USA Toobin
Jeffrey Toobin fired from The New Yorker after exposing himself on a Zoom call

Crystal's Nightcap

03:19 min | 2 weeks ago

Jeffrey Toobin fired from The New Yorker after exposing himself on a Zoom call

"Okay. This first story. I think is the funniest story of twenty twenty. I believe they talked about it before. But there's like an update to what happened and is pretty epic. I don't know if you guys remember. But a few months ago the new yorker had to suspend one of their authors and legal analysts. By the name of jeffrey toobin what happened with him. Basically he was on a zoom call. An important call with the new yorker staff and some people from cnn and some people from wnyc radio and during the soom call you guys today soom whatever during the zoom call you guys he with the camera on and with the microphone on was out here controlling himself so not okay like like oh my god so the new yorker not doing with what to do with him at the moment so they had disclosed suspended him but now they did fire him and he did in a tweet today explain. He said i was fired today. By at new yorker after twenty seven years as a staff writer. I will always love. The magazine will miss my colleagues and we'll look forward to reading their work. My question is how the heck do you bounce back from this. This is so embarrassing. Apparently he thought his excuse was that he thought he was on mute and he thought his camera was off. Is like hello sir. When you're on zoom call like you can see your face. They're right now. no. I don't go on too. Many zoom calls me. Maybe i'm on one once a week For the most part. If i've talked to people or do business with people it'll be facetime and for zoom calls like i do do teams meetings sometimes my boss and we do sometimes have like an entire town hall meeting. That's what we call them where it's like. Everyone on staff is part of the meeting. I would be disgusted if one of my coworkers did this on the zoom call. Honestly and i i. It's sewn appropriate like you can't do this on your own time like. Why do you have to do this on company hours your i. Would you want your co worker to get fired over something like this like i definitely think. So that's just so disrespectful to all your other coworkers to everyone's time to your own self like just not okay. Over guys and on top of it wasn't just his co workers like these are other clients on the call. Cnn was on the call. And like i said that news radio so yes. i'm sorry. He deserves to be fired. I don't even know why that was a question. If it was a woman right ladies if it was us like switching out a bra during zoom call an accident you we would be fired. We will be fired. This over here. Exasperating himself and he got suspended for a few weeks and now finally is five. Yeah i'm sorry. Don't way way way too much and just not okay like i would definitely want my coworker fired.

Wnyc Radio New Yorker Jeffrey Toobin CNN
Jeffrey Toobin fired from New Yorker after Zoom incident

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 2 weeks ago

Jeffrey Toobin fired from New Yorker after Zoom incident

"And legal expert Jeffrey Toobin fired by the New Yorker. This follows an investigation is the last month's incident in which he exposed himself during a zoom call with colleagues who've been sent out a tweet announcing his firing this afternoon, he writes, He has worked at The New Yorker for almost 30 years. He will always love the magazine and we'll miss his colleagues to bin still works for CNN as the chief legal analyst, but has not appeared in weeks. Spokesperson for the CNN did not immediately respond to our request for comments on tube in status at the network

The New Yorker Jeffrey Toobin BIN CNN
$5,000 reward offered for information about arson case at Miami nightclub

Glenn Beck

00:19 sec | 2 weeks ago

$5,000 reward offered for information about arson case at Miami nightclub

"Reward being offered for information that leads to an arrest in connection with an arson fire set at a nightclub in October of last year. The investigation into the fire the Lobo Jack nightclub is ongoing. Investigators hope a tip can crack the case. Is surveillance video of the fire being set at the club located on Northwest Seventh Street. Jeffrey Toobin,

Jeffrey Toobin
New Yorker parts ways with Jeffrey Toobin after Zoom snafu

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

New Yorker parts ways with Jeffrey Toobin after Zoom snafu

"Legal commentator Jeffrey Toobin's lost his job at The New Yorker magazine the announcement came from Jeffrey Toobin himself a long time staff writer for The New Yorker who's been dismissed after reportedly exposing himself during a zoom conference call last month to been rights he will always love the magazine missed his colleagues and we'll look forward to reading their work the sixty year old Toobin had been with the New Yorker for more than twenty years writing about everything from the OJ Simpson murder trial to the impeachment hearings of Donald Trump two bins also put on leave by CNN where he's been a legal commentator I'm Jackie Quinn

Jeffrey Toobin New Yorker Toobin Oj Simpson Donald Trump CNN Jackie Quinn
New Yorker suspends Jeffrey Toobin after he reportedly exposed himself on Zoom call

Charlie Parker

00:21 sec | Last month

New Yorker suspends Jeffrey Toobin after he reportedly exposed himself on Zoom call

"A sex act during a zoom call with colleagues. While the magazine took action. CNN instead issued a statement claiming he just wanted some time off to bin later issued a statement apologizing, adding he thought his zoom video was off and no one could see him. Six Russian military intelligence officials are facing federal charges for cyber attacks against American companies and a variety

CNN
Jeffrey Toobin suspended by The New Yorker, on leave from CNN

The Rashad Richey Morning Show

01:22 min | Last month

Jeffrey Toobin suspended by The New Yorker, on leave from CNN

"Chief political analyst for CNN. Super Star writer. I mean, he's the one writer that everybody knows at the new girl. He was on his own call. Let me just read part of The New Yorker writer and CNN analyst, Jeffrey Toobin didn't just exposed during a zoom, a work meeting he was allegedly called masturbating. While the magazine's biggest names were on the zoom with him. He released a statement, he said, and I quote I made an embarrassingly stupid mistake believing I was off camera. I believed I was not visible on zoom. I thought no one on the zoom call could see mean. I thought I had muted the zoom video. I apologize to the family friends. Coworkers. You need apologize to your co workers. First, they don't need to be the lacked need apologize to them. You need apologize to the co worker's wife, family and then France. That's how they should go. The co workers were exposed to this. He was masturbating, according to multiple reports from people who were there in the meeting. I mean, why is this even a feigned? The more I think about it, the more

Jeffrey Toobin Writer CNN Political Analyst Analyst The New Yorker France
Jeffrey Toobin suspended by The New Yorker, on leave from CNN

Bob Sirott

01:20 min | Last month

Jeffrey Toobin suspended by The New Yorker, on leave from CNN

"About. Jeffrey Toobin, CNN's chief legal analyst and longtime writer and reporter for The New Yorker, has been sidelined. Because he exposed himself during a zoom call with colleagues in what he says was an accident. A New Yorker says they suspended to have been following the incident and they're investigating the matter, Toobin says. I made an embarrassingly stupid mistake believing I was off camera. I apologized to my wife, family, friends and co workers. I believe that was not visible on zoom. I thought No one on the zoom call could see me. I thought I had muted the zoom video. So if you mute on zoom, that's the sound right? Correct. It's not the picture. And you have the little icon of the microphone, which you can draw you. You can click and there's a line through it The same with that little video camera there. It's not that hard, you know? And if you if you Hit the button that that takes the picture away. You would see that right? I mean, it's Yeah, because then your whatever your alternate images, whether it's your name her Ah, photo that pops up there. How about if

Jeffrey Toobin The New Yorker Chief Legal Analyst CNN Reporter Writer
New Yorker suspends Jeffrey Toobin after he reportedly exposed himself on Zoom call

John Howell

00:21 sec | Last month

New Yorker suspends Jeffrey Toobin after he reportedly exposed himself on Zoom call

"Tonight, CNN and New Yorker Ah, commentator and author Jeffrey Toobin has He's been suspended by the New Yorker magazine, and for now he's stepping away from his job is CNN senior legal analyst The network calls it a personal matter. The website vices reporting the Toobin had exposed himself during a zoom

Jeffrey Toobin New Yorker Magazine CNN Analyst
Toobin suspended by the New Yorker for 'personal' reasons

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

Toobin suspended by the New Yorker for 'personal' reasons

"A popular author has been suspended from his job Jeffrey Toobin usually gets a lot of exposure on his job at New Yorker magazine and on CNN as a legal analyst but he'll be away from both of those games for a while because of some exposure that happened online vice is reporting that two been exposed himself during the zoom meeting with staffers of The New Yorker and W. NYC radio the nature and details of the alleged exposure are not clear to them is sixty and has written for The New Yorker for twenty years he's a regular on CNN has written several books the most recent of which focused on the trump impeachment saga I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Jeffrey Toobin New Yorker Magazine CNN Analyst NYC Oscar Wells Gabriel
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:48 min | 3 months ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on The Book Review

"That Bob Dylan Song did the two of them know each other yet? They did well first of all she she was the famous manager, the flamboyant folk and rock manager in the sixties and Seventies Albert Grossman and he became Bob Dylan's manager of at the first person Grossman ever represented as a client was so data and so dylan data got to be I wouldn't say close but Bob Dylan claimed that he bought Odeta's first or second record of nine, hundred, fifty seven and it changed his guitar. Style he went out and just absolutely changed the way he played because of Odeta's sort of hammering sound and then she made this record Dylan Coverage, which is which is a great record and and according to Ian Zach and his biography Dylan walked in one night. Late, one night when we know data was singing these songs and she told him to get his White House out of the studio because she didn't want him in her head. She wanted she wanted her own sound on this record. What's your favorite album or Song Dia data? You, know throw lot of them I mean she she did all of these. She did she did convict songs and work songs an old field hollers and she did this freedom trilogy three of the Great all-time Freedom Song that she sang. We shall overcome she did this little light of mine. She did a lot of songs like that but I also note she did a lot of like the dylan stuff is really great. The album that Matthew frye Jacobson talks about in his book called one grain of sand. The album is also called one grain of sand is a pretty good place to start when you were working on a review like this. Do you put on her music? Are you listening to while you? Right? Got, it went down such a wormhole. There's so many amazing clips. The Best Clip if people listening WANNA, go have a look during the Harry Belafonte program the first time he brought her out she sang the song called waterboy and there she is alone it's black and white television back. Then there's a spotlight on her. There's nothing else on stage and she sings the song while sort of like you're hammering on her guitar and it's just overpowering the great and it it it.

Bob Dylan Albert Grossman Odeta Harry Belafonte Matthew frye Jacobson White House Ian Zach
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:04 min | 3 months ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on The Book Review

"I do think he was the right person again this is why open the book with the One and only meeting between trump and muller may sixteenth two, thousand, seventeen I feel like they are such great arcs types and and so similar in some ways both born during World War Two both. Came from families of wealth both go to Ivy League schools, and then in the crucible of their generation Vietnam they veer off an entirely different directions and spend their lives in entirely different ways in a trump is all about trump his whole life Robert Mueller is all about public service commitments to institutions rather than self the Marine Corps, the Justice Department, the FBI but. As admirable as as Muller is in the way of literature, his greatest strength also turns out to be a considerable weakness and and I think you know the the failures of his investigation come his commitment institutions I don't think the these are moral failings on Muller's par but I think they were failing and I think the investigation suffered because I want to change the subject completely. To something much cheerier. So one thing that our listeners probably don't know is that you and I have something in common having to do with books, which is that both of us keep a book of books written record of every book that we've ever read and I think we both have done it from the same year from nineteen eighty-seven. I didn't realize that's exactly right now. Yeah. So. So the way that I found out about your Book Fox was when you did a by the book interview in the Booker View and I think in your opening answer you referred to the spoke of books that your father kept that you took over and at the time I was very upset because I had written a book about my book of books and it hadn't come out yet and I thought. A free tube in Sunday scoop. Scoop to me. dammit. My thing was supposed to be so original and exciting. And then I think I confronted you with my fury and resentment at a panel that we did at Nyu together, and you then came up with a very fun idea which is that we ended up having lunch. We each brought our book of books and we showed them to one another and I have to say and I don't know if I confess this at the time. But for my part, I had a lot of trepidation because my books really does not leave the house very delicate at this point is. Getting a little long in the tooth and the binding is frayed and I hadn't taken it out in a long time. But more importantly, I'd never shown to anyone and I was like am I gonNA show to Jeffrey Toobin but we did it and I. I would love to hear you tell the story to our listeners about your book of books and how you started doing. Now, we'll get to our lunch because I had a similar trepidation to bring it because it never leaves my house either what happened with my dad died unfortunately a very much on the young side in nineteen eighty four when I was in law school and I.

Muller Jeffrey Toobin Robert Mueller Ivy League schools Nyu FBI Booker Marine Corps Justice Department
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:04 min | 3 months ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on The Book Review

"Is. Something we've never seen before it's been building through the past couple of decades, but I think that's what accounts for the phenomenon you describe, which is no matter what he does the the political architecture of our time really never changes anymore because fifty five percent of the people are appalled forty forty percent of the people stick with trump and thus we have the election we have. So you're saying it's essentially the fact that he's not held. Accountable is a result of the fact that the party has sort of been entirely captured by trump. He has captive and very loyal audience among Americans, and then presumably the other arm of that is what's happened with the media and that certain is catering to and delivering that message. I. Can just add one thing. You know a lot of people like what trump is doing. It's not like this forty percent says, well, you know it's bad that he fires Komai. It's bad that he says, all these races. Thanks their gladis says racist things. I. Mean there are a lot of people in the country who have the same attitudes and I think that's what's chilling for people like me who was. I like to think is not a racist, but the way trump behaves in public it's a feature, not a bug people don't support him in spite of his excesses they support him because it's similar to when people talk about trump and what game he's playing in what message he's trying to send it almost feels like the most obvious explanation is that he actually believes all of the things that he says he's delivering. Exactly. The message of the the belief that he holds exactly and you know every time, the white. House. They people they bring in what they call the grownups whether it's rex tillerson or McMaster or the generals who are surrounded and they say, Oh, well, you know now he's going to start to be presidential and trump says and I've heard this from people around him. He says, you know I got elected president of the United States behaving this way why would I change and frankly it's a good question and he hasn't changed and we'll see maybe he'll get reelected. All right. So trump made writing this book different I've also heard you say that this is the hardest book you've ever written why Several reasons first of all was the the lack of access to Muller during the Muller investigation that just was difficult..

trump Muller United States president
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:37 min | 3 months ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on The Book Review

"Jeffrey toobin joins us now from northern Connecticut. . His latest book is called True Crimes and misdemeanors the investigation of Donald, , trump, , it's already a New York Times Bestseller Jeff Welcome back to the podcast. . It is a pleasure to be here Michelle. . Well, , we are talking about probably an unpleasant topic you've been covering this regularly for the New, , Yorker, , talking about it on CNN, , the investigations of Donald. . Trump plural I think and the impeachment process at what point did you think to yourself? ? Okay. . This should be a book as well. . Right at the beginning you know I have a special interest in fun for independent investigations of the presidency. . I was one of the prosecutors in the Iran Contra -CATION in the Lawrence Walsh Investigation wrote my first book opening arguments about that did a book about. . The Starr investigation of Whitewater Lewinsky in the Clinton years and so I know that the behind the scenes, , stories of these investigations are always interesting. . But what was a nerve ing as I started in was that I didn't realize that Muller which completely shut down all access I had to trust that eventually, , I would get access to the Muller Office, , but it was incredibly unnerving journalists to. . Spend almost two years working on his side of the investigation really from the outside even though you've written about impeachment, , you've written books about investigations. . This book feels different and I'm curious to hear your take on what makes this book in the process of writing the book different from those previous books. . Trump makes it different? ? The president is such an enormous figure in American history, , his complete disregard. . For norms his constant lying his inability or unwillingness to play by rules that Democrats and Republicans have played for all of certainly my conscious life it makes everything about these last three and a half years just feel different from anything I'd ever covered in anything I've ever felt as a citizen we've had conservative presidents. . We've had liberal presidents, , but we've never had a president like trump and. . Both he as a protagonist in my story and the people who gravitate to him just make it totally different. . Okay. . Here's one way in which it feels different to me and I'm curious to hear your take and it's about trump but it's also about the reception of trump among Americans or certain group of Americans and it's that every single time there are some kind of event trump takes. Some . action that seems to be a game changer. . There's this expectation or there has been the expectation. . Okay. Well, . , now, , this is the end of this changes things, , and that goes back to his not filing his tax returns during the campaign, , but then I think the next point was with access Hollywood tapes and it's been that way ever since where where something will happen and people will say. . Well now, , that's it. . You know there's gotTa be a consequence and then there really isn't a consequence I. . Think you're right in part I mean you know and and you can go through others whether it was praising the white supremacists in Charlottesville standing by Vladimir Putin, , in Helsinki, , and disparaging the American intelligence agencies firing James Comey which seemed like complete departures from how we expect presidents to behave. . Another theme of my journalistic career has been the evolution of the Republican Party that if you go back to Richard Nixon the turning point in Watergate was when seven Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee voted in favor of impeachment and then ultimately Barry Goldwater Hugh Scott John Rhodes went to Nixon and say we can't support you anymore those three famous Republicans The Republican Party has turned into a trump call. . And the ability of the president to do absolutely anything no matter how outrageous and retain the support of that forty percent of the country. . Is. . Something we've never seen before it's been building through the past couple of decades, , but I think that's what accounts for the phenomenon you describe, , which is no matter what he does <hes> the the political architecture of our time really never changes anymore because fifty five percent of the people are appalled forty forty percent of the people stick with trump and thus we have the election we have. . So you're saying it's essentially the fact that he's not held. . Accountable is a result of the fact that the party has sort of been entirely captured by trump. . He has captive and very loyal audience among Americans, , and then presumably the other arm of that is what's happened with the media and that certain is catering to and delivering that message. . I. . Can just add one thing. . You know a lot of people like what trump is doing. . It's not like this forty percent says, , well, , you know it's bad that he fires Komai. . It's bad that he says, , all these races. . Thanks their gladis says racist things. . I. . Mean there are a lot of people in the country who have the same attitudes and I think that's what's chilling for people like me who was. . I like to think is not a racist, , but the way trump behaves in public it's a feature, , not a bug people don't support him in spite of his excesses they support him because it's

Jeffrey toobin Pamela Paul Elena New York Times Richie Rhonda
Jeffrey Toobin on Writing About Trump

The Book Review

05:37 min | 3 months ago

Jeffrey Toobin on Writing About Trump

"Jeffrey toobin joins us now from northern Connecticut. His latest book is called True Crimes and misdemeanors the investigation of Donald, trump, it's already a New York Times Bestseller Jeff Welcome back to the podcast. It is a pleasure to be here Michelle. Well, we are talking about probably an unpleasant topic you've been covering this regularly for the New, Yorker, talking about it on CNN, the investigations of Donald. Trump plural I think and the impeachment process at what point did you think to yourself? Okay. This should be a book as well. Right at the beginning you know I have a special interest in fun for independent investigations of the presidency. I was one of the prosecutors in the Iran Contra -CATION in the Lawrence Walsh Investigation wrote my first book opening arguments about that did a book about. The Starr investigation of Whitewater Lewinsky in the Clinton years and so I know that the behind the scenes, stories of these investigations are always interesting. But what was a nerve ing as I started in was that I didn't realize that Muller which completely shut down all access I had to trust that eventually, I would get access to the Muller Office, but it was incredibly unnerving journalists to. Spend almost two years working on his side of the investigation really from the outside even though you've written about impeachment, you've written books about investigations. This book feels different and I'm curious to hear your take on what makes this book in the process of writing the book different from those previous books. Trump makes it different? The president is such an enormous figure in American history, his complete disregard. For norms his constant lying his inability or unwillingness to play by rules that Democrats and Republicans have played for all of certainly my conscious life it makes everything about these last three and a half years just feel different from anything I'd ever covered in anything I've ever felt as a citizen we've had conservative presidents. We've had liberal presidents, but we've never had a president like trump and. Both he as a protagonist in my story and the people who gravitate to him just make it totally different. Okay. Here's one way in which it feels different to me and I'm curious to hear your take and it's about trump but it's also about the reception of trump among Americans or certain group of Americans and it's that every single time there are some kind of event trump takes. Some action that seems to be a game changer. There's this expectation or there has been the expectation. Okay. Well, now, this is the end of this changes things, and that goes back to his not filing his tax returns during the campaign, but then I think the next point was with access Hollywood tapes and it's been that way ever since where where something will happen and people will say. Well now, that's it. You know there's gotTa be a consequence and then there really isn't a consequence I. Think you're right in part I mean you know and and you can go through others whether it was praising the white supremacists in Charlottesville standing by Vladimir Putin, in Helsinki, and disparaging the American intelligence agencies firing James Comey which seemed like complete departures from how we expect presidents to behave. Another theme of my journalistic career has been the evolution of the Republican Party that if you go back to Richard Nixon the turning point in Watergate was when seven Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee voted in favor of impeachment and then ultimately Barry Goldwater Hugh Scott John Rhodes went to Nixon and say we can't support you anymore those three famous Republicans The Republican Party has turned into a trump call. And the ability of the president to do absolutely anything no matter how outrageous and retain the support of that forty percent of the country. Is. Something we've never seen before it's been building through the past couple of decades, but I think that's what accounts for the phenomenon you describe, which is no matter what he does the the political architecture of our time really never changes anymore because fifty five percent of the people are appalled forty forty percent of the people stick with trump and thus we have the election we have. So you're saying it's essentially the fact that he's not held. Accountable is a result of the fact that the party has sort of been entirely captured by trump. He has captive and very loyal audience among Americans, and then presumably the other arm of that is what's happened with the media and that certain is catering to and delivering that message. I. Can just add one thing. You know a lot of people like what trump is doing. It's not like this forty percent says, well, you know it's bad that he fires Komai. It's bad that he says, all these races. Thanks their gladis says racist things. I. Mean there are a lot of people in the country who have the same attitudes and I think that's what's chilling for people like me who was. I like to think is not a racist, but the way trump behaves in public it's a feature, not a bug people don't support him in spite of his excesses they support him because it's

Donald Trump President Trump Jeffrey Toobin Republican Party Michelle CNN Lawrence Walsh Investigation New York Times Yorker Connecticut Muller Iran Richard Nixon Muller Office Vladimir Putin James Comey Starr
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:42 min | 3 months ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on The Book Review

"The way they did Jeffrey toobin will join us to talk about his latest book, True Crimes and misdemeanors. What's the lure of Elena? Ferranti Dana tour reach Richie will be here to discuss Rhonda's work and her latest novel the lying life of adults. Plus our critics will join us for the latest and literary criticism. This is the book review podcast from the. New York Times it's September fourth. I'm Pamela Paul. Jeffrey.

Jeffrey toobin Pamela Paul Elena New York Times Richie Rhonda
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:31 min | 3 months ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Kickass News

"You know every time one of these scandals. Happens, there starts to be a new vocabulary vocabulary that comes around I mean perjury trap is not a new phrase of Yeah I mean if you hell the truth you can't be trapped. Another phrase that they you know I literally had never heard before despite a lifetime spent in the world of criminal justice. Process crimes it's like Oh obstruction of justice is only a process crime. It's a crime and and and I I don't know what a process I mean I know what it's used. To describe, but I don't understand why it's sort of okay to commit a process crime but not some other kind of crime right and even trump and his teams use of the word collusion collusion's not illegal term. This context I mean there's coordination I guess something like that. Well, conspiracy. But it is I mean, one of the things that in a muller investigated a great life and did not find was some sort of meeting of the minds between trump. And any sort of Russians during the two thousand, sixteen campaign, any sort of agreement, a conspiracy to commit illegal acts. The peculiar thing about it is. Russia did an extraordinary effort to help trump win this election, and one of the things I spell out in the book is just how Muller identified in really is an extraordinary piece of detective work both the Internet research agency through the use of social media out of Saint Petersburg, and even more extensively by the Russian military intelligence in Moscow to hack. The Democratic National Committee emails and later the emails of John Podesta Clinton's campaign chair. That was incredibly elaborate effort by bladder Amir Putin's regime to help donald trump get elected president. Trump encouraged it, but there was no evidence at least Muller found or certainly that I found that there was direct communication between the two agreements between the Russians and trump and by that definition and I think in fairness you have to say there was no crime committed by trump with the rush and yet all of these people around him were somehow dirty has so many people i. it's funny as much as they wanted to portray it as a hoax you do have a number of people who were indicted and convicted or pled guilty and his own family were meeting with the Russians or his campaign leaders National Security Advisor, other close associates, Rogers Stone. How is it to everyone around trump is dirty but none of it ever touches him well, you know. Jim Komi the FBI director who had these bizarre dealings with trump before trump fired him. said his interactions with trump reminded him of. How organized crime leaders Mafia leaders dealt with outsiders and subordinates is they never say anything explicit but there is a lot of understanding between the lines of what?.

donald trump muller perjury Democratic National Committee Amir Putin Russia Jim Komi FBI John Podesta Clinton Saint Petersburg Moscow Rogers Stone National Security Advisor director president
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

05:03 min | 3 months ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Kickass News

"What made it so difficult no question it was it was the hardest. It was a moving target. I. I agree to write this book more or less as soon as muller was appointed in May of two thousand seventeen and it was supposed to be basically a molar. I quickly found out that. was impossible to get any access to Muller and his team while he was working so. That was extremely unnerving. In the first place but then of course, the story evolve. From simply. The Muller Investigation to Ukraine and the impeachment investigation. Which of course, I had no idea what's going to happen when I when I started work on it. So I I obviously wanted to get this book before the election. So it involves a a lot of working. You know trying to do the reporting and writing it more or less the same time, and then you layer on top of that the the pandemic which. In some respects was. I don't mean to make light of anything, but you know by by confining me to home, it certainly forced me to write by deadlines, but it also limited some of my reporting options of because I'm I'm someone who likes to go see people in person not just talk to people on the phone. So all of that men did it was just it was it was very difficult project especially compared to Patty hearst. which was really sort of at the border line of history and journalism a those people were not used to being called on the phone and they were all basically happy to talk about what was many respects. The most interesting thing that ever been involved in Robert Muller's team was famously lipped during the investigation. As you mentioned, were you able to get access to some of the people who were on the inside of this? Oh very much. So but but only after they closed up shop I, you know the the book. At one of the one of the things I think is most interesting about the book I found it in writing and then I think people are finding in reading it. Is that It it goes behind the scenes in the Mueller Investigation and it tells people what. They you know how they went about. They were who they are with the you know the people. Who conducted the investigation of other than? Muller himself were largely on now..

Robert Muller Mueller Investigation Ukraine Patty hearst.
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:27 min | 3 months ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Kickass News

"This is kick. Ass News I'm Ben. Mathis. Donald, trump's campaign chairman went to jail. So did his personal lawyer, his longtime political concierge was convicted of serious federal crimes and his National Security Adviser pled guilty to others several Russian spies were indicted in absentia career intelligence agents and military officers were alarmed enough by the president's actions that they alerted senior government officials and ignited the impeachment process yet despite. All of this, a years long inquiry led by special counsel Robert Muller and the third impeachment of a president. In American history, Donald Trump survived to run for reelection why CNN chief legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin attempts to answer that question in a highly entertaining definitive account of the Muller investigation and the impeachment titled Drew Crimes and Misdemeanors. The investigation of Donald. Trump. And today Jeff Returns to the podcast to discuss why this was the hardest book that he's ever written and how he managed to gain access to a number of Robert Muller's lead investigators including a few of those so-called angry Democrats. He reveals why Muller declined to Subpoena Donald. Trump. Y, he never attempted to get a hold of trump's financial records and why he ultimately stopped just short of saying that the president had committed the crime of obstruction describes muller and trump has not a story of good versus bad as much as old. Versus. New and he explains how mothers integrity and restraint may have been his greatest weakness and how trump's all star team of lawyers managed to outfox the investigation by dominating the narrative in the media plus Jeff gives a damning assessment of bill bars conduct as attorney general questions whether trump will be out of legal jeopardy once he's out of the White House and speculates on what might happen if a Supreme Court vacancy opens up between Election Day and the inauguration coming up with CNN chief legal analyst Jeffrey. Toobin in just a moment. Jeffrey Toobin is chief legal analyst at CNN and a staff writer at the New Yorker, he's the author of several bestselling books including American heiress, the oath, the nine and the run of his life, which was the basis for the fx limited series, American crime story, the people vs Oj Simpson, a vast conspiracy his book about the Clinton Lewinsky Scandal is also slated for a new installment of American crime story next year, and now he's out with his latest book and I'm told he's already got TV or film deal for that one too. It's called true crimes and misdemeanors the investigation of Donald Trump Jeffrey toobin welcome back to the podcast. Here, well, Jeffrey last time we talked about your book about the Patio Kidnapping, and now you're writing about something much fresher in the public's mind and way more fraught with political controversy. I've actually heard you say that this was the hardest book that you've ever written..

Donald Trump Jeffrey Toobin Robert Muller chief legal analyst president CNN Oj Simpson National Security Adviser Jeff Returns Mathis special counsel Kidnapping Supreme Court chairman Clinton Lewinsky White House staff writer attorney
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:53 min | 4 months ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"He didn't do this. It's really grotesque. What would bar has done to that department and to just continue what you refer to with an election coming up. And people really worried about Russian interference in our election. This time around like they did in two, thousand, sixteen, and other. Countries interfering in our election instead of investigating that Boras Investigating the origins of the initial FBI investigation into the ties to trump's campaign and Russian interests. And I think the understanding is the bar is going to try to discredit the FBI to discredit the Muller Investigation and you said the report might be released before the election which would be An October surprise it could be released in a timely way. To. To work in trump's favor. That's a feature, not a bug. The whole focus of the trump administration. Tragically including the Justice Department has all been about getting him reelected. And that's true for this Durham report as well, and it's you know as someone I worked in the Justice Department at a low level I was an assistant us attorney. But I you know I grew up in that culture and there was a real culture in the Justice Department that, yes. The US Attorney's presidential appointees and yes, the attorney general is a presidential appointee, but there is a continuity and an apolitical nature to the work of much of the Justice Department, and that is just vanished a under bar and. It's just painful to watch. The trump administration is now suing some states who have mail in ballots and trump keeps talking about how mail in ballots lead to immense voting fraud. What is William Bars role in those lawsuits? There is a lot of experience in this country with mail in voting whether it's in Colorado or Washington, which has virtually all mail in voting or you know extensive mail in voting in other states, and obviously there is going to be a great deal of it in this election because people don't WanNA stand around a voting booth in the age of covert. Of trying to make that system work and giving states the resources to process, you know a greatly increased number of mail in ballots. They're trying to discredit the process and prevent states from allowing people to vote now. This is somewhat mysterious to me. Because Republicans traditionally have used mail in voting more more than. Democrats. So it may it may be counterproductive politically, but I don't think you have to have a great deal of psychological insight to see the trump is trying to set up a scenario where it appears that he loses, and in fact, may actually lose, but he's looking to either challenge the results or at least disparage the results and say. Even. If he loses that it was only because of fraud. I think a lot of what's going on here is trump trying to find an explanation for. The reason he's losing this election and bar tragically enabling this behavior. Let's take another break here, and then we'll talk some more. If you're just joining us, my guest is Jeffrey Toobin. He's the author of the new book, True Crimes and misdemeanors. The investigation of Donald Trump. We'll talk more.

Donald Trump Justice Department Jeffrey Toobin FBI fraud Muller Investigation assistant us attorney US Attorney Boras Durham Colorado William Bars attorney Washington
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:02 min | 4 months ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I. Don't know that I really even understand the difference between the two That difference is significant legally well. Terry. That's that's a very legitimate question, and there is a difference, but I think it's it's somewhat arcane intent means simply the desire to complete a task you intend to. Rob a bank, and you don't really have to know why some you know someone really robs a bank. You don't need to know that they had an unhappy childhood that they needed money for. You know to to buy a house. Those are questions of motive. Intent is a more narrow concept, and that's all you need to prove in a criminal case. You just need to prove that someone intended to do something. Wrong. You don't need to know why they intended to do something. Wrong. You know most prosecutors liked to do both. They like to get motive and intent. But as a technical legal matter in terms of how a judge instructs the jury, all you need is intent you don't need motive and the Muller prosecutors fell that the issue of trump's finances was really about motive, it wasn't about intent. Where are you able to talk to? Robert. Muller for your book. No. I tried Terry I tried Terry. So did. Look. The last time he spoke publicly was his pretty disastrous testimony. Before. The two House committees and? You, know I think Robert Muller. Aged a lot in this investigation, the seventy two year, old Robert Mueller who was appointed was very different from the seventy four year old Robert Muller who completed this investigation and I think the public saw that in his testimony. So. Mullah Writers report then Attorney General William Bar gets the report before it's released to the press or to the public, and he declares that the report is a total exoneration of the president which it wasn't. I'd say that was very clear on the report. That's the really confusing paragraph. So it was, it was less than clear although. It was not a total exoneration bar offered. You write about this bar offer to share his statement with Muller before saying anything to the Public Muller declined to read it in advance. Why? You. Know it was such an interesting moment. They think. If. We read the statement. Bar? Will. Say. It's Muller, agrees. Muller agrees with what I'm saying. We don't want to be associated with bar statement bar statement is bar statement. It's not our statement. So they say we don't want to read it would they did not anticipate and their tragic failure was they didn't realize how far would distort their report and present it as a gift to Donald Trump, what they also did know. The bars report would be followed by weeks of of the report not being released. So all the public would know was bar statement. What Muller failed to recognize and again I think this was a bigger failure in this investigation is they didn't realize the political dynamics of what they were dealing with. They didn't realize that William Bar Muller had worked with in the George W Herbert Walker Bush administration in the justice. Department had turned into such a political hack someone who was so determined to help donald trump at every opportunity and was willing to distort Muller's words..

William Bar Muller Attorney General William Bar Donald Trump Terry Robert Mueller Herbert Walker Bush House George W president
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:59 min | 4 months ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The tragedy of the Mueller investigation is they did this brilliant investigation proving that Donald? Trump repeatedly obstructed justice far worse than Richard Nixon did in Watergate far worse than Bill Clinton. Clinton did in the Lewinsky matter when when he told the FBI Director, not to investigate Michael Flynn when he tried to get his white, house counsel to fire Muller. When he told his White House canceled to lie about whether he tried to get him to fire Mueller. All of that was agreed, Gis, obstruction of justice. It's all laid out in the Muller report, but then he doesn't finish the job and say what is obvious to any plane leader of the of of the Muller reported who actually knows the law, which is that the President committed crimes repeatedly. What's the point of investigating whether trump committed a crime? If the special prosecutor is unwilling to say that the President committed a crime, if the special prosecutor actually finds that the President committed a crime. Terry. That's what's called a good question. I don't. I don't think there is a point to doing criminal investigation if you can't say what the where the evidence leads and those of us who have practiced criminal law, those of us who've who've had prosecuted obstruction of justice cases, we could read that evidence and see what a strong case it was, but you know who cares what? What a bunch of journalists and lawyers think the point was to know what Muller Thought and Muller pulled this punch. And it. It gave him. It gave the president. A free pass effectively on. The fact that he repeatedly committed obstruction of justice. What. Did Muller's team have to say about the way the final report was written? Well I think for good reason. They were very proud of the factual exposition in the mall report. You know it was A. Bestseller when the Washington Post published it as a book. My sense is. Like Stephen Hawking's a brief history of time. It was probably more purchase than read but. Because it is very dense and very. detailed. But God knows I read it repeatedly and and they should be proud of how they established the extent of the Russian effort to help trump during the two thousand sixteen campaign. You know the social media campaign out of Saint. Petersburg. The Russian military effort to hack the emails and give them the wikileaks distribution. It's remarkable piece of investigation that the smaller did I mean this? Also I think goes tamales character muller was. Deeply. Suspicious and afraid and. Found it deeply distasteful that he became a political figure. He did not want to be the case against trump from the democratic perspective. He didn't like that there were Robert Muller action figures, he didn't like. That there were muller time t shirts, and then he became, you know the the hope and dream of MSNBC. This was not how Muller saw himself and I think there was this institutional resistance which Mahler fostered of becoming a political figure and I think that contributed to his just the fact reports. And his reluctance to draw conclusions I think that was a flawed approach. But I, it comes out of Muller's background as someone who was deeply suspicious of the political process. In your opinion, the Miller report shows that trump committed obstruction of justice not once, but several times are there other crimes that you think muller could have charged trump with? Had it not been for the office of Legal Counsel ruling that you can't indict a sitting president? No. I don't think there are other crimes. I I now another thing muller did. And refrain from doing was investigating trump's background before the presidency, and before his campaign, you know one of the things that has been a source of mystery and curiosity. Throughout In ever since trump declared, his candidacy is why he has this incredible solicitude for Vladimir, Putin why he refuses to criticize Putin why he's so solicitous of Russia and. Many..

Robert Muller Trump Muller President Mueller Bill Clinton White House Richard Nixon FBI Stephen Hawking Donald prosecutor wikileaks Michael Flynn Director Terry Petersburg MSNBC Russia
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:41 min | 4 months ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"From whyy in Philadelphia. I'm terry gross with fresh air today. How president trump his lawyers and attorney? General. William. Bar outmaneuvered Robert. Muller. We talk with Jeffrey toobin about his new book, True Crimes and misdemeanors. The investigation of Donald. Trump it's about how trump survived the muller investigation and impeachment. Tuban will explain why he thinks Muller failed at his two most important task and how that mind otherwise remarkable work included in the long list of people to been interviewed are members of Muller's team and trump's legal team. Cubans CNN's chief legal analyst and writes about legal issues for the New, Yorker that's coming up on fresh air. Remember the Muller Report. Seems like a long time ago. Doesn't it? How about the impeachment of President? Trump? The Senate trial ended just a few months ago February fifth. But that seems like a long time ago to so much has happened since then but the mullahs report and the House impeachment and Senate trial left us with so many unanswered questions questions. My Guest Jeffrey Toobin is still trying to answer to Ben's new book, True Crimes and misdemeanors. The investigation, of Donald, trump adds new twists and turns to the story of how trump survived the mother investigation and impeachment. The book is based in part on two bids interviews with members of Miller, staff, subjects of and witnesses. In Muller's investigation. Trump's league team, trump administration officials, members of Congress of both parties, Congressional staffers, and defense lawyers to been is a staff writer at the New Yorker and chief legal analyst at CNN. He's written previous books about the Supreme Court the Bill Clinton Monica Lewinsky Scandal and the trial of O. J. Simpson before becoming a journalist Tuban was a lawyer and in the eighties he served on the team of the Special Prosecutor Lawrence Walsh investigating the Reagan administration's Iran Contra arms for hostages affair. Jeffrey toobin..

Muller trump Jeffrey toobin chief legal analyst Senate Tuban CNN president Donald whyy Bill Clinton Monica Lewinsky Philadelphia Yorker Lawrence Walsh Supreme Court attorney Reagan administration Robert Congress
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

15:58 min | 8 months ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on The Book Review

"Everyone knows that famous picture from the seventies of publishing heiress Patty hearst the one where. She's posed with knitted cap army shirt and machine gun in front of the flag of her captors. The symbionese Liberation Army. Jeffrey Toobin has written many books about the law and other famous cases including OJ. And he's a staff writer for the New Yorker and a senior legal analyst at CNN. Jeff thank you for being here all right so this is a story that I feel like we all think we know well or at least we have that photo of Patty hearst with the gun which have on your cover in our head but the details have become fuzzy. So tell us about the story of Patty. Hearst will in a nutshell Patty hearst was the granddaughter of William Randolph hearst though he died before she was born and In the one thousand nine hundred. Seventy s the hearst name and newspapers generally Had A greater resonance of power and Wealth Alas than they do today So she was very famous family although she was not famous and on February fourth. Nineteen seventy four She was kidnapped by she. She was just about to turn twenty Su still a teenager. She was just nineteen years old and She was kidnapped by a rag. Tag almost elevates their significance. I'm a very small crazy. Group called the Symbionese Liberation Army. She was kidnapped on February fourth And within two months she had announced that she had joined the SLA and her new name was Tonya. On April Fifteenth. She participated in a bank robbery in San Francisco. The following month six of the eight kidnappers were killed in a enormous shootout with the Los Angeles Police Department and for the next year. Almost year and a half patty was on the run with The the remnants of her group. She was eventually arrested in September of Nineteen seventy-five charged convicted of bank robbery for her original bank robbery Later had her sentence commuted by Jimmy Carter shoes later pardoned by President Clinton and she's now a living sort of the life of a wealthy dowager in the New York. Suburbs are any less summary but the book explains it all. Let's go back to. She's nineteen years old. She's living in Berkeley and she's kidnapped and correct. How does that happen? She's living with her boyfriend. Fiance Stephen Weed and three members of the SLA led by Donald de freeze. Who was the leader? Who called himself? General Field Marshal Sin Q. They broke into this very quiet apartment on a quiet street in Berkeley. Grab Patty Hearst Steven. We'd to his ultimate chaim sort of ran away. They stuffed Patricia in in the trunk of a car and wound up driving across the San Francisco Bay to Daly City. Patty was placed in a closet where she was held captive in the SLA tried to figure out what to do with her. And even what to ask for ransom because they hadn't really even figure that out and one of the things that strikes us now. I think looking back at this and there was this other great book by Brennan Kerner. The skies belong to us about. Can I tell you something? I love that book so much. That book was so weird and funny and strange and again an example of how insane the seventies were that to me was one of the real revelations in writing this book. You know I was alive during seventies but I was a kid the seventies were not yes and and and Brennan Colonels Book Was really one of the inspirations for me wanting to go back to that period. That's how 'cause that was my next question you. How did you get to this subject? The specific route was very clear. I I wrote a piece for the New Yorker in about three years ago about this gang and Baltimore that took over the local jail. The gang was called the black guerrilla family. I got interested in the history of the black guerrilla family which was founded by George Jackson. The famous prisoner Soledad prison in the early seventies and it turns out that the seventies were tremendous time of PR- activism in prisons. That there had been the Attica riots in New York but in California in particular there was a lot of activism for an by prisoners. The symbionese Liberation Army came out of that prison activism. And so it was actually my editor Bill Thomas when I was sort of boring him about California prisons. He said we'll book. But what about Patty hearst? And I said to. Bill will there must be a million books about Patty hearst. And he said we'll go see and it turns out right after the kidnapping. There had been a whole bunch of books including Patricia Zone Book. But there's been nothing written on this subject for decades so I thought. Wow there's an opening here and is there new stuff that's come out in those decades or were you able to get people to talk. Who hadn't talked wolf? There's not new stuff that's come out during the decades but there's new stuff I am confident to say in my book. Lots of it. Actually I Made a deal with Bill Bill Harris. Who was one of the surviving members of the SLA? I'm he was he. He was a tremendous pack rat and he had one hundred fifty boxes of material that he was about to sell to a university library. The deal fell through. I bought those documents from him and I'm going to give them to the Harvard Law School Library. You know after my book is out And there was a lot in those documents. Go through one hundred and fifty bucks. It was actually a tremendous challenge me you know. I had been dealing almost exclusively with. Pdf's with stuff online. And suddenly I had all this paper and I hadn't dealt with paper for for quite some time and I actually hired. My son used to play soccer in in Sherman Connecticut where we have a weekend house. I hired a couple of the soccer moms that I used to stand on the sideline with to make an index of one hundred fifty boxes and they did a credibly meticulous a stereotype recruitment tool here suggestion to like hire the soccer moms. Tha these women were fantastic in. There was a lot of gold in those boxes. Let's talk about the city's Liberation Army. I mean what is that Donald to freeze? Who was this really somewhere? Between a minor and amid level criminal most of his life was sort of radicalized in prison but really never had any clear political ideas. He came up with this word. Symbionese as a sort of corruption of symbiosis people working together he called Liberation Liberation. They didn't liberate anything or anyone and he called them an army. They never really had more than about a dozen people so that the name is Tripoli misleading but it is certainly has resonance in history. I find that when I talk to people about this. The first thing they say is oh the Symbionese Liberation Army because the name is kind of colorful and feel bad because they don't know who the Symbionese are. Why don't why don't they know they needed to be liberated? Why don't they know? And and actually you know the other thing about it is that people think of this is some sort of like a black revolutionary movement. There was exactly one black person. In the SA was just a freeze the others were sort of radical hangers on middle-class kids several of them from the Indiana University Drama Program and though the SLA didn't really accomplish anything they did have a sense of guerrilla theater which was in the air even even in Bloomington Indiana and that was a big part of what they did was sort of showing off. How radical they were even if they had no coherent goals right. Well the the photo of Patty hearst has tiny with that gun I mean that posed like what is absolutely classic example of their guerrilla theater was posing her in front of the seven headed Cobra which was their symbol in one reason. I think this story still has resonance for people. Is that icon photograph? The expression on Patty hearst's face is so inscrutable. I mean in the book I say somewhat facetiously but not entirely that it was Kinda Mona Lisa for the era. Because you can't quite tell. Is she proud? She terrified. Is She coerced is she? A revolutionary and that photograph which is so emblematic of the whole story was indicative of how much they really liked to show off which they did and what is her version of this. What's the version that she put forth in her memoir and has she stuck to that yet year and her version that she testified about it at her at her trial which was from day one. She was kidnapped which is a terrifying horrifying experience but following her kidnapping her version is. She was coerced to do everything from for the next year and a half. She was coerced to rob the original. Bank the Bernie Bank which is bad bank robbery for which he was prosecuted. A big part of the story. As far as I'm concerned is the extraordinary numbers of crime. She committed while she was on the run to other bank robberies. When including the woman was killed. We're she shot up a street in Los Angeles set off bombs in the San Francisco area. Her version is that she was coerced to do all of that. My version is that she actually became a member of the SLA and was a voluntary participants for much of that period. And what persuaded you that? That's what happened the scope and range and number of crime. She was committed also the way she was treated she was left alone. She had many opportunities to escape. She had many chances to simply walk away. She was involved with some people during this period. Who encouraged her to surrender? My view was given Her behavior you know I try to avoid the psychobabble associated with this case brainwashing Stockholm Syndrome and focus on what she actually did. And my view is in light of what she actually did. She was a voluntary participant for most of that period now f Lee Bailey during his defense of her that the defense they used was Coercive persuasion or so what? I'm curious about the the history of that versus brainwashing this pre-stockholm Syndrome as a notion right but had that defense existed and been used successfully. Did it have a long history and it didn't have a long history but it was established in law. Just as as a practical matter. Think about it. You know if if you have a gun on you and rob a bank with you know under your under the gun you are not guilty. And that's a long established principle in law and that was the defense that that she used a trial that this was simply rob this bank or you'll be killed two and so as a legal matter. It wasn't novel. But you had to prove factually that you were in fact coerced. That was what the whole trial was about. I mean the the the what was so interesting about her trial. Is that the facts of the case. Were not in dispute. Everyone acknowledged that she was in the bank but she held the machine gun. The whole trial was about what was in her head. What was her motivation? Her her intent and she was convicted and sentenced to seven years in prison as a result of that case. And did she serve? Will She served twenty two months? But then Jimmy. Carter gave her a commutation and then twenty years later. Bill Clinton gave her a full pardon. So Patty hearst to this day remains the only person in American history to receive a commutation from one president and a pardon from another And was that. Was there a lot of pressure I assume? Put on the President's by the hearst family and it was an extraordinary demonstration of the power and privilege of the hearst family that they manage to recruit Ronald Reagan who was governor of California the time to encourage Carter Tissue. Apart and local congressman. You had the African American community. I mean they really mobilized a tremendous Lobbying campaign on her behalf and there was an intervening news event. That actually tip the balance in favor of a commutation which was another seventies insanity the mass suicide in Guyana by the Reverend Jim Jones and his followers people's Temple which gave the idea of brainwashing wide airing and that helped prompt Carter to giver..

symbionese Liberation Army Patty hearst Patty Hearst Steven Patty William Randolph hearst hearst Bill Bill Harris Jimmy Carter robbery hearst family Berkeley President Clinton Jeffrey Toobin New York kidnapping California San Francisco Donald de soccer
Author Colson Whitehead on 'The Underground Railroad'

The Book Review

08:32 min | 8 months ago

Author Colson Whitehead on 'The Underground Railroad'

"Colson. Whitehead's new novel. The underground railroad is already making a mark as a work of fiction that combines history and metaphor telling a story about slavery in America in new and surprising ways whitehead is the author of many books including zone one and Sag harbor and he's also received a macarthur genius grant and many other awards Colson. Thanks so much for being here. Shurmur pleasure so this is not your first novel. Obviously but how many novels have you written? And the last one was about poker this is my sixth and I have to nonfiction and last nonfiction was about Playing the world series of poker and having to bone up on a game and and trained for a couple of weeks and crash course in order to play at the annual big game that was the no Hustle Noble Hustle. Yeah so how did you get from the Noble Hustle to the underground railroad? I'm always sick. Like whatever style is working in on the book and the last book was first person a lot of jokes. I saw it as a humor book. That's tried to cram as many weird jokes in as I could With the underground railroad. Well it's fiction. Try to have humor in my books but obviously you can't really have as many jokes for page in a book that slavery so that so that was good. My last couple of novels had a ton of black dudes walking around thinking about things and it seemed Have a female protagonist and mix it up and never explored a mother daughter relationship before so it seemed good for me to break out of sort of a mode. I'd been did part of the idea of this scary you to brighten the voice of a woman example multiple her. I mean I think That's your job. I mean. It's Nice if people say oh you got a female characters voice and I just think well. That's what you signed up on when you pick the book and said as female character like if you have a plumber and Drain you go. Wow you were the UNCLOG that drain. That's why you call them and That's why he did it. So it was hard to tackle slavery and get into the Research and really contemplate and immerse myself in the horror. Hadn't only people walk around thinking about slavery in a deep way all the time and Obviously exposed to route. I was very young and studied it in college but I had immersed myself in slave narratives and a very long time and now that I'm older you know affects me more than it did when I was a teenager in my early twenty s and so I'm realizing how much the true ours was not to submit my protagonist in her companions to Dante and terrifying. It also seems that I mean we're roughly the same age that depictions of slavery obviously there was roots and there was a beloved but in the last decade or so have almost reexamined it and in a way that's a lot more fearless and visceral and that you're kind of fits in well with that Well I think You know taking liberties with historical record. I mean I'm playing with time. Once Cora gets deep into her journey but that first section mergers George. I want to be as realistic as you know. I can make it. Which means a lot of brutality? And it means impressing upon the reader the psychological tortures that they were forced to endure so for those who have not yet read the buck. Let's just talk a little bit about the the story line We start off as you mentioned in Georgia with Cora. Court is Sixteen or seventeen year old girl Owners didn't keep track of their slaves. Birthdays she has no idea how old she has. Her family has gone. Her mother has run off years before. And she's a an orphan astray on the plantation. A man named Caesar sold down South From the north he has contacts underground railroad so they light out to the north availed themselves of his contacts. And that's when the book changes I guess I had this idea that you know. What if the railroad was an actual literal railroad would apprentice not so much of a full story? Was that the first like one of the first things that you came upon when you were yes about. Sixteen years ago I was thinking. Oh isn't funny like when you're a kid and I hear about anything other little subway and that was like one little well actually on twitter. I'll search for the entire book and it'll be teenagers in school. Like Oh missy stupid. She thinks of underground wherever and as always like a couple of those a day. So I think it's a common Fantasy the notion and then I was thinking mcdan- to a story like what if every state Georgia South Carolina North Carolina. She goes through is a different state of American possibility. And so I was thinking about how each different character and the first place she ends up is South Carolina which is seemingly benevolent paternalistic place. Where a lot of programs for black social uplift jobs programs housing North Carolina is a white supremacist state. Where black people were outlawed and not allowed to step over the state line and so I was trying to sort of tweak American history to expose various tensions and I mean did you sort of create certain rules for yourself like well. This is going to be this part of me. Maintain kind of historical accuracy and integrity. And I will place these sort of discreet. What could have been or what might have been or what was then and not there within Georgia where we meet on the plantation going to be very realistic and traditional depiction of plantation life. And then the first gets the WHEEL ROAD. She looks up and sees a skyscraper and that's As a writer that's why I'm GonNa let it rip and have fun and go crazy and and the beaters notions and it's a you know. Obviously a big signs of the reader that we're not I think you know. I thought the Book Sixteen years ago and initially in for many years each state took place in a very different time frame and so South Carolina would have been like in this very stylized future place with with gene experiments and enslaves bread for different roles. And it would have been an fantastic. Gestures would have been much more broad and a sort of cloud atlas type style and so you're in a different world and the North Carolina chapter was going to some sort of fifty suburbia Myst- sort of Eisenhower Era America. That was the default for many years of the Voice of the book and a structure and then has to be read and as mentioned in the review. Glad to see it a hundred years of solitude which I read when I was in high school and had been an impact on me and I read it a few months before I started writing this book and it just seemed what if I just toned it down and didn't have to have these broad gestures ever sort of my default setting. There's a section in the book where she's a living exhibit in a museum and she acts out scenes from a plantation and a slave ship behind glass for the museum's patrons and I feel like five years ago would have been a ten page. Like huge like setpiece announced like two pages. It's interesting because I think just in the paper today. There was a photo from one of these museums. Where you know wasn't the Museum of Living Wonders but place where they reenact an earlier incarnation of America and you know and there were two African American people dressed up in costume. The first world's fairs you know often had an jungle natives and garb Dancing around to fit some some some sort of idea of darkest Africa Their various African pygmies were you know paraded For the delectation of American audiences you know once I decided not to make a historical novel and play with Time. Allowed to bring in things like that. Which occurred in eighteen fifty but were part of America in the late nineteenth century and the various things about eugenics and the Holocaust which I bring in. That's novel eighteen fifty but they ranked true and so I think another rule of besides concision was stick to the truth and not the facts and so There seem to be a truth in that museum. Section and where core funders in North Carolina that. I wanted to be loyal to even if it didn't actually

North Carolina Georgia South Carolina America Cora Colson Colson. Whitehead Museum Of Living Wonders SAG Twitter Africa Macarthur Dante Caesar Writer
Trump talked about silencing stories about alleged affairs, documents show

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

03:27 min | 1 year ago

Trump talked about silencing stories about alleged affairs, documents show

"President Trump worked directly with his former lawyer Michael Cohen on hush money payments and that he and top campaign aides scrambled along with Mike Account to cover up his alleged affair with a porn star Jeffrey toobin. What can you tell us looking at these new documents just released today about the pattern of communication involving hush money payments that occurred and you know it's really amazing to sort of take step back and look at all the evidence? The Department of Justice has said that this money I need to stormy. Daniels was an illegal campaign contribution okay well. Whose money was it well ultimately it was donald trump's money? He paid Michael Cone to you know he reimbursed Michael Colin who benefited from that illegal campaign contribution it was donald trump because he was the one who's running for president and who directed that the money be paid that word was used by the Department of Justice in a court filing but who's in prison because of this campaign illegal campaign contribution Michael Cone why it just it just seems so crazily unjust that Michael Cohen is prosecuted in Donald Trump is and I just can't I can't fathom how this works. The Justice Justice Department guidelines say that sitting president can't be indicted. Are you surprised that no one else is being charged. That's a little less clear to me. Frankly I mean hope Hicks was involved in some of these phone calls but it's not establish that she you know what exactly she new but it's quite clear what what what the candidate trump new and yes it is true that currently there is a policy that says the president can't be prosecuted but you know he's not going to be president forever and if you if you prosecute Michael Cohen for this. I don't see why you shut this down. As apparently the southern district has done when the real culprit the person who was behind this the beneficiary of it has has gotten away with it. You know it's interesting Gloria because after the Wall Street Journal published its initial story about all of this Michael Cohen according to the documents that we now have texted hope picks was then working for Donald Trump in the campaign and said so far I the only six stories getting little to no traction Hicks same. Keep praying. It's working. So what do you make well. First of all Hicks is loyalty was to Donald Trump and still is I believe and so what she was saying oh good this stormy Daniels L. Story not getting a lot of pickup. It's not getting a lot of traction here. I think the point that the Jeffrey is raising is the right one which is the question about Ho- picks for example. There probably won't prosecutor but you know the F._B._i.. I says that she had called cone and they had a discussion and perhaps trump joined them on the line. Well what were they talking about. Were they talking about stormy Daniels where they talking about access Hollywood. We you know I don't know the answer to that and I think that there are all these questions that are raised and the only one who seems to be sort of walking off is the president of the United States because it was his cover up it was his affair and it was his checks that he he was writing from the Oval Office and Michael Cohen is sitting in jail April. Let's remember what the president said aboard Air Force One. This is April fifth twenty-eight team last year when he was questioned about this watch this

Donald Trump Michael Cohen President Trump Michael Cone Hicks Daniels Department Of Justice Jeffrey Toobin Justice Justice Department Michael Colin Mike Account Wall Street Journal United States Hollywood Prosecutor Air Force Gloria Oval Office HO
Amazon founder Jeff Bezos says National Enquirer publisher tried to extort him

All Things Considered

08:07 min | 1 year ago

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos says National Enquirer publisher tried to extort him

"The world's richest man published on explosive blog post last night, a nine minute read that could have huge repercussions. Jeff Bezos, the Amazon founder and Washington Post owner accused the publisher of the National Enquirer of trying to blackmail him with sexually explicit photos. The National Enquirer is also caught up in the federal investigations tied to the Trump campaign. NPR's Alina Seljuk is here to help us untangle the many threads here Alina. This is a crazy story so many threads. What are the latest developments today? The big question today is whether federal investigators will take a new look at the publisher of the National Enquirer as you said, it's called American medium. It's run by David pecker and piker is or at least used to be a longtime friend of President Trump, and Jeff Bezos is accusing him and his company of extortion and blackmail, and that's big because bear with me here. Beker has an immunity deal with federal prosecutors. It's part of a case of a hush money payment to a woman who said she had an affair with Trump. But the deal hinges on Becker and his company staying out of trouble and Basil's alleging blackmail puts a huge bold question. Mark over the fate of this immunity. So one question here is has he just nullified the immunity deal. How did bazo get involved in this entire controversy that until now was about President Trump and hush money payments to women? Well, a few weeks ago, the National Enquirer published very awkward embarrassing text messages that Basil's had sent to the woman with whom he was having an affair and Bezos funded an investigation to find the leaker of these messages will fast forward to last night, he decided to publish emails that he says he's received from officials at American media in the National Enquirer in the Email say the tabloid has many more salacious texts and photos, which are described and. Painful detail, and the emails demand that Basil's stop investigating the leak and also publicly declared that the coverage of his affair was not motivated. So today American media responded, they're basically saying they were reporting on Basil's, and they did it legally, though, notably. They did not come on the content of the emails that were posted by Basil's. And I just want to say this is unusual for basis. He's very rich. Of course. But he is a tech nerd who founded Amazon, he's not your typical celebrity. This is not a man who's lived out his life in the public eye, and with those blockposts he's started a pretty public crusade against a meteoric mutation that time, and again has gone to bat for President Trump, and now basis is accusing them of going after him for political reasons because he owns the Washington Post, which Trump has repeatedly criticised, we should also say that while the National Enquirer says what it did was legal. It is not typical journalistic practice to say, we have embarrassing material. And if you don't back down, we will publish it. Right. But how tip? Typical is it for the national inquirer and its publishing its owner company to do this sort of thing. It definitely has as you're saying history of practices that are considered journalistically unethical, for example, paying sources for stories buying embarrassing stories about celebrities in exchange for favors from them. The tactic known as catch and kill in which the tabloid buys rights to stories purely to suppress them that was what was alleged in the Trump incident. We'll get to that didn't Justin. That is actually what God the National Enquirer in the federal investigation involved in the federal investigation with the Trump campaign is you're saying American media in Becker admitted to paying former playboy model Karen McDougal to buy the rights to her story. She says she had an affair with Trump. And the publishers plan was to kill the story to protect the Trump campaign during the two thousand sixteen election Becker, cut an immunity deal as I mentioned with the prosecutors, and this is the deal that's now in question because of businesses accusations of essentially criminal wrongdoing. MPR's Lena Seljuk? Thank you very much. Thank you. Okay. Back to the legal threats of this fight between Jeff Bezos and American media as Alina just mentioned AM, I signed an immunity deal with federal prosecutors in New York the deal was in exchange for cooperation and pledging not to break the law again AM I admitted to violating campaign finance laws in order to help President Trump get elected as we also. Just mentioned bazo snow alleging blackmail and extortion, hangs a big old question. Mark over the fate of this immunity deal to talk about that we're joined by legal analyst, Jeffrey Toobin. Hi, jeff. Hi, hi. So am I put out a statement this morning saying they believe fervently that the company acted lawfully? But also saying they're going to look into basis his claims. So if he is proven right, if they find something did break, the law will this is a very interesting question. Extortion is obtaining a thing of value by threats. In other words, if I say to you give me a million dollars or I'll kill you. That's extortion will here there's clearly threat we will release these embarrassing photographs if you don't drop this investigation and clear our name. So the question what's the thing of value? Exactly. The question is is that service from the from the Washington Post? A thing value. And I think the answer clearly to that is. Yes, it is enormous value to am. I. To be cleared by the Washington Post. However, it is not certainly a kind of extortion that either ever heard of actually being prosecuted and one possible defense that AM I might offer is that look we are simply trying to get our name cleared through preventing unfair inaccurate publicity. And you can't punish us for that. Now, it's not usually done through the threat of of, you know, dirty pictures, but I think that sets up the argument, I don't really know the answer that sets up my next question, which is what standard would have to be met to prove that AM. I violated its immunity deal. Well, all immunity deals in non-prosecution agreements. Have the condition that you must not commit any more crimes. So it's really the. So we looked it up. And it's shall not commit shell commit? No crimes whatsoever. Right. And so if. AM I were even prosecuted, I think for this extortion or blackmail that could void that could void the immunity agreement right there. So, but they come down to the same question, which is was this interaction with bazo say violation of the law and without venturing too far down the road of hypotheticals. What would be the consequences? If AM I was found to a violated the deal. Well, then they could be prosecuted for the unlawful campaign contribution, which is was the money given to Karen McDougal to help the Trump campaign. I'm sorry. The women who says she had an affair with President Trump before he was correct. Nice. Okay. That one hundred fifty thousand dollar payment to her could be prosecuted as an illegal campaign contribution, which is one of the things that Michael Cohen already pleaded guilty to that's Trump's former personal lawyer real quick and the moments we have left or a federal prosecutor wants game out for me how the attorneys who signed that of unity dealer thinking about all these developments. Well, I think they have to investigation the basis post on medium dot com was certainly very provocative, and and and interesting, and and and potentially incriminating. But I think what you have to do is start talking to everyone involved. You have to see what the other emails were between everyone. What what what were there any phone calls between them you have to do a thorough investigation? But it is certainly worthwhile to do that investigation. Because as bazo says it does sound like blackmail or

President Trump National Enquirer Jeff Bezos Extortion Basil Alina Seljuk Becker Washington Post Amazon Karen Mcdougal Bazo Mark Publisher Beker MPR David Pecker
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on KTRH

"On NewsRadio seven forty KTAR h. There's still a few players who doing a to. They're just you know, keeping a quiet the NFL is really talking about it. But it's happening. Five twenty two now here. Newsradio seven forty KTAR. HR things are. Things are getting even stranger than ever at CNN. Jeffrey Toobin is their legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin has been there for twenty plus years. I think. And for most of those years he actually was fairly reasonable. He wrote some incredible books, and he he he used to play it down the middle. I mean, he used to look at things and analyze them from a legal standpoint played them pretty much done World Affairs Council of Houston. Brought him in several times to speak always seem very measured. Yes. Guess what? That's over at the new CNN, no more measured Jeffrey Toobin. Well, if you want to keep your position, maybe you have to maybe don't what kind of marching orders. They have over there. We know what kind of marching orders. It comes right right from the very very top. You know, as far as what kind of a slant they're gonna take here is Jeffrey Toobin from yesterday. He was talking about the gubernatorial race in Kansas. Chris Quebec in actually called him a racist. Chris has devoted his career to stopping black people and poor people from voting. I mean that's been your goal for decades that and and outrageous accusations completely is absolutely outrageous accusation. Oh, so you so if you are if you like photo ID, you're trying to stop people of color from voting absolute is outrage, slowly. Jeffrey Toobin if you like voter ID laws you're trying to stop black people from voting you're racist. I never thought I'd hear him go that far. Well, that was the argument you used in courts for a long long time, and his certainly shut it down. It was affective effective argument that you know, what? It's almost become Adolf Hitler argument. When you when you're desperate, and you're at the point where you have nothing left to divide the argument with the card out, and that's what Jeffrey Toobin did. And I can't believe that. He actually sunk that low he was on FOX Chris go back was on FOX a detail about the accusation. The argument is that somehow because of your skin color, you are less likely to having your wallet a photo ID, or you're less likely to be able to go to a government office and get a free photo ID. It's a ridiculous argument. It's been disproven empirically state after state, but the hard left, and now increasingly the entire left keeps making the argument, and you know, Tucker, I went into that debate program thinking, we're going to have a cordial debate about birthright citizenship, but as soon as Jeffrey Toobin started losing the argument, he just out of the blue says you've devoted your career to stopping people of color from voting. It's crazy. It is crazy. Like, I said. Until people start realizing it that is and then they won't play the card if there's no longer effective, Betty just Rams people up. I don't it. Just I guess with my semi logical mind. I can't I can't wrap my head around the idea that people look at that in the whole voter ID thing and just buy into the whole racism year. The American people finally say I am going to go vote. Well, it sure sounds like it will make a difference. Maybe maybe I can put down whatever else I'm doing an I can go vote. People are going to the polls, especially here in Texas. We're find that out and then we had an abysmal midterm record. As far as motor turn up..

Jeffrey Toobin CNN NFL Chris Quebec analyst World Affairs Council of Houst Texas Betty FOX Kansas Tucker
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"I write seven thousand words about this guy. And I couldn't watch it. And this. You couldn't even my dad might have been because of the beer because like this is long. I love you, son. But it's just too long. We got we got to wrap up. I have a couple of final words. But before I do that everyone big round of applause for Jeffrey Toobin. Live podcasts in the same way. I do the regular podcast talk about something. I think is important are being here as I said at the beginning of the show is as -nificant thing where we are. The town hall is a significant place in some ways, you could say this is hallowed ground in terms of civic engagement because this this theater was founded by a group of Suffragettes the league for political education, and what they were looking for. Was a place to gather people together and educate them, hence the name of the place. The town hall built in nineteen twenty one with democratic principles in mind. The idea was they were no box seats or obstructed views in theory. What led to the phrase, not a bad seat in the house, and I hope that that has been true. And while this building was being constructed the nineteenth nineteenth amendment passed and women gained the right to vote, and it became a symbol of the movement. So voting has always been important. Not everyone is always had the right to vote back in the time. I was referring to women didn't have the right to vote people who do have the right to vote or not exercising it enough. And as we discussed it's really really important. It's never been more important. There are other whole categories of people who don't have the rights that virtually all of you. I guess have. And they go with people that Jeffrey. No, well, people who have been incarcerated in prison. I've mentioned this on the show a few times there are people who after they pay their debts to society, and they try to rehabilitate and come back into society. They still are not permitted to vote which to my mind makes no sense, and is a form of injustice that makes should make your blood boil. In florida. There's a ballot measure that's a ballot measure that people can vote on to amend a section of the constitution. That would that would Rian franchise people who have been incarcerated, and it would be I think one point five million people are not able to vote in Florida. It'd be one of the greatest Rian franchise minutes of groups since the Civil Rights Act in the sixties. So. This is all just emphasize and to reiterate because I'm redundant lawyer guy. Voting is important if you have the right to vote, please use it if you know someone in Florida where have influenced in Florida get people to vote for this. So everyone has a chance to vote and decide the future of their country. There's nothing more important. Thank you. I love you. God bless you. That's it for this live episode of stay tuned. Thanks again to my guest, Jeffrey too. But if you like to show rate and review it on apple

Jeffrey Toobin florida Rian apple
Ex-Playboy model alleging Trump affair wants to nix contract that "controlled her life," lawyer says

All Things Considered

01:40 min | 2 years ago

Ex-Playboy model alleging Trump affair wants to nix contract that "controlled her life," lawyer says

"You're listening to all things considered on wnyc i'm jamie floyd a former playboy model who says she had an affair with donald trump is now doing to be released from a legal agreement restricting her ability to speak out about it that makes her the second woman this month to challenge efforts to bury stories during the presidential campaign about trump's alleged extramarital affairs trump denies the affairs which both women have described as consensual karen mcdougal is suing the national enquirers parent company american media inc which paid her one hundred fifty thousand dollars and who's chief executive is a friend of the president the other woman the adult film star stormy daniels was paid one hundred thirty thousand dollars to keep quiet by the president's personal lawyer michael cohen she filed a lawsuit earlier this month jeffrey toobin has written about the national enquirer and its relationship to president trump for the new yorker and he joins us now jeffrey the national enquirer is based right here in new york it's actually part of a much the larger tabloid empire tell us about that i well the key figure and all of this is david pecker who is a media entrepreneur who is a close friend of president trump's and he has assembled this tabloid empire that includes the national enquirer the star the globe and and mother more minor supermarket tabloids but but he's in charge of all of them and they were hall reflect his views these women karen mcdougal and stormy daniels whose real name is stephanie clifford granted exclusive ownership of their story rights to the inquirer what exactly does that mean jeffrey a limited life story rights.

Jeffrey Toobin Hall American Media Inc Playboy Stephanie Clifford David Pecker New York National Enquirer Jamie Floyd Michael Cohen Daniels President Trump Chief Executive Karen Mcdougal Donald Trump One Hundred Thirty Thousand Do One Hundred Fifty Thousand Dol
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

"Who what he did do wanting change so your humble narrator will be uh china lose weight so occupy guys posted that'll be may accountability maybe a heavy guys held a and i'll do the same for you okay so let me know if you want me to give you a shout out i'll do that you know and say hang in there you know whatever you're doing uh so i'm happy to do that so him really good show a today jeffrey toobin is interviewing him from cnn senior legal analyst been a fan of jeffries for a long time always find his commentary very good we have a really good discussion today about some of this stuff meant i don't know if you guys got the book of fire fury at the the michael wolff book which by the way people in twitter okay i love how people say lay wilma you look like michael wolff people loves to tease me with who they think i look like you know and i'm like well first of all i don't think i look like him i think he looks like dr evil personally if you rick get out a picture dr even pitting next to michael of i think that's how he looks like i haven't read the book yet i do have in thanks to my friend joni thanks journey she went to make sure hand it so i'm kinda toward about how i feel about some of this stuff um it just seems a little i mean look i believe almost any of these things there are probably said about trump in this book i've heard some of it of course in the news it is a bit tabloid he for me m michael of i don't know it's a little problematic some of the way he answers the question to me interviews like i'm not sure if he's read the whole book sometimes.

jeffrey toobin analyst jeffries trump cnn michael wolff rick joni
"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

15:51 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey toobin" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast