19 Burst results for "Jeffrey Lewis"

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:57 min | 2 d ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Or two So we'll have to stay tuned to the forecast today Some of those storms we said could be severe a high today near 76 and then tomorrow sunny and a high of 74 It's 5 45 It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin Hello Martinez Right after North Korea admitted its first COVID-19 outbreak after denying for two years that it had a single case tested three ballistic missiles Last week made this its 16th test launch of the year Now as NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports the U.S. and South Korea are watching for another kind of test the first involving a nuclear weapon in 5 years Deep in the mountains of North Korea about 60 miles from the border with China there is a village called pongi and near that village is North Korea's main nuclear test site Imagine that your next to a creek and all around you are these very tall mountains Jeffrey Lewis is an arms control expert at the middlebury institute of international studies in Monterey California To your north there is a tunnel entrance and inside that mountain there is a network of tunnels where North Korea did 5 of its last 6 nuclear tests The other test was done in the same complex but in a different tunnel North Korea partially dismantled Bulgaria in 2018 it declared a moratorium on nuclear testing and began a yearlong period of summit diplomacy This march Lewis looked at satellite pictures and saw signs of construction suggesting that North Korea could be planning to resume nuclear testing One danger of underground nuclear tests is that radiation could leak out But Lewis believes ponge de is pretty solid There are several hundred meters of granite above those test tunnels which is more than enough to contain even very large nuclear explosions There are of course riskier ways of testing atomic bombs than detonating them underground Adam mount a fellow at the federation of American scientists explains The major risk is that they mount a nuclear warhead on a ballistic missile fire it over Japan into the Pacific and detonate it above the surface of the water This year North Korea has tested many kinds of missiles long-range short-range submarine launched train launched hypersonic and cruise missiles Mount says all of these may carry nuclear warheads which first need to be tested depending which systems they want to make nuclear capable It may require them to develop a generation of new nuclear warheads for those systems North Korea needs to miniaturize the warheads and to make its nuclear deterrent credible mount says they need to prove the weapons really work Until Kim Jong-un is sure that the United States believes that he has a functional nuclear deterrent he may have an incentive to continue to demonstrate that he does Kim Jong-un has a very strong incentive to convince the U.S. president personally President Biden will meet with South Korean president Yun seung y'all this Sunday in Seoul an experts think that a nuke test this month is highly likely This test would signal the end of a 5 yearlong testing moratorium By scrapping the moratorium Jeffrey Lewis says Pyongyang will be clearing away a major obstacle to its nuclear ambitions When Kim Jong-un agreed to stop testing long range missiles and when he agreed to stop exploding nuclear weapons that was a real constraint Not on his deterrent that he had at that time But on his ability to build the deterrent that he is about to embark on With nuclear talks between the U.S. and North Korea stalled since 2019 the prospect of negotiating a new moratorium appears for now to be nowhere on the horizon Anthony Kuhn in PR news soul This is NPR news Later on morning edition the alleged gunman in Saturday's massacre in Buffalo may have been fixated on a white supremacist theory known as the great replacement It's the Jews bringing in brown people to replace white people and the sort of horrors they're in The racist idea has gained traction in the U.S. in recent years That story coming up Next hour Mid 60s now with some clouds out there could get rough today as a cold front moves in and clashes with the warm weather could have some thunderstorms maybe even some damaging winds and large hail and maybe an isolated tornado or two We'll have you forecast Otherwise today those storms could be severe in a high of 76 tomorrow sunny and 74 It's 5 51 Support for WNYC comes from content square human analytics that go beyond the numbers to help deliver a deeper understanding of what makes customers click more information is available at content.

North Korea Anthony Kuhn NPR news Rachel Martin Hello Martinez middlebury institute of intern Jeffrey Lewis ponge de Kim Jong Adam mount South Korean U.S. Lewis NPR un federation of American scienti President Biden president Yun seung y Monterey
"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:08 min | 2 months ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Based fiber for trapping and removing waste in the digestive system designed to be taken every day More at metamucil dot com And from C three AI C three AI software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable problems C three AI is enterprise AI From NPR news this is all things considered I'm Sarah mccammon and I'm el sit Chang Social media is awash with satellite photos and cell phone videos of the war in Ukraine The speed and scale at which this information is spreading is unprecedented But as Ampere's Jeff bromfield reports some experts worry the picture painted by online posts may not always be accurate Jeffrey Lewis saw the invasion before it began on Google Maps Here's how it happened His team was using commercial satellites to watch a Russian military unit Tanks armored personnel carriers the whole 9 yards The unit was outside the Russian city of bio garage vehicles were lined up on the road like they were about to go somewhere We were like that unit is prepared to go plunging into Ukraine Lewis is a Professor of arms control at the middlebury institute of international studies at Monterey He and his team wanted to know how long it would take for the unit to actually reach the border So they did what anyone would do they plugged it into Google And guess what There was a traffic jam that began exactly where that armored unit was located And it stretched toward the Ukrainian border And it was three in the morning In Russia In other words the armored column was on the move clogging the roads The invasion had begun Lewis tweeted out what his team had found about an hour later Putin declared the start of Russia's military offensive This is the speed at which information travels in the Ukraine war Cell phones and commercial satellites are providing a flood of data about troop movements attacks fleeing civilians It's all out there for everyone to see All of this data is being collected and shoved on to social media where we can look at it And there is a small army of semi professional investigators who are looking hard Ross Burley is the executive director of the center for information resilience a UK group that's helping to gather and collate all the on the ground videos investigators and volunteers while trawling telegram on Twitter and Twitch and all the different social media platforms that you can imagine Collecting anything that they see and everything goes into the database The group is collecting around a hundred posts a day The ones that are verified go on to a real-time map to show where the fighting is happening Burleigh says that these videos could also become valuable evidence Personally I hope that our work can inform future prosecutions and that there is a degree of accountability for individuals who are involved in war crimes and other things like that While some groups are trying to gather everything to get a clear sense of the big picture most people are just seeing a handful of posts that get the most likes and shares And that can sometimes be misleading Take for example a video on TikTok of an attractive woman showing how to start a Russian armored vehicle The video has over 7 million views one person who saw it was Rita canaye at the center for security and emerging technology at Georgetown university She says when this video first aired it was depicted as this has been taken by Ukrainian forces are resistance And that's not what it was According to a fact check by Reuters the woman is a Russian auto mechanic and vlogger She filmed herself weeks before the invasion in Russia driving the armored vehicle for fun Even though that is not something significant I think it sounds part of a.

Russia NPR news Sarah mccammon Chang Social media Jeff bromfield middlebury institute of intern Jeffrey Lewis Ampere Lewis Ross Burley center for information resilie Google Monterey Putin Burleigh Rita canaye center for security and emergi Twitter UK
"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

06:10 min | 7 months ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Always be on the cutting edge That is why we are also proudly reasserting America's legacy of leadership in space Our foreign competitors and adversaries have already begun weaponizing space Developing new technologies to disrupt vital communications blind satellites and I mean you look at what they're doing They've given me rundowns I've seen things that you don't even want to see what they're doing and how advanced they are will be catching them very shortly Well I wish that were the case but everybody was focused on spying on Trump and leaking about Trump and getting Trump out of office that we didn't catch them Matter of fact we fell far behind We don't have a hypersonic weapon According to what I'm hearing we're at least two years away from that Now you may say to yourself well Dan how would they possibly know our Intel community How could they have possibly known about a hypersonic weapon I mean it wasn't like the writing was on the wall since all the way back in 2012 Oh yeah I'll get to that in a moment Here is a middlebury institute professor guy by the name of Jeffrey Lewis on CNBC saying what do you want the Chinese to do serve it on a silver platter They've been warning us about a hypersonic weapon for a long time But yeah our CIA has been focused on wokeness spying on Trump and that other stuff Maybe if we didn't do that and we focused on Intel gathering you know that traditional stuff like the meat and potatoes have actually going out and developing sources and shaking the trees Maybe we wouldn't find ourselves in this position right now being quote shocked by a hypersonic missile Jim cu up cut to listen to this professor Say this China test This is no surprise Check this out The Chinese looked at doing something like this in the 1970s Orbital bombardment they have published papers on doing this And honestly the fundamental technology is pretty similar to the space plane they just put up and similar to say the U.S. space shuttle where you use a rocket you put something in orbit And then you bring it down and it kind of glides to its target So the Chinese have had these capabilities for a long time They've said it's something they're interested in They have done research I guess maybe they should have engraved it on a silver platter or something and said it in I think we had plenty of warning We did So why was the intelligence community quote shocked according to one reporter by China's test of this deadly hypersonic weapon that can evade our missile defense is why Listen folks you know my stance on this okay I am not some kind of adventurous overseas I never have been if you listen to my show or you listen to my podcast which may be the only place you can find me sadly sometime in the future this thing don't work out But that's all right I've been telling you for years how I think we have to be very careful and judicious about our use of our greatest asset our military our flesh and blood overseas But having a nuclear powered enemy on the verge of possibly invading Taiwan flying sorties over high one at Taiwan would fighter jets all the time You know developing a weapon that can be tipped with a nuclear powered weapon right And evade our missile defenses You don't have to be some kind of like hawk to be like that It's kind of a big deal to me Now what if I told you the Democrat party had a role in creating this weapon No You can't say that bro you can't say that No I'm not only gonna say it I'm gonna prove it What pushed Russia and China over the technology hump because none of this is new and why am I throwing Russia in the mix Because Russia's already claimed to have tested a hypersonic weapon that could destroy American cities Here's a headline from CBS News by Mary Mary ileus Sheena October 4th 2021 Headline Russia claims first successful tests of zircon hypersonic missile from a submarine So again why our upper level of the military not our soldiers airmen marines sailors God bless your coast guard represented as well You know from the bottom of my heart sincerely appreciate the deep sacrifice you've made And to the families of those who never made it back mean more to me than anything you always will Sadly many of you have been fell by military leadership who's more concerned with general Mark Meadows focus on your wokeness and critical race theory than actually winning wars and preventing the Chinese government from getting a hypersonic military weapon that could kill us Now you know the Tucker Carlson theory right Which he says all the time whatever the left is accusing you of doing they're guilty of doing them themselves They're doing themselves Now why do they do that Why does the left accuse you of doing something when they're doing it themselves Well it's for a very sound tactical reason folks It's not just the Nelson months thing They do it for a reason The left knows the media are a bunch of sycophantic acolyte ass kissing losers and that whatever they say the left the media will then take up and run with Correct They know that We all know you're all nodding your head you already get that So they know that if they're in trouble So let's say the left Democrats were colluding with the Russians In a way that led to the development of a weapon that could destroy portions of the United States The best way to get the media to not pay attention to that story because their butt kissing losers The best way to do that is just to accuse Trump of doing exactly that Colluding with the Russians And they know the media like lap dog They know the media will lick it up and run with the story because they're too dumb to do real homework So for you media people out there interested in doing actual homework I'm about to break a story for you it's been broken on my podcast probably 20 times in the last 5 years But I'll break it again for you if you're interested in doing homework And the headline is this Did Hillary Clinton help the Russians create a hypersonic weapon that could kill us Headline Dan bongino October 18th Monday one 40 p.m. Eastern Time Here's an article BMI newsletter today I strongly encourage you to go look at it If you want to sign up for my newsletter no cost to you We don't spam your inbox It's spongin dot com slash newsletter.

middlebury institute Intel Russia Jeffrey Lewis China United States Taiwan CNBC Mary Mary ileus Sheena CIA general Mark Meadows Dan Chinese government Democrat party CBS News Tucker Carlson Nelson Dan bongino Hillary Clinton
North Korea Expands Uranium Enrichment Plant

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 8 months ago

North Korea Expands Uranium Enrichment Plant

"Photos show North Korea is expanding a uranium enrichment plant recent satellite images show the north is building up a uranium enrichment plant at its main Yongbyon nuclear complex analyst Jeffrey Lewis and two of experts at Middlebury institute of International Studies in Monterey CA in a report the expansion probably indicates that the north plans to increase its production of weapons grade uranium at the site by as much as twenty five percent the assessment comes off to the north recently raised tensions by performing its first missile tests in six months I made it long dormant nuclear disarmament diplomacy with the U. S. I'm Charles the last month

Yongbyon Nuclear Complex Middlebury Institute Of Intern Jeffrey Lewis North Korea Monterey Charles
"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

06:35 min | 10 months ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"The preparation. Have time another thing. That can be exciting. Another colleague of mine former boss. Jeffrey lewis and i worked with airbus to look through missile deployments in russia and we could see that even though they had painted their temporary installations with radar reflecting material because they had large garage doors. That rolled up. We could see sideways into the building. A little bit not seeing everything inside the building but we could see inside a bit for others. It's the smartphone revolution a censor in every pocket that has fueled and interest in open source. Intelligence they really started. I think with the launch of the iphone back in two thousand seventeen thousand eight which then led to the development of loss of apps in particular social meteoroid more people were kind of sharing images fought since comments in real time with the entire world. I'm a higgins. I'm the founder of bellingham and currently the executive director. Bellingham is an organization that is known for online open source investigations. So that's using online publicly available material to investigate a range of topics from the first big story we did which was the downing malaysia airlines flight. Seventeen Up to more recently looking into russian assassinations plus a whole range of topics in between alongside. That you also have the development of social media platforms and social media sharing platforms where it was image. Based panel romeo. for example we geo tagged images gave his reference images. We also have things like street view. Stop hearing from. Google and also satellite imaging made available from various sources so those two elements combined really kind of provided the material needed to do the open source investigations and then into fascinated eleven. I think the arab spring really became the kind of big catholic for the development of the entire movement. And it's really something goes. Congress grown from there and gained more recognition as time has gone on and with that growth handy new tools of emerged. Some of them simple. Some of them incredibly sophisticated. We have like a big tool walks. One is reversed Something that's become increasingly available through things like google image search more so finding facial recognition being pops engines and specific platforms being created for facial recognition searches and. It isn't just pictures. Maybe you have a fitness tracker on your wrist. Well it might be giving away more than you realize. There's been big data leaks from excise apps that related to kind of military security. While we've discovered online you can find pupils. Excise routes that they've done it. It's actually public but some of these end up being around patches of desert in the middle of nowhere in the middle east and it becomes very clear that these admitted treat people running around the edge of the basal something like that you can track very important people from the home to where they work on a regular basis because they keep taking the same jogging route oversee that presents a security risk to them. And if you work with state secret like the location of nuclear missiles that is worth being extra careful with the apps on your smartphone. We've also found recently. We're looking into these flash collapse that you can get teachers out. Various things and one thing people who've been teaching themselves the security details of nuclear basis. They're working at so. Us nuclear bases where the soldiers based using these apps to make notes about stuff where camera positions code was. They should be using in a different levels of security based everything you would need if you wanted to break in the basin get access to those nuclear weapons so people do tend to over share quite a bit without realizing it. Internet sleuths like eliot higgins and melissa. Hannan aren't the people you might expect to find working for traditional intelligence agencies. Like i six or the cia. Elliott started a blogger who enjoyed spotting weapons in youtube videos from syria. Melissa described herself as a regular lady who just got really into exploring the unknown on. Google earth the amateur investigator who recently discovered missile silos in china is an undergraduate. So who are these people. And why do they do. these investigations. Information is power the cliche but it's true and governments had the monopoly on this power but the real takeaway to me is that the world is becoming more transparent and i think companies governments all have to take note that there are citizen scientists who can verify with real time evidence be it from a satellite or from ground photos or even trading on stock markets or other types of data that. Your story needs to check out now. You have to be accountable to public and in modern democracies that's a great thing But it's a bigger hardship for countries. That don't want the truth to come out the open source. Intelligence ecosystem is like a star. Wars parsing amy z. Is a political scientist who studies intelligence at stanford university. It's filled with everybody. You can think of volunteers profiteers. Amateurs experts activists hobbyists truth seekers and dissection peddlers so anybody can play in this space. This makes open source intelligence amazingly democratic. But there are also risks associated with amateurs doing all the investigating one of the things we often see in this world. Is that people think that they can read satellite imagery very easily at turns out understanding. What's an image when it's taken from overhead is really an art form and it requires extensive training so errors are pretty easy to generate in the open source intelligence world and of course no one gets fired if they make a mistake because most people in this world volunteers. That's very different if you're in the us government. There was some famous examples of mistakes like this in recent memory off to the boston. Marathon bombings in two thousand thirteen. The open source community scowled the web to find the perpetrators after the boston. Marathon bombing for example Many people online wanted to help crack the case and figure out who was responsible and they wrongly accused a number of people so it became sort of a vigilante mob online pointing fingers at.

Jeffrey lewis Google airbus bellingham Bellingham higgins eliot higgins romeo russia malaysia Congress Hannan middle east amy z Elliott melissa cia syria Melissa youtube
"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Cross country with family with Jeffrey Lewis. Anywhere is possible. Jiffy Lube technicians are here to change your oil check brakes, batteries, plus so much more and they're committed to keeping you and your vehicle moving forward as you can explore from anywhere, work from anywhere or recharge from anywhere. Check out Jiffy lube com to find a service center near you now, more than ever anywhere as possible with Jiffy Lube. At Children's National Hospital. Everything we do is just for kids. Our top ranked specialists are here for kids of all ages from babies who need help before they're even born to teens and young adults. Our pediatric experts work together to diagnose problems quickly and thoroughly and use treatments designed exclusively for growing Children with convenient locations all across the D. C. Metro area. Find a specialist today at Children's national dot org slash stronger today tastes like a sunny day, like firing up the senses and cooling them down with an ice cold Coke. It tastes like a flaming hot grill and backyard gangs today tastes like a Sunday ritual, and it never tasted this good. Summer tastes better with Coca Cola. If you're loading up for a blowout barbecue this weekend, don't forget to pick up Coca Cola from Safeway today. Do your part to reduce waste and recycle right. Many of us are ordering more items such as food and other goods delivered to our homes. More packages means more waste, consolidate smaller orders into one larger order to reduce waste. When shopping in person. Bring a reusable bag, recycle right by keeping plastic bags, foam containers, rechargeable batteries and garden hoses out of your recycling bin. Learn more at go recycle org brought to you by Montgomery County, the city of Alexandria and Fairfax can Honey. As businesses reopened. Let's work together to.

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Marco Werman. This is the world. Thanks for joining us on this. This Christmas Eve as we've been reporting this week. North Korea has sent a warning that it might be preparing an unwelcome Christmas gift for the United States. Today President Donald Trump was asked just about that he was at his mar-a-lago resort in Palm Beach Florida and he appeared to brush away the concern. That's okay we'll find out but the surprises and we'll deal with it versus excessively. Let's see what happens. Everybody's got surprises. But let's see what happens. I handle them as they come along. So how did we get to this point with North North Korea. Here's the world's Chris Wolf. You could say that. Donald trump inherited a pre existing condition from Barack Obama. George Chair tag twin. Either way you'll get yours in two thousand sixteen North Korean television announced on a hydrogen bomb test the H. Bomb of course can destroy entire cities. He's North Korea was also perfecting missiles to reach the United States. Jeffrey Lewis a professor at the Middlebury Institute of International Affairs in Monterey says this would have presented a huge challenge for any incoming administration an adversary of the United States had not acquired the ability to hit the US with nuclear weapon. Since China did more than thirty years years ago Obama ramped up sanctions against North Korea but Donald Trump put them into overdrive sung. Yoon Lee teaches Korean. Affairs at the Fletcher School at Tufts University. You throughout two thousand seventeen. The trump administration did the right thing in that for the first time in history. The United States tried to galvanize the international community to put maximum financial pressure on North Korea. Trump's maximum pressure policy also included threats of more severe consequences North Korea Korea best not make any more threats to the United States. They will be met with fire and fury life. The world has never seen but North Korea responded in kind that were more missile tests and more gushing on North Korean television into doing Nicole Nago movie on TV and John Twenty Seventeen.

North Korea President Donald Trump United States Barack Obama trump Marco Werman Middlebury Institute of Intern Jeffrey Lewis Chris Wolf Yoon Lee Nicole Nago Fletcher School Palm Beach Florida John Twenty China Monterey professor
"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on Table Reads

Table Reads

15:06 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on Table Reads

"A script is written that is so bad no one will fill eh these brave podcasters will bring it to life just so they can mock it. This is table reads so the movies report which means your script Ain't worth the bubble sheet on a nickel with SEAN MC B and Joshua Baker and Jeff Lewis Lewis Jeffrey Lewis our favorite maximus and permanent gets.

Jeff Lewis Lewis Jeffrey Lewis SEAN MC B Joshua Baker
"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:40 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Satellite images show vehicles and railroad cars near officially in North Korea. Jeffrey Lewis of the East Asia nonproliferation project says so when you put that all together, that's really what it looks like when the north three and the process of building. NPR's? Jeff Brumfield has the story. This hour also a novel grown from the lives of real children lost crossing the border and in the cross currents of history is Italy about drawn out of olive oil and. Andy griffith. A new look at a classic film. Many people say is must see today. I our newscast Saturday March nine two thousand nine hundred ninety. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Louise Schiavone analysts say activity at two sites in North Korea suggests Pyongyang they be preparing to launch a satellite into space NPR's. Jeff Brumfield reports. US officials say that could violate the North's voluntary halt on missile testing, the activity was seen in commercial satellite. Images of North Korea taken between late February and early March vehicles railcars for seen at one site where North Korea assembles its missiles and space rockets and workers were seen rapidly reconstructing buildings at another site the north it's Houston the past to launch rockets carrying satellites Jeffrey Lewis of the Middlebury institute says the evidence points to a possible space launch. I think when we put it all together. It's a pretty good guess North Korea's leader Kim Jong UN has pledged to stop missile testing during the Goshi with President Trump speaking on Thursday, a senior State Department official said that launching a rocket into space would be quote inconsistent with that pledge Jeff Brumfield NPR news Washington negotiations over Brexit continued this weekend with Britain's departure from the European Union due to take effect in less than three weeks with no agreement in place from Brussels Teri Schultz has more British Prime Minister Theresa may continues pressing her EU counterparts by phone to make changes to the deal. They all approved in November. But the British parliament won't lawmakers reject the arrangement called the Irish backstop that would extend current EU regulations, preventing new customs checks, for example on the border between EU member Ireland and the UK Northern Ireland in case. No new trade agreement is reached between the EU and the UK you chief negotiator. Michel Barnier Friday suggested the backstop could apply only to Northern Ireland. And and not Britain. But that idea is unpopular in the UK to if British lawmakers rejected deal again, Tuesday, they have to decide whether to quit the EU with no deal, March twenty ninth or ask for a delay. For NPR news. I'm Teri Schultz in Brussels a change in travel requirements for Americans visiting Europe. The European Union says that starting in two years Americans will need a visa to visit the zone of twenty-six nations within the EU currently US citizens may travel to Europe for ninety days without a visa the attorney representing empire. Actor jussie smollet maintains the charges against his client from Cook County. Grand jury are not true Mark era. Go spoke to NBC's access about accusations that small let had fabricated and falsely reported hate crime. Every single thing recently put out there has been demonstrably false. And then guess what happens? They walk it back. So take a look at what the reporting was. I understand it makes a good lurid story. But I would just council you to wait. The grand jury. Issued a sixteen count indictment clocks move forward by one hour for daylight saving time starting at two AM Sunday. There's no change in some isolated cases. Like Hawaiian parts of Arizona. This is NPR from news. I'm Tiffany Cam high. If you're planning on taking Bart this morning, you may want to consider another way to commute as there's really no service for all of BART's trains, according to its transit officials. A computer problem reported just before six AM deadlocked. The system. The problem occurred while crews were working on bars power supply trying to fix an issue with its train control routing and traction power systems. Embark spokeswoman says both of those systems are necessary to operate trains safely. There's currently no estimate as to win. Bart service will be up and running again in a tweet. Bart says bus agencies that serve it stations will pick up writers at no charge and district court judge in California who ordered that. More than twenty seven hundred children be reunited with their parents has expanded his authority to potentially thousands more children who were also separated at the border by the Trump administration. Judge Dana bra ruled late yesterday that his authority applies to any parents who are separated at the border on or after July first twenty seventeen previously. His order applied only to parents whose children were in custody on June. Twenty eighteen Subroto said his decision responds to report by an internal watchdog from the US, health and human services department. The report said thousands more children may have been separated since the summer of twenty seventeen cake. Julie small explains there may be thousands of kids who were separated from parents that we didn't know about before. And the judge says now that we do the government has an obligation to identify them first. And then we can figure out what to do for them. And the government has pushed back hard saying it's going to be very costly and time consuming, but ACLU attorney leak. Learnt who represents the family says, you know, it's a burden to the government has to bear. That was Julie small. The judge says he'll consider next steps..

North Korea NPR Jeff Brumfield European Union US Jeffrey Lewis Teri Schultz Bart UK Britain Brussels Washington government Andy griffith East Asia attorney Julie small Michel Barnier
"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:24 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"December it made the point that to just withdraw all of our forces before the campaign was even complete was particularly reckless. In rash decision later, a story of false confessions and DNA exonerations in Nebraska five of the six eventually during interrogations were convinced that they were there regal victory. Thirty years later for the wrongly accused and our podcast and visibility is back with a story about a changing approach to treating pain. Now news. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jim hawk a federal judge has ruled that thousands of additional migrant families that were separated at the border can be part of a class action lawsuit. As NPR's Joel rose reports. The Trump administration may be forced to reunite them district. Judge Dana Subroto in California has already ordered the Trump administration to reunite more than twenty eight hundred migrant children who are separated from their parents under the zero tolerance policy last year. But a government watchdog report revealed that the administration may have separated thousands of additional families under an earlier pilot program that was not disclosed the American Civil Liberties union, which brought the case argued that those families should be part of the class action to and judged the bra. Agreed. He said a hearing for later this month to decide whether the government will have to identify and reunite the additional families as well. Joel rose NPR news commercial satellite. Imagery shared with NPR. Now shows activity. And a second North Korean missile site. As NPR's Jeff Brumfield reports it could indicate an upcoming launch the images were taken February twenty-second by the company digital globe. They are of a facility called salmon Dong. It's a factory where North Korea assembles, both long-range missiles and satellite space launch vehicles. Jeffrey Lewis with the Middlebury institute says the images showed trucks and vehicles at the facility and also activity at a nearby rail yard, so when you put that all together, that's really what it looks like when the North Koreans are in the process of building. A rocket separate images. Have also shown North Korea working on a satellite launch facility in recent days taken together Lewis believes the north could be planning to launch a satellite into space. Jeff Brumfield NPR news, Washington. Power outages continue across Venezuela. The blackout reach virtually every part of the oil rich country of thirty one million which was once Latin America's wealthiest, but is now beset by shortages, and hyper and. Flation US special Representative for Venezuela. Elliot Abrams says the US had nothing to do with it the nationwide power outage throughout Venezuela is a reminder that the country's once quite sophisticated infrastructure has been plundered and allowed to decay under Medeiros miss rule Abrahams. Also said the situation in Venezuela is the result of what he called years of corruption and incompetence British lawmakers are due to vote for a second time Tuesday on Prime Minister Theresa May's brings a deal, which they overwhelmingly rejected in January. If parliament throws out the deal, again, lawmakers will vote on whether to leave the EU without an agreement an idea likely to be rejected or to ask the EU to delay brings it beyond the scheduled March twenty nine departure date may acknowledge that even if her deal passes next week time, we'll be very tight. This is NPR news. The US food and Drug administration is clearing the way for a company to sell its genetically modified fast-growing kind of salmon in the US as NPR's, Dan Charles reports additional obstacles remain including convincing stores to sell the fish, the US based company. Aqua bounty is raising the fish in tanks on land in Panama and Canada. The salmon have an extra growth hormone, gene. So they grow faster the FDA decided back in two thousand sixteen that aqua bounties. Fish are safety eat, but congress banned imports of them demanding that the government come up with a way to label them GMO labeling rules were finalized last year. And the FDA has now lifted that ban on imports the fish could go on sale as early as next here. Critics of GMO food though continue to oppose the fast growing, salmon and many supermarkets have pledged not to sell them. Dan. Charles NPR news, former army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning who served years in prison for leaking one of. Largest troves of classified documents in US history was sent to jail Friday for refusing to testify before a grand jury investigating WikiLeaks. Manning objects to the secrecy of the grand jury process and claim she already revealed everything she knows that her court martial. It's still feels like winter across much of the country. But it's already time to spring forward at two AM local time Sunday. Most of the US will move an hour ahead marking the shift from standard to daylight saving time. The exceptions are most of Zona Hawaii and u s territories such as Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. I'm Jim hawk NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include X chair maker of the X to office chair with dynamic variable. Lumbar support and ten features to fit users of different shapes and sizes at X chair radio dot com.

NPR US Venezuela North Korea Jeff Brumfield Joel rose Jim hawk Charles NPR Jeffrey Lewis Dan Charles Washington salmon Dong American Civil Liberties union FDA Nebraska Judge Dana Subroto
"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"ES of grape production, which is what k- as you is all about. So this is a great opportunity. It's all happening Friday night, double it up. And if you become a sustaining member than that, of course is the best kind of membership that you can give and not only that every time. The pledge drive comes up from this day forth. You don't need to squirm around and feel guilty or any of that quite the opposite. You can feel proud to be a member of this community. And all of these words were simply reinforce your great decision to be a big part of this great community. So I love to encourage you to go to five eight to KFC you. There's a really wonderful group of people standing by. They are all as it turns out sustaining donors themselves. And so there it is five eight two K as e you chat with them. Or simply go online, Casey, you dot org slash donate. From NPR news in Washington. I'm Janine Herbst commercial satellite imagery show. Shared exclusively with NPR chose activity at a second North Korean site. NPR's? Jeff Brumfield reports equipped indicate an upcoming launch the images were taken February twenty-second by the company digital Klobe. They are of a facility called salmon Dong. It's a factory where North Korea assembles, both long-range missiles and satellite space launch vehicles. Jeffrey Lewis with the Middlebury institute says the images showed trucks and vehicles at the facility and also activity at a nearby rail yard, so when you put that all together, that's really what it looks like when the North Koreans are in the process of building. A rocket separate images. Have also shown North Korea working on a satellite launch facility in recent days taken together Lewis believes the north could be planning to launch a satellite into space. Jeff Brumfield NPR news Washington in Alabama today. President Trump toward the fallout from the weekend's deadly e f four tornado that left at least twenty three people dead in Lee county. And met with one family who lost ten people in the storm. We just met some of the survivors and family members..

Jeff Brumfield NPR North Korea Jeffrey Lewis Janine Herbst salmon Dong Middlebury institute Washington Lee county Casey President Trump Alabama Klobe five eight two K twenty-second
"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:53 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Mary Louise Kelley new satellite images taken just two days after the Trump Kim summit indicate North Korea has begun rebuilding a long range rocket site. The site is in Tung Chung on the country's west coast North Korea started disassembling it last year, but it did not finish the job and the new imagery shows cranes a roof under construction and other signs of activity. Now, it is not exactly clear when the rebuilding started was it before the Hanoi summit or more recently, which prompted us to wonder how closely use the US able to monitor nuclear and missile sites in North Korea. Jeffrey Lewis is director of the East Asia non-proliferation program at the Middlebury institute of international studies, and he's with us now. Hi there. It's a pleasure. So a point to note, which is these new images, come from commercial, satellite technology. My first question is who. Who owns these commercial satellites who decides what they're photographing these satellites are owned by private companies, and so the private companies decide, although they have clients, and in some cases, those clients our governments the United States government buys a lot of commercial satellite images. But in other cases, the clients are places like my employer academic institutions that studied the spread of nuclear weapons. So help us understand the questions about timing. So this is a function of the two different types of images. We have that really beautiful high resolution image that picture was taken after the summit and that clearly showed that the facility was being reconstructed. What a lot of us have now done is go back and use the lower resolution images, and what we can see is that in mid February things started to change at the site. But we didn't really know what the nature of that activity was until we got much better pictures is satellite intelligence more important when monitor. North korea. Then it might be with some of the other countries where the US is trying to keep track of capabilities. Russia comes to mind or Pakistan. But in those countries, there are more readily available other sources of intelligence human intelligence, old-fashioned spies on the ground. I think that's exactly right. A country like North Korea is essentially closed if you want to know whether a facility is operating the only way you're going to be able to answer that is by looking at it from space, the limitation being of course, that you can't see what is happening underground. So it takes you only so far if you're trying to look at their nuclear capabilities, for example. So that's true. Although we're hoping it's going to get less true. The commercial sector is moving away from just taking optical images, and is starting to deploy different kinds of sensors. So we have our partnership with Airbus where we get radar images. Which in some cases, actually allows us to see through rules. And then there are companies that take thermal pictures, so we can see if a building warm a variety of new technologies coming online talk to me about the cat and mouse scam North Korea knows. That the US is watching from space. So when they will cranes to a safe that they had said, they were dismantling they know it's going to be seen and remarked to fund this is North Korea signaling, I think that's right. I mean, there is no chance that the United States was going to miss this development. And the way that the North Koreans had taken it apart. They didn't box things up and put them away. They laid them out. Right. So that they could clearly be seen from space. And I think the message they're trying to send is pretty obvious. And what is it? So in his New Year's speech, Kim Jong UN said that if sanctions were not removed from North Korea that they would have to find a new way to secure the country's well-being. And so perhaps the next thing North Korea will do if negotiations really have faltered as they seem to have is it might start putting satellites into space using rockets that's not a violation of his pledge to end missile testing. But I do think it'll be fairly provocative and upsetting to a lot of people in Washington. Jeffrey Lewis, he tracks North Korea and all those satellite images of it from his post at Middlebury institute of international studies at Monterey, California. Jeffrey Lewis, thank you. It was a pleasure. A freshman democrat on Capitol Hill is being accused once again of antisemitism and Democrats are divided over what to do about it. The Representative is Ilan Omar of Minnesota in response to her latest remarks democratic leaders had planned to vote today on a resolution condemning antisemitism, they postponed it after meeting resistance from lawmakers who came to Omar's defence NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Has this report congresswoman Ilhan Omar remained silent during a House Democratic meeting today, but she is the cause of much debate. It's about this comments. She made an event in Washington DC coffee shop last week..

North Korea Jeffrey Lewis United States NPR Audie Cornish Washington Tung Chung Ilhan Omar Hanoi Mary Louise Kelley Airbus Susan Davis Middlebury institute of intern East Asia Kim Jong UN Russia Pakistan
"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:12 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro, and Mary Louise Kelley if all goes to plan one week from today. President Trump will be in Hanoi Vietnam, preparing to sit down for a second summit with North Korean leader, Kim Jong UN so far. This one is coming together with decidedly less drama than the first time. These two met you may recall just days before last year summit and Singapore Trump called off. And then suddenly it was back on this time. Trump's tone is less heated and on the substance and the central US demand that North Korea give up nuclear weapons, the president has been tempering expectations is no testing, I'm a no Russia. This testing that's another appeal, but there has been no testing. So where does that leave expectations for this summit in our studio to discuss is Frank m he was senior adviser for North Korea at the defense department during the Obama. Administration. Welcome good to be here. So start with what we just heard from the president. I just a quick fact check. He's right. There has been no testing since the Singapore. Summit correct. Yes. That's correct. Okay. And when you hear him say, he's he's in no rush. Should we read into that? While I'm speculating here. But I think he is trying to create the impression that he is not desperate for denuclearization that he can walk away from a deal. If it's not good for the US. I don't think that was the best way to phrase it because it sends the wrong message that the US government is okay with a nuclear North Korea as long as it doesn't conduct provocations. I was gonna ask me isn't he desperate for North Korea to denuclearize mean? That has been the US position for many years now when negotiating with North Korea was the complete verifiable irreversible denuclearization. Well, I think President Trump certainly is looking for a foreign policy victory. And it's interesting that you've seen a radical shift in his policy. Towards North Korea over the last six months, I think that's probably actually a helpful indication of what's to come at Hanoi explained that what's the radical shift you so previous administrations and the Trump administration at least earlier on had always said that they demanded denuclearization from North Korea. First before they would be willing to discuss peace and normalization, but in the remarks from Stephen begin who's a special represent for North Korea may remarks at Stafford a few weeks ago, and he said that the US is committed to pursuing denuclearization. But also peace talks in parallel, and that would be a market shift from the policy that we pursue in the past. So if I'm hearing you right? It sounds as though in your view, the US is walking into the summit with a radically different starting point than it did last year on it before the Singapore summit, President Trump described it by saying that it would be a get to know you meeting, plus so, and that's a very superficial just establishing the relationship with Kim Jong UN, it's I actually had very low expectations. Out of Singapore. We're now eight months later, I think a ally the ideas have had a chance to marinate a little bit more. You're hearing more reports about potential concessions from both sides that gives us a little more optimism going into Hanoi with his backdrop, what does the US want from this summit in Vietnam next week what would count as a US win tangible outcome. So we need to see something that demonstrates that. North Korea is denuclearizing one. I think right off the bat is to reaffirm their dismantlement of their nuclear test site at from Gary and missile test site at Tung Chung ni also the permanent dismantlement of their main nuclear facility that would be a big step to go. Even further a commitment to freeze or cap their production of fissile material on ballistic missiles that would be a significant win for us as well. What is North Korea one right now their main interest is to get some sanctions relief. I don't think we need to give up all of the sanctions immediately or dismounted. But I think it'd be helpful to get some initial steps. Also, they would very much. Appreciate a declaration confirming that the crane war is officially over. That would be something that can could take to his domestic public to convince them that there's a new environment on the peninsula. So bottom line, you said you were skeptical about the Singapore summit where are you a week or so out from Vietnam? Well, I think it's a false choice to be too optimistic about progress, especially in the context of North Korea. But I don't think we need to swing for the fences here, I think a single is good enough as long as we keep the the rally going for diplomatic momentum. I think that'd be a success Frank former senior Pentagon adviser, he's now with the us institute of peace. Thank you. Thank you. When President Trump and North Korean leader, Kim Jong undiscussed. Gusty nuclearization in Hanoi. They are likely to focus on one North Korean nuclear facility in particular NPR's. Jeff Brumfield introduces us to it. It's called the young young nuclear research center. This is really the oldest best known nuclear facility in all of North Korea. Jeffrey Lewis is a scholar at the Middlebury institute of international studies at Monterey, you know. It's basically a small city. There's quite a lot of housing for scientists and workers there are many facilities, including a nuclear reactor that can produce plutonium a giant facility designed to extract impure FAI that plutonium and a separate modern facility filled with centrifuges for enriching uranium plutonium and uranium are both used in nuclear bombs sig Hecker is a former nuclear weapons scientists now Stanford University, he's one of the few westerners who's visited young. And he says it's pretty Spartan. Yeah. Most important party was. Called. This was January in young and particularly what was striking. It was colder inside the buildings than outside the buildings on other trips. Hecker saw scientists growing their own vegetables and using primitive safety equipment while working in potentially dangerous areas, but he is convinced they young beyond is effective it producing material for nuclear weapons, these facilities may be old, but they're functional and the people were professional and very competent. If the north does give up young van as it suggested, it might in statements. They would significantly curtail their abilities to continue the nuclear weapons program. Of course, it doesn't mean that they're giving up their bums because I'm quite certain the bombs are not in young beyond Hecker estimates North Korea's current nuclear arsenal. Several dozen weapons that are stored somewhere else North Korea. It is also believed to have covert facilities where it can make your radium for nuclear weapons on top of all that. It's not clear what giving up young beyond would mean. Last year North Korea closed its underground nuclear test site by dynamiting, the entrances in front of foreign journalists. But foreign inspectors were never allowed to examine the site. I John pack with the Brookings Institution. Says that North Korea is paranoid about foreigners. North Korea does not want people running around their country looking at their nuclear facilities or their missile facilities, but young Dan is a big technically complex site. It can't just be blown up pack believes that any deal should include inspections. It will be a big change at a good signpost of North Korean sincerity on denuclearization. If they did allow inspectors into their facilities. Those inspectors would probably be lead in in exchange for some kind of sanctions relief, and perhaps a peace declaration between North Korea and the US which have remained formerly at war since an armistice in nineteen Fifty-three for now. Jeffrey Lewis says the satellite photos indicate the reactors running making more Pluto. Oh, neom for nuclear bombs. You know, it's really business as usual at Yongbyon at the moment people will show up for work and material comes in. It looks pretty much like it's looked for the last ten or fifteen years. It remains to be seen whether a second summit can change that Jeff Brumfield NPR news, Washington, Southwest Airlines canceled more flights today than usual and not just because of the harsh winter weather sweeping across much of the country, the airline has double the number of planes out of service because of unspecified mechanical issues as NPR's David Schaper reports southwest management is pointing the finger at the airlines mechanics union amid a long-running labor dispute Southwest Airlines cancelled at least four hundred forty flights today that's more than eleven percent scheduled nationwide. At one of the reasons is that the airline has about forty planes out of service due to mechanical problems. That's double the normal number at any given time experts say, it's unusual. Most of the time. You can predict the types of work that you're going to be have to be accomplished on an aircraft. That's why airlines use maintenance programs rather than spot Maitland or things like that. That's Bill Waldoch professor of aviation safety science at Embry riddle aeronautical university Waldoch notes that planes that aren't flying. Passengers are not making money so with so many planes grounded Southwest's chief operations officer declared an operational emergency. Basically, it's all hands on deck. Yeah. They want everybody. Available to try to get the airplanes maintenance as fast as they can. That means cancelling time off mandatory overtime for mechanics. And in a statement last night southwest COO called out the mechanics union pledging to launch an investigation into why so many planes are being pulled out of service all at once. His statement added that the aircraft mechanics fraternal association with represents Southwest's twenty four hundred mechanics has a history of work disruptions communication. I didn't feel very southwest. Like, you always think of southwest is fun. And and not a serious, right? Snyder writes about the airline industry on his cranky flier blog from their perspective. This is something they think is necessary to make sure that the fleet is sticks and flying, but it certainly would be taken by the union as a shot across the bow. It's going to ratchet up tension. I would think the airline in the mechanics union have been contract negotiations for six years with no new agreement did site as for tension today. The union fired back at management accusing it of scapegoating maintenance technicians, it characterizes the airlines linking of the operational emergency to contract talks as simply an attempt to divert attention away from the airline safety issues. So should southwest. Passengers be concerned breath. Snyder says no that's just labor to go. Patients. This is this is almost a standard pattern. You know, one side will claim safety issues and the other side will push back. And I it's it's part of the tug of war experts say neither side, whatever do anything unsafe with one saying he'd have no problem. Getting on a southwest.

North Korea President Trump US Singapore Hanoi Kim Jong UN Southwest Singapore Trump president Vietnam sig Hecker NPR Jeffrey Lewis Frank m Jeff Brumfield Ari Shapiro us institute of peace
"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:31 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And tech support pros up work. Hire freelancers make things happen. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro, and Mary Louise Kelley if all goes to plan one week from today. President Trump will be in Hanoi Vietnam, preparing to sit down for a second summit with North Korean leader, Kim Jong UN so far. This one is coming together with decidedly less drama than the first time needs to met. You may recall just days before last year summit and Singapore Trump called it off. And then suddenly it was back on this time. Trump's tone is less heated and on the substance and the central US demand that North Korea give up nuclear weapons, the president has been tempering expectations as long as there's no testing. I'm a no Russia this testing that's another deal, but there has been no testing. So where does that leave expectations for this summit in our studio to discuss is Frank m he was senior adviser for North Korea at the defense department during the Obama administration. Welcome good to be here. So start with what we just heard from the president. I just a quick fact check. He's right. There's been no testing since the Singapore summit, correct? Yes. That's correct. Okay. And when you hear him say, he's he's in no rush. Should we read into that? While I'm speculating here. But I think he is trying to create the impression that he is not desperate for denuclearization that he can walk away from a deal. If it's not good for the US. I don't think that was the best way to phrase it because it sends the wrong message that the US government is okay with a nuclear North Korea as long as it doesn't conduct provocations. I was gonna ask isn't he desperate for North Korea to denuclearize man? That has been the US position for many years now when negotiating with North Korea was the complete verifiable irreversible denuclearization. Well, I think President Trump certainly is looking for a foreign policy victory. And it's interesting that you've seen a radical shift in his policy toward. North Korea over the last six months, I think that's probably actually a helpful indication of what's to come at Hanoi. Explain that what's the radical shift you previous administrations and the Trump administration at least earlier on had always said that they demanded denuclearization from North Korea. First before they would be willing to discuss peace and normalization, but in the remarks from Stephen vegan who's a special represent for North Korea. Humane remarks at Stanford a few weeks ago, and he said that the US is committed to pursuing denuclearization. But also peace talks in parallel, and that would be a market shift from the policy that we pursue in the past. So if I'm hearing you right? It sounds as though in your view, the US is walking into the summit with a radically different starting point than it did last year before the Singapore summit, President Trump described it by saying that it would be a get to know your meeting, plus so, and that's not a very superficial just establishing the relationship with Kim Jong. I'd very actually at very low expectations out of Singapore. We're now eight months later. I think a lot of the ideas have had a chance to marinate a little bit more. You're hearing more reports about potential concessions from both sides that gives us a little more optimism going into Hanoi with his backdrop, what does the US want from this summit in Vietnam next week what would count as a US win tangible outcome. So we need to see something that demonstrates that. North Korea is denuclearizing one. I think right off the bat is to reaffirm their dismantlement of their nuclear test site up from Gary and missile test site at tongue. Johnny also, the permanent dismantlement of their main nuclear facility that would be a big step to go. Even further a commitment to freeze or cap their production of fissile material on ballistic missiles now it'd be a significant win for us as well. What is North Korea one right now their main interest is to get some sanctions relief. I don't think we need to give up all of the sanctions immediately dismounted. But I think it would be helpful to get some initial steps. Also, they were very much. Appreciate a declaration confirming that the crane war is officially over. That would be something that can during a could take to his domestic public to convince them that there's a new environment on the peninsula. So bottom line, you said you were skeptical about the Singapore summit where are you a week or so out from Vietnam? Well, I think it's a fool's choice to be to optimism about progress, especially in the context of North Korea. But I don't think we need to swing for the fences here, I think a single is good enough as long as we keep the the rally going for diplomatic momentum. I think that'd be a success Frank former senior Pentagon adviser, he's now with the us institute of peace. Thank you. Thank you. When President Trump and North Korean leader, Kim Jong undiscussed. Denuclearization in Hanoi. They are likely to focus on one North Korean nuclear facility in particular NPR's. Jeff Brumfield introduces us to it. It's called the young young nuclear research center. This is really the oldest best known nuclear facility in all of North Korea. Jeffrey Lewis is a scholar at the Middlebury institute of international studies at Monterey, it's basically a small city. There's quite a lot of housing for scientists and workers there are many facilities, including a nuclear reactor that can produce plutonium a giant facility designed to extract purified that plutonium and a separate modern facility filled with centrifuges for enriching uranium plutonium and uranium are both used in nuclear bombs sig Hecker is a former nuclear weapons scientists now at Stanford University. He's one of the few westerners who's visited young gun. And he says it's pretty Spartan. Yeah. Most important party was. Called. This was January in young beyond particularly what was striking. It was colder inside the buildings than outside the buildings on other trips. Hecker saw scientists growing their own vegetables and using primitive safety equipment while working in potentially dangerous areas, but he is convinced they young down is effective at producing material for nuclear weapons, these facilities may be old, but they're functional and the people were professional and very competent. If the north does give up young van as it suggested, it might in statements. They would significantly curtail their abilities to continue the nuclear weapons program. Of course, it doesn't mean that giving up their bums because I'm quite certain the bombs are not in young beyond Hecker estimates North Korea's current nuclear arsenal. Several dozen weapons that are stored somewhere else North Korea. It is also believed to have covert facilities where it can make uranium for nuclear weapons on top of all that. It's not clear what giving up young beyond would mean. Last year North Korea closed its underground nuclear test site by dynamiting, the entrances in front of foreign journalists. But foreign inspectors were never allowed to examine the site. I John pack with the Brookings Institution. Says that North Korea is paranoid about foreigners. North korea. Does not want people running around their country looking at their nuclear facilities or their missile facilities, but young is a big technically complex site. It can't just be blown up. Pat believes that any deal should include inspections. It will be a big change at a good signpost of North Korean sincerity on denuclearization. If they did allow inspectors into their facilities. Those inspectors would probably be let in in exchange for some kind of sanctions relief, and perhaps a peace declaration between North Korea and the US which have remained formally at war since an armistice in nineteen fifty three for now. Jeffrey Lewis says the satellite photos indicate the reactors running making more Pluto. Oh, neom for nuclear bombs. You know, it's really business as usual at Yongbyon at the moment, people will show up for work and material comes in and looks pretty much like it's looked for the last ten or fifteen years. It remains to be seen whether a second summit can change that Jeff Brumfield NPR news, Washington, Southwest Airlines canceled more flights today than usual and not just because of the harsh winter weather sweeping across much of the country, the airline has double the number of planes out of service because of unspecified mechanical issues as NPR's David Schaper reports south west management is pointing the finger at the airlines mechanics union amid a long-running labor dispute Southwest Airlines cancelled at least four hundred and forty flights today that's more than eleven percent of its scheduled nationwide. At one of the reasons is that the airline has about forty planes out of service due to mechanical problems. That's double the normal number at any given time experts say, it's unusual. Most of the time. You can predict the types of work that are going to be have to be accomplished on an aircraft. That's why airlines use maintenance programs rather than spot Maitland and things like that. That's Bill Waldoch professor of aviation safety science at Embry riddle aeronautical university Waldoch notes that planes that are flying. Passengers are not making money so with so many planes grounded Southwest's chief operations officer declared an operational emergency. Basically, it's all hands on deck. Yeah. They want everybody. Available to try to get the airplanes maintenance as fast as they can. That means cancelling time off mandatory overtime for mechanics. And in a statement last night southwest C O called out the mechanics union pledging to launch an investigation into why so many planes are being pulled out of service all at once. His statement added that the aircraft mechanics fraternal association, which represents Southwest's twenty four hundred mechanics has a history of work disruptions communication. I didn't feel very southwest. Like, you always think of southwest is fun. And and not a serious threat. Snyder writes about the airline industry on his cranky flier blog from their perspective. This is something they think is necessary to make sure that the fleet is fixed and flying, but it certainly would be taken by the union as a shot across the bow. It's going to ratchet up tension. I would think the airline in the mechanics union have been in contract negotiations for six years with no new agreement did site as for tension today. The union fired back at management accusing it of scapegoating maintenance technicians, it characterizes the airlines linking of the operational emergency to contract talks as simply an attempt to divert attention away from the airline safety issues. So should southwest. Passengers be concerned breath. Snyder says no that's just labor negotiations. This is this is almost a standard pattern. You know, one side will claim safety issues and the other side will push back. And I it's it's part of the tug of war. Experts say neither side would ever do anything unsafe with one saying he'd have no problem getting.

North Korea US President Trump Hanoi Singapore Trump president Singapore Southwest Kim Jong Vietnam sig Hecker NPR Jeffrey Lewis Kim Jong UN Stanford University Frank m
"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:10 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Ari Shapiro, and Mary Louise Kelley if all goes to plan one week from today. President Trump will be in Hanoi Vietnam, preparing to sit down for a sec. Second summit with North Korean leader, Kim Jong UN so far. This one is coming together with decidedly less drama than the first time. These two met you may recall just days before last year summit in Singapore. Trump called it off. And then suddenly it was back on this time. Trump's tone is less heated and on the substance and the central US demand that North Korea give up nuclear weapons, the president has been tempering expectations. There's there's no testing I'm a no Russia this testing that's another deal, but there has been no testing. So where does that leave expectations for this summit in our studio to discuss is Frank m he was senior adviser for North Korea at the defense department during the Obama administration. Welcome good to be here. So start with what we just heard from the president. I just a quick fact check. He's right. There's been no testing since the Singapore summit, correct? Yes. That's correct. Okay. And when you hear him say, he's he's in no rush. Should we read into that? While I'm speculating here. But I think he is trying to create the impression that he is not desperate for denuclearization that he can walk away from a deal. If it's not good for the US. I don't think that was the best way to phrase it. Because it sends the wrong message that the US government is okay with a nuclear North Korea as long as it doesn't conduct provocations. I was gonna ask me isn't he desperate for North Korea to denuclearize man. That has been the US position for many years now when Nick O'Shea with North Korea was the complete verifiable irreversible denuclearization. Well, I think President Trump certainly is looking for a foreign policy victory. And it's interesting that you've seen a radical shift in his policy towards North Korea over the last six months, I think that's probably actually a helpful indication of what's to come at Hanoi explained that what's the radical shift you so previous administrations and the Trump administration at least earlier on at always said that they demanded denuclearization from North Korea. I. Before they would be willing to discuss peace and normalization, but in the remarks from Stephen Megan who's a special represent for North Korea may remarks at Stafford a few weeks ago, and he said that the US is committed to pursuing denuclearization. But also peace talks in parallel, and that would be a market shit from the policy that we pursue in the past. So if I'm hearing you right? It sounds as though in your view, the US is walking into this summit with a radically different starting point than it did last year before the Singapore summit, President Trump described it by saying that it would be a get to know your meeting, plus so, and that's a very superficial just establishing the relationship with Kim Jong side, very actually had very low expectations out of Singapore. We're now eight months later, I think a lot of the ideas have had a chance to marinate a little bit more. You're hearing more reports about potential concessions from both sides that gives us a little more optimism going into Hanoi with backdrop what does. The US want from this summit in Vietnam next week what would count as a US win tangible outcome. So we need to see something that demonstrates that. North Korea is denuclearizing one. I think right off the bat is to reaffirm their dismantlement of their nuclear test site at Plum, Gary and missile test site a tongue Chung also the permanent dismantlement of their main nuclear facility that would be a big step to go. Even further a commitment to freeze or cap their production of fissile material on ballistic missiles that would be significant win for us as well. What is North Korea one right now their main interest is to get some sanctions relief. I don't think we need to give up all of the sanctions immediately or dismounted. But I think it'd be helpful to get some initial steps. Also, they would very much. Appreciate a declaration confirming that the crane war is officially over. That would be something that conjoined could take to his domestic public to convince them that there's a new environment on the peninsula. So bottom. Line. You said you were skeptical about the Singapore summit where are you a week or so out from Vietnam? I think it's a fool's choice to be too optimistic about progress, especially in the context of North Korea. But I don't think we need to swing for the fences here. I think a single is good enough as long as we keep the the rally going for diplomatic lamentable. I think that'd be a success. Frank, former senior Pentagon adviser. He's now with the us institute of peace. Thank you. Thank you. When President Trump and North Korean leader, Kim Jong undiscussed denuclearization in Hanoi. They are likely to focus on one North Korean nuclear facility in particular NPR's. Jeff Brumfield introduces us to it. It's called the young young nuclear research center. This is really the oldest best known nuclear facility in all of North Korea. Jeffrey Lewis, a scholar at the Middlebury institute of international studies at Monterey, you know. It's basically a small city. There's quite a lot of housing four scientists and workers there are many facilities, including a nuclear reactor that can produce plutonium a giant facility designed to extract impure fi that plutonium and a separate modern facility filled with centrifuges for enriching uranium plutonium and uranium are both used in nuclear bombs sig Hecker is a former nuclear weapons scientists now Stanford University, he's one of the few westerners who's visited young. And he says, it's. It's pretty Spartan. Yeah. Most important party was cold. This was January in young beyond and particularly what was striking. It was colder inside the buildings than outside the buildings on other trips. Hecker saw scientists growing their own vegetables and using primitive safety equipment while working in potentially dangerous areas, but he is convinced they young effective at producing material for nuclear weapons, these facilities may be old, but they're functional and the people were professional and very competent. If the north does give up young as it suggested, it might in statements. They would significantly curtail their abilities to continue the nuclear weapons program. Of course, it doesn't mean that the giving up their bums because I'm quite certain the bombs a not in young beyond Hecker estimates North Korea's current nuclear arsenal. Several dozen. Weapons that are stored somewhere else. North Korea is also believed to have covert facilities where it can make your radium for nuclear weapons on top of all that. It's not clear what giving up young beyond would mean. Last year North Korea closed its underground nuclear test site by dynamiting, the entrances in front of foreign journalists. But foreign inspectors were never allowed to examine the site. First junk pack with the Brookings Institution. Says that North Korea is paranoid about foreigners. North Korea does not want people running around their country looking at their nuclear facilities or their missile facilities, but young beyond is a big technically complex site. Eight can't just be blown up pack believes that any deal should include inspections. It will be a big change in a good signpost of North Korean sincerity on denuclearization. If they did allow inspectors into their facilities. Those inspectors would probably be lead in in exchange for some kind of sanctions relief, and perhaps a peace declaration between North Korea and the US which have remained formerly at war since an armistice in nineteen Fifty-three for now. Jeffrey Lewis says the satellite photos indicate the reactors running making more platoon. Neom for nuclear bombs, you know, it's really business as usual at Yongbyon at the moment, people will show up for work and material comes in looks pretty much like it's looked for the last ten or fifteen years. It remains to be seen whether a second summit can change that Jeff Brumfield NPR news, Washington, Southwest Airlines canceled more flights today than usual and not just because of the harsh winter weather sweeping across much of the country, the airline has double the number of planes out of service because of unspecified mechanical issues as NPR's David Schaper report southwest management is pointing the finger at the airlines mechanics union amid a long-running labor dispute Southwest Airlines cancelled at least four hundred forty flights today that's more than eleven percent of its schedule nationwide. At one of the reasons is that the airline has about forty planes out of service due to mechanical problems. That's double the normal number at any given time experts say, it's unusual. Most of the time. You can predict the types of work that are going to be have to be accomplished on an aircraft. That's why airlines use maintenance programs rather than spot or things like that. That's Bill Waldoch professor of aviation safety science at Embry riddle aeronautical university Waldoch notes that planes that are flying. Passengers are not making money so with so many planes grounded Southwest's chief operations officer declared an operational emergency. Basically, it's all hands on deck. They want everybody available to try to get the airplanes made them as fast as they can. That means cancelling time off mandatory overtime for mechanics. And in a statement last night southwest CEO called out the mechanics union pledging to launch an investigation into why so many planes are being pulled out of service all at once. His statement added that the aircraft mechanics fraternal association, which represents Southwest's twenty four hundred mechanics has a history of work disruptions communication. I didn't feel very southwest. Like, you always think of southwest is fun. And and not a serious threat. Snyder writes about the airline industry on his cranky flier blog from their perspective. This is something they think is necessary to make sure that the fleet is fixed and flying, but it certainly would be taken by the union as a shot across the bow. It's going to ratchet up tension. I would think the airline in the mechanics union have been contract negotiations for six years with no new agreement in sight as for tension today. The union fired back at management accusing it of scapegoating maintenance technicians, it characterizes the airlines linking of the operational emergency to contract talks as simply an attempt to divert attention away from the airline safety issues. So should southwest. Passengers be concerned breath. Snyder says no that's just labor negotiations. This is this is almost a standard pattern. You know, one side will claim safety issues and the other side will push back, and it's part of the tug of war. Experts say neither side would ever do anything unsafe with one saying he'd have no problem getting.

North Korea US President Trump Singapore Hanoi president Southwest Vietnam sig Hecker Kim Jong UN Kim Jong Jeffrey Lewis us institute of peace Frank m Jeff Brumfield Russia NPR
The U.S. And Russia Are Stocking Up On Missiles And Nukes For A Different Kind Of War

NPR's World Story of the Day

03:55 min | 3 years ago

The U.S. And Russia Are Stocking Up On Missiles And Nukes For A Different Kind Of War

"The US has begun production of a new nuclear weapon supporters of the weapons they it's needed to counter Russia, but critics worry it's taking America back to a time when nuclear weapons were more likely to be used NPR's, Jeff Brumfield has more. It wasn't that long ago with the military had plans to use nuclear weapons all over the place July nineteen sixty two these troops were the first hour army's history to engage in tactical exercise supported by live nuclear firepower. That's our KYW footage from the Nevada. Desert. Hundreds of troops rehearsed to the tech. But before they went in they fired a tiny nuclear weapon at a simulated enemy position it detonated perfectly releasing its lethal radiation back, then that was how some thought nuclear war would look nukes small enough to knock out just a couple of city blocks used together with conventional weapons like tanks and troops. Of course, that's not what happened radiation and other factors may nuclear weapons of bad fit for the battlefield, and as the US's conventional strength through battlefield nuclear weapons became less important and the end of the Cold War, the United States said well that was kind of stupid. Why did we have all the? Stuff. Let's get rid of it. Matthew crane is at the Atlantic Council. He also worked on nuclear strategy in the Pentagon, the US dismantled nearly all of its battlefield nuclear weapons. But Russia took a different path. It has kept thousands of battlefield nukes in storage. So today Russia has nuclear landmines nuclear torpedoes, nuclear depth charges nuclear artillery, nuclear short range missiles, and the Trump administration believes Russia would be tempted to use some of these weapons in conflict. If that happened chronic says, the US wouldn't be able to responding kind though only nukes it has left are big weapons designed to fight an apocalyptic nuclear war. So the administration has begun converting an existing larger warhead into a new smaller low-yield weapon. More like the old battlefield nukes. What the low yield nuclear weapons do say, no actually we have a range of options. If you use a low you'll nuke. Earlier weapon we can respond with one two or three of our own. I mean, well, it's insane. That's Jeffrey Lewis a scholar at the Middlebury institute of international studies, who's not a fan of battlefield nukes. The Trump administration's new warheads sits on the same missile that now carries a much more powerful nuclear weapon. So if the US did use it for some reason, all the Russians are going to see is that a missile that only carries nuclear warheads is heading toward Russia and Russian policy as Flannery. Putin has said many times is not to wait for it to land. In other words, Russia could unleash an attack on the US just to be safe or go ole occur is with the International Crisis Group. She says just the existence of smaller US weapons could cost the Russians to take battlefield nukes out of storage. They think wow, we need to deter that. No way are conventional weapons deter that. We have to emphasize the nuclear capability, she says that could end. Up countering the vastly superior conventional forces of the US, they're throwing away advantage. The Trump administration says several of these new smaller weapons will be ready to enter service later this year, but the administration's long-term plans for more battlefield nukes. Face a bigger obstacle. Newly elected Democrats have vowed to block them. Jeff Brumfield NPR news, Washington. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast.

Russia United States Trump Administration Jeff Brumfield NPR Comcast Putin Nevada Matthew Crane Jeffrey Lewis America Atlantic Council Middlebury Institute Of Intern International Crisis Group Pentagon Flannery Washington
"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:39 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Considered from NPR news. The US has begun production of a new nuclear weapon supporters of the weapons they it's needed to counter Russia. The critics worry it's taking America back to a time when nuclear weapons were more likely to be used NPR's, Jeff Brumfield has more. It wasn't that long ago with the military had plans to use nuclear weapons all over the place, July nineteen sixty two these troops were the first in our army's history to engage in a tactical exercise supported by live nuclear firepower. That's archival footage from the Nevada. Desert hundreds of troops rehearsed in attack. But before they went in they fired a tiny nuclear weapon at a simulated. And we position it detonated perfectly releasing its lethal radiation back then that was how some thought nuclear war would look nuke small enough to knock out just a couple of city blocks used together with conventional weapons like tanks and troops. Of course. That's not what happened radiation and other factors made nuclear weapons of bad fit for the battlefield, and as the US's conventional strength through battlefield nuclear weapons became less important and the end of the Cold War, the United States said well that was kind of stupid. Why did we have? This stuff. Let's get rid of it. Matthew crane is at the Atlantic Council. He also worked on nuclear strategy in the Pentagon, the US dismantled nearly all of its battlefield nuclear weapons. But Russia took a different path. It has kept thousands of battlefield nukes in storage. So today Russia has nuclear landmines nuclear torpedoes, nuclear depth charges nuclear artillery, nuclear short-range missiles, and the Trump administration believes Russia would be tempted to use some of these weapons in a conflict. If that happened chronic says, the US wouldn't be able to responding kind. The only nukes it has left are big weapons designed to fight an apocalyptic nuclear war. So the administration has begun converting an existing larger warhead into a new smaller low-yield weapon. More like the old battlefield nukes. What the low yield nuclear weapons do say, no actually we have a range of options the few years ago. Nuclear weapon, we can respond with one two or three of our own. I mean, well, it's insane. That's Jeffrey Lewis a scholar at the Middlebury institute of international studies, who's not a fan of battlefield nukes. The Trump administration's new warhead sits on the same missile that now carries a much more powerful nuclear weapon. So if the US did use it for some reason, all the Russians are going to see is that a missile that only carries nuclear warheads is heading toward Russia and Russian policy has Flannery. Putin has said many times is not to wait for it to land. In other words, Russia could unleash an attack on the US just to be safe or got all occur is with the International Crisis Group. She says just the existence of smaller US weapons could cost Russians to take battlefield nukes out of storage. They think well we need to deter that. No way are conventional weapons that we have to emphasize the nuclear capability, she says that could. End up countering the vastly superior conventional forces of the US. They're throwing away the vantage. The Trump administration says several of these new smaller weapons will be ready to enter service later this year, but the administration's long-term plans for more battlefield nukes. Face a bigger obstacle. Newly elected Democrats have vowed to block them. Jeff Brumfield NPR news, Washington..

Russia Trump administration United States Jeff Brumfield NPR Nevada Matthew crane America Jeffrey Lewis Putin Atlantic Council Washington Middlebury institute of intern International Crisis Group Pentagon Flannery
"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Considered from NPR news. The US has begun production of a new nuclear weapon supporters of the weapons say it's needed to counter Russia. The critics worry it's taking America back to a time when nuclear weapons were more likely to be used NPR's, Jeff Brumfield has more. It wasn't that long ago with the military had plans to use nuclear weapons all over the place, July nineteen sixty two these troops were the first in our army's history to engage in tactical exercise supported by live nuclear firepower. That's archival footage from the Nevada. Desert hundreds of troops rehearsed in attack. But before they went in they fired a tiny nuclear weapon at a simulated. And we position it detonated perfectly releasing its lethal radiation back then that was how some thought nuclear war with look nukes small enough to knock out just a couple of city blocks used together with conventional weapons like tanks and troops. Of course. That's not what happened radiation and other factors made nuclear weapons of bad fit for the battlefield, and as the US's conventional strength through battlefield nuclear weapons became less important and the end of the Cold War, the United States said well that was kind of stupid. Why did we have? This stuff. Let's get rid of it. Matthew crane is at the Atlantic Council. He also worked on nuclear strategy in the Pentagon, the US dismantled nearly all of its battlefield nuclear weapons. But Russia took a different path. It has kept thousands of battlefield nukes in storage. So today Russia has nuclear landmines nuclear torpedoes, nuclear depth charges nuclear artillery, nuclear short-range missiles, and the Trump administration believes Russia would be tempted to use some of these weapons in a conflict. If that happened chronic says, the US wouldn't be able to responding kind. The only nukes it has left are big weapons designed to fight an apocalyptic nuclear war. So the administration has begun converting an existing larger warhead into a new smaller low-yield weapon. More like the old battlefield nukes. What the low yield nuclear weapons do say, no actually we have a range of options. Few years though. You'll. Nuclear weapon, we can respond with one two or three of our own. I mean, well, it's insane. That's Jeffrey Lewis a scholar at the Middlebury institute of international studies, who's not a fan of battlefield nukes. The Trump administration's new warhead sits on the same missile that now carries a much more powerful nuclear weapon. So if the US did use it for some reason, all the Russians are going to see is that a missile that only carries nuclear warheads is heading toward Russia and Russian policy as Flannery. Putin said many times is not to wait for it to land. In other words, Russia could unleash an attack on the US just to be safe or got all occur is with the International Crisis Group. She says just the existence of smaller US weapons could cost the Russians to take battlefield nukes out of storage. They think well we need to deter that. No way are conventional weapons deter that. We have to emphasize the nuclear capability, she says that could. End up countering the vastly superior conventional forces of the US. They're throwing away in the vantage. The Trump administration says several of these new smaller weapons will be ready to enter service later this year, but the administration's long-term plans for more battlefield nukes. Face a bigger obstacle. Newly elected Democrats have vowed to block them. Jeff Brumfield NPR news, Washington..

Russia United States Trump administration Jeff Brumfield NPR Nevada Putin Matthew crane America Jeffrey Lewis Atlantic Council Washington Middlebury institute of intern International Crisis Group Pentagon Flannery
"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey lewis" Discussed on KOMO

"Stay connected. Stay informed. Komo news. Good afternoon. Komo news time one oh two. I'm Taylor van Cise in in Seattle, we have partly cloudy skies. And it's fifty degrees today marks the twenty eighth day of the government shutdown and congresswoman Pramilla giant Paul renewing her call for the president to end the stalemate. More from komo's Jeff Pohjola. The Seattle democrat has been one of President Trump's harshest critics since joining the house continue to try to take the country hostage and to put eight hundred thousand federal workers and the actual security of the country. I I think is absolutely outrageous on ten. Unpresidential. That the president is standing his ground vowing to keep the government closed until there's a deal on funding for the wall. We need strong borders. We need strong barriers and walls at the moment. There is no compromise insight. Jeff Pohjola, KOMO news. Meanwhile, is Seattle man is raising money to help feed furloughed federal workers in Washington DC. Jeffrey Lewis says he heard about chef Jose Andres work with the world central kitchen in DC and wanted to help. Employees her load or working without pay. They've been serving us for a while. So it's about I for us in America to serve them to get back on Tuesday. Lou set up a gofundme page for the hashtag chefs for feds initiative with the goal to raise ten thousand dollars. As of today. It's getting close to fifty thousand dollars Liu says he'll keep going as long as the shutdown continues. You may remember him of the go fund me campaigns to repay those lunch bills at schools around the country,.

Komo Seattle Jeff Pohjola komo president Liu President Trump Washington DC Taylor van Cise Jeffrey Lewis Lou Paul America Jose Andres fifty thousand dollars ten thousand dollars fifty degrees