18 Burst results for "Jeffrey Kluger"

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:50 min | 5 d ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Polios arrival in the London sewer system is worrying experts. But Jeffrey kluger the UK's most recent case of polio occurred in 1984 and the disease was declared formally eradicated there in 2004, but the country is on edge this week after the polio virus was discovered in several sewage samples in London, giving rise to what government health officials call a national incident. No new cases of polio have been confirmed in the UK, but according to an alert by the UK health security agency, it is likely there has been some spread between closely linked individuals in north and east to London, and they are shedding the type two polio virus strain in their feces. There were originally three strains of poliovirus, but types one and three have been vaccinated out of existence. The virus that was detected in London wastewater is not the so called wild poliovirus, which used to circulate freely around the world, but has now been eradicated in all but two countries Afghanistan and Pakistan. Rather, it is what is known as vaccine derived poliovirus. There are two types of polio vaccines, the injectable version, which uses a killed virus to confer immunity, and the oral version, which uses a live, but weakened virus. The oral version is easier and cheaper to administer and is thus the vaccine of choice for mass immunizations. But on occasion, the harmless, weakened virus can mutate to the infections paralytic form, pass through the body and feces and threaten to infect individuals. This is what experts fear could happen in London. Officials have no way of knowing who the original source of the virus is, but it was likely a visitor from another country since the UK switched from the oral to the injectable vaccine in 2004 to prevent precisely this kind of vaccine derived circulation. While 86.6% of British children have been vaccinated, via injection and are therefore protected that still leaves more than 13% who are vulnerable to the newly discovered virus and officials are urging those children and anyone who isn't inoculated against polio to get vaccinated. Vaccine derived polio virus has the potential to spread, particularly in communities where vaccine uptake is lower, said doctor Rebecca saliba, an epidemiologist at the UK health security agency in a statement. The presence of the virus in London is undeniably a worrisome development, but it by no means means a public health emergency. Circulating vaccine derived polio can rarely cause paralysis, but like wild poliovirus that occurs in only about one in every 200 people who are infected. The rest develop only cold like symptoms or no symptoms at all. Public health officials, meanwhile, are trying to trace the original source of the contaminated sewage through the wastewater plant, where it was first identified. The problem is that the plant handles waste for millions of people, making finding even the neighborhood from which the virus originated much less the individual unlikely. The World Health Organization reports that sewage lines upstream from the plant are nonetheless being sampled to determine more precisely the region of the city in which the contamination occurred. For now, the virus does not appear to be circulating widely in the community. If any infections do turn up health officials would be able to type the strain of the virus and determine if it's the same as the one that was isolated in the sewage sample. Either way, the London scare is one more reminder that global eradication of polio along sought goal is tantalizingly close. The sooner it stamped out and the two remaining endemic countries, the sooner no child will have to be sickened by.

polio London UK health security agency Jeffrey kluger polio virus strain UK Rebecca saliba Afghanistan Pakistan paralysis World Health Organization
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

01:39 min | 2 months ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Jeffrey kluger. Anti vaccine sentiments have been simmering in the U.S. since at least 1998 when the lats at a prestigious medical journal published and later retracted, a fraudulent paper falsely linking childhood vaccines to autism. They've grown even stronger in the past two years, thanks to disinformation about the COVID-19 vaccines. Though the development of the COVID-19 vaccines happened at an unprecedented pace, they've been rigorously tested and have proven both safe and effective. Nevertheless, falsehoods about them that the vaccines contained microchips that they would alter the DNA of recipients or cause them to become magnetic have spread. Public health experts feared that those groundless claims would exacerbate mistrust among people who already doubted vaccines, or serve as a gateway into vaccine skepticism among people who previously had no such concerns. Now it appears those fears might have been well placed in April, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a study showing that during the 2020 21 school year, rates of routine vaccinations among the nation's 3.52 million enrolled kindergarteners fell below the 95% level necessary to ensure herd immunity. The average drop from the rates during the 2019 20 school year was small, just over 1% for each of three vaccines. But CDC researchers say, that is enough to allow viruses to gain a foothold in the overall community of kids..

COVID Jeffrey kluger medical journal autism U.S. U.S. Centers for Disease Contr
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:59 min | 2 months ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"NASA's mega moon rocket is flunking its stress rehearsal. But Jeffrey kluger it is a fact of orbital mechanics that the moon is steadily receding from the earth every year the distance between the two worlds grows by 3.78 centimeters, 1.48 inches, or about the speed at which our fingernails grow. That's not much compared to the overall 384,472 kilometers, 238,900 miles, average distance between the earth and the moon, and there's no reason to worry that the moon will be bidding us farewell anytime soon. Still, ever since April 1st and especially in the last week, the gap between the earth and the moon suddenly seems wider than ever. For that, you can thank issues with the space launch system SLS, NASA's brand new mega rocket designed to return American astronauts to the lunar surface sometime this decade. It was on March 17th that the towering 98 meter 322 foot rocket emerged from its hangar in the Kennedy Space Center's vehicle assembly building VAB, and began its slow creep out to its launch pad. The rocket wasn't getting set to fly, but rather to undergo what NASA calls a wet dress rehearsal. That involves filling the giant machines tanks with 2.8 million liters, 730,000 gallons of liquid oxygen and hydrogen fuel and running a simulated 45 hour countdown taking it down to the T -9.3 second mark before stopping the exercise, draining the fuel and rolling the SLS back to the VAB for further readying. The initial steps of the exercise began on April 1st. And let's just say that if a Broadway bound show had a dress rehearsal, anything like what the SLS has had, the whole production would close out of town. As NASA reports in an admirably candid blog, the last 15 days out I launch pad 39 B have involved one headache after another, with serial breakdowns reportedly forcing the countdown to be stopped. Among the most serious problems is a stuck helium valve on the rocket's second stage that has prevented that stage from being loaded with fuel. The problem can't be repaired on the pad, but only back in the VAB, meaning that even if the rest of the work went perfectly, the wet dress rehearsal would still not be run to its plant completion. And the rest of the work is by no means going perfectly. Among the other problems to beset the giant rocket over the past two weeks, a liquid hydrogen leak in one of the vehicle's umbilical cords, temperature fluctuations in the super cold liquid oxygen fuel which must be kept at -182°C, -297°F, and a troubling pressure surge in the liquid hydrogen flow line, all of this has prevented ground controllers from loading the liquid hydrogen tank to more than just 5% of its capacity and the liquid oxygen tank to no more than 49%. NASA has not said how many more times it will attempt to wet dress rehearsals before giving up. What it has said is that one way or another, it will stay on the job and that the SLS will ultimately fly. For that bit of cockeyed optimism, NASA has history on its side, as veteran space reporter Bill harwood of CBS reports back in the 1960s and intended 6 day countdown of the venerable Saturn 5 rocket took 17 days to complete longer than the SLS has so far been at it. As history notes, the Saturn 5 ultimately flew, taking 9 crews of astronauts to the moon and back, may the SLS have the same good fortune. The story originally appeared in time space our weekly newsletter covering all things space. You can sign up in a link embedded in the text.

NASA Jeffrey kluger Kennedy Space Center headache Bill harwood CBS
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:17 min | 3 months ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"NASA's new budget means it won't be going back to the moon any time soon by Jeffrey kluger. On its face, 1966 was a very good year to be a consumer. A gallon of milk would set you back just 42 cents a pack of cigarettes went for 30 cents, and a gallon of gas, which today is topping $5 in some places as the war in Ukraine and the cutoff of Russian oil push prices higher went for just 31 cents and what just for the record did it cost to finance the greatest space program in the history of the world, a space program that went from a standing start in 1961 to having boots on the moon in 1969. That cost taxpayers $5.93 billion in 1966, which represents the high water mark of NASA annual funding in the 64 year history of the space agency. Of course, inflation plays a role in all of this too. That same 42 cent gallon of milk goes for $3 68 cents in $2022, NASA's $5.93 billion annual allowance, similarly, would translate to $51.66 billion this year. That generous annual funding is worth contemplating this week when, as space news reports. Congress completed work on an omnibus spending bill that allocates the space agency just over $24 billion or $760 million less than The White House requested and less than half of what the space agency was getting back in its golden era. The details of the spending bill reveal a lot about why it has been a half century since human beings last landed on the moon. In 2020, NASA requested $3.4 billion to build its human landing system, HLS, a 21st century lunar module to carry astronauts down to the surface of the moon from lunar orbit. Congress responded with a check for just $850 million. Barely enough for basic R&D. This year, NASA lowered its sites, requesting $1.195 billion and getting it. That's good as far as it goes, but remains less than half of what NASA needs to build the ship for real. If you want to know why that much touted 2024 date for getting boots back on the moon under the new Artemis program has slipped to a more generalized, sometimes this decade look no further than the HLS. Then two, there's the SLS. The 21st century Saturn 5 moon rocket, which is budgeted at just $2.6 billion for 2022. A funding level that allows for launching one rocket per year. Back in the Apollo days, 11 Saturn 5s were launched, 9 of them on crude lunar missions from just 1968 to 1972. Similarly, the Orion spacecraft, the modern day version of the Apollo orbiter, was budgeted at just $1.4 billion this year. Orion has been in development in one form or another since 2004 and has never yet carried a crew. By contrast, 15 different Apollo capsules carried 15 different crews from just 1968 to 1974. The government has its spending priorities, yes, and if the decision has been made that space is a lower tier enterprise than it was half a century ago, that that is within Congress's authority, but please, no more promises of crude moon landings in 2024, or even 2025 or 2026. If you're not going to cut the checks to make the missions possible. You can either talk about going to the moon or you can actually spend the money and go. The choice Washington is making is regrettably clear..

NASA Jeffrey kluger Congress Ukraine
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

05:26 min | 5 months ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Everywhere you get podcasts. Pandemic anxiety is fueling OCD symptoms, even for people without the disorder, by Jeffrey kluger. Rosalind, not her real name, had no idea what she intended to do with the three boxes of spaghetti she had just dumped into her shopping cart. She didn't want them, she certainly didn't need them, but never mind. She had to buy them, and the spaghetti boxes weren't the only unwanted items she picked up in the grocery store that day during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. If she so much as grazed one item while she was reaching for another into the shopping cart, it went. Everything my hand touched, I had to buy, she said. I didn't feel I had a choice. There was too great a chance that I had somehow contaminated the item, and then it would hurt another unsuspecting customer who bought it. So she left the store with a bulging load of shopping bags, and a lot of guilt, too. Once I had bought so much, I worried there wouldn't be enough food left for other people. Rosalind is one of the 2.3% of American adults diagnosed with obsessive compulsive disorder, or OCD, according to the National Institute of mental health. OCD has caused principally by excessive activity in the amygdala, a walnut sized structure at the base of the brain that processes fear, danger and the fight or flight response. The disorder can manifest as compulsive, repetitive behaviors, an anxiety about getting ill or spreading germs or an excessive sense of responsibility and an intense fear of causing risk to others, as in roslin's case. Even people without an official diagnosis are affected about 25% of Americans will exhibit at least some obsessive compulsive behavior at some point in their lives, according to a 2008 study published in the journal nature. The pandemic has made life much worse for people with OCD symptoms. New research shows that OCD symptoms have gotten more severe for many people during the pandemic and new diagnoses have increased. More and more people are turning up in doctor's offices with new cases of the condition. Studies have consistently shown that people without OCD have scored higher on our OCD assessments than they did before the pandemic says Andrew guzick, a clinical psychologist at the Baylor college of medicine. They are exhibiting more OCD like behaviors and reporting more intrusive fears characteristic of OCD. It's no wonder a global pandemic is a perfect breeding ground for anxiety. OCD, as a disorder of doubt, was that door knob contaminated? Did I leave the stove on?.

OCD Pandemic anxiety Jeffrey kluger Rosalind National Institute of mental h OCD symptoms roslin Andrew guzick Baylor college of medicine
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:24 min | 7 months ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on WTOP

"To wrap your business week Wall Street finished the week with losses the Dow dropping 532 points or one and a half percent The S&P was down 48 a loss of 1% NASDAQ dropped 11 D.C. based commercial real estate data giant costar group says it will invest $460 million in building an expanded corporate campus in Richmond The university of the District of Columbia has received its largest ever private gift from a single donor much of the more than $2 million anonymous donation will pay for new scholarship programs Brandon hazelton WTO P news He had one 26 This is the voice of Time Magazine's 2021 person of the year So you can see what's going on in the factory and stay grounded It's Tesla and SpaceX boss Elon Musk This morning Time Magazine editor at large Jeffrey kluger explains the choice Well Elon Musk is more than just the most influential person of the year We came to the conclusion and I certainly am running The braiding the piece came to the conclusion that he's in some ways a transformative figure He is changing the shape of the commercial space industry His Tesla cars control two thirds of the EV market He's a player in solar He's a player in crypto and battery tech He's a market force as we say in the story He can move stock markets with a flick of his Twitter finger He is in a sense in a very real sense the most influential person of 2021 And that's how we ultimately choose the person we name Can you perhaps let us in on some of your thinking in terms of other people that may have been in the running Well certainly the miracle workers the people who develop the mRNA vaccine are people we did honor And it was a very close choice between that group of four whom we named and Musk And we ultimately chose Musk just because of the scale of his achievements We also named Simone Biles as athlete of the year for being so direct and straightforward about her struggles with the yips and the twisties as she calls them and general mental health of athletes And Olivia Rodrigo of course as entertainer of the year for being such a young and transformative figure in the pop music sector We know feedback is immediate and the time person of the year often generates that Thanks to social media of course is it more positive or negative I would say it's pretty much a coin flip which is pretty consistent with what Elon said when we asked him about how his giant starship rocket and his super heavy booster would fare when they first try to get to orbit Sometime after the first of the year he said I'd call it 50 50 And I think that's what the response to this choice has been But it's not a popularity contest It's not an award It's simply an acknowledgment of influence Magazine editor at large Jeffrey kluger talking about Elon Musk as times 2021% of the year with Michelle and Sean You are listening to 103.5 FM at P dot com Not any morning December 18th at one 28 Trying to get whether all the apes and what it breaks good morning to Carlos Ramirez who in the double TLP traffic.

Elon Musk Jeffrey kluger Brandon hazelton Time Magazine Tesla costar group university of the District of SpaceX Simone Biles D.C. Richmond Olivia Rodrigo S Twitter Elon
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:33 min | 7 months ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on WTOP

"Of Time Magazine's 2021 person of the year So you can see what's going on in the factory and stay grounded It's Tesla and SpaceX boss Elon Musk This morning Time Magazine editor at large Jeffrey kluger explains the choice Well Elon Musk is more than just the most influential person of the year We came to the conclusion and I certainly am running The braiding the piece came to the conclusion that he's in some ways a transformative figure He is changing the shape of the commercial space industry His Tesla cars control two thirds of the EV market He's a player in solar He's a player in crypto and battery tech He's a market force as we say in the story He can move stock markets with a flick of his Twitter finger He is in a sense in a very real sense the most influential person of 2021 And that's how we ultimately choose the person we name Can you perhaps let us in on some of your thinking in terms of other people that may have been in the running Well certainly the miracle workers the people who developed the mRNA vaccine are people We did honor And it was a very close choice between that group of four whom we named and Musk And we ultimately chose Musk just because of the scale of his achievements We also named Simone Biles as athlete of the year for being so direct and straightforward about her struggles with the yips and the twisties as she calls them and general mental health of athletes And Olivia Rodrigo of course as entertainer of the year for being such a young and transformative figure in the pop music sector We know feedback is immediate and the time person of the year often generates that Thanks to the social media of course is it more positive or negative I would say it's pretty much a coin flip which is pretty consistent with what Elon set us when we asked him about how his giant starship rocket and his super heavy booster would fare when they first try to get to orbit Sometime after the first of the year he said I'd call it 50 50 And I think that's what the response to this choice has been But it's not a popularity contest It's not an award It's simply an acknowledgment of influence My magazine editor at large Jeffrey kluger talking about Elon Musk as times 2021 person of the year with Michelle and Shawn You are listening to 103.5 FM at.

Elon Musk Jeffrey kluger Time Magazine Tesla SpaceX Simone Biles Olivia Rodrigo Twitter Elon Michelle Shawn
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:22 min | 7 months ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on WTOP

"Just the most influential person of the year We came to the conclusion and I certainly am running The braiding the piece came to the conclusion that he's in some ways a transformative figure He is changing the shape of the commercial space industry His Tesla cars control two thirds of the EV market He's a player in solar He's a player in crypto and battery tech He's a market force as we say in the story He can move stock markets with a flick of his Twitter finger He is in a sense in a very real sense the most influential person of 2021 And that's how we ultimately choose the person we name Can you perhaps let us in on some of your thinking in terms of other people that may have been in the running Well certainly the miracle workers the people who develop the mRNA vaccine are people We did honor And it was a very close choice between that group of four whom we named and Musk And we ultimately chose Musk just because of the scale of his achievements We also named Simone Biles as athlete of the year for being so direct and straightforward about her struggles with the yips and the twisties as she calls them and general mental health of athletes And Olivia Rodrigo of course as entertainer of the year for being such a young and transformative figure in the pop music sector We know feedback is immediate and the time person of the year often generates that Thanks to the social media of course is it more positive or negative I would say it's pretty much a coin flip which is pretty consistent with what Elon set us when we asked him about how his giant starship rocket and his super heavy booster would fare when they first try to get to orbit sometime after the first of the year He said I'd call it 50 50 And I think that's what the response to this choice has been But it's not a popularity contest It's not an award It's simply an acknowledgment of influence I'm magazine editor at large Jeffrey kluger talking about Elon Musk as times 2021 person of the year with Michelle and Sean You are listening to 103.5 FM at WTO P dot com At United way of the national capital area building equity is.

Simone Biles Olivia Rodrigo Tesla Twitter Elon Jeffrey kluger Elon Musk Michelle Sean WTO United
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:30 min | 7 months ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on WTOP

"This is the voice of Time Magazine's 2021 person of the year So you can see what's going on in the factory and stay grounded It's Tesla and SpaceX boss Elon Musk This morning Time Magazine editor at large Jeffrey kluger explains the choice Well Elon Musk is more than just the most influential person of the year We came to the conclusion and I certainly am running The braiding the piece came to the conclusion that he's in some ways a transformative figure He is changing the shape of the commercial space industry His Tesla cars control two thirds of the EV market He's a player in solar He's a player in crypto and battery tech He's a market force as we say in the story He can move stock markets with a flick of his Twitter finger He is in a sense in a very real sense the most influential person of 2021 And that's how we ultimately choose the person we name Can you perhaps let us in on some of your thinking in terms of other people that may have been in the running Well certainly the miracle workers the people who develop the mRNA vaccine are people We did honor And it was a very close choice between that group of four whom we named and Musk And we ultimately chose Musk just because of the scale of his achievements We also named Simone Biles as athlete of the year for being so direct and straightforward about her struggles with the yips and the twisties as she calls them and general mental health of athletes And Olivia Rodrigo of course as entertainer of the year for being such a young and transformative figure in the pop music sector We know feedback is immediate and the time person of the year often generates that Thanks to the social media of course is it more positive or negative I would say it's pretty much a coin flip which is pretty consistent with what Elon said to us when we asked him about how his giant starship rocket and his super heavy booster would fare when they first try to get to orbit Sometime after the first of the year he said I'd call it 50 50 And I think that's what the response to this choice has been But it's not a popularity contest It's not an award It's simply an acknowledgment of influence Magazine editor at large Jeffrey kluger talking about Elon Musk as times 2021 person of the year with Michelle and Shawn You are listening to 103.5 FM at WTO P dot com Sports at 15 and 45 powered by Red River technology decisions aren't black and white Think red That Wednesday morning December 15th middle of the week everybody update Welcome in 1215 sports time here's rock The stage was set for a historic night at Madison Square Garden and fittingly for Steph Curry the third time was the charm Here's curry for the record The all time three point king in the NBA That was the call on TNT before they stopped the game for curry to exchange pleasantries with previous record holders Ray Allen and regie Miller and hug his dad and former NBA sharpshooter Dell curry Steph Curry wasted no time getting the record knocking down the historic three on his third attempt in the first quarter telling TNT after the game I can't express how much of an.

Elon Musk Jeffrey kluger Time Magazine Tesla Simone Biles SpaceX Olivia Rodrigo Elon Twitter Steph Curry Red River WTO Shawn Michelle Madison Square Garden regie Miller NBA Ray Allen curry Dell
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

05:20 min | 8 months ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Earth has a second moon. For another 300 years, at least, by Jeffrey kluger. It's easy to be brand loyal to the moon. We've only got the one after all. Unlike Jupiter and Saturn, where you'd have dozens to choose from, here it's Luna, or nada. Or not. The fact is there's another sort of kind of moon and a sort of kind of orbit around earth that was discovered only in 2016. And according to a new study in nature, we may at last know how it was formed. The quasi moon named Camaro aleva after a Hawaiian word that refers to a moving celestial object is not much to speak of, measuring less than 50 meters or a 164 feet across. It circles the earth and a repeating corkscrew like trajectory that brings it no closer than 40 to 100 times the 384,000 kilometer or 239,000 mile distance of our more familiar moon. It's odd flight path is caused by the competing gravitational pulls of the earth and the sun, which continually bend and torque the moonlets motions, preventing it from achieving a more conventional orbit. Its primarily influence just by the sun's gravity, but this pattern shows up because it's also but not quite on an earth like orbit. So it's this sort of odd dance, says graduate student Ben sharkey of the lunar and planetary laboratory at the university of Arizona, the lead author of the paper. None of this means that a leva has to have especially exotic origins, the solar system is littered with asteroids, some of which are captured by the gravity of other planets and become more conventional, if fragmentary moons. Others don't orbit other planets in the common way, but fall into line in front of them, or behind them and paste them in their orbits around the sun, like the flocks of so called Trojan asteroids that precede and trail Jupiter. Either way, komo aleva was bound to get attention because its composition posed a stubborn mystery. Asteroids tend to reflect brightly in certain infrared frequencies, but just doesn't. It's dimmer somehow, clearly made of different stuff, which suggests a different origin. To investigate the mystery, sharkey under the guidance of his PhD adviser, planetary scientist Vishnu Reddy, first turned to a NASA run telescope in Hawaii, routinely used for studying earth vicinity asteroids. But even through the usually reliable instrument, the infrared signature seemed to faint. Instead, they switched to a university of Arizona run monocular telescope that, as sharkey says, could squeeze every last ounce of photons out of that object. That produced better clearer results, but still they were incomplete. The Rock was made of common silicates, like other asteroids, but they were common only in their general composition, not in their infrared signature, which remained stubbornly off. At last, the answer suggested itself. If komo a lever was behaving like a sort of quasi moon, perhaps it was an artifact of the actual moon. Earlier in sharkey's PhD program, one of his advisers published a paper on lunar samples brought back by the Apollo 14 mission in 1971, when sharkey compared the data he was getting in his telescope with what the earlier geologists came up with in The Rock lab, the results matched perfectly. The kind of space weathering lunar silicates undergo when they're still on the surface of the moon precisely accounted for the differences in the infrared reflectivity between common asteroids and aleva. Visually, what you're seeing is weathered silicate, says sharkey, the eons of exposure to space environment and the micro meteorite impacts, it's almost like a fingerprint. And it's hard to miss. How camo aleve shook free of our lunar companion is no mystery. The moon's been getting bombarded by space rocks for billions of years resulting in all manner of lunar debris getting ejected into space, nearly 500 bits of which have made it to the surface of the earth as meteorites. Is one such piece of lunar rubble that spiraled away from the moon. But rather than landing on earth or simply tumbling off into the void, it found itself a quasi satellite in its own right. We see thousands of craters on the moon, so some of this lunar ejecta has to be sticking around in space, says sharkey. What stick around all that long as its current trajectory is not entirely stable. According to estimates from sharkey and others, the object will remain an earthly companion for only about 300 more years. Nothing at all on the cosmic clock, after which it will break free of its current gravitational chains and twirl off into the void. Originally, a part of the moon, then a companion of earth, it will spend the rest of its long life traveling on its own..

sharkey Jeffrey kluger Ben sharkey university of Arizona komo aleva Vishnu Reddy sun NASA Hawaii
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:19 min | 8 months ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Brought to you by audible. COVID-19 boosters are now more popular than the first shots by Jeffrey kluger. When Americans divide themselves into camps, they stick to them fiercely. Democrats versus Republicans, pro life versus pro choice, gun rights versus gun control. Add to that, as has become apparent over the course of the past year, those who are pro versus anti coronavirus vaccines. As with so many other polarizing issues, your position on getting or not getting inoculated against COVID-19 has become more than a medical question. It's morphed into a form of cultural identifier, a sign of your membership and one tribe or another. More than ever, that's becoming clear as booster shots are rolled out around the nation, with about 70 million Americans now eligible for an additional dose and tens of millions more sets to join them as the eligibility age inevitably falls. The extra dose comes as very good news to a lot of the population, people who are mindful of the way vaccine induced antibody levels fall over time and anxious to bump them back up. But that doesn't remotely include everybody with resistance to even initial vaccinations keeping the country far from the much hope for her immunity. All of this is playing out as the government looks beyond first doses and encourages Americans to step up for their extra dose. Plenty of people are responding, according to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, booster rates are now exceeding first shot rates across the country. In the week ending October 24th, just over 400,000 people per day were getting boosters compared to just over 200,000 receiving their first shots. Those numbers have been moving in a sort of Newtonian equal and opposite dance since last August. When more than 400,000 people daily were getting first doses and boosters were just being rolled out to the immunocompromised. The lines crossed in late September when the CDC recommended Pfizer BioNTech boosters for at risk groups. And the upward trend for boosters and downward trend for first shots as continued since. Boosters got another bump on October 21st, when the CDC approved additional doses of the Moderna and J&J vaccines. Those recommendations, CDC director Rochelle Walensky said in a statement last week, are another example of our fundamental commitment to protect as many people as possible from COVID-19. When it comes to the boosters, the government's pro vaccine message is apparently being heard. When it comes to first doses, not so much. Looking for more entertaining stories, try audible. They deliver everything you love listening to all in one app, like bestsellers, new releases, and more. If you love redemption stories and complicated men, check out Stephen King's audiobook, Billy summers, or if you want something a little more touching, listen to Gabrielle Union's memoir, you got anything stronger? Try audible for free with a 30 day trial when you sign up at audible dot com..

Jeffrey kluger CDC Rochelle Walensky COVID Pfizer J Billy summers government Stephen King Gabrielle Union
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:11 min | 10 months ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Inspiration for makes space history with first ever all civilian orbital launch by. Jeffrey kluger in the end the camping trip up the flank of mount rainier that the inspiration for crew made back in april may have done more than anything else to prepare them for last night's successful launch into earth orbit at eight. Oh two pm eastern time from pad thirty nine a at cape canaveral florida even the day before the launch at a t minus twenty seven our press conference they were still talking about the experience and what it taught them. Haley arsenault age twenty nine a physician assistant at saint jude children's research hospital and who tonight became the first person to fly in space with a prosthetic a. Rod in place of her left femur which she lost her childhood cancer called the hike. The most daunting and transformative part of the training one that forged powerful bonds among the all civilian crew members. It was ten hours of hiking and three days of camping with four people in small tents. She said chris dombroski. H forty one. An engineer at lockheed martin and everett washington sees the three days the crew will spend in orbit before their saturday splashdown as in some ways. Nothing more than an extension of the mount rainier trip. It will be like camping with your three closest friends and van for three days. He said sim broschi. Even pacta ukulele for the journey and when she will use to perform a song from space as part of the mission's goal of raising two hundred million dollars for saint jude. But if this is a camping trip it began like no other while the lift off of the falcon nine rocket carrying inspiration for spacex crew dragon spacecraft precisely on time on a warm but breezy florida evening with temperatures of eighty one degrees under a partly cloudy sky at t minus zero the nine engines on the two hundred thirty foot falcon lit and the rocket muscled itself off the pad the first stage burn for one hundred fifty six seconds carrying the crew fifty miles high before cutting off on schedule and coming in for an upright landing on a recovery barge then the second stage ignited and just over eight and a half minutes after launch the crew of inspiration for was in orbit the inspiration for mission was the brainchild of jared. Isaac men the billionaire. Ceo of shift for payments an online payments company. Who bought all four seats aboard the dragon for a reported fifty million dollars a piece. The goal was to fly the first all civilian non-professional astronaut crew space and in the process race. About for saint jude. Isaac mun knew from the start that he wanted to saint jude employee on the crew and the hospital recommended arsenault who promptly accepted after as she likes to note. Checking with her mom sim brodsky won his seat and sweepstakes that he entered by making a contribution to saint jude the fourth crew member syon proctor. H fifty one. A professor of geosciences at south mountain community college in phoenix. Arizona had her ticket punched by winning a contest.

Jeffrey kluger Haley arsenault saint jude children's research chris dombroski saint jude mount rainier sim broschi cape canaveral florida everett Rod cancer martin washington Isaac mun
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:02 min | 10 months ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Brought to you. By american express business american express offers a line of cards dow. Take your business further because with needs like yours. You need a card built for business. Recovery from severe cova nineteen may provide better future protection against some variants by jeffrey kluger. Contracting a case of cova nineteen is bad enough contracting a case that requires you to be hospitalized is decidedly worse but according to a new study published in the journal science there is one small good hidden in that otherwise unalloyed bad recovery from corona virus infection. Severe enough to land you in. The hospital appears to provide better protection against later. Infection with at least three of the viral variants currently in circulation then does recovery from a less severe infection. The study conducted by a team of researchers affiliated with the university of amsterdam involved a relatively small cohort of sixty nine cova. Nineteen patients infected between march. Twenty twenty and january. Twenty twenty one. Twenty eight of those patients were hospitalized and the remainder weren't an additional sample group of fifty uninfected healthcare workers who had received two doses of the pfizer biotech vaccine were also included and the period in which the infected subjects became ill the three sars covy two variants causing the most concern. Were alpha which emerged in the uk beta which first appeared in south africa and gamma which emerged in brazil delta far and away the most concerning variant now was not i identified until december of twenty twenty to conduct their research. The investigators drew blood serum from the sixty nine patients four to six weeks after the initial infection and from the vaccinated subjects for weeks after. They got their second shots. The point at which the immune response would be highest in both groups. They then exposed the three variants as well as the original sars..

american express business amer jeffrey kluger university of amsterdam brazil delta pfizer south africa uk
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

08:30 min | 11 months ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"To be siblings. We are assembling rail though now. Who don't do that with your mouth revelry. That's good ali. Are we gonna do. An email episode stood moves. Ems ns meaner. I feel like. I'm definitely not gonna cry because i'm in serbia in like when you're in serbia you don't really cry about things. This is true you very hard. Yeah it's it's a tough little city over here a really cool tough city so I think i'm going to be good to just because you know back on medication. So i'm not gonna cry. Oh you are gnarly back on this other one called telex than a went back on alexa pro as just been. It's been crazy. I'm trying to get light for this job. I need to like able to function correctly. You know otherwise. I'll just be like a mess. People what is wrong with this guy. I've set Jay's all right well good whatever you do just isolated to make sure. He didn't even sweat sweating. He's been good okay off alexa pro. I know i know. I know all right. The other side actually gotta go fuck my studio. It'll get the lex alexa alexa. Throw that one thing or victory alexa. Press on okay. Shy go first. You go i all right. Hi kate and oliver. I want to start by saying. I'm a huge fan of the podcast and both of you. You're banter embassy in. Wit is a pleasure to listen to and laugh along with for context. I'm twenty two the middle child of three some of my favorite episodes of the ones involving psychologists psychiatrists experts the first episode. I listened to involved birth order and its influence on personality. Although i never lacked or longed for more love from my parents there is definitely a difference when it comes to middle children I found myself being more independent and relied on friendship over family. At times my younger sister was born very soon. After me. And i've always been told to take care of her include her etc. When i was in college. I realized i carried a lot of anger and animosity towards my family members for this. I felt like. I didn't get the childhood i should have because i never got to be a newborn toddler teenager by myself. It was always me and my sister. That's when i found your podcast. When i heard jeffrey kluger say one of the for lack of a better more accurate phrase worst. Birth orders is boy girl girl. I felt slightly validated. There were definitely moments growing up. I felt a lack of individuality family members. Obviously not close ones would mix up my name with my sisters and my mom would dress in the same outfits. Cute now not cute them. I felt lost in the crowd and definitely acted in ways to grasp people's attention. I was always the entertainment at family functions. The one to make everyone laugh. I feel like now is a good time to clarify that. I love my siblings and my childhood was filled with so many amazing memories. There is not enough room for all of them. Lisa genova might disagree about the room thing. My older brother and i went from fist. Fighting is kids to confidence as young adults. My sister is a built in best friend. One of the kindest people i've ever met. I'm so grateful for my siblings. We share memories inside jokes tears and laughs that i can't even begin to explain to even though i had a vastly different childhood than you and your amazing guests. I find myself relating to many of the stories. You've created an environment of honesty in love with your podcast and helped me learn things about myself and my relationships. I likely never would have keeton. Oliver created gold with this podcast. I just wanna say thank you sending love and laughter to Both maggie thanks maggie. Love as you know what else i like. She still young. You know she's twenty two. She's listening to our podcast is twenty two and just probably out of college. I graduated college or go to the work place in this. Is she's listening to the podcast. It makes me think too. We really should get on more experts because there's just so many people to talk to you about dynamics. Will we still talk to a child psychologist. I know then. i'll cry. we should we. Should talk to dan siegel. The i don't know the middle. The middle child thing it can go both ways like i can only relate to i guess you and then bodey was my middle and nothing seems to be much different. At least he hasn't told me yet. Different than what in wild or real. Meaning being the middle child and sort of having how middle children are parented. typically shade. You know or the. But i don't feel like maybe i don't. Maybe i'm conscious of that in. Just don't do that. I mean it's you more independent. Probably well i think it's boy boy girl too. So it's it's a little bit different. I think i mean. I think the middle middle children are usually sort of more independent and Things like their things come a little bit. I mean usually easier. Yeah like school an and just because they were especially if you're close in age to your older one. I think you probably develop quicker. Yeah you're witnessing and you kind of want to be like older play with the older kids and right right. I mean bodies friends albers friends. That's it i mean. He doesn't have any friends in aspen or in. La or anywhere. We go honestly well then. That's probably the issue that will end up coming up. At some point you'll be like environment it but the only reason i didn't have any other friends is because nobody gave me opportunities to really like spend time with other people and that's bullshit boaty. I asked you if you do with all the time they said now. So we'll go get in later. Okay dear kate knowledge. I recently found your podcast but quickly caught up. Because i couldn't stop listening. My name is jamie. And i'm three or jimmy miss right and i'm three years older than my older brother. We were close his kids but as we got older we chose different pass. He became a husband a father and successful businessman. I became a gambling addict for years. I tried to hide addiction. But it didn't work. He moved off with his family and offer to move me. Four hours away to get to go to rehab. Be closer to him. I repaid generosity by stealing from him and his family. He offered to help me move back to my hometown and told me could be around for his kids but we were done as brothers. That was the waco call needed. I haven't gambled in five years in our relationship is on the net both love baseball and this pandemic offered us opportunity to reunite through that even though now lives fifteen hours away. We texted every day about random baseball history to fill the void. We continue to text your talk each day about everything going on in our lives in a way i feel like i finally let my brother know me the real me. Thank you both for giving us a glimpse into your relationship with siblings and helping us grow our own relationships jamie.

serbia jeffrey kluger Lisa genova maggie dan siegel ali alexa kate bodey oliver Jay keeton Oliver albers aspen La jamie jimmy waco baseball
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:58 min | 11 months ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Jeffrey kluger on september fifteenth if all goes according to plan jared isaac men. The billionaire ceo of shift for payments and three other private citizens will strap into a space x crew dragon spacecraft. All four seats paid for by isaac men and blast off for orbit on the mission dubbed inspiration. For three days later they'll return to earth. Unlike most of the rest of us they will have spent time off of the planet but will that earned then. The label of astronaut time was it was easy to recognize an astronaut. They were all test pilots. They wore silvery space suits and signature buzz cuts and they had perfect fly. Boy names like d.c. And gus and al and gordo that they were all white. Males was often overlooked in the fawning media coverage of the time but that changed happily if belatedly as women and people of color joined the core in later years now things are changing again and fast with the opening of the private space sector. All manner of people who don't write the word astronaut on the occupation line of their tax return are queuing up to fly blue origin and virgin galactic both of which launched high profile missions involving their respective founders. Jeff bezos richard branson earlier. This summer aim to begin regularly carrying paying customers on brief eleven minutes sub orbital flight soon and spacex is selling seats not just isaac men in his inspiration for crew. The company along with rival. Private firm axiom. Space is also selling tickets to the international space station. The iss beginning in january twenty twenty two time studios is producing a documentary series on the inspiration for mission. Civilians have flown into space. Before former senator bill nelson who was sworn in as administrator of nasa in may finagle the junket for himself aboard space shuttle flight in nineteen eighty. Six as did former. Senator jake garn the year before and a handful of people including entrepreneur and video game developer. Richard guerrier have bought seeds aboard russian soyuz spacecraft for trips to the iss but the current surge in private spaceflight is something much bigger and likely only to grow so will the elite band fewer than six hundred people who've earned the title astronaut or cosmonaut in russia or tie cannot in china suddenly become a rabble of thousands who singular qualifying criterion was the disposable cash to buy a ticket and take a ride. And that's a question that has a lot of people wondering and at least a few. Shrugging i try not to get all wrapped around the word says nicole stott a retired nasa astronaut who twice flew to space and served a long duration mission aboard the iss. Maybe it's just a question of achieving presence in some place with whatever role you have when you're there she says not. Everyone is so at ease with the matter. The someplace dot mentions may be loosely described as space but has always been more strictly defined as anything above the so called von karman line. That's a boundary point. One hundred kilometers sixty two miles above earth named for hungarian american engineer. Theodore von karman who helped determine the altitude at which aircraft no longer function and spacecraft. Become necessary crossed that frontier. The original thinking went and you earn your astronaut wings that standard qualified not only the early space travelers from the us and ussr. For the astronaut or cosmonaut honor it also qualified the largely forgotten nasa pilot joe walker who in nineteen sixty three flew in.

Jeffrey kluger jared isaac Jeff bezos richard branson isaac senator bill nelson Senator jake garn Richard guerrier gus spacex nasa international space station Theodore von karman nicole stott al russia china joe walker us
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"Dollars Went up in his blue origin. Both by the way. I watched both broadcasts the announcers breathlessly announced how historic this was when it's not historic. It's just a guy with a lot of money flying rocket kind of into space even orbiting. Well my favorite Quote was from Jeffrey kluger time. Who said is this a real phenomenon or pop gun trajectory in thought those cute term. But you know what does make this. Different is is the factor doing their money. I mean both these guys are worth more not just in the spaceship they're flying and but then the entire program that's never happened before but he's that but but doesn't blue origin or didn't they have massive airforce contracts which they never delivered a blue origin spacex. Who who is that. Yeah that might have been spacex. A blue origin primarily help. Blue origin has the air force awarded blue origin. A contract worth two hundred fifty five million dollars actually. It was a half billion dollar contracts Which they've ended because he's got nothing so blurred you know besides the so when they say that. Jeff bezos paid for his own flight. And by the way he had the singular temerity and tone-deaf is at the end of the flight to thank all of us amazon customers and slave workers for making it possible. i was a little tone deaf. Jeff i'm they have. This isn't all he does. I mean he's developing some of the largest rocket engines that have been developed in the us and decades big ones that he's telling other people he's actually selling competitors he selling tonight launch alliance which is a lockheed. Martin partnership with boeing. And so. he's doing this weird copetition thing which is pretty open minded. But there's an instinct story kind of forming around these two flights which is an only in our modern age with this story really get wings. Are these astronauts. So i decided okay. Article for ad astra called astronaut or not. And it's interesting. Because as i was writing this thing another story came out the said. Hey on the very day of basis flight the faa released new specifications about what an astronaut is spec. They moved the goalposts goalpost. So what is an astronaut guys. Our age and astronaut was this carefully cultivated. Mythical figure that nasa put together during the space race of the best. We've got they're all white men. They're all in the peak of their physical health. They were all military former military fighter. Pilots fighter jocks. And you know that was a certain cut down over the years. That's changed by the time. The shuttle program came around more. Normal people were flying as payload specialists and so forth And they were devoted to doing things other than actually flying the spacecraft they were up there experiments and build the space station so forth so this definition has moved around bit so now we have these private citizens going up at least in the case of bezos later when nealon's flying his space x starship these are both base craft that are the fly themselves not even on the joystick right. It's doing its own things not so very different than that. Estes rocket that. I launched from the park with my eight year old son sometime ago. Right the came down on the first base. Line of steph off shoot. Yeah but as these as these flights came down in both cases of bezos in branson they got astronaut wings will. What's that well. The astronaut you know real mass astronauts quote unquote who are government employees..

Jeffrey kluger spacex Jeff bezos air force boeing astra amazon Jeff faa Martin nealon nasa bezos us Estes branson
Africa now free of wild poliovirus, but polio threat remains

TIME's Top Stories

02:25 min | 2 years ago

Africa now free of wild poliovirus, but polio threat remains

"The World Health Organization declares Africa polio-free. By Jeffrey Kluger. Nobody will ever know the identity of the thousands of African children who were not killed or paralyzed by polio this year, they would have been hard to keep track of no matter what because in ordinary times they would've followed thousands last year and thousands the year before and on back in a generations long trail of suffering and death instead, no African children were claimed by polio. This year or last year or the year before it was in two thousand sixteen that the last case of wild circulating polio was reported in Nigeria the final country on the fifty four nation African continent where the disease was endemic and with the required multi year waiting period. Now, having passed with no more cases, the World Health Organization today officially declared the entirety of, Africa polio-free. A disease that as recently as the late nineteen eighties was endemic in one hundred, twenty, five countries claiming three hundred, fifty, thousand children per year has now been run to ground in just two remaining places, Pakistan and Afghanistan where there have been a collective one, hundred, two cases so far twenty twenty that's one hundred to too many. But there's no denying the scope of the whol announcement today's victory over the wild poliovirus in the. African region is a testament to what can happen when partners from a variety of sectors join forces to accomplish a major global health goal says John Hueco, general, secretary, and CEO of Rotary International. It is something the world can and should aspire to during these turbulent times. It was Rotary and International Nonprofit Service Organization that kicked off the polio endgame in Nineteen Eighty eight with the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative the GPA. That program aimed to leverage the power of rotaries thirty, five, thousand clubs and one point twenty, two, million members in two hundred countries and territories worldwide to make polio only the second human disease after smallpox to be pushed over the brink of extinction.

Polio Global Polio Eradication Initi World Health Organization Africa Jeffrey Kluger International Nonprofit Servic Nigeria John Hueco Rotary International Pakistan Whol Afghanistan Secretary CEO
"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"jeffrey kluger" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Lovell who commanded the Apollo thirteen mission the movie that was put out in the mid nineties brought new favorite new attention to an entire new generation just so accurate was that film to what really happened in space we'll touch on that end just how scared did James level ever again the most fascinating element what how there's a lot of fascinating elements is the work that you and Hayes and Swider did up there an improved team work than on the ground of troubleshooting and taking it step by step member reading a comment you made at some point along the way about you didn't really become overwhelmed by the but by the gravity of the situation you have to take it step by step and I think that that's also by the way great life lesson well that rodeo the team had to have a positive attitude who we didn't know exactly what went wrong first of all how how dangerous we were and it certainly is yeah things started out of school and got worse and worse it's got darker and darker about flights and then we had to go into the lunar module of course use all has a lifeboat then we understood that the only way that we're going to survive this whole thing is work together and work with the ground control people they should control and look so we have to do to get all and and see if the lunar module was sufficient with materials and engine fuel things like that to do it and then they keep on going it is a classic example was the build up of carbon dioxide in the lunar module because it was designed for a two people for two days and here we were three people for four days of course we're all exhaling carbon dioxide to is building up for more thirteen the film was that accurate and and and I I know you played a key role in the in the production of that and and guiding it along the way for people who have seen it or maybe young young people who are maybe now seeing it for the first time how accurate what's that movie to what you guys experience it was very accurate okay follow the book very closely with her we're very happy about there was certain artistic licenses that were taken only to enhance the story itself which you know you could do without the up some of that but I will have the story as that of the movie redone of of of the actual flight the book of course lost moon the story that you co wrote with journalist Jeffrey Kluger back in nineteen ninety four and highly recommend that what was your most scared moment up there during that thirteen mission when were you most fearful but I've heard it all because I think I have I have a you know apprehension for the time of the explosion occurred at the time I landed on the water but I I put aside being afraid I think you have two guys did two days late the the the problems for a long time and so we're very successful in working with issue control of bird for C. we had communications with them it will overcome or things that we had to do how much disappointment did you have from not being able to step foot on the moon well always got back and of the ground like I was disappointed for awhile because I didn't land on the phone as long on the that hi I was going to be what the fifth man to be alone and and actually they use the flight was the insulin to NASA I mean is there was almost like it was planned to be there because people were getting bored with going to the moon as I mentioned we were the fifth place to land and and it wasn't being covered by the news media because the other flights had done and so they were they actually occurred everybody you know after years of that and glued to the television set things like that and it really brought back what NASA can do and what we're doing in the space program so some aspects I think that the bottle thirteen played a better rock bigger role and are you a follow up programs that maybe some of those future place.

Lovell