35 Burst results for "Jeffrey Katzenberg"

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Sway

Sway

05:10 min | 1 d ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Sway

"A legend in hollywood. He helped turn dizzy around in the eighties and nineties. By overseeing huge hits like the lion king and beauty the beast he also co-founded dreamworks animation studio behind shrek and kung fu panda like much of hollywood kassenberg dabbled in tech but in two thousand eighteen. He made a giant leap when he and former ebay. Ceo meg whitman. Founded a short form video subscription platform later named qube the idea videos with the production value of net flicks. The length of you to be raised a whopping one point. Seven five billion dollars and launched in april twenty twenty six months later they announced platform would be shutting. Down could be was a flop but katzenberg has doubled down on tech his holding company. Wonder co has invested in a range of techie businesses from digital security companies like aura to sites like the infatuation which by the way just told jp morgan so i wanted to catch up with katzenberg to see what he learned from the face planet. Webby where he sees the battle between tv and tick talk billing and why he's given up hollywood for the land of the techies. Hi jeffrey thanks for being here cure rate to see you when we last met you were very bullish on qube. I was less so. Because i was worried about youtube. And you're gonna spend a lot of money. And i thought a lot of these young influencers did not do that. Did very well so i want you to talk about the experience of this company. How you're looking at it now since you closed down which was about a while ago you almost a year. yeah actually. So here's obviously mixed feelings. I i have one of real pride. I felt what we built quickly actually realized In many respects the best. Of what i imagined when we set out i thought the idea of being able to tell movies in chapters was a big idea sort of next evolution of narrative and i felt like the creative community more than delivered on my expectations around that so we would look back and say. Why.

kassenberg hollywood Ceo meg whitman katzenberg Wonder co dreamworks animation kung fu panda shrek ebay jp morgan Webby jeffrey youtube
Roku Channel Adds Quibi Shows

Talking Tech

02:13 min | 4 months ago

Roku Channel Adds Quibi Shows

"They listeners. Mike schneider here. And i'm brett molina and welcome back to talking tech so mike whatever happened to that video app funny mentioned that i think folks will remember the short live video service that launched in april twenty twenty by former dreamworks animation ceo. Jeffrey katzenberg and former ebay ceo. Meg whitman it got. Its name qube from quick bites or video snacks of eight to twelve minutes ideal for riding the subway or bus or in newburgh or waiting in line unfortunately justice launch the nation shut shutdown with the corona virus and started binging seasons of long form content. So could be shut down six months later in october. Twenty twenty then. In january twenty twenty one roku announced it was acquiring quibbles content for its own growing roku channel and now brokers gonna make a huge chunk of that library thirty shows available may twentieth which roku celebrate to streaming day. That's the day it shipped its first streaming player back in two thousand eight back then. It was called the netflix player by roku because roku he don't know began as a part of netflix and then was spun out of the company. Now some folks have seen this content because qube has more had more than one million downloads tap when it launched initially but for most of this. This is going to be new stuff. One of the shows hashtag free. Ray sean has already won short-form creative arts emmy awards for stars laurence fishburne and jasmine separate jones. There's also show starring sophie. Turner of game of thrones and liam hemsworth of the hunger games and christoph waltz specter. There's also documentaries Called ball and big rad wolf. And there's reality shows. I like christie's court where chrissy teigen presides and the revived punked hosted by chance. The rapper. also. Come into roku this week. A double helping of kevin hart who die.

Mike Schneider Brett Molina Roku Jeffrey Katzenberg Dreamworks Animation Meg Whitman Newburgh Netflix Mike Ebay Ray Sean Qube Jasmine Separate Jones Starring Sophie Laurence Fishburne Emmy Awards Liam Hemsworth Christoph Waltz Turner Chrissy Teigen
SolarWinds - The Gift That Keeps On Giving - DTNS 3943 - burst 04

Daily Tech News Show

33:27 min | 9 months ago

SolarWinds - The Gift That Keeps On Giving - DTNS 3943 - burst 04

"You're unique and so are your taxes. Turbo tax live has experienced tax experts. Who listen to you. Learn about your unique tax situations and answer your questions and on top of all that they can do your taxes from start to finish. Maybe you started investing and want some reassurance from an expert that you're doing things right maybe you're now self employed and needs some expert advice on what qualifies as a home office deduction or maybe it rather have an expert file your taxes for you so you can focus on what matters most no matter what. Your situation is turbo. tax live tax. Experts can answer your questions. Give tax advice review your return before you file or even do it all for you. Turbo tax live. Gives you confidence that you're uniquely you. Taxes are done right into a turbo tax. Live file with the help of an expert or let an expert file for you coming up on how to clone someone security key roku by some qube and we'll make the apple cars. This is the daily tech news for friday january. Eighth twenty twenty. One in los angeles on tom. Merit and from studio redwood on sarah lane from studio colorado. I'm shannon morris drawn the top tech stories in cleveland. I'm lynn per nine. The show's producer. Roger j we were just talking about a cas product that makes you ice cream and ninety seconds whenever you wanted and why roger never cries wider conversation join our expanded show. Good day internet at patriotair dot com slash dpd s. Let's start with a few things you should know. Amazon has discontinued its prime pantry. Grocery and household item service products previously available in pantry will now be available like any other products on amazon. So it's not going away to gather but the service itself prime pantry launched in twenty fourteen offering reduced shipping on up to forty five pounds of household goods for a monthly fee. Amazon node vied prime pant pantry subscribers about the closure in december and then issued refunds the. Uk's competition and markets authority launched an investigation into google's privacy sandbox. That would block third party. Cookies in chrome regulator received complaints from the marketers for an open web coalition saying the plan would abuse google's dominant position in online advertising. So the investigations going to evaluate. If the privacy sandbox changes would concentrate advertising spending market share with google samsung launched the galaxy chromebook to a cheaper version of the galaxy chromebook at launched last year so instead of four k it has a ten eighty p lcd screen with less storage fewer cameras less ram. It's also heavier and thicker overall but it also now starts at five hundred forty nine dollars instead of one thousand dollars. That has a thirteen point. Three inch nineteen twenty by ten eight hundred sixteen nine. Lcd touchscreen with the dual core intel seller on five twenty five you upgradable to an intel core. I three ten ten eleven ten one. one zero. You eight gigs. Ram and one hundred twenty five gigs of storage for six hundred ninety nine dollars a shortage of semiconductors affecting automakers. Volkswagen said last month that they needed to adjust first-quarter manufacturing plans around the globe because of the shortage. Now honda says it will cut domestic output by about four thousand cars this month at one of its factories in japan nissan is adjusting production numbers for its note hatchback model and ford has moved up previously planned downtime at a kentucky plant for its sport utility vehicle factory to the jin chips all right. Well we're talking about cars. Let's talk about the the apple car. Yeah a lot of rumors as of late will really over the last few years. But but but the rumors had resurfaced recently and hyundais. Now talking to apple about kerr's so says the company hyundai representative told cnbc quotes. We understand that apple isn't discussion with a variety of global automakers including hyundai motor as the discussion is at its early stage. Nothing has been decided. Korean economic daily said that apple suggested the arrangements and hundred was reviewing the terms that involved e production and also battery development hyundai has had his own battery platform called e. g. m. p. going into production later this year. So might be saying what you're doing. Reuters sources say that apple would like to produce a passenger vehicle by twenty twenty four however might not be that date bloomberg's mark gurman reports in thomas e. v. from apple is five to seven years away and michio recently said he wouldn't be surprised if it takes until twenty twenty eight. Yes what's probably going on. Here is apple and i think this significant part has decided to start investigating how they would build. Whatever it is. They're going to build whether it's a whole car or an integrated platform and they're going to different manufacturers and parts suppliers and folks like magna including hyundai. And saying what are you got. How can you help us with this. And is a great company for this because they make parts they make systems. They make full cars. There's all kinds of services in the conday company that could play a part with apple so it may not be. That apple knows what they want from hyundai. It may just be that they're going and saying hey let's talk. You do a lot of the kinds of things that we think we're going to need. I'm pretty excited about this. I just got my first hyundai ever this year and my perception of this story was weight but hyundai currently uses android auto and a lot of their their cars. So i would love to see. How apple would integrate Hyundai's current technologies into something that is very useful for that apple ecosystem not just looking at e itself but also the The the systems inside of it the controls in how they would manage that four a driver and a passenger in the car. Yeah i mean. I think that's one of the big questions that i have is okay. Let's say let's say it's hyundai that that applet ended up working with with clearly not set in stone at least from what we know at this point. But let's say it's the companies for kicks. Let's imagine that that's what it is. Yeah it is. It is an apple car that hyundai produces a lot of parts for the way that works with lots of other companies to produce other hardware for apple. I mean that that's the loftiest kind of goal that we're looking at and maybe that would take till twenty twenty eight at you know if if apple was lucky. I think it probably has more to do with like you said shannon not that you know android auto wouldn't still be prevalent in a lot of passenger vehicles but maybe at some sort of it's a special relationship. It's it's a special kind of os inside a car that is supposed to you. Know i don't know move some merch because What apple is providing on the software side is is. Is that much more interesting. I really don't know if you look at that. Bloomberg article mark gurman sources are saying that Tesla people that apple has hired are working on things like interior exterior. Drive train stereo. Desist the kinds of things. You need when you're building a car not carting a software platform so then the question becomes is it the apple car period. Maybe hendaye makes it. Maybe somebody else makes it. And you know they'll figure out how to distribute it or is it the apple car by sunday and you go to hyundai dealership to buy it the way you went to an. At and t. store to an apple iphone but it's really apples car in cooperation with sunday. Are there multiple partners. I mean that's all the kind of stuff we're waiting to see but it really does feel like we have gotten to the point where this is no longer just yeah. They're working on project titan. They don't know what they're gonna do to. They have an idea. It's more than just software and they're working out the details. Maybe they don't even know that yet. Well i'm interested to see what happens but we also have some other news. Security among the systems impacted by the solar winds attack is the electron filing system. Used by the us federal courts at investigation is underway to determine if confidentiality of documents filed with the courts was breached and as a result starting wednesday confidential documents filed with the courts will be stored on standalone systems. Not uploaded big difference so these are documents sealed from public access because they contain sensitive information like investigative techniques identities of informants and a lot more other. Us federal agencies affected included the justice department the state treasury and energy departments as well solar winds has engaged. The krebs stay most security consulting group to help deal with this attack. That firm was formed by alex. Stamos the former chief security officer at yahoo and facebook and chris krebs the former director of the us cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency or sisa. So krebs was fired last month. By the president after finding no evidence of with voting systems in the twenty twenty election. Yeah stamos first of all brilliant for those two to team up and smart for solar winds to engage them for what they say is Helping with transparency with companies that are affected But this we we are not done finding out how bad this is. There are reports that there may have been other ways that this whoever is behind this intruded beyond just solar winds. They're finding evidence of that. They have not been able to root out the people that got into this vulnerability from all systems yet. They're still in there in a lot of cases. And you know this. This kind of confidential information is exactly the kind of thing you fear that someone would get intruding into a government system informants investigative techniques that you can now learn from to evade being prosecuted or caught yourself. That's that's crown jewel type stuff it's it's very interesting. In fact krebs spoke on record saying that it could potentially take years to figure out how deep the solar winds attack actually went and how many different kinds of infrastructure. You know brands and everything that it might have affected so this is not something. That's going to die anytime soon. I'm glad that they are reaching out. Craig's and stay most though because that i agree with you tom. It's excellent. excellent team roku made a few interesting announcements roku says. Npd data shows that the roku s was the top selling smarter operating system in the us and canada in two thousand twenty thirty one percent market share in canada. Thirty eight percent in the united states That's pushed the samsung's tizen number two. At least we don't actually know samsung's ties and was number. One in two thousand nineteen also announced a wireless soundbar reference design that uses wifi for its roku. Tv ready program remember. Last year roku announced the program which had a designed for wired. Sound bars. The program includes tcl. Pokemon on an element has just announced. They'll join as well with two point. Two point one ready sound bars roku tv ready to expand internationally later this year as well. But here's the big roku news roku has agreed to acquire exclusive global distribution rights to more than seventy five Shows documentaries some of which had not been released before qube shutdown. So there'll be some new stuff that nobody's ever seen after their exclusivity deal expires. That'll happen in a bit more than a year. Depending on the show roku will still have the rights to show the content just not exclusively until thousand twenty seven the content will have to be presented in original increments of ten minutes or less. The deal doesn't let them stitch it altogether. The content will be added to the more than forty thousand movies and tv shows already available. In the roku channel shows include from Be anyway punked. Murder house. Flip and dummy which stars anna kendrick. I never watched the new punk. I heard had its moments. The whole qube thing. It's really interesting to me because it was sort of like. It crashed and burned so quickly. And there's a lotta shot and friday around folks in the industry about it. And i think that's not because qube was doing things wrong. It was because the company had raised so much money time. Because you know. They had meg whitman. Jeffrey katzenberg who are you know. Heavy hitters and there was a little bit of like you are being to embassies and therefore you shall fail. The company did fail and the idea that some creators will have a new life on another platform shows. That just don't even saw but people still worked on. And maybe you're really good. I think this this makes a lotta sense and good for roku to get exclusivity for at least a few years so does roku have to wait at all in order to start showing this content or can happen immediately. I don't know when the start date. Whenever the deal is you know goes into effect. Then they'll immediately be able to to show it so you know within a month or so it would be my guess anyway but no they. They don't have once. The deal is actually in effect. They don't have to wait. What's going on here. is that the baby. Production companies own the rights to their own stuff but they have a two year exclusive for each one of their shows with qube and those two year exclusives are now being transferred to roku so roka will be able to have the exclusive for the remainder of whatever. The period was with quick. That's why it's more a year. Exclusively goes away then they still have the right to show it until twenty twenty seven but the production companies that made it can now start shopping at around to other places as well so the production companies do hold the content and remember this is just the content. Qube is still in a over. Its turnstile technology which is holding it up from selling its technology and i would expect once it resolves that lawsuit should resolve it in a way that they still hold their technology. They'll sell that to so this isn't the last you're going to hear could be selling off a part of it. I would imagine. Gotcha yeah that whole. The whole technology part of qube was again was an ambitious thing that was released at a very inopportune time in twenty twenty when everyone was like. We're just sitting at home like we don't need this like mobile phone technology. It's like cool that you can shifted around but you can't even cast thing. I mean the company did fix that pretty soon after allow about she was just. I mean it's just did. The timing couldn't be worse but that technology when you think of it in a variety of other form factors such as monitors that swivel talked about some of those yesterday. I don't know that qube or tiktok or snapchat or all of the stuff where we're like. Oh yeah that's the. That's the portrait view. Rather than landscape view. That works for certain apps is is is all that this is four. I think there's more to it So we'll see what happens and there's patents and things that are always valuable because you can use those to extract some concessions and money and stuff. So yeah expect that all to come join the conversation in our discord which you can join by linking to a patriotic. Can't get in there and talk about your favourite qube shows with all the other discord folks. Just lincoln to your patriotic out at patriotair dot com slash. Dpd s all right shannon. How do you clone a security key. Well i i will say please do not stop using your security keys because of this story i will explain it. Researchers from ninja lab published a paper on thursday showing how you could clone a google tightened security gate this is a two factor authentication key which is very similar to a you. Be key that you have to plug in or tap in order to access an account after putting in your username or your password credentials. Were both so in order to pull off the clone. You would need physical access to the key for about ten hours. Sometimes a minimum of ten hours just kind of depends on how good you are at this. About twelve thousand dollars worth of equipment physical equipment and custom software and some advanced skills in electrical engineering and cryptography as well. So you have to remove the chip and then take measurements of it at a being registered on each account that you went to attack the measurements observe electro magnetic radiation as the chip generates digital signatures that let the attacker slowly deduced the private key so measurements take about six hours per account. That's not including taking apart. The original tighten security key putting it back together. Then you need to seal the chip back into its case. You also need the targets password in order for this to work. So the reason it works is because of vulnerability in the security hardware chip residing within the google titan key and that is called an eighty seven hundred x by this company called. Xp if it's exploited in attacker could grab the elliptic curve cryptographic private key for the account and the same chip is actually found in other two factor. Authentication physical tokens as well like There's a ubiquity that it's found in but chances of attack or very very minimal given the scope of the attack so if you do all of this without the target ever noticing then they would never duplicated key but again given the scope given how much it costs and everything behind the scenes probably when it happened to normal user. The point of these security keys being the best way to use For two factor. Is that you can't even get at your private key right you. Nobody has to be able to get in there like the chip. Just doesn't make it available so the fact that they were able to get in there and get it is huge. You know the fact that they were able to do this is significant. But i mean if you're not a target of an advanced persistent threat. You don't need to worry about this. No one's going to go to the trouble to do this. And even if you're a target. I would guess shannon that most of them probably would be able to notice if someone took their key for ten hours or more you. You likely likely would especially since a lot of people with hardware tokens like google titan will stick them on a on their keychain for example like with their house keys or whatever wherever they keep all those personal physical devices that they don't want lost or stolen they keep them all on engaging so if somebody was to take one of these out of your purse out of your gym locker wherever it might be and remove it for like ten hour street minimum. You would likely know that this would have happened. the neat thing about these chips inside of these. Google tightened security keys. And any other cryptographic hardware tokens like these is that. Even the manufacturer doesn't know the private key so the fact that they were able to find vulnerability on these specific chipsets is really interesting. And i think that's the important bit of that. Is is even though the google titan like the end all be all of really excellent. Two factor authentication. There's always. The potential that vulnerabilities can be found. So i'm happy that this research came out. It's so fascinating and it's so interesting in this means that an x. p. and other security chipset manufacturers that sell these teeny tiny chips to google or whoever the company might be They can build on this. They can research and figure out what the next version of their chipset needs to entail in order to not be vulnerable to this again in the future. Yeah i mean this is really a good security story right. We finally figured out because there's always a way right. We finally figured out the way you get the private key out of a security key and guess what it's really hard takes a long time and now that we know it we can make it even harder and hopefully you know push that barrier out even further and even if somebody did have time to do this and you didn't notice i was reading the paper because i'm a huge nerd and they go as far as using fuming fuming nitric acid in order to get like melt the epoxy off of the original google titan. How are you going to put that back together. In order for somebody to not notice like there's a lot of intricacies with this attack in order for it to actually be pulled off so chances are very very slim that somebody would be able to pull off so again as i said at the very beginning. Don't stop using your google tightened security key if you have one keep using it because chances are you would never be attacked with this. Just just know if you haven't seen it in ten hours look together strange. This is going to be in a movie though. I'm calling that shot right now. We're gonna we're gonna see this movie. Where like i hope so. Somebody goes into surgery and they take his key and they go out and do all this and they slip it back in because ten hours later. He wakes up from anesthesia on something like that. I just hope they talked to the researchers so they actually show it off right. Yeah Sony tv and audio announcements Starting with details for its own tv lineup. Sticking with lead ravi x four k and k. Tv's will support four k at one hundred twenty hertz variable refresh rate vr as well as a l l m low latency mode and e arc. These are all things that are important. If you've got a ps five now you've got sony. Tv they can go. That sony also has an improved a chip that is going to improve the picture and sound positioning. So it aligns with what you see on the screen. Sony's master series. Tv's will come with a sensor that adjusts white balanced immense. Your ambiente color temp. You don't have to do anything they'll just do it. Also an aluminum heat shield. That will make for brighter. All the sets will support. Hdmi two point one. Another big one for ps five dolby vision hdr angle tv. Sony also announced. It's three hundred sixty reality audio platform if you're not familiar with three hundred sixty degree audio places instruments and vocals in a virtual sound field around your head but using just the one speaker so you can do this in an amazon echo or google. Home sony will start streaming video with three sixty audio later this year. Starting with concert from zara larsson on january eleventh. And somebody's gonna make speakers that support this. It'll be may supported by other speakers as well. But sony is going to put out the are five thousand and three thousand They've got that dark cloth. Surface that all these speakers seem to have these days with either bronze or silver accents. Work with google and amazon assistance and can connect to select sony abroad via. Tv's as well as supporting wi fi bluetooth. Spotify connect in google cast. The speakers do automated calibration to the room. They're in donut. The press a button for that. Either and we'll simulate three hundred sixty degree audio for stereo tracks as well. The five thousand cost five hundred pounds or five hundred ninety nine euros no. Us price yet on the three thousand two hundred eighty pounds. Three hundred fifty nine euros. This seems this. Seems like it's shaping up to be one of the trends. Is this the sort of three hundred sixty degree audio while you're listening to your black bank and it's just one speaker or potentially a couple of speakers ativan. Maybe yeah yeah already supported. Yeah there's less of kind of like What do i have to do. Five point one surround or at least get a couple of speakers and make them a stereo pair type thing. I really haven't heard this in. I don't know. I used to hang out at magnolia at best. Buy all the time. And just like geek out on stuff like this. of course. this technology wasn't around at the time. But it's really come on. Let's turn on some stuff and see the speakers. Do it works well. Then that's awesome my first reaction because i got rid of my kind of pants speakers some years ago because friend of mine needed them more than i did and i didn't have room in my apartment but i miss that i'm also an a. A permanent now that's smaller and kind of has a lot of weird angles and i find audio bounces off walls in wiz. That wouldn't if it was more of a square box broom So i'm not sure that i'm the perfect target market for this. You're the you're the one puts this through its paces and sees if it really works. Yeah if i could actually work as advertised again with some funny angles in a big old frame. Then i'm i'm really into this and i've always been. I don't have a sony. Tv currently sorry zony. But i was abroad. Bravi a person for years. Nears i think what the new bravi line is coming out with. Looks really nice. And i mean not totally in the market for a new tv. But i like the fact that i might get a new sony again paired up with a sony speaker. You got three six. Yeah already got all this stuff. It's going to be a messed anyway. You slice it. But i like. I like this to be sixty reality audio platform. What would you have set up in your house. I was straight up going to mention sonos because if if it doesn't have the connectability to be able to work with all of my other platforms that currently have invested in. Then chances are i wouldn't buy it. So i do have sono says in my house and i do have some issues connecting those with other speakers in the household to like like my google hub for example so the fact that this works with google and amazon assistant the speaker specifically The audio speakers. I think that's pretty cool. I like that. They are bringing that in and i am interested because i do live in a household. That has very high ceilings. How this would work in that kind of environment. So yeah. I'm very interested in the audio aspect. Well you might also be interested in what colour has come out. Oh yes the folks who make things like toilets and and sinks and lots of appliances however. Been a real. Cas mainstay for the last few years for some cool innovations and this year is no different. Even though we're not in vegas koehler has a new smart bathtub called the stillness bath. That lets you use an app or use your voice using google or amazon's assistance to fill up the water or perhaps set the mood by changing the color of the lights around the tab or even add some fog. You know you wanna kind of pretend like you're in the then present routines also turn on features in a certain orders if you wanna get kind of creative. that's cool. Yeah the certain amount of limitations with the base model and the base model is not cheap so temperature and depth control models alone will cost around eight thousand six hundred ninety eight dollars. That's right it's almost nine thousand dollar bathtub. If you want the experience tower that lets you activate fog and aromatherapy. That will run you just over ten thousand dollars. Both models are available in july. There are real things and if you want the version with lights and floor grades for overflow fifteen thousand nine hundred ninety eight dollars available. This october signed me off. I won't be buying those. Nope not even a little bit but we could have taken a bath at s in the new in the pre show roger was like. Why would you want fog. It's like this. Why does anyone want to be on. Yeah racist luxury suites in hotels for sure as well as apple's houses sure yeah something well. Yeah it's it's that like hey look at what my bath can do people go. Wow very fancy and then you know ten years from now will be like remember when we thought it was fancied to talk to your bathtub so that it would start filling up without touching it but Yeah it's it's somewhat silly because of the price. But i'm not really much of a bath person but they do look very nice all right. Let's check out the mail bag but ads do it. Nick wrote in with a pronunciation. Ramps own neck. You are not alone he says. Ac's rog is an initial list. Because it's our og like fbi or cia. People say ron yet. They're lower end gaming brand tough not initially them. It's an acronym like scuba or produce you f but pronounced off. It's like ace's can't make up their name minds. Then there's strict which is our subbrand strikes as a word it's a completely nonsensical made up word. But it's a word and you pronounce it as such nick as honestly as somebody. That buys a lot of hardware. Because i've rarely had a bad experience with them over the past twenty years. I am baffled by some branding decisions. The one the bugs me. The most is the strict subbrand. Sometimes acis makes the tricks products. The high end product in the product stock yet other times. It's a mid range product. Would it be too much to ask for consistency and product. Branding twenty twenty one. Yes apparently apparently we feel your pain. Nick i love the dichter's just like i just need to vent you guys. Let me let me let me get this up. Just we appreciate that. Yeah i mean i. i'm with you nick. Everyday is a fresh new hell when it comes to reading out some model numbers but what is not is shouting out our patrons at our master and grandmaster levels. Today they include christmas merton james and digression daniels and of course landon peralta back and illustrating the show. What have you drawn for us today. Len well you know. I'm really excited. Say that we've have the first image of the ample car the car. Which i'm that's what i'm calling it. I'm sure they're gonna take my advice. Coming around twenty twenty seven ish or so maybe You know you may. If you're a fan of richard scary busy world a you may be very familiar with the look of of the apple. Ii car I think it'll be a big hit with with fans of people who have kids So check it out. this is called meet. I car And this is available right now. My patriot on which by the way has to new levels. If lets me be your Let me be your teacher. Your mentor with your artwork. I can give you some help that way. And patriots dot com forward slash. Len plus i also just launched a new product called flip face max which is over at lend store dot com. And i i want to show you what that looks like. I did something special. for For our friend shannon for snubs. This is a this is what the flipping flipped. Face masks. looks like This is It's a little bit higher Higher end than the normal flip sister used to But those are on the front page story on pro dot com. But this is for you shannon. If people wanna see that because most people are just listening to this what should they do. Go to well right now. It's going to be on twitter instagram later. But just go to lend dot com. You'll see all the ones i've done over the past couple of weeks and including including shannon's so it's really lovely. Let it's yeah. That's adorable shannon morris First show of twenty twenty one certainly not the last. I know you're a busy lady at. Where can people keep up with your work. Oh my gosh. I have been busy. Youtube dot com slash shannon morse. Just like name. I just did at tech predictions video and it was so cool. I got like eighteen up and coming tech youtubers to their twenty twenty one tech predictions for the year. And there's some names in there that you that you definitely know. Aunt pruitt Miriam take rene ritchie. So i had a whole bunch of people joining and kinda give me their thoughts and It was very very optimistic. And i was really happy to see that. So if you want to see that video and the rest of mine check out my youtube channel. Hey folks if you need. Just the headlines. It's okay to skip eighteen s. Know you get busy. Check out our related show daily tech headlines all the essential tech news in about five minutes daily tech headlines dot com. We're live on this show. Monday through friday at four thirty. Pm eastern twenty one. Thirty e. c. And you can find out more at daily tech news show dot com slash lives. We back monday with chris. Ashley have a gray weekend. All this show is part of the broadband network. Get more at frog pants. Dot com club who've enjoyed this broader.

Tech Technology Apple Hyundai Hyundai Motor Mark Gurman Nissan Honda Cnbc Kerr Kentucky Ford Japan Michio Reuters Bloomberg Thomas Magna Google Roku Krebs Shannon Morris Sarah Lane Roger J Competition And Markets Author Samsung Shannon Sony Chris Krebs
How Quibi crashed and burned so quickly

The 3:59

04:03 min | 9 months ago

How Quibi crashed and burned so quickly

"So equity was always the odd duck all the new streaming services that immersive last year for just for listeners who don't stand top of the streaming rewards just give quick description of what could be is and what's happened to it. Quimby was a mobile initially mobile only than kind of transition to be mobile centric streaming video service. That made cereal like tv. In very short episodes everything was like ten minutes or last and it was very very expensive programming. They made big budget programming with really big stars. So it's pitch was that it was kind of like a curated. Youtube only with like the biggest and brightest of hollywood involved. The problem is they launched the service that was designed to be watched. Moberly on the go in those like brief much of your day where you have a spare ten minutes to watch something getting coffee. Waiting for us. Launched it at the beginning of all the lockdowns keeping people trapped in their homes so they had a mobile on the ghost service launching when nobody was mobile or on the go. That's one of the problems with but there's underlying consideration that. The premise of the service given that people already have youtube and they can watch other things on the go to netflix on the go on their mobile phones that the premise of this being a service at all was flawed from the beginning. So what's happened. At least as far as we know right now is that would be instead of trying to survive after six months is going to just shut down. We don't know exactly win but at some point the service is going to go dark and this programming is going to. I don't exactly know what's going to happen. So all this stuff that they made. Yeah i wanna get into that but it just. It's interesting just sort of looking at the background of their the foundation that this company was built on one point. Seven billion dollars in funding of meg. Whitman from hewlett packard. Lots of a-list talent But medina think looking back at this now it was was the model just fundamentally or was it just a matter. Bedtime may and launching in the middle of a pandemic. i remember maybe even before they had a name. I believe they katzenberg jeffrey katzenberg. The hollywood Whitman as you mentioned the ceo of the service they went to south by and they had this whole presentation. And i remember coming out of this presentation being like these people have no idea what they're getting into you know. They had really really ambitious goals. They talked a really big game but they're getting into something. That is really hard to break into going up against something like youtube. Which has two billion people watching it every month. So that's one way to kind of put in perspective whether or not the pandemic was the real. You know silver bullet that killed qube but also mentioned that i did. I did a poll on twitter. Asking people this exact question because they make whitman. Jeffrey kassenberg worth open letter. The apologized for disappointing. Their investors their workers their talent and they said in there. You know it we may never know what was the problem here was timing or was this a bad idea to begin with and so i had a poll on twitter quoting that portion of the letter and saying well which was it could be equals a bad idea or timing and i think eighty six percent of people could be was just a bad idea to begin with so

Youtube Quimby Moberly Hollywood Whitman Katzenberg Jeffrey Katzenberg Netflix Hewlett Packard Medina Jeffrey Kassenberg Twitter
Startup Streamer Quibi Quits

Business Wars Daily

05:04 min | 11 months ago

Startup Streamer Quibi Quits

"A huge Hollywood experiment ended its life in a way that seems somehow fitting qube accompany designed to bring miniature Netflix's quality shows to your smartphone call. It quits earlier this month like it's programs which were no longer than ten minutes apiece. quickies vary life was itself short only about six months long the infant media company hit attracted almost two billion dollars from investors about one hundred, fifty, million dollars in advertising and some big name actors and directors. As a result quibbles dramatic closure has spawned no end of speculative criticism about what the startup did wrong and whether it's leaders Hollywood powerhouse, Jeffrey Katzenberg and former HP. CEO Meg Whitman did anything right? In case you haven't heard of it. The original idea behind Qube was to make high quality programs that were short enough to watch from start to finish. While waiting to do something else say riding the subway were standing at checkout line. These wouldn't be user generated youtube like videos but what qube envisioned as the quote next generation of storytelling dramas comedies a non-fiction programs cut into quick bites the origin of the company's name you get the idea. QUBE had the bad luck to launch during the pandemic that meant the service designed explicitly for people out and about debuted when people were in definitely not out and about position as another streamer. But Not at first on your TV quickly did what most streamers and new apps do when it launched in early April it offered a ninety day free trial about a million and a half people signed up and presumably began watching quickies original shows thrillers like. Wireless about a drunk man caught in a New Year's Eve snowstorm free Ray Sean drama about a black man accused of killing a police officer and last looks a series about scandals in the fashion world. As I said earlier at launch, you can only watch on a smartphone despite the fact that most viewers were quarantined in their homes with perfectly usable TV's at their disposal. It took a few more months for quick to make the TV leap. The question back in May and June was how many of those initial free viewers would convert to paying customers quickies price was high five month with ads were eight dollars without them as the verge points out apple TV plus costs four, ninety, nine a month worse quickies higher prices more expensive than Disney plus. The answer on those conversions was clear. Qube didn't get anywhere near enough money or viewers, and with that dearth viewers, some advertisers threatened to canceled on October Twenty Second Katzenberg Whitman published an open letter on medium announcing queries collapse. The founders laid some of the blame on Covid nineteen but not all in addition to timing they said, another likely reason could be. That the idea itself wasn't strong enough to justify a standalone streaming service. Indeed. A great deal of the criticism says exactly that the format itself was flawed from the start ten minutes may have been far too long for some content and far too short for others. A sort of nether world that works for user generated youtube content, but not for expensive productions that aspire to be the next Netflix. As one example, the Guardian reporter. Jack Bernhardt commended free ratio on actors Steffan Jones Laurence Fishburne an emmy winner. Jasmine Safest Jones for spectacular performances in powerful production. But he added quote it feels almost offensive to everyone involved that I can only watch it on tiny phone screen. Furthermore, he said it should have been a two hour film not fifteen quick bites. The company is exploring selling the rights to some content screenwriters and producers with shows underdevelopment or left to try to sell them elsewhere a tough sell given that most media companies can't use five or ten minute episodes. is returning about three hundred, fifty million dollars to investors and giving severance to two hundred employees. The Wall Street Journal reports, Katzenberg and Whitman's letter puts quickies. Of the entire very busy streaming media ecosystem the executives would never have imagined launching during a pandemic they said, but they admitted other businesses have faced these unprecedented challenges and have found their way through it. Indeed, we've reported here on boom times for Netflix's and Disney plus among others all of benefited enormously from lockdowns. The mistake Qube made lies in a different sphere altogether says verge critic Julia Alexander Qube didn't fail because TIKTOK. existed she says, it failed because executives refuse to see Tiktok its biggest competition she wrote tick tock has exploded globally with an ever growing mountain of user generated short form video video that is virtually free to produce free to consume. But qube had its I trained on net flicks if Alexander is correct quimby was looking for threats or a role model in the wrong direction. In an already struggling Hollywood, it's hard to watch the layoffs of employees and the suffering of artists who shows are now killed. A great deal of talent converged around quipping remains to be seen. We're all that talent. Finding out.

Qube Katzenberg Whitman Netflix Julia Alexander Qube Jeffrey Katzenberg Hollywood Disney HP Jasmine Safest Jones Guardian Apple Covid Emmy Steffan Jones Ray Sean Jack Bernhardt Officer
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

06:11 min | 11 months ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Right. This is the portion of the program where we have to break it to don McLean that her beloved Quimby. No longer living. Yeah, it's been struggling for a while. This, of course, is the short form streaming company nights. That's what stands yes, that it was founded by Jeffrey Katzenberg, and it is seven months Into launch, and it's kind of fitting Right that the the life of Quid beware was short also that they were going on. Yeah. Ah, I'm sorry. It's gone date now, just last month. They were looking into it. Maybe some potential buyers believe Facebook was mentioned Mammal. I think they're having a hard time, though, because The format. Well, they, you know they had an open letter yesterday, where Jeffrey Katzenberg said. It likely failed for one of two reasons. Either there. The idea didn't have merit like they thought it did, or They were a victim of bad timing. Having launched essentially here during the pandemic, and they were meant to be These were meant to be consumed these videos when someone's waiting in line at the coffee shop or on the light rail or on a subway on and those things don't exist anymore, well out of the 910,000 people also who downloaded Quimby. In the three days following it, you know, launch on ly 72,000 of those people converted to paying subscriptions because they were offering it for free for a limited time, So alright wants or something. May I pay for it? How much was it done any more like $5 a month. I the one thing that I know I've talked about this many times on here. So I apologize if you've already heard it at nauseam, But I'm really going to miss and I have to watch again. The shape of bottle. Your noodle show is like such a great show. I even saved the last episode. Because have you ever done that? Like you save something. You don't want it to end? Yes, I just watched it this morning. Oh, don where Evan Funk takes all of his pasta that he learned to make When he goes to Italy. Each episode is him learning a different shape of pasta from these known as that known as are going to be extinct because people aren't making them anymore And there Hundreds of years old. Maybe the food network will grab that. Remember how they used to have, like The Simpsons at one point was A short? Yeah, right. They were just little shorts within another show. I wonder if we can somehow find a way to and by we I mean they. Yeah, he should just have his own. I mean, he's really busy with his restaurant's most one of the most popular in L. A called Felix and you can't get into it. And he brought all of these pastas back to his restaurant. He's just a master of Italian food and cool. I am in love with this show, I now have to learn how to make pasta. Oh, well, first you gotta get a pasta maker. No, I'm talking about whole made a hand. Paul. Like cutting. It was a knife cutting it. Yeah. Special tools. It's like it's an art form. Really? It is. I did it one time, did you It was brutal. Well, my ex boyfriend in college his he was Italian and his mother, um, made homemade pasta and she would make it by hand. I helped her once, and it was so good, but I'm just so in love with this show in the passion I have for this guy's passion. Oh, my gosh, I just want it so nice. Just it's so cool because it's he talks about how it's a connection to family? Sure, And it was Harry's story about the region and the people that make it in the history. And it's just I can make his lasagna I'd be able to cut that. I haven't amazing sauce rapist recipe, So I think that's why. You know my family has one very old East Coast. You know, my grandpa. His recipe, Papa Mac sauce and Papa Man, So anyway. Yeah, I got to make some good pasta to go along with this and not just by noodles at the store, Right? Right. Hi, Harry. Um, sorry. Dawn's not even focusing on the quippy death going to she's burying her emotions hunger. Yeah, that's true, and I am hungry. Sino Did anybody watch CBS Sunday Morning on Sunday? No. So, speaking of, you know, Lost Arts or ancient art David Lee Roth. Kind of. He's just kind of a kook on, but he's just quirky. You know, he's just kind of like they say, a diamond A like sideshow Bob. It's like David as pumpkin. Yes, he is learning over. He took two years to learn how to do this ancient. I don't know if it was Japanese. Art. And he's just so committed to this. Yes, and I can't remember what it's called. But anyway, just thought maybe someone thought Never mind. I don't grass. Check it out. But it relates what I'm talking about Just some ancient You know, old timey things that you don't want to see die off. You want to keep them alive, So I understand you're Where you coming? From? What? You don't get into that restaurant. It's interesting, but first you got to get on a plane going. There won't be for a while. Before I read the story that quickly actually was done that they were folding. I first saw a spoof headline from one of those called the hard times dot net Sounds like the onion kind of thing..

Evan Funk Jeffrey Katzenberg David Lee Roth Quimby don McLean Facebook Harry Felix Quid CBS Dawn East Coast Paul Sino Italy Bob
Quibi shuts down after six months

Morning Edition

03:34 min | 11 months ago

Quibi shuts down after six months

"Between the idea being less than perfect, which we We own and the environment we found ourselves in is where the fail has come. That's Jeffrey Katzenberg, founder of Quick Be in an interview with CNBC yesterday morning, and this is after the announcement that Quimby after a mere six months as a streaming service is shutting down and this is an idea that many people were skeptical about from the jump. Jeffrey Katzenberg and his co founder, Meg Whitman, raised a lot of money, $1.75 billion, and yet people didn't think it would work. And when Jeffrey Katzenberg says, as he does repeatedly, we don't know what went wrong. I think a lot of people in Hollywood Matt think they do know what went wrong. Yeah, this is a case where the critics ended up being right because most people from the beginning said What is new about this idea? You are attempting to create a market for premium short form. And that people would pay for on their phones when the market wasn't exactly screaming for this idea, Geoffrey thought that high end star driven vehicles would work on phones when most people are perfectly happy looking at TIC tac, or snap or YouTube or watching premium content on places like Netflix or HBO, Max on your phone. It wasn't exclusive. It wasn't original, and ultimately it failed. Well, I would say it was original idea, but unfortunately, it was an original idea that no one asked for five minutes. 10 minute increments says this programming was offered in. I don't know that many people who just wanna watch five and 10 minute things. I mean, especially as you say, in the world of Tic Tac and Sam and YouTube is available again, and it's not premium content. People don't seem to even at this point have an interest in that The hypothesis is that they would, but they clearly didn't And it was a very cluttered market. Anyway, they decided to go ahead during the pandemic. Now, you know, they are saying Is this a reason why it didn't work Was it of the wrong time, and people did complain that they leased in the early going? They couldn't watch this stuff on their TV. They also couldn't share it on social media, So there were a lot of issues there. But the fact is, I don't really think the pandemic has anything to do with it. I think it was an idea failed because people are not wanting to pay. You know, they're they're slowly coming to pay for other streamers. They wouldn't want to play for five and 10 minutes stuff and none of it. Most of all, I think, really sealing the doom. Nothing broke through. I can't think of anything that people chattered about. That was a must watch on quicky. No. In a lot of the time that, Katzenberg said people would be watching this stuff was going to be spent that doctor's offices are on the bus or commuting things that did grind to a halt during the pandemic. So was not an ideal time to launch. This certainly didn't help. But It didn't fix the ultimate problem here, which was that it was filling a market that did not exist. Now. It doesn't mean that down the road, someone won't figure out short form premium content. My opinion is, it will likely be an existing streaming service like snap or YouTube or one of the others that figures out how to get people to pay for this kind of short form content by launching from scratch, declaring that you are going to reinvent The entire content universe raising $1.75 billion from a bunch of traditional Hollywood oriented cos That's a challenge.

Jeffrey Katzenberg Youtube Hollywood Meg Whitman Tic Tac Cnbc Co Founder Quimby Founder Geoffrey Matt Netflix HBO SAM
Quibi shutting down 6 months after its billion-dollar debut

TV's Top 5

00:52 sec | 11 months ago

Quibi shutting down 6 months after its billion-dollar debut

"It really was called Kwa by Jeffrey Katzenberg Meg Whitman short-form Mobile Streaming Service Qube Aka Quick Bites is officially shutting down. So by could buy in an open letter to investors, employees and partners that duo said, there are two billion dollar venture imploded six months after launching during a pandemic quote likely for one of two reasons because the idea itself wasn't strong. Enough to justify a standalone streaming service or because of timing end quote the duo said they're working on in the coming months finding buyers for the roster of programming which yeah, I mean I think that's going to be a little difficult when you film an entire season of TV in an hour qube previously tried to find a buyer. The platform was shopped to multiple services apple apple passed on it. Just. No takers

Jeffrey Katzenberg Meg Whitman Apple
Quibi is Proof that Capitalism Works

MarketFoolery

06:35 min | 11 months ago

Quibi is Proof that Capitalism Works

"Six months after its launch, an April Qutb. The short video streaming service is being shut down due to a complete lack of interest. Company was started all the way back in. August of twenty eighteen by Jeffrey, Katzenberg and Meg Whitman. The raised one point seven, five billion dollars, and then proceeded to like that money on fire. Where do you want to begin with this because? I had and we were chatting a little bit about this yesterday is that capitalism works? Like among other things, this is an example of capitalism working. The built this thing they spent a lot of money to do it. They put it out there and everyone collectively said No. I mean you're absolutely right. This is a great example of capitalism working And there are a lot of different ways to go with this in. I don't want to make light of the fact that people are losing their jobs from this though I will say that Even even for the most glass half full person. Jumping on board with this with this. Entity had the probably feel like chances were were chances of success. We're going to be lower than fifty percent I would have assumed but I mean, it seemed like it was a little bit bit obvious to all of us in the analyst community. But I, it was amazing to me like there was read in one of the articles that during a video call. With. With employee's Katzenberg actually suggested. Staffers listened to the song get back up again from from the trolls film to buoy their spirits. Like, he's still talking book. He's ready to lay people off is what it sounded like. It was very odd. I just feel like. It it it just didn't seem to me to be empathetic is probably could have been but. I mean, we talked about this a few shows ago right a few weeks back where it just I don I don't think anyone including Jeffrey really knew what Qube was supposed to be I mean is social as it streaming is social streaming i. mean there were already all sorts of competitors out there in that space to some extent in. So you know you sometimes when in-investing, like we say sometimes investing, you just got to be able to call call the mistake admitted move on as opposed to just keep on burning money in. It sounds like in this case I mean they burn through their capital and that was basically that and I think the writing is on the wall. It sounded like a lot of Hollywood was doubtful to begin with interestingly enough. They didn't have any problem selling content there like eight. Sure. We'll sell it but we don't think you're GONNA succeed. So. It's listen when you jump into a crowded space like this in in video streaming a crowded space obviously, you need to differentiate yourself right you need to innovate do something different and and it just didn't seem like they did that like at all in. Speaking of Seinfeld that reminded me of that reservations episode of it all comes back to Seinfeld Chris like you know how you say you know how to like get in their differentiator or innovate, but but you don't actually know how to do it. Right saying it doesn't mean that you're doing it and it didn't feel like they. Really. had come to that realization until way too late. So. One of the thoughts I've had about all this is. I feel like we need to come up with a new word to replace the Word Unicorn as it is used in the world of investing and for those unfamiliar. A Unicorn is a private company that. Reaches a private market valuation of a Billion Dollars and. I was thinking about something Emily flippant set on this show a few weeks back where. She was she made the comment like the world is only getting bigger. We're only going to have more. Companies with trillion. Dollar. MARKET CAPS in the future not fewer and so as things continue but I think I. Think we need to come up with a different because you know that was part of it. It's like Oh look at this company they've raised nearly two billion dollars. You know what would this be worth in the open market? Well, it turns out zero. So, look at I look at some of these capital raises with some of these businesses. It's astounding the money that some of these businesses raise and it's just. It's Just astounding I mean like it's it's breathtaking like you said, I mean look at. Robin. Hood for example with all of the trouble and issues that they continue to have like I don't know why anybody who's getting started investing today why would you use Robin because every other platform could basically match what they're doing for the most part and it's going to be a more robust and frankly trustworthy platform and yet this business continues to raise billions and billions of dollars it's garnered some like Ten. Billion Plus Market Valuation now, which to me seems really serve but it. It just goes to show. There are some very deep pockets when it comes to when it comes to. These, these these interests in know investors who aren't necessarily participating the public markets and. I think the thing is in most cases it's really all about it's all about hitting a couple of really you know it's about hitting a couple of home runs as opposed to try to get like sixty percent of your picks. Right I think most people know they're not going to be getting sixty percent of those picks right? It's really just about finding a couple of grand slams. The can make a big impact. Yeah. I mean a Unicorn is an incredibly rare creature and private market valuations of a billion dollars are becoming increasingly less rare. I'll tell you what is really a Unicorn is something like qube something that from day one we all sort of looked at and we're like I don't think that's going to work and then every step along the way like, yeah it's still working the launch isn't going well, they're burning like Oh my God they're they're exploring strategic alternatives up their dead. Every I can't think of another time when. There was a bit like. maybe, pets.com early like back in the day but. It feels like. They're always going to be those examples and I mean it's it's it's that's just so fun. That's why this job is so fun because we get to see this stuff every day I mean the market at the end of the day we said it is it's just like a really big to just disagreement right and I, mean both parties think they're right for whatever reasons and You have to figure out a way to reconcile that and choose the side. I think we chose ours on

Katzenberg Qube Jeffrey Robin Meg Whitman Pets.Com Analyst Seinfeld Hollywood Emily
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

01:32 min | 11 months ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Into podcast for each week. A new episode will present an all new on solve case. The series will feature theme music, a narrator and interviews with individuals involved in the cases as well as make the call out for Maurin Formacion. The structure will be similar to what fancy on the Netflix Siri's true crime podcast or typically among the highest rate of podcast. The show was Originally hosted by Robert Stack. It ran from 1987 to 97 on NBC, Then again on CBS Lifetime. In Spike where it ended in 2010, the podcast will launch an early 2021. Could the Superbowl kick off at a later date because of the pandemic? One NFL executive says there's a plan Green Bay Packers CEO Mark Murphy admitted during an interview on the team's website that the NFL does have a contingency plan in place if they need to delay the date of Super Bowl 55 because of the covert 19 pandemic of the Super Bowl back as Faras for weeks, So we obviously prefer not to do that. So you do have that far to the Super Bowl right now scheduled for February 7th at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida. However, the NFL has run into some issues with scheduling already as a result of Corona virus outbreaks for multiple teams, while also reportedly considering adopting a playoff bubble for clubs to relocate throughout the postseason. The streaming service. Quimby is shutting down after just six months who was created to be the next generation of storytelling, with chapters no longer than 10 minutes, But the company reportedly had low viewership and download numbers. Founder and chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg, who we talked.

NFL Maurin Formacion Jeffrey Katzenberg Robert Stack Raymond James Stadium Green Bay Packers Quimby Founder and chairman Netflix NBC Mark Murphy CBS Tampa Florida CEO executive Faras
What happened to Quibi?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:01 min | 11 months ago

What happened to Quibi?

"So how do you raise almost two billion dollars a billion and three quarters and blow through it in something less than a year I personally have no idea but Jeffrey Katzenberg sure does the Wall Street Journal reports this afternoon the Katzenberg, one of the founders of the much touted and once promising entertainment platform Qube for quick. Bites, real short bits of content mobile, first Katzenberg shutting it down. So for the second day in a row, molly would is here with our lead story. Hey, Ma. Hey hello again hello. Yes. So. What happened with BE? Yeah Qube. You have to give Jeffrey Katzenberg. Meg Whitman Credit Qube was consistent all along. This is a company that said we are about mobile content. You are going to watch everything on your phone. We're about it being short and we're about this specific technology that makes it cooler to watch on your phone. That's it. No compromises and unfortunately. They. Had the double whammy of miscalculating I think how much people wanted to do that and more importantly how much they wanted to pay to do that. And arriving in the middle of a pandemic where all of a sudden people were at home with their big huge screens instead of in the grocery store on their phones right We're you surprised I mean you and I've talked about this on, make me smart but we use the prize because they had Katzenberg. They had whitman. They had. Janice. Min, at one point I mean this was a it was a stack cast here as it were. It really was, and yet it is one of those weird wisdom of the crowds thing where almost everybody was skeptical of qube almost everybody felt like feels like a little too much money and a bet that is not entirely proven what I'm surprised about is that after six months qube is going to disappear I mean you don't hear about that very often they must have really not made a lot of friends in Hollywood to actually just. Go away any. Lessons learned. Was it just an idea before its time and it's coming eventually and let's hang out and wait for it or what? You know I think the lesson is twofold one. You cannot prescribe what people want to do in the way they want to consume like sometimes you really do have to follow a market and also content is king yet can't watch streaming service without a library of content, a deep bench, and you can't be mediocre. I mean, the the content you know the T. V. making landscape right now is operating at as high a level as it ever has right and a lot of the content reviews for what was on Qube, were. You know right some things were good. Some things were terrible. Things were just okay and that is not enough in a billion and three quarters dollars later it is reportedly a done deal molly would she's the host of marketplace tech also with me podcast, we do call make me smart molly. Thanks a lot. See you later maybe more of who knows.

Whitman Credit Qube Jeffrey Katzenberg Molly Qube Wall Street Journal MA Whitman Janice Hollywood
Movie Theater Stocks Have Two Problems

MarketFoolery

06:31 min | 1 year ago

Movie Theater Stocks Have Two Problems

"Movie Theater Stocks Are Getting hammered today a sinner world group, which is the second largest theater chain in the world. Announced it is closing its theaters in the US and in the UK here in the US, it's regal cinemas in the UK. It's a world. So all told we're talking about more than six, hundred, fifty theaters roughly forty, five thousand employees who are going to be out of a job and the stock is down. Forty percent and. In sympathy I guess you could say shares of AMC, which is the largest movie theater chain. Down ten percents, cinemark down fifteen percent. We've seen sort of this drip drip drip of tentpole movies having their release date pushback. The latest James Bond movie which was supposed to come out this past April got pushed. November, and over the weekend was announced, it's getting pushed him next April and it's among other things Jason It is a reminder. Of how those big action tentpole movies Drive this business. Oh yeah, and I mean it's not just the theaters that are really feeling the pain today to write its. Properties which is A read that focuses on the entertainment arena in in general, but they have a lot of exposure to to movie theaters and in certainly a APR's feeling a little bit of that painted as well. Given given what we know. Is playing out in the movie theaters and you know when you look at cinema world, I mean. Into kind of the first thing. The first thing that made me think of it's kind of like kind of like Pluto, and Pluto was downgraded from planetary status like sin world is more like a Dwarf Planet. Now, like this isn't this isn't a world anymore this is really a company that's just struggling to figure out how to survive at this point because they've got to problems. They've. Got, two really big problems they got a supply problem and the demand problem and like noted with with the the actual releases having the content to get in those theaters. That's one problem. But then the other problem, obviously, the health concerns regarding the pandemic people just don't want to go sit in movie theater like like we used to and and so all of this is playing out. On these theaters big and small, and and when you you look at the cinema world's financials I mean they are facing the same problems as everyone else missing revenue falling off a cliff. They've got a slug of debt on the balance sheet eight and a half billion dollars and a half of that lease liabilities. But that speaks to the to the weight that that that those theaters can conserve right that drag that they can serve when when they're not being used in a theater is just like a restaurant is just like a retail store they're all of these high fixed costs in keeping those theatres open paying for those leases keeping them staffed and open. In. So you need traffic to go through them the more traffic that goes through the more profitable they become and that's great and good times. But in bad times as we're seeing now, just profitability just vanishes in I think the trouble. The. Trouble that they're facing. Is that you know when you start looking forward and try to figure out exactly how people are going to be feeling about going to the movie theater when all of this stuff passes over, I mean when when we finally turned the corner and in the concerns For Health aren't aren't the same as the are today are people. GonNa want to go back to the movie theaters like they did before I mean some will no doubt. But for all of the time that passes while we're not going to those movie theaters, all of the time that those theaters are suffering other forms of entertainment are are gaining right other. Forms of entertainment are becoming more and more an option, a nice substitute for folks whatever that may be You know all the way down to new ways of of catching movies, and so we're seeing we're seeing distributors figuring out new ways to get movies out there. We're seeing consumers figuring out new ways to actually watch movies and all of a sudden. A year from now and I mentioned this on on twitter earlier today all of a sudden you really have to be of that good enough risk in that like hey, you know what? It's not the movie theater but I'm sitting at home. I'm eating the pizza I'm watching a new movie that that's good enough for me and I'm okay with that I don't need to get my car go to a movie theater in. So all the more time that passes I think the more difficult it becomes for these theaters to really. Get back to where they once were in. Under. Unfortunately it feels like you know we're we're going to be dealing with this certainly for the rest of this year I mean granted only a couple of months left really few months left but I mean, you know going into twenty twenty one. I mean what does this look like when April or May comes around I don't know we don't know enough yet. But but when you look at central world itself I mean it's really silly United States seventy, five percent of their revenue comes from here. So what's going on here really matters to this business and right now it's just not looking good. Yeah and one of the thoughts I had when I was reading through this stuff this morning was. member. When Warren Buffett bought the Omaha World Herald. There was just sort of this sense. Like. For someone who is so rational in his investing it kind of seemed like he let nostalgia. Get the better of him and you know what he can do, whatever he wants his money although he did sell it. Earlier this year. But. It reminded me of that and I just thought I think there is a possibility where. Some, very wealthy person at some point in the next year or two just maybe not to by. AMC Holdings whole cloth but I wouldn't surprise me if someone was just like not now I love movies and I want this to survive and if it's if it's break, even that's all I care about but but other than other than. Sort of a very rich angel coming in given everything you just laid out with the business I mean. I like how you put it I mean. It's not just a demand. It's not just a supply and demand problem while I mean, Hey, listen apparently Jeffrey Katzenberg get some pretty deep pockets. I mean Chris are you thinking what I'm thinking Quigley theaters let me just rolls right off the tongue doesn't it qube theaters? Hey, it's a possibility. Anything. Positive.

United States AMC UK Omaha World Herald Jeffrey Katzenberg Twitter James Bond Warren Buffett Jason Amc Holdings Chris Quigley
Jeffrey Katzenberg’s Quibi Is Looking to Sell Itself, Among Other Possible Options

WSJ Minute Briefing

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Jeffrey Katzenberg’s Quibi Is Looking to Sell Itself, Among Other Possible Options

"We're reporting exclusively. The short video streaming service Qube is looking at several strategic options including a possible sale launched April. Getting subscribers has been a challenge quickly declined to comment on whether it's pursuing a strategic review.

Qube
A New Documentary Shines A Spotlight On The Lyricist Behind The Disney Renaissance

Morning Edition

03:40 min | 1 year ago

A New Documentary Shines A Spotlight On The Lyricist Behind The Disney Renaissance

"Wrote the words too some of the classic Disney songs he was the lyricist behind three classic Disney song books, as well as Little Shop of Horrors. But his career was cut short when he died of AIDS in 1991. Composer Alan Menken had worked closely with Ashman and now a new documentary film has given him one last chance to collaborate with his late friend Tim. Grieving has the story. Alan Menken wrote this song at Howard Ashman Hospital Bed while his friend was dying. His life was pitifully cut short. But As an artist. He's really vital Even now. They met in New York in the 19 seventies, where Ashman was running a black box theater. They yelled like Rodgers and Hammerstein and wrote the musical's Kurt Vonnegut's God Bless you, Mr Rosewater, and the unlikely hit little Shop of horrors. Pretty soon Ashman was courted by Jeffrey Katzenberg to come to Disney and help in animation department That was on the skids. I have a letter that I found in the Library of Congress. And it's a letter from Jeffrey Katzenberg. Don Hahn, a producer on beauty and the Beast directed the new documentary, Howard, says Howard. Thanks for talking the other day. There's so many things we want you to work on. We'd love you to work on a Arabian Nights story. We'd love you to work a little murder, and Jeffrey ends up, saying the collaboration of Of Howard Ashman and and bolt. Disney is, you know just a hit, waiting to happen. It sure Wass, Ashman and Mink and brought a vibrant Broadway sensibility to Disney animation, and it led to a lucrative renaissance. The beast. Ashman died before he finished Aladdin and even before beauty and the Beast premiered, he was only 40. The documentary tracks his rise from a theater obsessed kid in Baltimore to his musical highs to his untimely death, told through archival footage of recording sessions, song demos, new interviews with family and friends and Ashman, explaining his own philosophies. You get to a certain point where the crab has to convince the mermaid not to go up above the water and change your life, So he has to sing under the sea, and she has same part of your world because she wants to go up to dry land so badly. Over the years, Alan Menken has worked unused songs from the Disney animated musicals into their Broadway adaptations. So in a way, he's never stopped working with Howard Ashman. I wrote a song for Howard past Mile friend Donna When Tim Rice and I began work on the Broadway adaptation of Beauty and the Beast, I said, I'm going to take a piece of music and is this home? This is where I should learn to be happy. So that became part of the fabric of beauty and the beast of hell in this Mink and shared his memories for the documentary. When Don Hahn sent in the rough cut, he told the director, he had to write the score. Oh, my God! Was it a labor of love? I feel deeply connected to Howard. And I just felt that I wanted music that if he was directing and he would have wanted to put in there Composer says This was really like his final collaboration with Howard almost 30 years after he died, a new work with words by Ashman and tunes by Minkin. For NPR news. I'm Tim grieving.

Howard Ashman Howard Ashman Hospital Bed Disney Howard Alan Menken Jeffrey Katzenberg Ashman Tim Rice Don Hahn Aids Library Of Congress New York NPR Kurt Vonnegut Arabian Nights Mr Rosewater Murder Broadway Rodgers Baltimore
Jeffrey Katzenberg Blames Pandemic for Quibi's Rough Start

Von Haessler Doctrine

01:29 min | 1 year ago

Jeffrey Katzenberg Blames Pandemic for Quibi's Rough Start

"I really you know because I do keep my finger on the pulse of tack I track trends and then when those trends become popular I tracked the companies that come in and try to leech off of those trends and then I laugh when those companies fail so for example Netflix they put in the time the effort they built a streaming platform that is become maybe now the mainstream and how people get their content TV and movies I think when he comes in and says Hey we like that we're going to change it a little bit for no reason and give you bite size quick bit sets would quit B. stands for quick bit of TV shows so eight ten I'm going to really I don't can I supplement what you're just saying if I if I get a little bit because I don't I see it more as them trying to be like you used to but not YouTube today because this is Hollywood backed so they're five years late you never with you too they used to always tell you ten minutes you don't want to go any longer than ten minutes and that was the rule for awhile but that was years ago and I lost a lot of people are watching things on YouTube they're very under produced and last for an hour or more so that's my supplement to what you just said and I agree with that so are there let's say they're marrying two models here because this was a subscription service with original content Jeffrey Katzenberg who's the the guy who was behind this he blames because of it here's this quote I attribute everything that has gone wrong to corona virus everything

Netflix Youtube Hollywood Jeffrey Katzenberg
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Directors Cut Radio Program

Directors Cut Radio Program

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Directors Cut Radio Program

"Name is Dan in the studio. We have the lovely quit 5:05 wearing a teenage mutant Ninja turtles shirts dressed all cute and a silver tiger. He's GonNa Bounce off your head. It looks like he's GonNa jump off your face and away on the fall. We have the lovely Chris Baloney how are you there? Yeah we had Jeffrey Katzenberg interviewing earlier in the show and I started looking up short attention span theater too because I thought qube reminded me of like short attention span. I called it. Short attention span channel. What am I guess? Or streaming service? What generally Katzenberg I get sense. He didn't like that too much but in my nostalgia I decided to look up. Short attention span theater to look who was part of it and to my surprise. I found that a lot of people when I type in short attention span theater a lot of people including like NPR and other news organizations are calling qube short attention span theater. Yup I'm not the only one I'm not the only one I mean. Everything kind of repeats itself so but it was also kind of cool to see all the host on that show a Jon Stewart. Marc Maron. Yeah Marcus Allen even though Marcus Allen is a fellow broadcast film critic and I think I've met many times and he pops up in my facebook feed many times and and Instagram feed because he's friends of mutual friends movie critic wise right so it's kind of weird. That's something from my childhood that I absolutely loved it all comes around again. I don't know yeah repeats. History repeats itself all right. Well Chris we have any news and abuse. That was on your mind that fun they saw this week. Well you said you said Steph was wearing a teenage mutant Ninja Turtle Picture yes. It's very pink and I guess I'd have to follow that up by asking if you guys have any plans on. May Twenty Third No. We're quarantining ourselves if we have to. Yeah selling if if you didn't know may twenty third in International Turtle Day and the cast of the original teenage mutant Ninja Turtles movie will be holding a virtual pizza party online. That's cool yeah along with the viewing the movie with Olaf is What's his name could be hosting Josh. Gad Yeah I don't think he was connected to this one however he did do a back to the future one this week. I guess that's crazy that done goonies and now back to the future. That's kind of fun if you want to check that out Josh Gad. In all the cavs from back to the future you just like the goonies. Wow I hope we did. I know I know that's GonNa be excited for this one. National Treasure is getting a TV series. Right do me but does it have Nicholas Cage does have Nicholas Cage? She said either. Can you hear US allow? Oh Hola odd weird all right yes we were asking have Nicholas Cage. I don't know but they're doing a what happened to have him. Will in to the third movie spinoff series with a young kid. You know it's really inspiring. We were just talking about it last week. We were like let's just steal something in go solve the mystery. Jeez the Davinci Your Vinci Code is just like it's just trying to be a more realistic national treasure movie. Like I remember when I saw I was like. Isn't this just national treasure? But Tom Hanks Tom Hangs instead of negate an Audrey Tato. Yeah it was weird anyway. All right we'll be on the Disney plus service. Kate do believe okay. May Twenty third for that. Pizza Party is going to be on facebook or do I just need to like Google kind of find out or do you. I think they have like a Hashtag. Like Virtual.

cavs Marcus Allen Josh Gad Jeffrey Katzenberg Nicholas Cage Chris Baloney facebook National Treasure Dan Steph Marc Maron Jon Stewart Tom Hanks Tom Hangs NPR Disney Google Instagram Kate Olaf Davinci
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Directors Cut Radio Program

Directors Cut Radio Program

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Directors Cut Radio Program

"Television series. Dang it Nick Cage will be Joey Jones Attic. It's nice but I think I think I have preferred David Spade but I think Nick Cage is acceptable substitute. I think Fan Dyke. I think David Spade already did it. Oh Yeah Yeah. It's not we don't need to see it again here. Put Him a note with this sequel to what you call it. Your Joe Dirt. Yeah see Joe Dirt Joe Exotic. Yeah it'd be the next movie. Joe EXOTIC EXOTIC DIRT EXOTIC DIRT. Yes that's an. Snl scare there. Let's do it. Just let's do it. Now take kids doing it now. We don't have David Spade. We have up. Show cancel great so it should be to give them a call. I don't know you wouldn't call us back. Well we got Jeffrey Katzenberg on the show. So maybe we can. Yeah hey drain one we did. That'd be great. One one we Jeffrey Katzenberg well. Actually we've had a good celebrity last couple of weeks. Yeah Amy Jo Johnson. Now Jeffrey Katzenberg. I also won the contest that amy Jo Johnson held for the screening. Would you legitimately entered the contest? Legitimately entered she picked when she picked forty sure but we didn't they didn't send instructions until it was too late. We had to watch the movie. Four the meet up. Yeah they were like. Make sure you watch the movie before the Premiere I was like what am I reading right now on drugs we only got. What is this being? They're like we're GonNa send you the link and then you gotTa Watch it and then we're going to talk about it at seven and you gotta be there sharp and I'm like so you want me to spend all day and I just got the instructions now and you want me to do all this today and I've got two kids that are in school and lake. We're yeah we're at the park. I like four hours that we we've got the email probably the night before the day or two days before and I didn't check until we were at the park the day of and I was just annoyed. That was like we have four hours between now and the Premier to watch two hour movie and we have so many things that we had to do until then so we were going to try to keep it on in the background. And then by the time the premier started it was already half hour in and we're like screw it. We missed it totally forgot because it was like seven. Pm on the East Coast and it was supposed to be five PM here. We missed out all right coming up next. We got our chat with Jeffrey Katzenberg. And quimby and he's going to tell us all about it.

Jeffrey Katzenberg David Spade Amy Jo Johnson Joe Dirt Nick Cage Joey Jones Attic Snl East Coast quimby
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Directors Cut Radio Program

Directors Cut Radio Program

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Directors Cut Radio Program

"We're broadcast all across the country on multiple radio stations. Mostly it's just banter about Life that's basically what our show has become used to be all about movies and a little later in the program. Actually I think in next segment. We're GONNA be playing a clip from a Celebrity that we got to interview last week. We had a question like from a couple of weeks ago. What the hell is maybe the question that we were talking about. Yeah Yeah didn't we have that question out yet? Well we used. Our powers are powers be directors radios powers. We decided to go all the way to the top. All the way all the way to the absolute top of these chain of We got Jeffrey Katzenberg on the show. I have no idea how the hell we pull that off. But we got Jeffrey Katzenberg on the show. A little later on. We'll be chatting with actual Jeffrey Katzenberg bringing the Guy Former president of I think Disney former president of creative on Disney right. I Dunno nice. No but I think he was president of like Disney creative or something or animation studios or something. I don't remember. He's had many roles in every Disney documentary. Mentions him right yeah? He's mentioned? Yeah so we got Jeffrey Katzenberg Lord. And we had him explain to me. What is and to me my first takeaway was that. It's adhd television because everything's about ten minutes or less and one of my favorite shows is a kid was show a little known show called ATTENTION DEFICIT. Disorder television. Adhd TV isn't it wasn't that there was no. There was a show on comedy central called no short attention span theater. That's what it was called. Oh Yeah I remember that and I think it was not a hosted by Dave Kuei for a little bit though my gre- that's Keel Ankle. Joey he'll order to disband theater. I just started typing. Look it up. It's an American Clip. Show which the host presented short segments. It was on. Hbo CINEMAX. Wow Aired on Comedy Central and it was hosted by John Stewart. We should China look episodes. Mark S Allen Mark Merrin was a member of the holy crap. Marc Maron was one of the hosts on short attention span theater. Okay short attention span theater. I'll look it up. I WanNa see if there's Marcus Allen Youtube episodes for that I think were no mark Allen a six time Emmy Award Winning Television Production Hall Mark. Not Marcus now. Mark S Allen. Wow I think I think. Mark S Allen is a friend of mine on facebook or instagram Mark S Allen Mark. Okay it's I see his face and it's very familiar and I I see is like face all the time and might get some questions grammar facebook or something like that. We might have been on the show. Hell I don't remember the get some questions off of Suicide girls I just went live all were suicide girls streaming on suicide girls live and just let them know that we're doing the show but I guess I should let them know that we did an interview with Jeffrey Katzenberg. Anyone has any questions about colby or would like to hear that interview. We'll do it in the second then. Yeah it'll be coming up on the show that they can listen to tonight but if you're listening to it tonight as in right now you're listening to it now then you're going to be hearing it now or you might have already heard it. Wow how it's going on. Yeah it's so funny like recording in the future. It is a little weird. It's it's funny because then you can say stuff like that. Look at this cord. Someone shoot on it. Yeah that's probably a cat dog or dog and say dog. Cats are our cats are at least. Don't link wires all right and we only have a couple of minutes left but what else do we have in the news for this segment Chris Real quick I guess just INDE- appetite a little bit. It's been announced this nick cage. We'll be playing jealous.

Jeffrey Katzenberg Mark S Allen Mark Merrin Mark S Allen Marcus Allen Allen Mark Disney adhd Marc Maron nick cage Dave Kuei Emmy Award Keel Ankle facebook Hbo president China Disorder John Stewart CINEMAX colby
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Directors Cut Radio Program

Directors Cut Radio Program

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Directors Cut Radio Program

"We wind up doing employees. My Dad's like where's the CDs and they were like these two aisles. These two aisles all the seas and it was just so reduced. It's just so really. Yeah it's been reduced even more now. I don't even know if their CDs and CDs and best buy there has to be. There's it's just a very remember. Walmart has them still. This is a very small aisle. It's only like top top artists. You know it's it's so weird but Walmart has all the clean stuff like everything is edited. Walmart. Dj Stuff. Yeah no like if I'm going to do a GIG like I go to Walmart bile the DJ stuff so that you don't go do a wedding or something like that and you have no post aunt. Myrtle Amaretto mad about host family music. Camp Myrtle it's what the kids are listening to and then she gets mad and now that's what I call wedding music. Actually I used to buy every single. Now that's what I call every single one. You're done you're done you buy that. Yeah that's it that's all you need. This is a Lotta deejays out there. Go ahead or you're saying after. Did you see what I former employees giving away employer with gearing away with that now? That's what I call yacht rock volume out to rock. That's funny that's ridiculous. I saw when I was doing. Dj Stuff. And I know a lot of deejays.

Walmart Myrtle Amaretto Camp Myrtle
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

10:03 min | 1 year ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"As far as I know But wanted you guys to make sure that you knew that okay. I'm here with my colleague from the Verge Fox Media Julia Alexander. I Dunno what your title is. I think you'd be the person who consumes more content and writes about more content than anyone else I know and I don't want your employer to notice but I think you might do it for free. Do a lot of it a lot of it and in this case I'm paying you big money to come talk to us about Qube. You've seen a lot of the shows on this show. Keep Getting Ready to watch right now and I want to know what you think of them. Jill of Xander. Welcome thank you very very honored to be here. My overall take on Caribbean shows in general from a quality perspective is that it all feels very youtube bread. That era of two thousand fifteen when you to was trying to do premium content of starring a lot of celebrities but also their youtube creators in. It just didn't work because that's not what people were going to youtube four. That's kind of how it feels like with Be whenever I watch the short episodes they release. So let's let's slow down and and I gotTa say if I'm hoping so preceding this interview we're going to have along route. Jeffrey Katzenberg. My worry is. I don't think he's going to listen to this part but I worry that someone's GonNa report back to him that after he just explain how these were not fancy youtube clips that he's GonNa hear you saying these are fancy youtube clips that he's GonNa blow multiple gaskets so again if you're listening to this part of the show you certainly know at Qube is Julius takeaway as these are upscale youtube by the way his Multiple Times. Try to throw money at making stuff and youtube red was the most recent. I watched a couple episodes of their karate. Kid reboot which is is. I mean it was like it was. Tv Buying Okay TV and and not that you asked me. But that's how quickly most the Kirby stuff looks like to me. Some of it is literally just TV. I've seen before right like there's punked and it looks just like punk did back when Ashton Kutcher was the host And there's other stuff that just sort of looks like reality. Tv In the same with reality TV looks like and other stuff. Looks like O K TV like one of those millions of shows that are on CBS. That you don't know exist but if you're at the gym or you're at an older person's house you might go. Oh I didn't realize L. Cool J was still on the air kind of looks like one of those shows bit. Neil's like leftovers from the studios in the networks that they thought would not work on their own network and then their own studio and then sold it to Jeffrey Katzenberg Something that was like leftover entertainment. We can't really use this. We don't see a way for this to work especially on the movie fronts. There are a bunch of a lighthouse productions which is top top tier entertainment That's the ones with like Sophie. Turner and Liam Hemsworth In a lot of those feel to me like movies that studios knew they weren't going to get a good return on investment on if they released it directly into theaters or even directly to streaming. And so they sold it off. The dangerous game is that a movie I thought it was like an episodic show out these movies feel like episodic to me all the things that I'm watching that are supposed to be movies. Just feel like really long chopped up series. So I think that's what get really is something. I can't wrap my head around. I spoke to on people who work in short films and dino lowest doesn't feel like of short that you watch when you think of an Oscar Short. We'd get pixar shorts where it's like. Oh encompass it's one story and it works out really well at six minutes. The idea that these are just chopped up into different segments. That people are going to tune into for me. I I can't wrap my head around it and the issue I run into and I watch certain shows and I think one of the best ones is the soapy Turner show Which is Dan basically on the plane crash and they have to figure out how to survive. It takes four. I think three or four episodes before they even get to the airport before leaving gets with her in some sort of asylum slash wellness slash treatment center. And it's very dark. I didn't get past the first one because I don't i. It's not for me. I was watching it thinking. This is doesn't seem different to me than again like lying on the couch and watching football and I fall asleep and then there's something on that I wasn't planning on watching and it's on it's fine and it's also because they're eight to ten minutes long right so that's Kinda how long a regular television segments before the commercial comes on it doesn't it just sorta seemed like show fine nuton not mind-blowing or in the other thing I was thinking about is there's a tons of stuff that I watch on Netflix. Not necessarily motivated by it A lot of time. It's stuff that I can download it onto my phone and I'll watch it on ten minute chunks on the subway and it's not ideal but it works And especially for a lot of the bad net flicks movies. You know the the underground six or whatever like in theory supposed to watch on a screen. But it's stupid and you can watch it on your own so I I guess I have two different questions one. Do you think qube will appeal to people as is level? Let's forget snotty people like you and me who are professional gripers in critics for a minute just a regular person. You have a phone eventually. You'RE GONNA travel again and right now. You're in your house or do you think a regular person is going to watch. No not if there's a few reasons one I think about the fact that both Jeffrey Katzenberg and Meg Whitman keeps saying that. They're not trying to compete with Netflix. Which is their opinion and I get that and they keep saying things like you know. We're really trying to compete for attention away from instrument to talk the thing about instrument. Tick Tock Tick Tock specifically is that. It doesn't require any attention. You can just kind of flip through it and then with instagram and twitter. You're falling people you know you're falling people you like your family members so you're getting something out of it that is personally relevant to you. Quimby is trying to come in and say take that ten minutes of time that you're spending doing that and watch our show instead but if it takes a few episodes or people to really get invested and if it's coming from a place where there's no real reason to sign up for a Disney Disney has its IP right. You think. I'm going to watch out because I want to watch mandatory in and I know they're star Wars Qube doesn't have any library entertainment that you can go and just dig into. It doesn't have any big. Ip that really playing off of so there's on celebrities rights he's Liam Hemsworth is in this show and then there's two hundred others and even then Liam Hemsworth is not exactly he's far more talented. One could argue. But he's not exactly Kim Kardashian. There's not this like immediate. I WANNA SECRECY TEAM HAS HAS A. It's not a reboot people's Corp but it's Chrissy Teigen's version of People's Court. Actually think that is where Qube could find some success but I don't know if it's via the APP or if it's via people kind of screen shotting with captions on tweeting Christie T in moments and then it becomes viral and then maybe people check it out but the shows that they the ironically the work could be could succeed. One of the shows I really liked was the Idris Elba One. Inter selbe. He is partnered up with so and stunt driver a stuntman and they take on different challenges and I watch those APSOS and I thought I could watch this every day for five six minutes. This is great this is like mindless entertainment. This is what I want to watch on the subway but part of me also found that because they spent so much time making these high cool explosions stunt type scenarios. I wanted to watch it on my TV like I was like how chrome cast for my phone to my by TV. How do I find a way to do this? Pointed out that this is emphatically for your phone. They are not allowing you the option. I'm sure there is a hack to get it on your TV. But it's specifically for that one thing you haven't mentioned by the way. Is this turnstile thing which to me. Seems like something they thought through midway through holds it on and the idea is you can watch it in two different directions and not only. Can you watch in two different directions but it's actually shot two different ways so one shot is Liam Hemsworth and the guy from the Tarantino not seeing Christoph Waltz Christoph wit and then if you turn it then it'll just be Liam hemsworth talking and that's fine but I I just I get that. It's at technically complex thing to do it doesn't. I don't think anyone will ever talk about it. I went to a preview and I got to watch a couple of hours of qube which is a lot because our short films type stuff and there's a few other people no one turn the phone unless they were like. Oh right. There's this thing and that plays into. I don't know if they necessarily understand the behavior. People with bones understand consumption patterns. Clearly we'll get numbers and they're like people are on their phones especially globally but people are spending time watching came on their phones but the idea that someone is going to shift constantly throughout a series doesn't make any sense. 'cause we've tried to do with other apps like snapchat tried to do something similar and no one used it. You just pick one way to go and you use it and then if you have to turn your phone for some other reason you do in life moves on your your countrymen met on. I play a lot of fortnight and I'm playing it on my phone and I only have one way to do it. So that's the way while my let's say it's twenty twenty. I give you one point. Seven five billion dollars. I say that all the media that's in the world today exists. Netflix exists youtube exist. Tv exists make me something. That's designed for the phone. What what would you make? What Nisha Phil? Or what product would you make that fills that? What do I think what it comes? Down for me is that it wouldn't be something that's dedicated to creating prestigious entertainment because we don't need that because there is a streaming not focus. That does that well. Like they already doing. The End. Because you can get net flicks on your phone nailing Disney posting your phone or wherever. You're not like you're starving for high entertainment a high quality entertainment on your phone..

Qube Liam Hemsworth youtube Jeffrey Katzenberg Netflix Caribbean Wars Qube Ashton Kutcher Fox People's Court Disney Julia Alexander Idris Elba One Jill Kim Kardashian Chrissy Teigen Oscar CBS Sophie Nisha Phil
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

12:22 min | 1 year ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"To cash break-even pretty quickly like you said you do have an ad component of this business. There's an ad version of it You guys at announce you sold out your inventory. Initially but you also know that the ad business is really tumbling along with the rest of the economy. We don't know winds lash. How it's going to recover. Do you imagine that you're GONNA have to go back and say look? We need to plan for a future where our AD business is significantly smaller than we thought and that may affect staffing. We may have to cut back soon. We've raised all this money. Listen the world is a changed world today from where it was three months ago one month ago one week ago and we don't have a better cristobal than anybody else other than knowing the world is still going to go through. Continue to go through changes that even today are unimaginable to us. We cannot be predictive of that and so all we can say is. We've sold one hundred percent of our ad-advantageous Corey for the next twelve months till April of next year. It sold out. We have some of the best companies in the best brands. These are the you know. Solid solid solid companies. That I am every one of which will be in business as much or more so a year from now that they are they are today and they are consumer facing companies. That are you know in the business of wanting to reach an audience. There are going to be changes. Fortunately we have now not financing that we are in a position that we will be able to make the adjustments and the changes that we need to make an order for this to be a profitable successful business and be able to take on the unknowns that we don't know when ask you a few more questions than a couple just general entertainment questions. I know you have worked in the Internet before I remember you working on pop dot com. Obviously you've done all sorts of stuff on the Internet. I'm assuming though this is the most sort of immersed you've been in this medium and the idea that you're going to get this immediate detailed granular feedback that you could never have gotten when you're making movies or television shows. A lot of people are grappling with sort of what that means for the creative process. Do you like that or would you rather have some mystery and and not get that instantaneous feedback or do you welcome it? I love it I love it. I can't wait for it but even even as a studio executive as a movie maker as a storyteller I've loved that feedback and even as old school as it was two years ago. Take a movie go into a movie theater sitting back and see how three or four hundred people react to a work in progress to be able to to actually see your work through. The eyes of your customers is a fantastic thing. And I've always loved that I loved that process and embrace that process and to me. This is just that times a thousand right and it's incredibly granular and you actually can see it in real time. I not only do I welcome it. I actually can't wait for for it and in the end it's an aide to judgement. I can't tell you what to do. But it sure can send you powerful powerful signals and And I'm looking forward to them. Do you magic a workflow where you know a lot? Obviously you've shot all this stuff you've made it but you imagine a workflow where you go Hey TURNS OUT. People are enjoying this kind of thing specifically and we should alter what we were planning on making to accommodate that either shortening the show or whatever whatever it is we see audience responding to exer- why let's change it and as close to real time as possible. Are these going to be sort of things that you make and you send out and you see how they work. And then you retool the next ship what we are so we have a very. I mean the beauty or the duty. The fortunate thing for Quimby is is that right now today for a whole bunch of reasons. We have a very very very big inventory of content. In fact we have enough content to deliver on the cadence of publishing that we have set out for ourselves. All the way up to the November December almost Thanksgiving Yup right so there will we actually have just a very rich now pipeline of content. We've also over developed for what you're talking about which is second cycle and what. I think is what I think we will learn here. Are Two people like movies and chapters? Do they like the unscripted? Do they like more comedy than do they drama do they WANNA be? They like it when they get scary stuff on this I. We've we have such a wide offering that we're doing at this point. I can't I love everything and so to get that feedback and to actually pivot into the things that are most rewarding to the audience. The things that they are consuming with the most enthusiasm you know is fantastic. I think that is you know a unique thing about streaming platform and why I think we will be able to be so successful. So quickly has a very very broad offering. Netflix sort of started narrowly when they started doing original content. And now they've gone very broad. Do you imagine that at some point you go? We tried every possible genre. Our audience is really responding to these three or four things comedy sports. Whatever it is going to become the short form comedy or short form sports or whatever it is that is most resonant and that becomes your identity and the thing you focus the most on and you're no longer has brought a service as long as that's a successful profitable enterprise and it fine you know. I have to tell you and we've talked a little bit about this but I actually think the thing that may be among the most surprising and valuable things that we are about to do for our customers is the daily essentials the fact that we have taken across a very broad swath of of verticals movies. Television Sports News Music Gaming Gaza. Entertainment News like literally. There's eighteen shows that are combination of informing entertaining and inspiring that. We have six talkshows literally. We've six talk shows and you know until you get to see those. There's a whole volume of things that nobody is actually. You'll only get to see these things starting on Monday when they go live. We've been actually seeing them all week in advance. So I'm sorry I now remember the show is you've seen them now for a couple days and my bet is is that very specifically for you. There are three or four of those daily essentials. That are gonNA give you an a quality way information about a topic that matters a lot to you in such a. Saint beautifully. Curated way that you're going to say will. That's that's invaluable for me and you'RE GONNA get up every day and that's where I'm actually going to get my sports news produced by ESPN. Or that's where I'm going to get my music news or that's where I'm going to get my entertainment news over the last few years men generally men who've been running the biggest media companies in the world have been either retiring selling their companies to someone else. you're kind of in that generation? You are in that generation. Is this your last runner? Is there another project after this? Well if this is what I hope. And Imagine and light candles and cross my fingers for this'll be fulfilling me for a decade or two and speaking of succession. I gotta ask you what you make of. What's been going on at Disney? Where he had. Bob Eiger is announcing what seemed to be an abrupt departure. But he's actually sticking around for a while you of course a long history at Disney. What do you? What do you make of what happened there? And what is happening there? Well you know Listen there Bob. Iger is in the hall of fame of you know. Maybe a a handful of the greatest. Eeo's of our time And has done just a extraordinary job building and running and managing and creatively leading that company. That's a hard job on a good day. That's a hard job. And you know I think he's been signaling insane to all of us for a couple years you know I. I'm just I'm getting to the end of this. You know he picked and Bob Shape. Pick an outstanding executive who's been running two thirds of the Of that company quietly you know the theme park business and Consumer Products Business and Bob Actually overlapped with me. That's how far back we go. The last two years I was at the Disney Company and so that was back in the Jurassic era. He was young up and coming executive then in the home video business and was a star then and has gone on to really do a remarkable job theme park business cruise ship business consumer products business. He's running all of those exceptionally well. He's different Foam Bob no matter what whoever came next was going to be different from. Bob Is probably the best management team in the entertainment and media business today. Everybody seems to have settled in there. And you know obviously huge headwinds in the face of corporate nineteen but You know as experienced knowledgeable group of people to figure out how they're going to sail through this storm in it so I cannot say that I personally was hugely surprised that he did it. I was surprised the immediacy the timing of it right like everybody else but not that he did do it. Because you've been saying that he's going to do it for a long time. Yeah I think a bunch of us were skeptical that he was ever. GonNa wave their because he kept saying he was gonNA leave and didn't but we'll we'll bring it back to you. Listen you can ask anyone. Who's talked to me been rooting for you? Because I've always said it's a much better story if you succeed. There's a lot of doubt about what you're doing and it's a much better story for me to write about for me to cover if you were successful and now given where we're at. I would very much like a positive story. Thank you and I wish you. Well I appreciate that and listen. You know skepticism when you're doing something that's new never been done before that actually. Has You know unique and original equal risky and risky by definition. Means you know there can be failure right so I I know I don't. I've never been A. I resent people skepticism in it. I understand it. I recognize it as long as it doesn't as long as it doesn't get in the way of our ability to have our best shot because in the end either we delivered and it works and it's going to be a great success or you know or we missed the mark and I. I think we've hit it and I'm excited about it and I understand. It was risky from day. One because it's not been done before and your skept as always come thoughtfully so. Thank you for your skepticism. I am rooting so hard to prove your skepticism wrong. That's a polite way to put it. I wish you luck. Thank you for your time. I know it's a busy time backs. Good luck thanks. Thanks Jeffrey Katzenberg and could be for making that happen now. We're GONNA HEAR FROM JULIA. Alexander who works for me over at the verge Again as Julie mentioned as I mentioned with Katzenberg Vox. Media is doing some kind of programming. Maybe more with Qube I'm not involved in as far as I know But wanted you guys to make sure that you knew that okay. I'm here with my colleague from the Verge Fox Media Julia Alexander. I Dunno what your title is. I think you'd be the person who consumes more content and writes about more content than anyone else I know and I don't want your employer to notice but I think you might do it for free. Do.

Bob Disney Company executive Bob Actually Julia Alexander general entertainment Jeffrey Katzenberg Corey ESPN Netflix Bob Eiger Bob Shape Quimby Consumer Products Business Katzenberg Vox Iger Fox
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

12:17 min | 1 year ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Back with Jeffrey Tambor by all accounts and I have talked to people who've worked worked on with you. Jeffrey Katzenberg are personally very hands on. I think almost all the elements of the is this. Are you spending more time on the creative content? Then you have another projects or this is just how you handle all your stuff. Well you know this is unique. I don't think it's like anything else that I've ever done before but there's a content team there's there about twenty principal leaders on that content team. They are in my opinion. They are the best and brightest from every walk of life within Hollywood and movies and television and News sports like there there there've diverse in their experiences that they've had but they're young they're millennial there are audience and each one of them is as overconfident as you could possibly find. That was a trade. I was actually looking for in recruiting them and their job has been to go out and find things they love and then just make sure. I can't talk them out of it. And so the buck has stopped with me but mine isn't actually to say yes. Mine is just saying I have forty five years of making so many mistakes. Let's just make new ones? So it's something I I just know from. My experience is not going to work. I try and edit out as opposed to me being the I mean if you look at the shows that we have it will not be hard for you to look at that and go. Well Gosh Jeffrey. This is a lot of stuff here. That's actually not for you. And that would be a fair assessment. Can you think of something where they brought it to you? You said I don't get it and they were so convincing that it's going up anyway. Half of half half of it. Yes I mean all kinds of things. But that's what's fun about it and by the way it they've schooled me. I really feel like I every day. I'm learning from them. They are articulate passionate. They are diverse and they are inclusive. They come from all different walks of life if you just impressive. And they're strong and they do fight for the things that they love. You guys have spent a Lotta time playing this turnstile technology which allows you to watch it in in vertical or horizontal landscape portrait beyond that. The tech element is sort of how you create those shows. How you stream them. Sending two different streams is there. Something that's different creatively about making these shows. You know when I I watch regular. Tv those are ten to twelve minute. Chunks the old days and they have a commercial and it's that kind of especially with some of the dramas you were sending me seem pretty similar. It seems like a familiar form of storytelling not radically different. That's not positive or negative. Just seems to be what I saw. Were a couple of things I would say so I to. The technology itself is the answers absolutely. And it's where our filmmakers the filmmakers that started at the outset really a year and a half ago the first ones that first directors that came along and started making content for us. They're the real pioneers because we gave them a technology in which we said in order to make this beautiful on your phone you actually need to start with a portrait version of at the vertical version of it and how do you make vertical. Storytelling immersive captivating and most of all beautiful. And not have it feel like it's confined or constrained or it's clipped at the edges in this and so that literally is the reverse about how most filmmakers have thought about. They tend to think in horizontal because we see the world horizontal so to reverse that and go to vertical versus horizontal as your first objective. Changed Literally changed the way they approach cinematography and this and that is where the first ones that did honestly they just just did such beautiful work and we actually sort of built this almost library of knowledge from project to project the project and each new project would contribute to it and we would pass it on to the next set filmmakers very specific techniques about how to move the cameras and how to frame things in it and so when you see things that were done later on who had the benefit of the learning of the shows it just got better and better in the content got more beautiful as we moved along to the storytelling part of it. You are correct and I you know. I've I've talked about this. I hope I'm not being repetitive. Here for you or for more pulling for our audience but the thinking behind this is is that we have actually had two generations of Film Narrative. The first generation were movies to our stories designed to be watched in a single sitting primarily in a movie theater now obviously migrated into many other places but they were to our stories to be watched in a single setting. The next generation of film narrative was television and these tended to be much much longer serialised stories. That were either thirteen episodes or twenty six episodes even the episodic ones which were meant to be watched an hour time over the course of a season and yes you are correct. They had act breaks for commercials so the technique of of actually writing for things that have chapters to them and then very specifically within the chapter have act breaks for TV commercials. We've been doing that in Hollywood for seventy years and would be is doing is not. We're not new science. We're actually new application of old science. Every EPISODE OF THIS IS US. The first act break is at eight minutes and thirty seconds as not eight twelve one week and eight forty two the next week so writing to act breaks and having cliffhangers in which they make you wanna come back after a couple minutes of commercial is a technique that the creator storytellers here in Hollywood understood and they were easily. I was with ease. They pivoted into this form of okay. Well let's just urge those two ideas together until to our stories in chapters. They're six to ten minutes in length. Yeah that's fascinating I was talking with Some of the networks about how they're adapting to a streaming world and they're almost doing the reverse in some cases with saying we know that this stuff is going to air still on linear. Tv. They will write to act breaks. We also assume that a lot of the consumption is going to happen on an asphalt platform. And so we are going to actually create versions Were YOU WON'T IN THEORY. Be Able to tell. That's where the AD was supposed to go in that episode of well by the way the entire library of these shows that are on these streaming platforms. Today they're all broadcast. Tv that are principally about forty five minutes yet when you take the commercials out of them. So what are you rooting for within your latest shows? They're all your children. You all of them equally. What are what? Are you rooting for? What do you think is going to pop you? Can't it can't get me on that one. I do love my children equally in this. And here's the thing is it doesn't matter what. I think I'm a hundred percent. Sure I'll be wrong. I will be surprised by the choices and things that people capture you know get onto. Here's the thing I haven't talked to him but I am absolutely confident that if two weeks ago I sat down and asked or you had asked Ted Sarande. Does if you look at the next thirty days of your shows that you're releasing on Netflix. And just pick. What do you think of the two or three biggest hits that you're going to have thousand percent? He was not going to say tiger king. I think you're right okay. I think I talked to him in early March. He did not bring it up because you look out for Tiger King. You're going to love it. I want some money you've raised. I think one point seven billion dollars give or take. I think that's less than what you were expecting to get. When you first started how has fundraising gone for you? What have you learned about that process? And how has that affected what you're making what you're launching? So first of all I sort of give you the history of this when I I had this idea without a business plan. I literally said I think this is gonNA cost two billion dollars. I didn't know anything other than just sort of put my finger in the air and back of the envelope. I thought it would take two billion dollars to actually build this business and launch. It Make Whitman came along and you know who is just amazing amazing CEO and executive and entrepreneur and she built a bottoms up business plan for us and the result of that business plan was we would need a billion dollars to launch Plus a couple of months and then another five hundred million would give us a runway of about a year and so are I fundraise which we successfully completed a year ago August. We raise that billion dollars very diverse group of all the entertainment media companies and just a very good group of investors and that got US started and we were funded for launch. Plus six months this last September we went out to raise an additional five hundred million dollars. That would give us a runway that would give us launch plus a year so that two billion number went away a long time ago. 'cause it was actually based on guests whereas the billion five was was actually guessing involved in it. It was very very detailed business plan when we went out to raise the money actually originally in September Things were pretty slow. There were the market was kind of a bit up and down and there was a you know as you know. There was a dip in the market there and that sort of October November period. And we got to that five hundred million dollar number before the end of the year but there had been a number of people who had actually expressed interest in wanting to invest and so in January we decided to open it up and to see if we could actually raise another one hundred fifty million actually our target with six fifty and the demand was actually a more than we had anticipated. Which is why we ended up raising actually seven hundred and fifty million dollars now the result of that and why that it was so important and frankly had such a huge impact on that decision that we talked about at the beginning of this conversation is that it gives us a runway for qube to be able to be healthy and well well funded into the fourth quarter of next year of. Twenty twenty one. And as you know you've talked entrepreneurs and you know watch the path of startups. Lots of time. You know the most important thing is to get out get launched a learn some lessons about what's working and not working have the opportunity to pivot on that and to drive your business to the things that are in fact where the great success is now. Maybe we got the content mix right navy. We didn't right. Maybe the product and the user experience is actually the light and people will be in love with it. Maybe NOT RIGHT. Maybe our customer acquisition paths. That we've been on right now..

Hollywood Tiger King Jeffrey Katzenberg Jeffrey Tambor principal Jeffrey Twenty twenty Netflix Ted Sarande Whitman CEO executive
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

08:34 min | 1 year ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Before so if we do fail if this does not work. This'll be the first time that I know of one specific my experience in my career and to to consumer products and consumer habit to try and explain both of those you so to consumer products and consumer habits. I don't think that you could actually name me. A widely distributed widely consumed product that when somebody came along and did a better or more convenient a premium or a luxury version of it that some percentage sometimes it's small percentage but some percentage of people actually would buy it then would see value in that so. I'll give you just two examples sneakers. You can buy a pair of one hundred percent great functional sneakers for Nineteen Dollars. Ninety five cents at Walmart. You can go to Nike and get a pair of sneakers for one hundred twenty five dollars or you can get Air Jordan's for two fifty or you can go to supreme and get them for six fifty or Gucci for twelve hundred fifty dollars now. There's no difference between any of those from a functional standpoint. Okay same things. Why do we pay for bottled water? It's free in the Faucet you know why it's convenient it's premium now. Everybody does it but there are a lot of people to pay for bottled water to sixteen billion dollar industry so that is true consumer pox. Here's my experience for me in my career forty five years of being in the storytelling business. I have actually never had a single instance where somebody delivered to me. A really really good. I'm going even going so far as to say great. I'm just saying really really good movie. Television show animated film Broadway. Play whatever the things are all of those things and then more. No one's ever delivered a very very good version of any of those and it didn't work. You've had flops right. It's just the nature of the business. Not when they were very very good. Maybe they didn't work on the first day. Maybe they didn't work. And the ten day or the thirtieth day no very very good actually always works in the long run people will find it they will discover it and if it's very very good they'll reward you for and so. I am of the belief that you know. Hollywood is turned out and delivered us. Something that is maybe great but for sure really really good and it's why I continue to believe I don't qube likely isn't a rocket ship. You know it's a marathon for us not a sprint. This is we're not Disney where you know in the first weeks or whatever we're going to have you know ten million downloads on this. That's not the way normal life works. They got the greatest brands. The Greatest Library Mandel Lori and all of these things that make them singular and unique. And there's nothing analogous about about if we were ten percent as successful as didn't want to say one tenth as successful as Disney we'd be the most successful launch of subscription service. Ever you million subs on the in that. First Week you'll be. You'll be very happy. Not The first week it's that wasn't subscribers downloads. Yes you are correct. Okay I I want to ask you about runway and all that it's like what I want to go back to the idea of content and good enough and I get that you're saying this is not a a better version of youtube or tick tock or social media. This is a different kind of content and look at it I think. Yeah this looks like stuff I see on Netflix or on CBS. I think they've probably cuts both ways but the broader question. I have is my kids. Are Now my my research for me right. So I can see how they're consuming and they consume a lot of stuff. They consume people they play fortnight and they watch people play for tonight and they watched terrible stupid stuff on Youtube. Really Moronic memes stuff and they'll also watch die hard with me because I'm an inappropriate parent and we also watch Lego masters on. They like all of that stuff. They don't distinguish between good and bad. They just like consuming it. Maybe it's different because they're not paying for it but I think that's sort of I'm never as approach is probably pretty common and so asking someone to say. This is premium. This is something you pay for as opposed to this is something you like and this is something you watch seems to be the issue for me. Well but here's the thing I've start with the following premise. Which you know your kids had never seen what we're about to do so there's no whatever you're asking them to judge you're asking them to look into around the corner over the band over the horizon and imagine something that they've actually never experienced before so the presumption that bill look at our stuff and go. Yeah fine it's just like everything else that we see and you know we don't have to have it so dad don't pony up for us. Now the problem is is that your kids are too young for. It's an platform by the way that is what my nine year old said to me this morning when we were looking through stuff is it. Isn't there stuff for kids here. I showed him punked which they can. They definitely they can figure that out but a lot of stuff you're right is is for someone younger than eighteen for sure. No it's not. It's an adult platform. It's for eighteen years old and older. It's eighteen to forty four years old and we're not marketing your kids. We're not you know we're not trying to in any way to not be completely forthcoming that. This was designed for millennials. The content the stories. The storytellers talent. It's a very millennial focused product. I mean you've got most dangerous game. Which is a very classic idea. We're going to hunt humans But there's a bunch of stuff that dealt with teen suicide. Did you think about that and sort of how much stuff that was edgy? The wrong word but just sort of dark That you wanted to go out with no. It's a balance of things here. I think that if you if you now look at what's on the APP Today. There's over fifty five shows. There's over five hundred episodes and they're hopefully is an incredibly diverse offering. We have enough humility to know that we don't know yet and in the end you know the thing that I have felt and live by my my my career is. I worked for the audience. They're the boss and the thing. I just cannot wait for literally cannot wait for is feedback because up until now everything has been driven by knowledge experience and you know instinct and starting this past Monday. The sixth it's now driven on data and to be able to hear from them. What are they like? How were they watching it? Do They WanNa Watch Chapter Day. Which is my fantasy of the way I would love them to consume our content. Because I think that water cooler conversation they will come out of. It will actually make it more captivating. Okay you know what the audience says where we're just going to wait and watch it when we can just watch them all at once. You know. We'll we want to be able to binge through them in a day or two okay. Well we'll pivot right. It's it's we're we're a work in progress so the most dangerous game. I watched the first four episodes of that. That's going to roll out weekly daily. No so they'll be in. Because of our launch pattern. We put three episodes out of that on day. One and then an episode every day until it through. It's I think it's fourteen chapters long but once they're published they stay up so it is streaming and therefore you can have access to the library any time but when we published a new series. It's an episode day whether it's a pump. There'll be a chat. You'll be a punked episode every day for twelve days in season one. There's actually season two coming of that. So each series sort of works that either serialized or episodic works on that basis of publishing an episode. Today we're GonNa take a quick break and be right back with Jeffrey Katzenberg. After we hear from one of our sponsors we love our sponsors.

youtube Disney Nike Walmart Jeffrey Katzenberg Gucci Mandel Lori Hollywood Netflix CBS
Will new TV streamers HBO Max, Peacock, and Quibi meet their launch dates?

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:12 min | 1 year ago

Will new TV streamers HBO Max, Peacock, and Quibi meet their launch dates?

"Breakdown. I'm Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown. Joining me remotely is Matt Bellamy of the Hollywood reporter. Hello Matt Are There. So this is really. It's the Hollywood breakdown breakdown edition For for now a Lotta people are at home. Obviously as they should be as they should be. They are looking to stream things. We've talked a bit in the past about how it is that the studios don't WanNA put their really big budget movies on on demand because the finances the equations don't make sense. The streamers several are poised to come online and people have been asking. Why don't they go faster? Why DOESN'T HBO? Max Go faster? They're supposed to launch in. May they are asking you know the peacock which is the NBC universal offering. Why doesn't it go faster now? The and they were supposed to do a soft launch and then really go. I'd in July. The truth is they would love to go faster but in this environment things are going so crazy. I don't even know if this would have happened with or without corona virus. But they don't know if they even have the technology to support the onslaught to get everything ready so that is a big problem. That is if you want to know where it is. That's the answer. The question really is. Will they make the dates that they had set for themselves in the first place and everything I have heard is that they are you know scrambling everyone's working from home and the priority is to keep these launch dates? Hbo Max is the priority of at and T. and Warner media. They Really WanNa make that day. They've had to delay production on the friends reunion special which is going to be the big lure they have the friends library on. Hbo Max that is still on track. I'm told to be finished by the time that their launch date comes and with with peacock they now have no Olympics to promote the big plan for NBC Universal was to showcase peacock via the Olympics. And have some of the minor competitions on peacock but also a lot of the commentary and promoted heavily during the Olympics. That's gone they're really going to be relying now on the library content. They have the office and they have a bunch of originals and they have things that they can promote but without the Olympics. That's another challenge for them. A lot of Dick Wolf stuff and I'll note Jeff. Shell that chairman of NBC UNIVERSAL. Now the incoming chairman. Steve Burke retires has been diagnosed publicly with corona virus has said publicly that he is recovering so it just a part of the life. We're living right now. Is that kind of news. Meanwhile qube something. That Hollywood loves to talk about this. Is Jeffrey Katzenberg Meg? Whitman's big attempt to sell little short programming short videos. This is something. There was a lot of skepticism about in Hollywood. Even before this this epidemic. This pandemic will people. It's aimed at young people. Will they pay money to for this thing? Which I think. We're finding a lot of people despite their attempt to advertise it a lot and promoted still bunches of people out. There haven't heard of it and I don't know whether people will pay for Qube. Qube has certainly been paying for content. That's the interesting thing here. This is a two billion dollar venture. Most of that money is being spent on high end studio quality short form content which in Katzenberg's view has never been tried before. Yes there've been other things that have tried to get people to pay for short form content. Go Ninety was a big venture from Verizon Youtube at various premium. Tiers of trying to get people to pay hasn't really worked but Katzenberg says this is a different value proposition. Because this has stars this as people recognize creators that come from overall deals with the big studios all of that is included in Qube and it is tailor made for mobile which is where the audience is going especially young people so will people pay five dollars. Eight dollars without adds to watch this kind of content. We'll see April. Six is the launch date and they are zooming towards that they're not delaying based on the world state. And I think not even Katzenberg knows how this is going to play out. One of the many many unknowns. Thank you matt thank you.

Jeffrey Katzenberg Meg Hollywood Olympics Qube Nbc Universal Matt Bellamy Kim Masters NBC HBO Steve Burke Chairman Dick Wolf Reporter Verizon Youtube Whitman Corona Warner Media Shell Jeff
Biden and Sanders brace for one-on-one battle in new phase of Democratic race

The Frame

07:32 min | 1 year ago

Biden and Sanders brace for one-on-one battle in new phase of Democratic race

"To the fray mom. John Horn the race to be the Democratic nominee for president is basically down to two candidates now Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders after Elizabeth. Warren dropped out today. Warren and former candidate Pete. Buddha judge attracted a good amount of support from Hollywood. So where do all those donors and their money go now? Ted Johnson has been covering all this for deadline dot com as its Washington. Dc correspondent Ted. Welcome back to the show. Thanks for having me so. A lot has changed in the candidate landscape since we last talked Pete. Buddha judge had the support of big names like Lee Daniels and Seth McFarland since dropping out Buddha judge endorsed Biden have some of his supporters followed. Yes some of the fundraisers have committed to Joe Biden's campaign actually did fairly quickly after people to judge endorsed Biden. And I'm talking about names that are really household. Names former executive and NBC universal a fundraising consultant. People like Lee Daniels in Seth Macfarlane. They actually hosted a fundraiser for people to judge they haven't said where they're GONNA go. Seth Macfarlane is. I actually tweeted out. The fact that in the last cycle he endorsed Bernie Sanders. So perhaps he's weighing that decision whether to go for by her whether a Gopher Sanders so I think people are still still may be a little bit on the fence even though there has been this definite movement toward Joe Biden's campaign. Let's talk more about that. There was a big fundraiser. Last night hosted by former paramount pictures head Sherry Lansing and I think a lot of the momentum hinges on his performance on Super Tuesday. You wrote in deadline that I think at one point eighty people were expected. It turned out to be a whole lot more than that. What happened. Well Yeah Actually. I talked to Sherry Lansing on Monday. And since then she continued to get phone calls for people interested in coming to the event and they finally had to cut it off. I think at about three hundred and fifty people. They just couldn't accommodate anymore to a certain extent. This isn't that surprising because Joe Biden occupies that moderate lane in. There aren't a lot of other options left so if you are not in favor of sanders you're probably naturally going to be looking at Joe Biden if you want to be engaged to this political cycle we're shaping up to have a Biden Bernie battle in Hollywood and we'll see how this plays out. It could be ended up being as as contentious and even nasty as it was back in two thousand and eight when you saw this huge division in Hollywood between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton if there were any lessons learned about that polarization that fight between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama. How did the town eventually choose where? There's some conflicted feelings about working with people who might have supported another candidate. Yeah for some people. I think it took them a while. I'm Savan is actually a big name. He's a longtime donor to the Democratic Party. Big Media executive known often for mighty morphin power rangers but he was a figure that was very much behind Hillary Clinton. He appeared on the today show and it took a while to actually get behind Barack Obama. I think it took him until the fall to support Obama's candidacy so it could be even more difficult when you are considering a choice between Biden and Bernie because the division isn't so much behind these two different personalities as it is ideological this race has been set up as a race between the moderates and the left or the far left. And you didn't see that back in two thousand eight. We're talking with Ted Johnson at deadline dot com about Hollywood's take on the two remaining Democratic candidates Elizabeth. Warren has officially dropped out of the race. But she's not endorsing anybody yet. She has a lot of Hollywood support. People that Krissy teagan and buried Jenkins is there any indication yet of where her supporters might go again? I think that this is where people could definitely be on the fence. Between Biden and between Bernie Sanders. I was added warrant event in South Carolina last week with John Legend. And he was. I thought an extraordinarily effective spokesperson for her campaign. He hasn't said Who He's going to endorse yet but he actually would be Think a valuable endorsement for either campaign and he seemed to really kind of reflect. This idea that weren't tried to advance that. There was kind of middle ground between what Biden represented and what sanders represented and she She just had a news conference. Apparently I was wrong about that. That there really wasn't that that lane in this Democratic primary so we'll see what someone like John Legend how he comes out in supporting either. By Sander's there are some very big Hollywood players who have yet to say where their money is going to go to be no which way they're leaning. And how influential are they in? Where other money might go after they pick a candidate? Yes people like Sabban people like Steven Spielberg and Jeffrey Katzenberg. Heaven publicly said who they're backing. I would be awfully surprised if they went for Bernie Sanders Just because people like for example Jeffrey Katzenberg. He has contributed to multiple candidates in this race except for Sanders. So I I think that might be an indication right there. Some of these figures wanted to kind of sit out the primary process but their support can be influential. It has the bandwagon effect. It probably would have been more influential earlier in the primary because it kind of would have rallied the troops behind one of these more moderate candidates but it will matter to a fair degree especially in fundraising. Especially if someone like a Katzenberg or someone like a High Sabban not only host fundraisers but also get involved in some of the Super Pacs for these campaigns where they can raise a much greater sums of money in the millions as opposed to twenty eight hundred. There might be some people in the country who would say to themselves. Well if George Clooney supports this candidate. I'm going to support that candidate. Is that really the factor though the celebrity endorsement or is it more about the money and what the check writing ability can mean for these candidates. Well I think that it depends on what time in the process. There's not a whole lot of evidence that voters look to celebrities for who they are going to vote for. But what they can do is kind of help. Elevate a candidate in terms of attention. And that's extremely important during the primary process. Probably less important when we get into the general election when it's just two candidates facing other and that's where fundraising tends to become a bigger issue especially as we get closer and closer to

Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Hollywood Barack Obama Ted Johnson Seth Mcfarland Hillary Clinton Sherry Lansing Jeffrey Katzenberg Warren Buddha John Legend Pete Executive Democratic Party Lee Daniels John Horn DC George Clooney NBC
2020 Democratic Presidential Candidates Visit Hollywood

The Frame

06:38 min | 1 year ago

2020 Democratic Presidential Candidates Visit Hollywood

"California presidential primary is less than two weeks. Away and Democratic candidates are in a mad dash to raise money and improve their name recognition. And where better to build both than in Hollywood. Ted Johnson is the Washington correspondent for deadline where he covers politics and entertainment. Ted Welcome back to the frame. Thank you for having so who came to town? And what did they do? Well Amy Klobuchar was at the home of Lorraine Sheinberg. She's the widow of Sydney Shamburg. Who was very top executive at universal and also very politically active and in his career and the rain. Sheinberg played the wife to officer Brody in Jaws yes And it kind of speaks to. What type of support she's getting. People were moderates in the entertainment industry. Probably a little older than you may see from some of the Bernie Sanders side and then p. Buddha judge is in town on Thursday. They've been out here raising money at the home of Seth Macfarlane who is very enthusiastic about his support for the former South Bend Mayor. It's also being co-hosted by league. Annuals I assume most of these events are relatively similar. You pay a couple of bucks you show up at somebody's house maybe get a photo shake hands and here twenty minutes speech. Do they all fall? Pretty much under that same pattern. Yes pretty much. So it's usually the candidate delivering a variation on their stump speech that you can hear in public on the campaign trail sometimes throwing in a few insider risk comments and sometimes doing acuity with donors who are the kinds of people who are hosting these events and are they aligned with one candidate or do. They spread their love around. You are seeing some of that but I think what really distinguishes. This presidential cycle past ones is here. We are just two weeks out from Super Tuesday and there are a lot of those traditional donors. The people who've been involved cycle after cycle who have not declared their support for one candidate or the other. I'm thinking people like Steven Spielberg Jeffrey Katzenberg. Hyme Savan these people who are incredibly involved in what they have done This cycle is. They either sat it out or just spread their money around among multiple candidates so as an observer. It's a it can be a little confusing. Just because someone has given to a candidate does not necessarily mean that. They're going to vote for that person or they're going to endorse a lot of people are just seeing how this plays itself out. We're talking with deadlines Ted Johnson about campaigning for president. In not that long ago I remember and you do as well the town being pretty much split between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama during the primaries has one candidate really kind of gone to the top in terms of leading Hollywood attention and money right now. Well it's interesting because if you look at the numbers Comma Harris actually is collected more money from the entertainment business than any other candidate. But she's not even in the race anymore. She's followed by people to judge who is raised. I think it's one point. Two million so far from the entertainment business is quite extraordinary that he's raised that amount. Given that a year ago he was unknown and he came in and really became kind of a darling of the entertainment industry very quickly that I think. A lot of donors a saw his candidacy as potentially historic he'd be the first LGBT president and they really won over by his message. They say hey. We see shades of Barack Obama in people to judge now also shouldn't discount Bernie Sanders. He's raised close to nine hundred thousand for the entertainment business for his campaign and he has a very enthusiastic number of supporters people. Like Adam McKay and Susan Sarandon and Mike. I'm war. They're out there on the campaign trail for him. It's just that he is not relying on these types of high dollar fundraisers to finance his campaign. He's is doing it through these small dollar contributions in his messages. Definitely resonating even in the elite circles of Hollywood but I have to add that. It's also tends to be the left side of Hollywood as opposed to the center La. So let's talk about the right side of Hollywood. It isn't very big but have there been any conservative people in the industry who have come out and said things in favor of or given money to president trump we have people who have come out in favor of trump. Benham with him very publicly from the star. People Jon voight. There is a reluctance to come out publicly in support president trump because there is a lot of blowback. I've talked to trump supporters. Who said they just don't want their names associated with him because things are so polarized at this time but if Bernie Sanders nominee will see. I've talked to centrist donors who are very concerned about sanders getting the nomination. They won't come out and say that that is going to force them into trump's hands. They'll they'll say I'm just GONNA sit it out if he ends up being the nominee but we'll see and once the primary in Nevada is over. Will there be a return of candidates coming back to La looking for more support now yet Joe Biden was post to have an event this week in southern California but that was rescheduled. Because he has to spend so much time on the campaign trail after a pretty dismal performance. In Iowa and New Hampshire. But we're now getting down to just a week away not just from Super Tuesday but also from the South Carolina. Vote so this is. This is crunch time for these campaigns in taking them off the campaign trail has to be a very Savvy calculation that it is going to end up being worth it to fly into California for our fundraiser will probably see the candidates flocked to California not this weekend but the following weekend for those first couple days before Super Tuesday. Ted Johnson is the Washington correspondent for deadline where he covers politics and entertainment. Ted thanks so much for coming back on the

Ted Johnson Bernie Sanders Hollywood President Trump California Barack Obama Washington LA Lorraine Sheinberg Seth Macfarlane Donald Trump Amy Klobuchar South Carolina Sydney Shamburg Jon Voight Steven Spielberg Joe Biden Hillary Clinton Buddha Executive
Quibi spending more than a billion wading into streaming wars. Luring subscribers will be key.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

09:41 min | 1 year ago

Quibi spending more than a billion wading into streaming wars. Luring subscribers will be key.

"QUBE was founded by former Disney Disney executive producer. Jeffrey Katzenberg Meg. Whitman is CEO. They gave a big presentation about the service last week at sea. Yes in yes Las Vegas. They've raised more than a billion dollars and signed up a lot of big name. Talent to create all new shows and movies but no video will be longer than ten minutes. At a time. I spoke to what minutes and she told me queries. Secret sauce is all new technology. I asked her to tell me how it works. Well the first thing is you know. People people are watching a video on on their mobile phone today but it's an uneven experience. Sometimes if you're holding the phone portrait it's a little postage stamp size than u-turn horizontally. It's got big black line. Some content is only available. Portrait sums only available in landscaping said for our use case on the go. Viewing we have to be able to have seamless portrait to landscape rotation with full screen video. And we figured out that it had to really be what we call script to screen innovation because the creators have to film a little bit differently. They have have to look at a shot and they have to say how will that shot looking portrait. How look landscape and then we make two edits of the movie? You Could Watch the movie and portrait or the whole movie and landscape but the gyroscope interscope in your phone knows which way you're holding the phone so we can show you the right editor of the movie and so we thought all right. We'll have the edit of the portrait the editor the landscape and we were going to run both in the background on your phone except for them. We figured out it would eat way too much bandwith and way too much battery life Susan. Okay got any other ideas us on how we can do this. And ultimately it came down to a kind of compression technology that when you are watching in portrait your landscape version is compressed and this is never been done before we have patents on it and that's why the experience is so seemless an so engrossing and then we shot obviously to the aspect ratio of the phone. Is there price pressure. Now I feel like Disney is putting a lot of pressure on a lot of services and you're launching at five dollars a month with ads eight dollars a month without. Yeah I'M GONNA have to come down. I don't know you know it's four ninety nine a month with ads seven ninety nine a month without ads we think that You know member we're going after millennial audience you know eighteen to forty four. We think that most will pick the ad-supported version because it's very light add load. It's only a two and a half minutes per hour of watching which is much less than prime time. TV which is seventeen and a half minutes of advertising for every hour that you watch and so for ninety nine we think is a good value for this premium content on their mobile phone and for those people who really don't want advertising. We felt like we should offer an ad free version Russian at seven ninety nine. Yeah so then. D expect that most of the revenue will be generated by the subscription We think that that will be obviously the base case. And we'll see how this works out. I think the majority will be subscription revenue But we'll see what made you sort of land on this idea of ten minutes for a long time in video radio. It was two minutes and then Youtube went to ten minutes for mid roll purposes. Is it for mid roll purposes. Like how did you sort of land on the part of this judgment but at the data that we used is it turns out that the average session length for the population worldwide except for China is actually six minutes so think about it to be spent five hours hours a day on your phone. You're picking up that phone a lot of different times and the average session six minutes. It's a little bit longer in China. So he said six minutes. So you know maybe our goodies. Abe's we call our content. Qubit should be between five and a maximum of ten. Can I watch on TV. You at launch. He will be able to chrome cast like you'll built casts is to your TV but we at launch will not have a unique apple TV or chrome. Google TV APP PER SE. Because really we think this is mobile. Only and when you think back to this portrait to landscape seamless full screen video. Think about it part of the joy of this. Is You get on the bus holding your phone portrait. Then you watch you know On the bus and horizontal then get off and you go back to portrait most people's. TV's are not going to go back and forth and So we think this is sort of an interesting thing new way to view and is uniquely suited to the mobile phone and then what about the content race. I mean that can be you know. I've been in content longtime. Yes it can be a little bit of money pit. Yes and you know and there's no built in library necessarily archive that you're working from. How do you win that battle? Yeah well you're right. There is no we will be the first streaming services that launches without a library. Because think about it. You can't take sixty minute television show and just chop it up into You know six ten minutes segments is all has to be shot for turnstile which is new and has to be written if it's a movie and chapters that has to be written in a chapter optimized version so it's all new which we think is actually exciting and fun but we have to make a lot of content. Because you can't come to see two or three things you have to field there's a world of richness and a lot of genres and you know we have quite a unique content strategy and so we have Maybe invested did significantly in content. And this is all about finding the great stories Attaching the great actors and actresses to it and getting them excited sighted about doing something entirely new so we will launch with In the first year. One hundred and seventy-five original shows every day we will will produce commission from our partners Three hours of new fresh content every single day which is thirty five five percent more than a network does in prime time so there's a lot of fresh daily new content on the on the APP which I think will keep people. We'll keep coming back for that. At least that's what we hope I mean I am listening to this as a person who does the daily show. And I'm thinking either your geniuses or you're crazy well here's the thing remember. We don't make any content ourselves. You make your own content for that I do. We have to pay for it. But we are leveraging leveraging the expertise of our craters studios were leveraging for our daily essentials where we curate news and sports and weather and lifestyle. We're we're leveraging the infrastructure of our excellent partners right and And so that makes a bit easier but but we have a budget. And we've we've planned for that and and you know we think that will Be The budget for the first year. Talk to me a little bit about the content. So do you anticipate that people will make short versions of things that they may be. Five years later turned into. Oh a longer project longer project. Let me give you an analogy in another medium that you will totally get Do you remember the Davinci Code. Yep The DAVINCI code is four hundred sixty four pages just one hundred and five chapters. Every chapter in the Davinci code is five pages because eighteen years ago. Dan Brown said people are not reading for forty five minutes now. They're probably not even reading for thirty and he said if you've got five minutes I want you to read one chapter got ten minutes. I want you to read two chapters but the thing I do not want you to do is stop in the middle of a chapter but nothing was lesser about the Davinci code other the length of its chapter so we like to say our movies. Nothing's lesser about the movies other than the chapter is the way we deliver them and then we have You know as I described our daily the essentials which we hope will create the daily consumption habit. We're going to curate. You know. Twenty five daily shows every single day From talk shows to horoscope go to news to whether to sports excetera and then The other kind of content we have is this unscripted episodic and documentary three shows and a perfect example. There is Chrissy. Teigen is doing a show her favourite show as it turns out of judge. Judy so she came to us and said I want to do Christie's Court and the tagline is no claim is too small and dumb and each claim will be ten minutes or eight minutes and And she's super excited about it and you by the way you can. You can't in our movies you've got to watch them. The episodes in particular order. But Christie's court you could watch in any order because they're not related to each other episodic so you really have like snack bowl and binge. Yes kind of covered exactly. Yeah okay why are you here. Yeah I mean considering your background ground what drew you to this. Yeah well I've been friends with Jeffrey. For thirty years. We worked at the Walt Disney Company together back in the day and then When I was at Ebay I sat sat on his DreamWorks Animation Board? So Jeffrey and I've been friends for a long time. And when he heard I was stepping down from HP after six and a half years. I told the board I would say five years. He called me and he said would you ever consider coming down and being the CEO of Qube. I said well I don't know I've gotta you know so. He came up and had dinner and at the end of dinner. Three hour dinner. I said this is a really good idea. It's a really good idea because what I look for in new consumer tech businesses. Is I look for other trends right. Trends are absolutely right is the market large. The market's gigantic back. And is there you know. Are you changing consumer behavior or are you just taking people to a premium level and is there a sustainable ainable what I call a sustainable competitive advantage. Meaning if we're successful and everyone else comes in how. How do we continue to win? And how how is that is that through the intellectual property. Well there's actually Largely through our relationships with our studios It is first mover advantage for sure and we have to learn how to how to create create this platform. And we've had to teach craters how to do it so we think we have A lot of barriers to entry because we will be out first by a pretty wide margin

Jeffrey Katzenberg Meg Walt Disney Company Qube CEO Christie China Disney Disney Editor Las Vegas Whitman Interscope Youtube Google Apple Executive Producer Dan Brown Qubit ABE
Quibi spending more than a billion wading into streaming wars. Luring subscribers will be key.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

09:41 min | 1 year ago

Quibi spending more than a billion wading into streaming wars. Luring subscribers will be key.

"QUBE was founded by former Disney Disney executive producer. Jeffrey Katzenberg Meg. Whitman is CEO. They gave a big presentation about the service last week at sea. Yes in yes Las Vegas. They've raised more than a billion dollars and signed up a lot of big name. Talent to create all new shows and movies but no video will be longer than ten minutes. At a time. I spoke to what minutes and she told me queries. Secret sauce is all new technology. I asked her to tell me how it works. Well the first thing is you know. People people are watching a video on on their mobile phone today but it's an uneven experience. Sometimes if you're holding the phone portrait it's a little postage stamp size than u-turn horizontally. It's got big black line. Some content is only available. Portrait sums only available in landscaping said for our use case on the go. Viewing we have to be able to have seamless portrait to landscape rotation with full screen video. And we figured out that it had to really be what we call script to screen innovation because the creators have to film a little bit differently. They have have to look at a shot and they have to say how will that shot looking portrait. How look landscape and then we make two edits of the movie? You Could Watch the movie and portrait or the whole movie and landscape but the gyroscope interscope in your phone knows which way you're holding the phone so we can show you the right editor of the movie and so we thought all right. We'll have the edit of the portrait the editor the landscape and we were going to run both in the background on your phone except for them. We figured out it would eat way too much bandwith and way too much battery life Susan. Okay got any other ideas us on how we can do this. And ultimately it came down to a kind of compression technology that when you are watching in portrait your landscape version is compressed and this is never been done before we have patents on it and that's why the experience is so seemless an so engrossing and then we shot obviously to the aspect ratio of the phone. Is there price pressure. Now I feel like Disney is putting a lot of pressure on a lot of services and you're launching at five dollars a month with ads eight dollars a month without. Yeah I'M GONNA have to come down. I don't know you know it's four ninety nine a month with ads seven ninety nine a month without ads we think that You know member we're going after millennial audience you know eighteen to forty four. We think that most will pick the ad-supported version because it's very light add load. It's only a two and a half minutes per hour of watching which is much less than prime time. TV which is seventeen and a half minutes of advertising for every hour that you watch and so for ninety nine we think is a good value for this premium content on their mobile phone and for those people who really don't want advertising. We felt like we should offer an ad free version Russian at seven ninety nine. Yeah so then. D expect that most of the revenue will be generated by the subscription We think that that will be obviously the base case. And we'll see how this works out. I think the majority will be subscription revenue But we'll see what made you sort of land on this idea of ten minutes for a long time in video radio. It was two minutes and then Youtube went to ten minutes for mid roll purposes. Is it for mid roll purposes. Like how did you sort of land on the part of this judgment but at the data that we used is it turns out that the average session length for the population worldwide except for China is actually six minutes so think about it to be spent five hours hours a day on your phone. You're picking up that phone a lot of different times and the average session six minutes. It's a little bit longer in China. So he said six minutes. So you know maybe our goodies. Abe's we call our content. Qubit should be between five and a maximum of ten. Can I watch on TV. You at launch. He will be able to chrome cast like you'll built casts is to your TV but we at launch will not have a unique apple TV or chrome. Google TV APP PER SE. Because really we think this is mobile. Only and when you think back to this portrait to landscape seamless full screen video. Think about it part of the joy of this. Is You get on the bus holding your phone portrait. Then you watch you know On the bus and horizontal then get off and you go back to portrait most people's. TV's are not going to go back and forth and So we think this is sort of an interesting thing new way to view and is uniquely suited to the mobile phone and then what about the content race. I mean that can be you know. I've been in content longtime. Yes it can be a little bit of money pit. Yes and you know and there's no built in library necessarily archive that you're working from. How do you win that battle? Yeah well you're right. There is no we will be the first streaming services that launches without a library. Because think about it. You can't take sixty minute television show and just chop it up into You know six ten minutes segments is all has to be shot for turnstile which is new and has to be written if it's a movie and chapters that has to be written in a chapter optimized version so it's all new which we think is actually exciting and fun but we have to make a lot of content. Because you can't come to see two or three things you have to field there's a world of richness and a lot of genres and you know we have quite a unique content strategy and so we have Maybe invested did significantly in content. And this is all about finding the great stories Attaching the great actors and actresses to it and getting them excited sighted about doing something entirely new so we will launch with In the first year. One hundred and seventy-five original shows every day we will will produce commission from our partners Three hours of new fresh content every single day which is thirty five five percent more than a network does in prime time so there's a lot of fresh daily new content on the on the APP which I think will keep people. We'll keep coming back for that. At least that's what we hope I mean I am listening to this as a person who does the daily show. And I'm thinking either your geniuses or you're crazy well here's the thing remember. We don't make any content ourselves. You make your own content for that I do. We have to pay for it. But we are leveraging leveraging the expertise of our craters studios were leveraging for our daily essentials where we curate news and sports and weather and lifestyle. We're we're leveraging the infrastructure of our excellent partners right and And so that makes a bit easier but but we have a budget. And we've we've planned for that and and you know we think that will Be The budget for the first year. Talk to me a little bit about the content. So do you anticipate that people will make short versions of things that they may be. Five years later turned into. Oh a longer project longer project. Let me give you an analogy in another medium that you will totally get Do you remember the Davinci Code. Yep The DAVINCI code is four hundred sixty four pages just one hundred and five chapters. Every chapter in the Davinci code is five pages because eighteen years ago. Dan Brown said people are not reading for forty five minutes now. They're probably not even reading for thirty and he said if you've got five minutes I want you to read one chapter got ten minutes. I want you to read two chapters but the thing I do not want you to do is stop in the middle of a chapter but nothing was lesser about the Davinci code other the length of its chapter so we like to say our movies. Nothing's lesser about the movies other than the chapter is the way we deliver them and then we have You know as I described our daily the essentials which we hope will create the daily consumption habit. We're going to curate. You know. Twenty five daily shows every single day From talk shows to horoscope go to news to whether to sports excetera and then The other kind of content we have is this unscripted episodic and documentary three shows and a perfect example. There is Chrissy. Teigen is doing a show her favourite show as it turns out of judge. Judy so she came to us and said I want to do Christie's Court and the tagline is no claim is too small and dumb and each claim will be ten minutes or eight minutes and And she's super excited about it and you by the way you can. You can't in our movies you've got to watch them. The episodes in particular order. But Christie's court you could watch in any order because they're not related to each other episodic so you really have like snack bowl and binge. Yes kind of covered exactly. Yeah okay why are you here. Yeah I mean considering your background ground what drew you to this. Yeah well I've been friends with Jeffrey. For thirty years. We worked at the Walt Disney Company together back in the day and then When I was at Ebay I sat sat on his DreamWorks Animation Board? So Jeffrey and I've been friends for a long time. And when he heard I was stepping down from HP after six and a half years. I told the board I would say five years. He called me and he said would you ever consider coming down and being the CEO of Qube. I said well I don't know I've gotta you know so. He came up and had dinner and at the end of dinner. Three hour dinner. I said this is a really good idea. It's a really good idea because what I look for in new consumer tech businesses. Is I look for other trends right. Trends are absolutely right is the market large. The market's gigantic back. And is there you know. Are you changing consumer behavior or are you just taking people to a premium level and is there a sustainable ainable what I call a sustainable competitive advantage. Meaning if we're successful and everyone else comes in how. How do we continue to win? And how how is that is that through the intellectual property. Well there's actually Largely through our relationships with our studios It is first mover advantage for sure and we have to learn how to how to create create this platform. And we've had to teach craters how to do it so we think we have A lot of barriers to entry because we will be out first by a pretty wide margin

Katzenberg, Jeffrey Free And Ten Minute discussed on The Frame

The Frame

06:36 min | 2 years ago

Katzenberg, Jeffrey Free And Ten Minute discussed on The Frame

"You wanna watch a movie would you rather watch it at home or in a movie theater how about another option watching that film on your smartphone but not all that one's rather in one ten minutes snippet a day that's jeffrey free katzenberg thinking behind his short form mobile video platform currently in the works it's called quimby in the name of short quick bites there's still a lot of questions about how it all work before its launch next year but so far quimby has been able raised more than a billion dollars in drawing some top creative talent laying low way senior tv writer at variety has been looking into what ob excitement is about quitting doesn't launch for almost another year actually it'll come out in april twenty twenty twenty but i think the reason why everybody is so hyped up about it is because you've got to story leaders one from tech meg whitman former e b and hewlett packard ceo and this giant of industry jeffrey katzenberg who was at one time the head of dreamworks and walt disney studios and he's really the reason why people are so excited about it right people are excited about it because he's excited about it people believe in because he believed in it he's been selling the service as eight mobile platform that allows these quick bites which is what could be a short for short form content that'll have premium serialized scripted content unscripted content news news and sports and it'll be released in these five to ten minute chunks daily andy idea is that when you're waiting for coffee or you have a dull moment in your day those times when you're whipping out your phone and you're looking at twitter or facebook or something else and you're just putting around phone instead of doing that you'll go quickly and you'll watch five minutes of a sand rainy horror anthology or ten minutes of an anna kendrick buddy comedy instead so he has raised i think more then a billion dollars to fund this and right now it seems like he has attracted some really interesting talent to make content frequency i was in a van a couple of weeks ago where i ran into antwon fuqua who were a lot of people know from the training day movie he's also made the equalizer with denzel washington and he was producing a movie frequency and he was telling me that it was very attractive even though i think this movie was gonna be caught up into ten minute chunks what is jeffries pitch been to the creative community would be paid responding to well a big part of the appeal for creators is he intellectual property because the way it's format it would be will exclusively license their projects for seven years but after the first two years be rights revert back to beans creators and filmmaker so they'll be able to go and repackage this series they'll be able to hopefully seamlessly thread together all of these five to ten minute chunks of these stories and repackage package them as a feature film as a two and a half hour project but they could then go sell to another service so that's really attractive thing and also again there's just see appeal of katzenberg himself because he has been so successful in this industry i mean an wants so i told me that sitting down with jeffrey katzenberg is like sitting down with the godfather yeah although if you look at some of the movies he made at the walt disney company and some of his animated movies there are some questions about jeffrey storytelling taste will save that conversation for something what is the financial model because a lot of people right now are thinking about disconnecting subscriptions that they might have to their cable or satellite company or who were netflix so how are they trying to position it financially and what do they expect you people so they'll be selling two versions of quip me they'll be ad supported version for five dollars a month and any ad free version for seven dollars a month and it sounds like a small amounts but you also consider that people are i don't know if they're near saturation but there are certainly so many different streaming platforms out there you've got netflix and amazon and who and all of these different subscription services that people are already paying for so that even when you cut the cord you've got sometimes a hefty bill at the end of the month when you combine all these so that'll be a real test will be deceived they can break through that barrier and get people to fork over five to seven bucks a month for this of of course they're bringing some real alias talent and that's where their strength wli again you've got a project from kia motors del toro don cheadle liam hemsworth a you know tyra banks chrissy teagan and you know i think the other question here is also whether there will be on de creator side resale value for them after they were allowed to take their project off of quickly or after they're allowed to repackage their project from could be and sell it to a different platform so if there are detractors in town or at least doubters what would you say is a consistent question that they have about quickly what is gonna be the obstacles to its success there are a couple of different questions that came up in are reporting one of them is do people want this model people were still used to benching on tv these days when you're going to netflix their whole thing is the bench model and it's this also isn't appointment tv it's sort sort of a a daily thing that comes on five ten minutes a day but what if i want to watch the whole movie so in that case do i just wait for a month for all of these daily releases it come on the service and then say binge watch them all anyway on a saturday afternoon a so that's definitely a very unique model that hasn't really been done before another question that people have is people are so used to getting something for nothing specially from a mobile device store people going to be willing to fork over five and seven bucks a month for quickey a get another question is will the viewership justify the cost there are some really high numbers that were being thrown around a believe entrances what's project is gonna cost about fifteen million dollars which is certainly more than you could say for a lot of other short for mobile video out there andy clippings model is subscriptions an ad revenue and that's how they're planning on monetize ing they're stored as a but it'll be interesting to see whether these dubs an ad revenue justify be amount that they're investing

Katzenberg Jeffrey Free Ten Minute Billion Dollars Fifteen Million Dollars Five Ten Minutes One Ten Minutes Seven Dollars Five Dollars Five Minutes Seven Years Ten Minutes Two Years
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on The Bancroft Brothers Animation Podcast

The Bancroft Brothers Animation Podcast

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on The Bancroft Brothers Animation Podcast

"Michael Eisner Jeffrey Katzenberg from key key roles from other studios, and this amazing thing happened, you know, and it was because of there was this this catalysts that happen with us going out there and making this secret of nimh movie. Now, it didn't do very well because we had mismanaged the distribution on it. The the company that had it in their possession. Did not know how to distribute animated feature film. So they dropped the ball. However, you know, it got the attention of someone like Steven Spielberg who looked at it and said the very words that Tony said, oh my gosh. This is Disney film. No, it's not. Yeah. It's it's like the old classic Disney. Yeah. And that's what he was saying. That's what a lot of other people are saying. And in fact, it wasn't it. And I want to say I was just reading this on the internet. You guys started seventy nine wasn't at eighty four that the company had to file for bankruptcy studio. We was that because of that low performance in the box office. No, it was because of mismanagement on the arcade games around nineteen Eighty-three. We started working on dragon slayer and space ace and dragon's lair to in our partners drop the ball as far as after sales service. And so a very very promising business with the arcade industry in the arcade, art form, just dropped, you know, like a like a hot potato and arcade owners became very angry with us. We lost a lot of money. And we found ourselves in a, you know, a bankruptcy situation in order to kind of move on with our business life. Yeah. And you did move on. I mean, that's the amazing thing. I remember being at Cal arts, Tom, and I we were always like so amazed that Dom blue would go from film to film to film. And it seemed like everyone was going to be his last one. But somehow it would always be financing for the next one right now, of course, that that did finally at some point. But it was amazing to see the resilience of Don, Gary, and you guys the made up the team making these movies to continually put out more and more films. And like you said it a huge ripple effect across the industry. I remember when Tom and I were Cal arts as a matter of fact. This is a little later than the rats Ness, guys. And all that there was there was two players in town. There was literally like like Tom said earlier there was the the people that wanted to work for blue and the people that wanted to work for Disney or you went into TV animation worked for Hanoi Barrett. Or maybe this new thing called Cartoon Network or whatever that was starting starting that wasn't starting up yet. Now that was later. Yeah. Said that the you're right. And really blue was winning at Cal arts. Everybody wanted to go work for blue for primarily because they were kind of the same mind set. It was sorta again you wanted to do this classic thing. But really got the tag of being rebels, right? More rebel rebellious than the people that we're the rebels at Disney the rats nece guys. It's I love that irony. But that that that bled over it to Cal arts. So when we were there, you guys were at your height as far as fandom goes, I would say within the animation industry. I it. They were Disney was working on or over. Company just come out. So what movie would that have been for you guys? We were working. I think we were just finishing all dogs go to heaven. Okay. Because all dogs. Get good having came out pretty much the same time as little mermaid. Okay. So that would attract. Wreck with that. And you guys were beating Disney like weren't you some your films making more money than the Disney movies for a few years there? Right. One in particular American tale that was that was the dynamic year that happened. I think in that convinced Disney that they had to revitalize their animation department completely that was year eighty six we American tale came out..

Disney Cal arts Tom Michael Eisner Jeffrey Katzenb Tony Steven Spielberg Dom blue Ness Cartoon Network Hanoi Barrett Don Gary
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on The Art of Charm

The Art of Charm

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on The Art of Charm

"Get there and sure enough Spielberg. You know, in the beginning of a party is like twenty feet away from me, but he's talking to like George Lucas and Jeffrey Katzenberg and shack black in the flinches in full effect. And finally. When it was my time to like, try to make my move. I was completely frozen mouth wired, shut feet, turn to stone, and I also my chance. And I go to the bathroom and I told myself, and again, this goes back to what you had mentioned. If I don't push through this by entire journey will be over before it started. And I go back to the party and I just, you know, Spielberg's in one set of the room on the other side, I go to the other. This is like really awkward dance. And Finally, I see him walking towards the exit. And again, my fear of failing was now even more powerful than I fear of getting rejected. So I just sprinting through the party and I'm dodging waiters. I'm going around two old ladies and I finally go, Tim, and I'm like, Mr. Spielberg. And he turns around, I remember like his eyebrows shooting up and he puts his arms in the air night like coil back. And he gives me this big hug and he's like, I've been on a college campus all day and you're the first I've met and I'm like, can I ask you a question? He's like, absolutely. Just if you just walk with me, which by the way I've learned is a great little thing that always works. If you just walk with someone to their car, what are they? What are they going to say? They're not going to say, so I'm walking with him just car, and he asked me when I'm working on and I just I didn't have a pitch. I just started pouring my heart out telling him about this dream. And finally, I'm like, Mr. Spielberg would you would you do an interview for the book? I see like his jaw clenched, you know? And he looks at me and he's like, you know, I don't do interviews unless it's promote a movie for my foundation. And then he looked up and I remember like him squinting even though the sun wasn't bright and almost as if he was debating something in his mind, and he comes back and look semi, and he goes, you know what? I'm gonna give you a maybe go out and do this. Go get all your other interviews. Come back to me. And I was like, wow, like thank you so much. And he gave me a hug and he walks away. He goes to his car and before I can leave, he turns back around walks back toward me and goes, I really meant that I believe you can do this..

Mr. Spielberg Jeffrey Katzenberg George Lucas Tim twenty feet
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Double Toasted

"And in the end it was nothing nothing nothing like the like the the humor of the show a lot of people look at this and they like wonder why this went wrong this is something that the reason why picked it is because it's a mazing that ever you would never seen anything approve this for network television this one even go as far as a dull swim even though does air did at one time sure you could see how they would show like that you know as as as bad as it is it's still expensive to produce yeah no it is it is it's very expensive yeah it's all about them seeing simpson's money in there is yeah remember this cancelled a shock to the world next day fish police council where all comes to a standstill i thought the headline was there was a show called fittingly you know the the other one again this is top fish police as being the weirdest animated show that they tried to make a prime time show on network television but they managed outdo themselves and imaginative weirdo with the two i remember there was a show out there and it was called father of the pride do you remember this you telling me about this this is what shocked me i remember i remember friend of mine actually went to work on this show called father of the pride this is after we got laid off from this other studio that we work in too like man i got this amazing job lined up i'm going to be working for jeffrey katzenberg.

simpson jeffrey katzenberg
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Le Show

Le Show

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Le Show

"The elegant initially address criticisms of that piece by writing that she felt like a words were being taken out of context and twisted but then she issued an apology for the op ed standing bluntly your never responsible for being assaulted i am truly sorry for causing so much pain i hope you can all forgive me few more apologies ladies gentlemen standby pain million soon jeffrey katzenberg cofounder of dreamworks issued an apology to mali ring walled after recruit comment he allegedly made about the actress resurfaced on line and specifically in an essay she wrote for the new yorker she recalled years of sexual harassment and allude comment by certain hollywood exotic the head of a major studio and incidentally someone who claims to himself to be horrified by the harvey allegations was quoted as saying quote i wouldn't know molly ring walled if she sat on my face mingled moat wrote maybe he was misquoted if he ever sent a note of apology must have got lost in the mail unquote she to name names she did mentioned the source and internet sleuths quickly traced the quote backed katzenberg he is now apologize saying he was horrifying mortifying an embarrassing that ring wall believed the comments came from hang anyone who knows me now and back then knows i do not use language like that is a matter of course are tolerated ms ring wall 22 years too late i'm deeply deeply sorry the houston area school district has apologized after altering a high school homecoming queens purple hair in a photo.

dreamworks new yorker harassment hollywood moat houston area school district jeffrey katzenberg harvey 22 years
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Le Show

Le Show

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on Le Show

"The elegant initially address criticisms of that piece by writing that she felt like a words were being taken out of context and twisted but then she issued an apology for the op ed standing bluntly your never responsible for being assaulted i am truly sorry for causing so much pain i hope you can all forgive me few more apologies ladies gentlemen standby pain million soon jeffrey katzenberg cofounder of dreamworks issued an apology to mali ring walled after recruit comment he allegedly made about the actress resurfaced on line and specifically in an essay she wrote for the new yorker she recalled years of sexual harassment and allude comment by certain hollywood exotic the head of a major studio and incidentally someone who claims to himself to be horrified by the harvey allegations was quoted as saying quote i wouldn't know molly ring walled if she sat on my face mingled moat wrote maybe he was misquoted if he ever sent a note of apology must have got lost in the mail unquote she to name names she did mentioned the source and internet sleuths quickly traced the quote backed katzenberg he is now apologize saying he was horrifying mortifying an embarrassing that ring wall believed the comments came from hang anyone who knows me now and back then knows i do not use language like that is a matter of course are tolerated ms ring wall 22 years too late i'm deeply deeply sorry the houston area school district has apologized after altering a high school homecoming queens purple hair in a photo.

dreamworks new yorker harassment hollywood moat houston area school district jeffrey katzenberg harvey 22 years
"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"jeffrey katzenberg" Discussed on No Agenda

"And david west tonight a now the head of amazon studios also resigning after allegations of sexual harassment that's right amazon's roy price also resigned today after being put on leave last week after an allegation of sexual harassment and atari flinty davis on this again tonight clinton thank you hey i have a uh a quick little entre mom that cuts into this jeffrey katzenberg talks about both the weinstein brothers i will say for the two years that he worked for me at the company interestingly enough my greatest issues were with his brother bob weinstein was genuinely abusive with people in my company and i very directly said the bob if you actually ever talked to somebody who works in this company again you're finished and he said to me you threatening may i said no i'm telling you if you do this again you're done so there's the fascinating thing about this in the one person who did reveal himself in an unacceptable way to me was in fact bob uh interesting huh yes very interesting and doesn't surprise me he's probably he's probably just a dick you know on these hollywood douche bags power trip but he's he's not he's not he doesn't have that is not that crazy machine is not a master he needs lessons but they came from the same family should are going to have similar characteristics and i'm sure they're both meanspirited unbelievable hard to works for you and bugs me you're bugging me the most is there were plenty of people talking about harvey weinstein publicly but these people were deemed nuts and all kinds of sexual stuff is going on hollywood but whenever someone came out said no i just crazy diseases nuts here this is yeah two thousand five.

david west amazon studios harassment amazon roy price clinton bob weinstein harvey weinstein hollywood davis jeffrey katzenberg two years