15 Burst results for "Jeffrey Cole"

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

04:31 min | 3 weeks ago

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

"And trying to move my feet. Now remember, dance, whether you realize it or not occurs from the waist down. It does not occur by flailing your arms around like a crazy person like almost everybody else does. And so I'm trying to list of these different music. I'm not trying. I am listening. Different music. Okay, that would require this kind of step and that step, And then I learned the next thing. Speed is important. The pace of the steps are important. The ability to change the speed from fastest slow the fastest slope was incredibly important to take a song and follow the song that as it built up your timing built your motion built and then you're going to a superfast spit and then stop on a dime and then come out slow again. All this type of control of pace became very important and the same thing is true. When you start to negotiate, you start to learn in negotiations that pacing yourself. Not diving in too quickly. Waiting until the other person gives you their position. Then acting as if it's not life and death. Very important that you don't act like it's life and death. But then turning right around and going. You know what? This isn't exactly what I want. But I'll tell you what. I'll take action right now. I'll make you this offer if you do this thing today. Now. That's a simplistic view of negotiation. But it is a very effective little four step movement. Wait, wait, wait. And then immediately act. With some type of an impending event. Okay, I'll do what you gotta do it now. That type of trash action is one of 8000 types of negotiable itty programs that I have in my brain or cycles or systems that I have in my brain. It's and I know when to use that one. But I have to learn that that one doesn't always work. In fact, when I had started out with single family houses, I had a guy that helped me learn. He was a broker. His name is Bill and Bill's basic approach. Back then, which was foreclosures was to figure out whatever the property was for sale and offer 10% less than what it was, he said. 99 interesting fact 99% of all Falls within 10% of the asking price. If you ask below the asking price, it falls down to less than 10% of the deals. So you won't get very many days, he said. But so go ahead and if they're asking 25 off from 22 And they'll either say yes or no. But the deal's gonna close between 20 and 25,000. That's just the way it's going to work. And so it got to the point where it was like I just go out and offer on everything. I'd go to every single house and you go. Okay. What do you want to go? I want 25,000 for it. I'll give you 22. No way. Never in a million years we take less than 24. Okay, I'll give you 24. Try it again. I'll give you 25 on this house and they go. I won 34 to go now. I'll give you 25. If you do it today they go. No way. Never in a million years when we take 25 will take 27. Okay, I'll give you 27. It just It was my only move. It's the only move I had in real estate was just to make a lowball offer and then let them counter at something less than what they had started at. It was very effective. It was very effective getting deals lesson, you know, no less than 10% under the market value, Uh, but it allowed me to build my portfolio. I learned other techniques. I learned how to Go after motivated sellers that were willing to owner finance and how I could use that and leverage the down payments and then take on the owner financing. All these techniques are just like learning to dance. There's hundreds of techniques we learned in this business. And the second part of this this learning curve. This action level of learning curve part is about learning as many different techniques as you possibly can. Now you specialized in a couple of them, but you want to know them all because there's going to be a time and a place. People ask me all the time. Does the data tell Donna Robert Alan Jeffrey Cole? Tommy View Miles around the Dan Carter? She's Robert Kiyosaki. Programs really work in the answer is, Yeah. At least once. Because whatever it crazy, zero down transactional type deal they created to teach you, which made them millions more teaching that one transaction than they ever made using that one transaction. But that transaction had to have worked at least once. They had.

Robert Kiyosaki 10% Bill 99% millions 25 second part today Dan Carter 34 99 24 one transaction 22 25,000 less than 10% 20 hundreds Donna Robert Alan Jeffrey Cole less than 24
"jeffrey cole" Discussed on KPRC 950 AM

KPRC 950 AM

04:42 min | 3 weeks ago

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on KPRC 950 AM

"Tie the music to the dance. And so I literally started listening to all kinds of music. All day long. home in my car and trying to move my feet. Now remember, dance, whether you realize it or not occurs from the waist down. It does not occur by flailing your arms around like a crazy person like almost everybody else does. And so I'm trying to list of these different means. I'm not trying. I am listening. Different music. Okay, that would require this kind of step and that step, and then I learned the next thing speed. Is important. The pace of the steps are important. The ability to change the speed from fastest slow the fastest slope was incredibly important to take a song and follow the song that as it built up your timing built your motion built and then you're going to a superfast spit and then stop on a dime and then come out slow again. All this type of control of pace became very important and the same thing is true. When you start to negotiate, you start to learn in negotiations that pacing yourself. Not diving into quickly. Waiting until the other person gives you their position. Then acting as if it's not life and death. Very important that you don't act like it's life and death. But then turning right around and going. You know what? This isn't exactly what I want. But I'll tell you what. I'll take action right now. I'll make you this offer if you do this thing today. Now. That's a simplistic view of negotiation. But it is a very effective little four step movement. Wait, wait, wait. And then immediately act. With some type of an impending event. Okay, I'll do what you gotta do it now. That type of trash action is one of 8000 types of negotiable itty programs that I have in my brain or cycles or systems that I have in my brain. It's and I know when to use that one. But I have to learn that that one doesn't always work. In fact, when I had started out with single family houses, I had a guy that helped me learn. He was a broker. His name is Bill and Bill's basic approach. Back then, which was foreclosures was to figure out whatever the property was for sale and offer 10% less than what it was, he said. 99 interesting fact 99% of all Falls within 10% of the asking price. If you ask below the asking price, it falls down to less than 10% of the deals. She won't get very many years, he said. But so go ahead and if they're asking 25 off from 22 And they'll either say yes or no. But the deal is going to close between 20 and 25,000. That's just the way it's going to work. And so it got to the point where it was like I just go out and offer on everything. I'd go to every single house and you go. Okay. What do you want to go? I want 25,000 for it. I'll give you 22. No way. Never in a million years we take less than 24. Okay, I'll give you 24. Try it again. I'll give you 25 on this house and they go. I won 34 to go now. I'll give you 25. If you do it today they go. No way. Never in a million years when we take 25 will take 27. Okay, I'll give you 27. It just It was my only move. It should only move I had in real estate was just to make a lowball offer and then let them counter at something less than what they had started at. It was very effective. It was very effective. Getting deals. Lesson. You know, no less than 10% under the market value, Uh, but it allowed me to build my portfolio. I learned other techniques. I learned how to go after motivated sellers that were willing to owner finance and how I could use that and leverage the down payments and then take on the owner financing. All these techniques are just like learning to dance. There's hundreds of techniques we learned in this business. And the second part of this this learning curve. This action level of learning curve Part here is about learning as many different techniques as you possibly can. Now you specialized in a couple of them, but you want to know them all because there's going to be a time and a place. People ask me all the time. Does the data. Tell Dr Robert Alan? Jeffrey Cole? Tommy who? Miles around the Grand Kartal? She's Robert Kiyosaki. Programs really work in the answer is, Yeah. At least once. Because whatever it crazy, zero down transactional type deal they created to teach you, which made them millions more teaching that one transaction than they ever made using that one transaction. But that transaction had to have worked at least once. They had.

Jeffrey Cole Robert Kiyosaki 10% 99% Bill Robert Alan Tommy 25 millions 99 today less than 10% one transaction 22 second part 34 25,000 24 one no less than 10%
"jeffrey cole" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

04:27 min | 3 months ago

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Fall broke based Padres fan last Friday. Ricky McGann, You made a barehanded catch leaning way over the rail at the park to catch a Manny Machado home run ball. Ricky is joining us on the cocoa news live line, and that was a heck of a catch. Tell us what you were thinking. What? You saw everything. Hello. I can't hear anybody. Okay, Can you can you hear me now? Now in Kenya. No Yes. Oh, yeah. Okay. So, Ricky, Sorry about that. So tell us what what you were thinking and what was happening when that ball was coming toward you. Yeah. So when? When my child hit the ball, I right away already knew the home run. So I stood up and I thought about coming close me, So I got on my feet like going towards the real insight washing come towards me. And I just take my hand up and pray to God that I caught the ball and what I thought about my head, please and hard they could, and I looked at it and I turned around and everybody was crazy for me. Well, when you caught that bullet looked a little bit dangerous. I mean, it's not like you grabbed onto that rail and you leaned way over there. Yeah, pretty much. All my legs are like there were against the real So now you have received a few items from the Padres for that catch. Tell us about it. Yeah. So, um Like the like. The Foreign day they contact me the CEO of the party and let me know, like they were like I feel host me for the party game for you. Me my uncle to a ticket next the dugout. That's pretty quickly. We thought we got telling all the players, you know, and then I saw my chocolate. That's a look. And I showed him the jersey Give me the fight dirty gave me and in the ball, you're able. Good catch. We actually did it hurt when I cut the ball. I don't know what dinner heard he goes. What? Don't don't Don't hear enough. I was like, no, No, no, don't glow gloves and they're all laughing with me and stuff. Well, Ricky, it was a great catch. And it was fun to watch on TV. And congratulations to you that bareheaded catch leaning way over the rail at the park for a Manny Machado home Run ball. Have a great day. Also also, um, I wanted to say, uh this Saturday at the fabrics morning and stored Uh, to 11 North Main Avenue. Former California We're going to have the shirt signing at his sword. So this charity from 11 to 3, I believe we will be having our shirts and they're signing every single sure that everybody buys. Oh, nice. All right. Well, thank you so much. Ricky have a great day. And way out. Think material am I never know. Madonna is reportedly she doesn't have one of these reportedly building a recording studio in her home, which I I thought most big artists like that had them generally do. It's a write off according to it like she needs it. According to the New York Post designer and builder, Jeffrey Cole, is the mind behind the design at her. Ultra posh Not just posh. No, sir. There's Mora ultra posh estate in Bridgehampton, New York, She can belt out those tunes as loud as she wants. Whether they're in the key of our or not, because, uh, this sits in the middle of the 58 Acre horse farm. Oh, so she can belt out vogue as long as she Yeah. Such a terrible song Father, a biopic based on stone Temple Pilots, late frontman Scott Wayland is in the works. His 2011 memoir, not Dead and not for sale will be the basis of the film called Paper Hearts. The film's writer is Jennifer Irwin and told the Hollywood reporter she is honored to tell Whelan's story. He died after an accidental overdose in 2015. He was 48 years old, and a lot of people had thought that because if you had a long running issue with addiction A lot of people thought he had a handle on it that you know he was. He was okay. But it's just the notorious nature of addiction, that it just boom. You're back in it and Then you're gon call me Call me up by your name. I'll be on the way like will Does..

Jennifer Irwin 2015 Ricky McGann Manny Machado Scott Wayland Ricky 2011 Jeffrey Cole Kenya 11 North Main Avenue Madonna Whelan last Friday Bridgehampton, New York New York Post 48 years old Paper Hearts Padres Hollywood God
"jeffrey cole" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:35 min | 4 months ago

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Assets. The spinoff will put HBO, CNN and TBS under the same roof as the Discovery Channel, HD TV and the Food network. 18 t get some ownership in the new content giant and also gets out from under that $85 billion acquisition of Time Warner Back in 2016 marketplaces Justin Ho has more on what's driving this deal. Etienne's He has a lot going on. In addition to its media business, the companies in the middle of rolling out a nationwide five G network and fiber broadband It's also competing for wireless phone subscribers. Each of those is an expensive proposition. So for 18 T, they just didn't have the money to fight three wars at once. Craig Moffett is the founder of the research outfit Moffett. Nathan sent. Meanwhile, he says Discovery is trying to boost its own programming with a new streaming service called Discovery. Plus, but I think it's pretty clear that's not Large enough on its own to be fully competitive, with Disney and Netflix going forward Disney and Netflix air pouring billions of dollars into new content this year in order to learn new streaming subscribers. Jeffrey Cole directs the center for the digital future at USC. If a TNT and discovery want to compete, he says, the only answer Is to put billions into content, and I think you need ambassador economic engine to do that which the merged company would have, says analyst Jim Nail, with Forrester Research, combining a TNT offerings like HBO and CNN with discovery content like HD TV and the food network, he says. There's kind of something for everybody, so that may be a good justification for household to spend whatever they're going to price of death, he says. One big challenge will be marketing the company and convincing users to sign up for yet another streaming service. I'm Justin. How for marketplace On Wall Street Today, Elon, Musk and Bitcoin are having a super messy break up on Twitter, and it is some investment drama. Other market details when we do the numbers So it is clear after.

Jim Nail Jeffrey Cole Musk Justin Ho TBS Discovery Channel Time Warner CNN 2016 Disney Netflix Craig Moffett HBO Discovery Elon Justin TNT $85 billion Etienne Forrester Research
"jeffrey cole" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:15 min | 4 months ago

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The spinoff will put HBO, CNN and TBS under the same roof as the Discovery Channel, HD TV and the Food network. 18 t get some ownership in the new content giant and also gets out from under that $85 billion acquisition of Time Warner Back in 2016 marketplaces Justin Ho has more on what's driving the steel 80, and he has a lot going on. In addition to its media business, the companies in the middle of rolling out a nationwide five G network and fiber broadband, it's also competing for wireless phone subscribers. Each of those is an expensive proposition. So for 18 T, they just didn't have the money to fight three wars at once. Craig Moffett is the founder of the research outfit, Moffett, Nathan said. Meanwhile, he says Discovery is trying to boost its own programming with a new streaming service called Discovery. Plus, but I think it's pretty clear that's not large enough on its own. To be fully competitive, with Disney and Netflix going forward Disney and Netflix air pouring billions of dollars into new content this year in order to learn new streaming subscribers. Jeffrey Cole directs the center for the digital future at USC. If a TNT and discovery want to compete, he says, the only answer is to put Millions into content, and I think you need ambassador economic engine to do that which the merged company would have, says analyst Jim Nail, with Forrester Research, combining a TNT offerings like HBO and CNN with discovery content like H G T V and the Food network, he says. There's kind of something for everybody, so that may be a good justification for household to spend whatever they're going to price it at. He says. One big challenge will be marketing the company and convincing users to sign up for yet another streaming service. I'm Justin. How for marketplace On Wall Street Today, Elon, Musk and Bitcoin are having a super messy break up on Twitter, and it is some investment drama. Other market details when we do the numbers So it is clear after the last 14 months or so that broadband Internet access is essential. It's also clear that a whole lot of Americans don't have it. Closing the digital divide depends on knowing where access is available and where it isn't. The Federal Communications Commission is the agency charged with mapping the country's broadband access. But its maps are not great. Congress passed a law last year asking the agency to correct that. Which leads me to Jessica Rosenworcel. She's the new acting chair of the FCC. I had her on the line earlier this month, and I asked her what action she was taking to address the mapping issue. In light of the law Congress passed, which is called the Broadband Data Act. I set up a task force that is looking at all the changes we can make in the short term, but also how we're gonna have really accurate maps in the long term, and what's most important here. Is we can't just take in data from the carriers and assume it's correct. We have to go to individuals, local officials and state officials and asked them what's really happening in their own backyard. I mean, it sounds like you're describing a little bit of a broadband census. I think we need it. When you think about how as a nation we've moved so much online during this pandemic. We've got to figure out how to get this service in a robust way everywhere, and I think it's appropriate to think about it that way. I wonder now, though, we're at this moment where there's a lot of money, all of a sudden between the cares Act and the American Rescue Plan Act. We're seeing hundreds of millions of dollars going to municipalities and Some are using it to increase broadband access. You know, without waiting for new federal maps like is the landscape changing even as your undertaking this effort? Yes, We have a lot of interest in this issue. You know, Broadband's gone from nice to have to need to have and everyone knows that not just Congress. And I don't want to tell the people who don't have service, you know? Just no wait for until we have pristine data. We're gonna have to sort of build this plane while it's in the air, and I think speed here matters. We don't want everyone. Tolo, wait for us to have just perfect information. Before we start doing real things on the ground to connect more people. I also just wonder about the power shift. As you see this money flowing into municipalities. I think that there has been a sense that in some ways The conversation has been dominated by what big telecom companies have been willing to invest in. And where Do you have a sense that that power balance is shifting a little bit? Yeah, I think that one of the realities of this infrastructure is there really high sunken fixed costs and as a result, it gets deployed in places where Companies can recover those costs faster. Those are often urban, suburban, more populated areas, so we're gonna have to look at other alternatives other ways. Other technologies to make sure we serve 100% of us. And those might involve, you know small local companies that might involve fixed wireless or electric co ops. I'm gonna have to get creative to make sure we get service everywhere. Let's shift gears and talk about cost. Congress created a $3 billion fund for low income Americans to receive $50 a month for broadband service. How will that also impact this landscape, especially as you are seeking other ways to lower costs? Yeah, The program you mentioned is called the emergency broadband benefit, And it's a really big deal because the United States has never had a big broadband affordability program. And so for the first time ever, we're going to be offering help the households where you know there. There's job loss or students or on the free and reduced lunch program..

Jessica Rosenworcel Jim Nail Jeffrey Cole Discovery Channel Time Warner Disney TBS Justin Ho Discovery CNN HBO Netflix 2016 Musk FCC Broadband Data Act Congress $3 billion Craig Moffett Justin
"jeffrey cole" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:36 min | 4 months ago

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on KCRW

"More than 11,000. Gas stations across the Southeast remain out of gas. Panic buying has drained over half the stations in North Carolina and as much as 90% of the pumps in Washington, D. C. This all comes five days after the colonial pipeline resumed operations after a ransomware hack forced a shutdown. Tomorrow, Congress will launch a pipeline security bill to prevent future outages, But critics say it's missing some major safeguards. Marketplaces. Scott Tom kicks us off when something goes wrong with the pipeline, like the Colonial pipeline hacked companies do not have to tell the government what happened. Electricity companies do and if there's a plane incident, airlines have to open up the government investigators says Rob Can AKI is a former top cyber security aide to President Obama. They will be doing everything they could to understand what happened, and then they would rapidly be sharing that information with other airlines so those airlines could prevent the same thing from happening. To them. That's not at all what's happening with this pipeline incident. Instead, it's a voluntary system of protecting data and sharing information. There are no government mandates or finds just recommendations in the bill in Congress would keep it that way. Thing is a recent survey of pipeline companies found that just 8% actively share information with the rest of the industry and the government. That's a woefully low number. Andy Lee at the law firm Jones Walker did the survey. There's not enough carriage and there are too few sticks to ensure that our pipeline industry stakeholders Are actively engaging in the budget, spend to make sure that they're safe. This isn't a new fight. Nine years ago, oil and gas lobbyist fought off mandatory rules and now energy trade groups are against, saying the industry should oversee itself. Mark Weatherford is dubious his strategy head at the National Cybersecurity Center, which advises government officials. I am not a fan of regulation, and I hate to say it like this, but you know, it's been proven over and over again back Companies are simply not going to self regulate. When the public safety is at stake, he says. The government needs a bigger role in Washington. I'm Scott Tong for Marketplace. Big Media News today, a TNT and Discovery announced they're forming a new company made up of their entertainment news and sports assets. The spinoff will put HBO, CNN and TBS under the same roof as the Discovery Channel, HD TV and the Food network. 18 t get some ownership in the new content giant and also gets out from under that $85 billion acquisition of Time Warner Back in 2016 marketplaces Justin Ho has more on what's driving the steel 80, and he has a lot going on. In addition to its media business, the companies in the middle of rolling out a nationwide five G network and fiber broadband, it's also competing for wireless phone subscribers. Each of those is an expensive proposition. So for 18 90, they just didn't have the money to fight three wars at once. Craig Moffett is the founder of the research outfit Moffett. Nathan sent Meanwhile, he says Discovery is trying to boost its own programming with a new streaming service called Discovery. Plus, but I think it's pretty clear that's not large enough on its own to be fully competitive with Disney and Netflix going forward. Disney and Netflix air, pouring billions of dollars into new content this year in order to learn new streaming subscribers. Jeffrey Cole directs the center for the digital future at USC. If a TNT and discovery want to compete, he says, the only answer Is to put billions into content, and I think you need ambassador economic engine to do that which the merged company would have, says analyst Jim Nail, with Forrester Research, combining a TNT offerings like HBO and CNN with discovery content like H G T V and the Food network, he says. There's kind of something for everybody, so that may be a good justification for household to spend whatever they're going to price it at. He says. One big challenge will be marketing the company and convincing users to sign up for yet another streaming service. I'm Justin. How for marketplace? On Wall Street today. Elon Musk and Bitcoin are having a super messy break up on Twitter, and it is some investment drama. Other market details when we do the numbers So it is clear after the last 14 months or so that broadband Internet access is essential. It's also clear that a whole lot of Americans don't have it. Closing the digital divide depends on knowing where access is available and where it isn't. The Federal Communications Commission is the agency charged with mapping the country's broadband access. But its maps are not great. Congress passed a law last year asking the agency to correct that. Which leads me to Jessica Rosenworcel. She's the new acting chair of the FCC. I had her on the line earlier this month, and I asked her what action she was taking to address the mapping issue. In light of the law Congress passed, which is called the Broadband Data Act. I set up a task force that is looking at all the changes we can make in the short term, but also how we're gonna have really accurate maps in the long term, and what's most important here. We can't just take in data from the carriers and assume it's correct. We have to go to individuals, local officials and state officials and asked them what's really happening in their own backyard. I mean, it sounds like you're describing a little bit of a broadband census. I think we need it. When you think about how as a nation we've moved so much online during this pandemic. We've got to figure out how to get this service in a robust way everywhere, and I think it's appropriate to think about it that way. I wonder now, though, we're at this moment where there's a lot of money, all of a sudden between the cares Act and the American Rescue Plan Act. We're seeing hundreds of millions of dollars going to municipalities and Some are using it to increase broadband access. You know, without waiting for new federal maps like is the landscape changing even as your undertaking this effort? Yes, We have a lot of interest in this issue. You know, Broadband's gone from nice to have to need to have and everyone knows that not just Congress. And I don't want to tell the people who don't have service, you know? Just no wait for until we have pristine data. We're gonna have to sort of build this plane while it's in the air, and I think speed here matters. We don't want everyone to wait for us to have just perfect information. Before we start doing real things on the ground to connect more people. I also just wonder about the power shift. As you see this money flowing into municipalities. I think that there has been a sense that in some ways The conversation has been dominated by what big telecom companies have been willing to invest in. And where Do you have a sense that that power balance is shifting a little bit? Yeah, I think that, um One of the realities of this infrastructure. Is there really high sunken fixed costs and as a result, it gets deployed in places where companies can recover those costs faster. Those are often urban, suburban, more populated areas. So we're gonna have to look at other alternatives other ways. Other technologies to make sure we serve 100% of us. And those might involve, you know small local companies that might involve fixed wireless or electric co ops. Gonna have to get creative to make sure we get service everywhere. Let's shift gears and talk about cost. Congress created a $3 billion fund for low income Americans to receive $50 a month for broadband service. How will that also impact this landscape, especially as you are seeking other ways to lower costs? Yeah, The program you mentioned is called the emergency broadband benefit, And it's a really big deal because the United States has never had a big broadband affordability program. And so for the first time ever, we're going to be offering help the households where you know there. There's job loss or students around the free and reduced lunch program..

Mark Weatherford Jessica Rosenworcel Jim Nail Jeffrey Cole Disney Justin Ho TBS Craig Moffett CNN Netflix FCC TNT Time Warner Broadband Data Act Andy Lee North Carolina HBO Congress 2016 Discovery
"jeffrey cole" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 9 months ago

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We're going to see some real anti trust action. So we're going to see regulation based on behavior, mainly Facebook and a little bit of Twitter and then regulation proposed based on size. Jeffrey Cole is founder and director of the Center for the Digital Future at USC. Annenberg. Jeffrey. Thank you so much for this conversation and happy New Year. Hi, Happy New year, and I think we mean that with more conviction than we've ever set in our lives. Don't we have a happy New year? Thank thank you guys. And you can share your thoughts on what you think. Your post pandemic life will look like what changes have you made that you're taking into the future? How will your work or school or social lives change? Right? I sit here and now, Dr Borg. Head in here And now more than 200. Google employees are forming a union. You'll hear the reason why coming up next and also the final countdown for a pair of runoff elections and Georgia that Are expected to determine which party controls the United States Senate more on that as well. Speaking of that, that will also be a topic on the takeaway beginning at one o'clock here on KQED from mobilizing voters on Tic Tac. Paying for Uber's to the polls. Young people are playing a critical role in this week's runoff election for the U. S senate in the Peach State of Georgia. That's on the takeaway again ahead at one o'clock here on KQED Public radio. I'm Michel. ST. Support for KQED comes from the Institute on Aging. Dividing customized care for those who need a little bit of help to remain living safely at home. Learn more at I o aging dot.

KQED Jeffrey Cole founder and director Georgia Facebook United States Senate Annenberg Twitter USC Institute on Aging Tic Tac Dr Borg Google Uber U. S
"jeffrey cole" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:50 min | 9 months ago

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is here and now January is usually all about looking into the future of what we want our lives to be, But so much has changed how we work. How are Children learned the way we shop and interact with each other. Joining us now, for some predictions on what a post pandemic life might look like is Jeffrey Cole. He's the founder and director of the Center for the Digital Future at USC. Annenberg, Jeffrey Welcome. I am delighted to be here, Tanya. Thank you. Well, we're very happy to have you. Okay, Let's start with work, according to a study by your group 30% of Americans say That even if they could go back to work safely, they don't want to. Some tech companies we know have already said they're going to allow their employees to work from home after the pandemic. Do you think more broadly, People will get their way when this is all over. I absolutely do. And first before you even talk about people working from home, you've got to ask how many people can work from home and we found 76% of Americans could do at least a little bit of their job on 76. 76 can do at least a little bit. 24% can't do any. And importantly, for people who with just a high school education 51% can't do any. So already. There's a sort of a cultural or economic bias in that, but at the moment only 10% say they want to go back. Just like before 30% say. I don't want to go back at all. And 60% say I want to go back. But not as much. Maybe 23 maybe four days a week, so clearly 90% of people want to change. Jeffrey. My big question for you, though our companies willing to change because so many structures are built on the idea of having people in an office together many people's jobs or to manage people in person. We're going to see a lot of restructuring. I would guess. Very much so well. First of all, we think most companies were suspicious of working from home before the pandemic supervisors. I think many of them felt that worked that didn't occur in front of them didn't actually occur. That working from home on a Friday actually meant a three day weekend, So we went into this with suspicion on people were resistant to allow too much working from home. But I think companies found it worked pretty well. Learning which we'll talk about in a minute didn't work as well. But working at home did pan out. It was productive. And I think companies are now seeing that it has significant implications for the size of offices. But what's gonna happen then, Geoffrey to all of these big corporate office faces, they're gonna shrink, and it's going to have profound consequences for commercial real estate, which may move into a depression. Most offices may get smaller by a factor of 50% the whole notion. I think you may see companies moving toe where people all come in on Thursday morning. And maybe to other would tell you is a week at their own choosing, But the whole corporate culture may change. Okay, Let's talk about school. You found that 43% of college students say. They like online learning better, but they want to see tuition reduced in many schools have pushed against this for several reasons, one being they wouldn't be able to afford need based scholarships. What do you see ahead for for higher Ed. Well for higher Ed is opposed to K through 12. It hasn't worked out very well. Most of the teachers who had never even heard of Zoom were given three days to get their courses online. It's not a surprise that most of it didn't work out very well. In the spring, the college students were in a particular bind because it's some places like USC were tuition $60,000 a year. Who wants to spend $60,000 a year going to school in your parents basement for a system that's not is good. We're going to see a lot of colleges disappear Sadly. Put into a horrible predicament because their costs don't go down. They still have to maintain the physical plant. The only thing they really save ah little bit of electricity. So it's been a terrible situation for everyone. But we think students K through 12 and college will be in front of teachers as quickly as possible. That's not Permanent change. We think Want to deepen what you said about K through 12 students, though you believe that they will be back in front of their teachers in person. You don't see us moving forward with more online schooling say into the next school year. Well, just today is we're recording this Governor Newsome and California announced considerable aid to get students back in the classroom. In early 2021. There's more research that shows the virus is spreading less among students at school. So now we do believe in our work sense of support this That students will be back at the latest when it's safe, and they're vaccinated, potentially with proper funding and conditions even earlier, when I used to teach I used to tell my students is was in college on Lee 20% of what you learn is in the classroom. The other 80% in the hallway or walking in and out of class. So students have really that this has been a horrible year for students, and we think they'll be back as soon as it's safe. If not even a little earlier. They've also been huge changes in the way we shop. Your team found that folks who had never made an online purchase. Let me see if I get this right. Four weeks into the pandemic. 37% had done it for the first time. This kind of disruption is kind of mind boggling. We've never seen that kind of adoption. But necessity, you know, made it Amazon just shown through the pandemic. It was a lifesaver, but it is terrifying. The growth they've seen their revenues in the first six months of the pandemic grew 40%. Now that's not a big deal. If your company's making a million dollars they were a trillion dollar company. And they grew 40%, and they're just getting started. I know that sounds like an exaggeration. But Amazon commerce is only in about 12 countries. And they've just been moved into beyond commerce. They've moved into entertainment, but now they're moving into medical and pharmacy and thanking. I mean they really are getting started. And if you really want to attribute to Amazon, you know she's looking at distributing the vaccine, which seems to be inefficient. At the moment, the Amazons, the greatest logistics company in the history of the world, they have billions of moving parts every day. They should be distributing the facts again. But But for some other issues involved. Yeah, There's some other issues involved there. But I'm guessing some folks have thought of this before. You know, it's not just Amazon. That's really seeing huge growth this year. Apple stock has nearly doubled to around $135 a share. Then there's alphabet up about 30%. Is this a bubble? Or are these tech companies just getting started? I genuinely feel they're just getting started The room for growth. The runway is enormous. The numbers boggle the mind The bill paying the papal the after paid those things. Are becoming even bigger because we've essentially become Akash list society during the pandemic. If you look at the entertainment companies, the growth of Netflix and Disney plus all of these tech, they are tech companies now because of streaming All of these tech companies. The growth potential is really just the beginning. And I know with the numbers like that. It doesn't seem possible, but it really is. When we talk about the future of commerce of these tech companies, we also can't help but talk about regulation. Do you think that Regulations will be a reality in the future in the near future. Yes, well, there's two types of regulation that we see on the horizon in both of little more likely under a Democratic administration, But the first type is for invading privacy, not policing their systems. Facebook the front of line there. Some real regulation on how they protect people's privacy. The other kind of regulation that we're going to see later into. The year is based on size. These companies in many people's views have just become too big. The Justice Department in the last 30 years has gone after the old 80 anti Microsoft, IBM. They are little flies compared to what Amazon and alphabet Google and Apple and Facebook are and the anti competitive practices, the inability of others to gain a foothold..

Amazon founder and director USC Jeffrey Cole Apple Facebook Tanya Annenberg Jeffrey Jeffrey Welcome depression California Governor Newsome Geoffrey Netflix Justice Department Amazons Microsoft IBM
"jeffrey cole" Discussed on Republic Keeper - with Brian O'Kelly

Republic Keeper - with Brian O'Kelly

03:42 min | 10 months ago

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on Republic Keeper - with Brian O'Kelly

"The newly there guys usually aren't corrupted the newly there guys want apply right. There guys haven't been told how the game is played. Okay the newly there guys wanna do it right so what happened. Is george kent. Newly there he was there to lead anti corruption efforts. He was concerned that the bribery allegations surrounding prosecutor general battalion were credible enough that he sought a meeting with one of your deputies to demand action. According to state department's notes came The february third. Two thousand fifteen meeting involved. Kent one of your top deputies anatoly danilenko as well as doj's liaison in ukraine. Jeffrey cole according to members now the again this is reporting from just the news. Straight out of the state department's memos so. Don't give me this. You know you're making it up stuff is right out of our own state department's memo's go to just the news dot com find the article. The pdf's of the of the these emails notes from the state department themselves are right there. So here's what he what he says. No problem which russell gets named soon as likely george. Jeff cole will confirm later Setting up the meeting. Right so george kent goes to this meeting okay about this. Bribe getting paid okay. And let's see what it says. Officials miller meeting walls one witness told just the news that can't strongly confronted danilenko insisting the. Us had strong reason to believe that bruise move officials made a multi-million dollar. Bribe to your emas office between may two thousand fourteen. When hunter biden joined the board and december two thousand fourteen danilenko was taken aback by the ferocity of the accusation and he even offered his cell phone to us officials to show that while he had contact info for barista. Founder mccullough cherokee. There was no evidence. The two had any recent context. We got out his phone and look. I got the guy's number in here balloons last time. I called him out. Not me right after that meeting with mr ken. Irina about roughly step down on february tenth seven days later Stepped down as a chief of the prosecutor general of course in ukraine. When you step down you just stepped down and go right back into another office. In the corrupt poor shinko government. He was offered a position and as governor of our state and Just turned it down State and fbi official did not respond to a request for comment About this story nor did hunter biden saw. Just a news contacted him and The state department has nothing to say. Neither hunter biden now So check this out. This is super. This is crazy after the fbi and m i five spent months and arguably millions. We're going to try to put together the first possible asset recovery case against former minister of ecology. Slow chessy by this works in ukraine The You minister ecology chessy was able then to Grant himself natural gas contracts to make him a billionaire so he was the secretary of energy and he said well you know who should get the energy contracts as me and so you ordered all these contracts for himself and then You know fled the country and you know fled the office in his just rich so anyway so this is how it works when i met you ramos. hot hand. man..

george kent danilenko hunter biden anatoly danilenko state department Jeffrey cole Jeff cole ukraine mccullough cherokee doj mr ken Kent shinko government russell miller george Irina fbi chessy Us
"jeffrey cole" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on WGN Radio

"You can replenish the candy. The monsters ain't get scary fast. Walgreens. to vote this year? Yeah, I'm registered. Well, you should vote. Yes. On Amendment one. You know what that's about, Right? Well, tell me more about it. So right now, politicians make back room deals to choose who they represent. Instead of us, the voters choosing them. That's partisan. Jerry Mandarin. Wait, So they're choosing what's best for us. See? That's why we must vote Yes. On Amendment one on the November ballot. We must end partisan gerrymandering so that we can choose who represents us. An amendment one will put new language taken from the 14th amendment and the Voting Rights Act into the Virginia Constitution. I see. So for the first time in 400 years, Amendment one will allow citizens direct involvement in the process of joined voting districts, and it'll add new civil rights protections, which sounds good to me, and that's not all. Voting? Yes. On amendment One will protect our right to vote. Well, I'm going to vote Yes. On Amendment one to put the power in our hands paid for by fair maps. Virginia. It's 10. 09. This is wg and I'm John Williams. Thanks for tuning in and the numbers 3129817 200. Our Web poll question. We call it a news click, You'll find it on. Wg on radio dot com or on my social media. I'm wg and King John on Facebook and so on and so forth is asking you if they should mute the microphones when the other person is talking at the presidential debate. They said they would President says he doesn't like it. Vice President Joe Biden says he does. There It is, so we'll see what you say on that. Just last night. We were watching that Netflix movie. Written and directed by Aaron Sorkin. It's called the Trial of the Chicago Seven. It's Thie. Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, Tom Hayden Story. Bobby Seale, William Counselor, Mayor Daley makes a cameo in the movie. I mean, just from the old clips. But of course, it's that story about The trial of these seven men who were charged with conspiring to incite riots in the 1968. Democratic National Convention held in Chicago. The wiki on it is this on November, 21st in this comes up with the scroll at the end of November. 21st 1970 to all of the convictions were reversed by the United States Court of Appeals for the seventh Circuit. So most of them were charged and convicted and sentenced to five years, But all of those sentences were overturned on the basis that the judge was biased in his refusal. To permit defense attorneys to screen prospective jurors for cultural and racial bias. It also says the FBI surveillance of the defense lawyers offices was cause for a retrial. The Justice Department decided against retrying the case. There were scores of contempt convictions, and I believe most of those were overturned, so they all went on to lead their lives. Tom Hayden was elected many times to the Statehouse in California. Abbie Hoffman died by suicide at the age of 50 to Jerry Rubin went on to be a stockbroker. So a kind of saw saw the light of capitalism but was struck and killed by a motorist while crossing a street near his home. The one surviving member of the trial team is on a phone line right now, and that's Dick Schultz season. This was Thea's assistant U. S. Attorney in charge of the criminal division at the time of the trial with Attorney Thomas Foreign Dick. Thanks for joining us on w G n. How are you today? I'm fine. How are you really good. I understand that you are scheduled to talk about that case at three o'clock this afternoon during an online seminar. I'm reading from the Tribune now sponsored by the federal And seventh Circuit Bar Association. So there's a talk down the centre and the Federal District Court. Yeah. So Jeffrey Cole and Thomas Durkin will kind of moderate talk a little bit about this. Oh, yes. Yes, We will, Are you Are you anxious to talk about it? You must get asked about it a lot, or are you done talking about this? You know, over the last 50 years, I've talked about it a number of times. But the in the die was cast during the trial one I neither time nor time foreign or I was permitted to talk about it. What? Whereas the descendants and their attorneys held two press conferences a day and did a great job of propagandizing the whole trial. You know, I haven't We haven't under their crap We hadn't have not undone. That yet, But what do you mean by that? Well, the whole world heard only from them for 4.5 months in a rocket rockets trialed and we didn't say a word there mute, And I'm saying that We were so far behind the propaganda that we never even made an attempt to State what really happened, and I'm going to do that this afternoon. What's the difference between the myth then? In the truth? I mean ones with the missing one. Is that the truth? One is what happened in one of the pretense for the The way they presented. Yeah, but how It's Hollywood. It's Hollywood. Yeah, well, are you speaking about the trial? Are you speaking about the Aaron Sorkin movie? Well, the the movie is just an extension of what has been going on for the last 50 years. Misrepresenting what happened? The movie is entertaining. It's a complete, um, fabrication, but it's fun to watch. But is it so just kind of interpreting you here? So it Maybe it's your view that we've sort of lionized these rebels as though They were the good guys in this story, and you don't like that version of history on this case. Well, let me put it this way. OK, They're considered to be lovable people who came to Chicago during the Democratic National Convention to peacefully protest and to enjoy a music fest and they were just peaceful people. That's a complete fabrication. For example, For example, when, when, when they came here before coming here, they told people come onto the come on to Chicago. We're going to be prepared to shed blood. We're gonna fight and die and Lincoln Park. We're going to have 6000 arrests 20 to 30 people killed I'm gonna pin the delegates in the in the amphitheatre with convention was taking place. We're going to require the government to use helicopters to get him out of the amphitheater back to there. They're hotels were goingto flood the loop with the demonstrators and caused the loop to fall. We're gonna storm the Hilton. These were revolutionaries. These were violent revolutionaries whom the public believes from their propaganda. That they were just little kids coming here for a nice time. I wanted to ask you about that because there's a scene in the movie where they turned to the city. I'm not sure who the representative is for City this person at City Hall, But they said, Can we get a permit to protest because we're going to be there and it would be better if you gave us a place. This is what they do now. Even if you don't like the message, even if you're worried about the violence, better to organize it and contain it rather than just deny them to permit. I wonder if you can talk about that, and we'll pick it up here in a minute. Our guest is Dick Schultz, and he's actually giving an online talk about this today, he said. I want you to know the truth it three o'clock We'll hear more from.

Chicago Dick Schultz Aaron Sorkin Abbie Hoffman Jerry Rubin Tom Hayden Virginia Vice President Joe Biden Jerry Mandarin Walgreens. Hollywood Netflix Federal District Court Tribune FBI Justice Department Bobby Seale
"jeffrey cole" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Online for a it looks like for twelve years. Yeah, yeah, so I was wondering how it is. You came to that form of sort of Internet video, and what it was that the first landed you there well I I had always been doing movies, and so then I decided you know at this. This is too much money. I started making videos with My friend Jeffrey Self I was. Working at a bakery I thought maybe I wanted to be a pastry chef. I didn't really think that I just liked contessa. was like. Maybe that's what I WANNA do. And speaking of working, that's when I was doing sex work as well so performing was like up for fun. I guess soon not for work religious something. You were doing creatively yeah. Yeah I've always wanted to perform, but I when I got here. It was sort of like. Oh, I think I'm just. A Gay Guy, who loves attention and I don't know that that's enough to qualify for like talent, because sort of like the only paths that I saw when I moved here was like theater actor paths and I was like Oh. My God, I don't WanNa do shaw like that's not. So I guess I'm not an actor, but when I was a kid I. My grandmother had a video camera and I I would take it from her and I made movies constantly. So, when you arrived in New York and you were in your twenties I guess yeah, and you and Jeffrey Self who's also an actor and performer. You guys would get together. That was really just an extension of that same kind of play that you would have been doing when you were a teen at home yet we were. We made some videos that went like. Somewhat viral at least and like you know gay blog circles, and we actually we called ourselves VGA kill. Gay. Boys on Youtube Salsa was yes, that was a craigslist term for the men men seeking men section like That was to get more viewers like that. Do you think actually worked advertising yourself as gay boys? Yeah, yeah, but this it's so weird. How fast everything has moved because? When we started, it was like. Two thousand, six, thousand seven, and like youtube videos now look so. Polished and well lit. But, at the time it was just like the Little Fish Islands of our Mac book great was yeah. Your interest was never in kind of replicating the production value of Liga Polish production value. I mean those early goes. You see like some one of you has drawn the titles on like a piece of yellow paper and his holding the camera and that wasn't like it wasn't intentional. There is an aspect to it even still where I feel like. I forget that it's Lo fi until people comment on it like in my mind, I'm so like in my imagination like Oh, yes, this is a multimillion dollar budgeted movie and I'm you know and this wig in this costumer incredible Roy and then people comment like ll that busted wig and I'm like. Oh, I guess. Yeah, it is sort of busted. But Lo, fi or not those early videos did get you an audience with IAGO television, but yeah, they came to the one of our live shows at Joe's pub and they offered us a m. A deal to do like of logs for their website. Like half hour weekly of logs, but we turned in. What ended up being our sketch show because we thought well, this will be boring if it's just US talking to camera for half an hour we turned in like our version of a sketch show, and they were like we love it. We're GONNA put it on the air. so it wasn't even intended to go on. Television, but then they put it on Fridays at midnight. And that's that was called Jeffrey Cole Casserole. Yes, yeah, and It is get show I mean it's exactly as you described it. It's a schedule with the sort of like very lo fi Bulgaria hi, subtitles, and things like that. Yeah, were you and Jeffrey when you're collaborating? That's obviously like two points of view two points of view, but were you. Were you thinking about things that you had loved and your youth? Were you thinking about like the kids in the hall or Saturday night? Live monty python, or were you thinking about some other cultural touchstone altogether? It was. It's one of those relationships where it's like where we're just like in our own world, we are both on the same page and it's a page that. Every body else is not on like I, I feel similar way when I'm around John Early in Caper. Land I'm like Oh. They have a language to themselves and black. It's just amazing to watch that We more connected over like. Growing up on SITCOMS and And things like that is the goal then to kind of make yourselves love. Yeah Yeah. That was all we did was when we may Jeffrey Cole, casserole it was just like making each other laugh. It's funny because it reminds me of my have two little boys and they. Like we are such like Fussy, Yuppie parents, and we really control all of their like media intake in the end, somehow they understand the language of podcast and so times when they play their kind of reenacting podcast like. They'll be like. Hey, it's Simon, and I'm here with my favorite Lego. A weird, because that's like who are you talking to? And what.

Jeffrey Cole Jeffrey Self Lo youtube craigslist Jeffrey contessa. Little Fish Islands New York John Early Liga Polish shaw Simon Roy IAGO Mac Caper Joe
"jeffrey cole" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Hire and right now you can try ziprecruiter for free that's right free just go to this exclusive web address ziprecruiter dot com slash work that ziprecruiter dot com slash work ziprecruiter dot com slash work I've been telling you for years now awesome my dentist is doctor Jeffrey Cole in the cosmetic dentist dot com five six one nine six seven eighty two hundred five six one nine six seven eight two zero zero he's so good as far as making you look your best in giving you a new smile that my brother's going to go see it and it's not like my brother lives up the street he lives in Rhode Island so I said you have to go see doctor calling you have to talk to him because he can help you with any kind of problem you may have I found a because he caters to cower tries to be petrified of going to the dentist not anymore and he has the experience and the where with all in just the education to make sure everything's done the right way the first time and there's never a problem over thirty years and practice with the same staff and when you go in if you don't like going to the dentist they'll change your whole perspective and they make me feel actually comfortable and I don't mind going anymore Dr Jeffrey calling five six one nine six seven eight two zero zero tell him I sent you and your first appointment is complementary the cosmetic dentist dot com right now at napa auto parts stores and napa auto care centers you can get a twenty five dollar prepaid visa card by mail when you buy any never automotive battery that's never know how dissipating napa auto parts stores and auto care centers while supplies last offer expires eight thirty one nineteen bill o'reilly here in the o'reilly update is coming up today at noon real news with knows van on news talk eight fifty W. F. T. L. Joyce Kauffman here and I have an opportunity right now to speak with Doug row he's the president and owner of code red roofers and I've been talking about code red roofers for a very long time Doug let me ask you a little bit about the roofing materials because I presume that you know roofs are come in all different kinds of metal roofs and tile roofs and where and how do people really understand what they need when they have a roof job well they can go to our website and they can research so the stuff that we have on our website we have a a metal.

Jeffrey Cole Rhode Island Dr Jeffrey W. F. T. L. Joyce Kauffman president napa o'reilly Doug twenty five dollar eight fifty W thirty years
"jeffrey cole" Discussed on Quest Means Business

Quest Means Business

08:34 min | 3 years ago

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on Quest Means Business

"Is it worth buying the home home pot? Is a breakthrough wireless speaker From apple that delivers amazing audio quality? So the home pods sounds good, but critics say it's not very bright Apple prioritize music with this device. It sounded apps to whatever room It's in, but it falls behind Amazon's Echo and Gugel home. And especially when it comes to trivia home pod by the way, is very pricey. Amazon and google are trying to get into as many homes as possible Fasold versions of their assistance like this Gugel home mini that cost less than fifty dollars. And then there's the uh, the one home pod and that costs about three hundred fifty dollars Jeffrey Cole founded USC Annenberg center from the central future. And he's joining me now from Washington. So are your reviews as mixed as most others? Yeah, I think I would agree with that. This really is a battle for the universe as far as Apple Gugel an Amazon or concerned. He or she who controls the digital assistant controls, the all controls, the car, uh, Volkswagen and Ford already reporting Alexa in their car. And ironically, Apple came to this first with Serey And yet This is a pretty disappointing entry. This many years later, It's a great speaker. It's not much of a digital assisted it. Of course, we'll get bad better, But Gugel an Amazon or already winning this war, Right? So it's something that's already at crowded field to where many would expect more from Apple at Tim Cooke spoke to investors today at anything noteworthy out from him. I think the fact that they understand how valuable this spaces and want to be in it, and this is an acknowledgement that it's still worth competing, but no, it's over. Rather disappointing effort, which which comes on the tail of the iPhone eight and ten which were great incremental improvements. But what people want from Apple is not incremental or as good as the other guy they want Game Changers. And do you think that's too too much pressure unrealistic for Apple, or do you think the onus is on Tim coat to deliver? I don't think there's ever been a CEO in history under more pressure than Tim Cooke Because what people want from him is not an incremental improvement. They wanna see him in a pair of jeans and a black turtlenecks sweater on stage at the Mosconi Center coming to the end of his presentation and saying almost as if he forgot all And one more thing in introducing the product that changes the world. Even though they don't know what it is, they want changed. That's apples role. And that's his burn. Of course, there was only one. Steve Jobs to end as side from his genius and changing the world. He had his failures as well. Our shareholders going to give up on Tim Cooke anytime soon and European. What? Even though the iPhone than ten were incremental improvements by and large, the last couple of Alpo phones have done very well. Their customers aren't abandoning them. It's the reputation for innovation that's taken a hit more than the bottom line. So no, I don't think they're unhappy with Tim Cooke But do keep in mind the only attempted game changer they've introduced since jobs passed away was the Apple watch. And that's been somewhat of a disappointment as well. I don't know. I like wine Jeffrey. I like mine. I wear it every day. I'm a convert. It's a great watch, but it's not a game changer cloudy. Nice, so easy to change game. It really is difficult. A lot of pressure on Mr Cook. Thank you so much for joining us. We appreciate it'll be honor. My pleasure. Thank you. We'll US intelligence chief, say cyber attacks are still a major threat to the United States, And that this year's midterm elections will likely be targeted by guess who Russia at a Senate hearing earlier. The head of National Intelligence said he has no doubt. Russia will try to interfere And laid bare the scale of the threat that the US faces. Frankly, the United States is under attack from US businesses to the federal government to state and local governments. The United States is threatened by cyber-attacks every day. Jessica Schneider has joining us in Washington A Jessica not really a surprise from director Kotze given the scale that we've seen, Russia conduct these attacks in the last election in yet, what does seem to be surprising is very little action has been taken in very little has come from the White House on this. That was exactly the just juxtaposition here Biana. So you had the six intelligence chiefs, they put it bluntly. And simply throughout this hearing they said that Russia is already at work said to interfere in the 2018 midterm elections, and that they'll Cimoli similarly metal in 2020 And in addition to deny coats their National Security Agency director, Mike Rogers, he put it like this. He said, This is not going to change or stop. But then on the other side, lawmakers were expressing frustration because this is so clear to the intelligence chiefs. But of course, President Trump himself has really refused to call out Russia for its interference. And he continues to cast. Out on the entire Russia investigation know which doesn't just encompass whether or not there was any collusion with the Trump campaign, but it also encompasses how exactly the Russians interfered. So lawmakers They put it plainly, they asked the intelligence chiefs has President Trump's specifically directed you to confront Russian meddling and no one among those six intelligence chiefs could directly say, yes, they sort of all danced around the issue. They said that the president has made clear that foreign threats should be protected from in general, but really be a you put it well. There was a lot of frustration stemming today from Wall makers that this election threat still exists. That there doesn't seem to be a concrete plan as to how exactly to combat this Russian meddling. No direction from the president, no direction in general and these intelligence chief saying, yes, this is happening now This will continue to happen. And of course it continues to be huge issue Just like we saw in 2016 getting. Confirmation that Russia, It dozen fact continue to meddle in the US elections in plans on it. And you just suppose that with the president saying that now is not the time to implement sanctions that were passed in a bipartisan Congress. How do you square that you will? That's exactly what lawmakers were asking. You know, the the ranking Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee. He put it exactly that way beyond a he said, You have a president here who continues to deny this threat. And when presented with the option to perhaps do something about this threat impose, those Russian sanctions, They say that of course, the president didn't act. So there was a lot of frustration here from these lawmakers and it really looked like these intelligence chiefs, their hands were tied, they sit, they sat there, And they tried to express the fact that they're intelligence agencies are working to combat this threat. They couldn't give a lot of information Because of course, a lot of it is classified. They said that they would give more details. When they went behind closed doors at 230 this afternoon, but still that underlying frustration that the president hasn't outrightly acknowledged that the Russians did metal in the 2016 election He continues to call the investigation into Russian meddling in general a hoax says it's all brought about by the Democrats and then lawmakers saying something needs to be done about it. And they pressed on the intelligence chiefs. They said, Get the president to at least acknowledge it because at least that will be somewhat of a first step here. Yeah, mental is quite something from Senator Angus King to, to hear him, uh, begging them to please have the president confirm what you are telling us right now a busy day in Washington Jessica Schneider. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks. Megan Marco has the Midas touch when it comes to the fashion world. Everything she wears Thursday goal and terse to Seoul's. No wonder They're calling it The Markel sparkle. Prince

apple intelligence chief president Tim Cooke Russia United States Amazon Washington Jeffrey Cole President Trump Jessica Schneider Game Changers Gugel National Intelligence Senate Intelligence Committee USC Annenberg center Steve Jobs director Seoul
"jeffrey cole" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on Accelerate!

"And so to me may trust israeli really more the critical thing and you can't you can't develop trust without some degree of empathy judge that up conversation when people hurt on the show are not too long the distant future and interview a stephen mr covey who wrote the book the speed of trust which is perhaps what the bus books written on trust ever and annual that's that's there wants or on the course as you have to have the bill developed this relational trust there has to be a degree of empathy hiding everybody i hadn't correlated the to that end dentist interesting and i think that that there's research 'now i think i've seen the the summary of the research huntsman written about the the in the same article unfortunate low author jeffrey cole untucked wrote that the researchers analyzed 72 studies a boom measured empathy in college students sprelland been something i measure solict annually since 1979 and to what they found is is that it's going down he does so it's going down gets going down year after year so it it's like uh you're as as the demand for empathy is is increasing the the supplies extra shrinking why well you know there's there's lots of reasons people sir project for that i'm not sure that that i know what one been there's one solid reason throughout but but certainly i think it's probably increased in maybe says safely at an over the last two decades as we come more serve engaged with.

stephen mr covey jeffrey cole untucked two decades
"jeffrey cole" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

Reality Life with Kate Casey

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"jeffrey cole" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

"Let me see i haven't thought about this stuff in a while i should have thought i should've maker more who were some of your favorite guests well might be rick guess are people do other we'll share boris share is a bitterly gago was a huge oil journey um but there are people who eat you know i am at all cost 40yearold gay guy who you know from the 90s and so people like gum on the have with sony the one from a bright of checky what's her name jennifer no what an athlete what's your name jennifer jason leigh i dunno oh jeffrey cole i'm going to look it up not will jennifer jasonleigh as it huge huge one from me uh now you know hold talkative jennifer tilley jennifer tally of she lost by dallas 110 one time add to an event in la and she was getting changed in the car parked trade outside the building she's a character exactly so a stand up for a long time someone you know of what's his name from uh who played the president all scandal may i have no memory la tony what tony goldwyn twenty goullet who had been with since goes through any had assured off so i turn to the thinking of who i never i always say very far away from the talent i have like an opposite of a sicophantic personality where i don't wanna seemed like a kiss asked so i of the people.

jennifer jennifer jason leigh jeffrey cole jennifer tally dallas president rick sony jennifer jasonleigh jennifer tilley la tony goldwyn