14 Burst results for "Jefferson World"

"jefferson world" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:25 min | Last month

"jefferson world" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"The president is asking communities to intervene and still wants Congress to act as well. Republicans balk at regulating private gun sales, but may okay tighter checks at gun shows. Gurnal Scott Fox News 10 senators are set to brief the president today on the framework of an infrastructure deal. The bipartisan group reached an agreement with the White House Wednesday on $579 billion in new spending. Moderate Senator Joe Manchin said after the meeting that They also have ideas on how to pay for it, but confirmed it doesn't include raising the gas tax. Another negotiator, Senator Susan Collins, Republican from Maine, said she is optimistic that they've had a breakthrough. Colorado is getting an eighth congressional district in a map is out on how to add it to the state. It's not the final version, according to redistricting staff attorney Jeremiah Bury Smaller Geography will certainly change. The redistricting commission is waiting on some updated census data. For now, Denver would remain as the bulk of District one and the new district Would be carved out of parts of Adams, Jefferson World and Boulder County's. Along with all of Broomfield County. Former Colorado Republican Senator Cory Gardner is joining a lobbying group it's named. He was named to Michael Best Strategies Board of Advisers yesterday firm President Rob March and praise Gardner for a strong relationship and ability to find bipartisan solutions. Gardner lost his reelection race to John Hickenlooper last November. In other news fire officials are monitoring another wildfire burning in northwestern Colorado. It's the muddy slide fire in Route County, and it grew to about 4000 acres just yesterday. Still 0% contained Mandatory evacuations have been issued for residents along the nine mile section of County Road 16. In response to that fire, the cause of the fire is still under investigation. Five other wildfires are currently burning in northwestern Colorado, including the oil springs fire that's burned about 12,000 acres. Luckily, we're getting some rain. It looks like so that's going to help that and, uh, cooler weather. It's exactly so that's all good was weird. Coming in this morning, I felt little Sprinkles from some rain and then could also smell the wildfire. So yeah, that's a little kind of an interesting mix. And you know, I didn't know this. We haven't had rain in awhile Have way it was. What do we have a little bit last? Yeah, but overall, nothing. Nothing really big. We need substantial rain 6 37 on Colorado's Morning news, and it's only June. Think of all the wildfires we had in fall of last year. All right, let's head outside and see how things are going in your road.

Congress John Hickenlooper White House Route County Broomfield County $579 billion 10 senators Gurnal Scott June Wednesday Gardner Boulder County County Road 16 Maine 6 Jeremiah Bury Republican Republicans last year last November
"jefferson world" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

08:38 min | 4 months ago

"jefferson world" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"In the new video by Prager University. See it have Prager. You thought Come where we teach what isn't welcome back to the Dennis Prager show. We've been talking about the effort that's going on all across the country. Miss educate our youth and in particular to turn them into anti Americans. It's it's basically a suicide mission by America's public school. Establishment that I've been talking specifically about about the state of Minnesota, where I live. And these these new standards that are being promulgated to govern K through 12. Public education, and I'm gonna go back and tell you some more about the battle that we're fighting here, Frankly, in just a moment, But first, I'll take a call. We've got Arthur in New York who has been waiting Patiently, Arthur. Welcome to the program. Yes. Hello. Good afternoon. Listen, Mike, My question is twofold. The first part vegetable I understand that the immigrants, these people, undocumented aliens or whatever you want to call them massing on the border in southern Texas and California. On the Mexicans or just allowing us to come through What? I don't understand that it's not only immigrants from Central America, but sources have said that they were immigrants coming from other countries as well. It's far away, but is there a Middle East? Is that true? Well, I've read the same thing you have. I have been down to the border myself, but But I I've seen the same reports and and I guess, See if if you open the borders and you let all comers in, Um how do you get how you gotta control where they're coming from? I mean, they're so you know, there's no control at all. So At the moment. I think it's come one. Come all. Thanks for that. Call Arthur. I want to go back now to the topic of of education and the left attempt to really hijack. Public school education and turn it into an anti American direction before the break. I was talking about the fact that the new standards the first draft of the new standards, Hey, through 12 Education in Minnesota left out things like the Revolutionary War. The Civil War. George Washington, Thomas Jefferson World War. One World War. Two of the whole cost goes on, and I And and replace those things with a bunch of stuff about systemic racism, and you know there's there's raced off, just shot all through this. And that I didn't mention this is a new standard in the first draft of these social studies standards that came out toward the end of January. Standard that reads an analysis of the ideology of Manifest destiny and its relationship to whiteness. Christianity in capitalism. So our school Children tower are to be taught that the westward westward expansion of the United States was oppressive. And that it was driven by theatrics s of evil. This is left axis of evil, whiteness, Christianity and capitalism. Well, this is obviously an effort to just hijack our Children and turn them into Anti Americans, so we responded to it. We set up this Web site, raise our standards and then calm at that website. We had information and you could sign on to a a letter that would be sent to the committee. It's coming up with these standards, responding to the first draft and pulled out some of the defects they've been talking about thousands of people did that thousands of people went to raise our standards. Mn dot com, signed the letter. There's a public comment periods of these air, public comments and well over 80% well over 80% of the public comments that were received on this first draft of the social studies standards came from that website. Raise our standards and Manda cop. So the next thing that happened was that the committee scheduled a public meeting to talk about the comments that they received during the public comment period, which to put it bluntly, We're not complimentary, so they scheduled that Public meeting and it was over zoom. Of course, they didn't get together in person and apparently Apparently, the members of the committee didn't expect that anyone from the public would actually tune in on zoom and participate in the meeting or listen to the meeting. But once again catching wig fall, the intrepid education fellow, its head of the American experiment, knew about the public meeting in ship ended it again again via zoom not only attended it, but recorded recorded the entire thing. So we have audio. Evidence of what the committee members said when they talked among themselves about the public comments, the thousands of public comments that they received whatever the committee suggested that they should just delete all the public comments. I mean, after all, who cares what the parents and the and citizens think? The chairman of the committee, said that it seemed to him that the letter that came from our website raise our standards and men that Tom was racist and manifested the dreaded white supremacy. Now, if you go to the website, you could read the letter, and there's a special prize. Anybody who could find any racism anywhere in it, or they irritate of White supremacy. But that is how these people talk. That's just their reflects that anybody points out that what they're doing is is crazy. And so, um, we put out these audio clips. We will turn him into videos with Cem was graphic overlays and we put him on social media at a lot of people. Many, many, many people in Minnesota found out that this is going on. This committee is revising the standards that they've gone off in this kind of crazy left wind direction that the That the parents of public school Children certainly are not looking for and they were supposed to come out with the second draft of these standards on February 17, but they beat a retreat. And they announced that that second draft has been indefinitely postponed the chairman, the committee was brought before a committee of the Minnesota Senate and ask questions about what the heck are you guys trying to do? All to all of which, by the way, should I misstated that they head of the administrative part of education would be appointed. The committee was brought before the Senate Education Committee and questions and, of course, she planned complete ignorance and said she didn't know what the committee was was doing. Um, but this is what's happened so so the left has tried to steal a march. They tried to do this kind of privately. The disinfectant of sunlight has been has been shined onto their process, and that's the product. But the fight is not over. The fight is not over. They have retreated for the moment. But the second draft will be forthcoming before too long. I'm sure it's gonna be better. But I'm also sure it's still gonna be terrible. And so it's a battle folks. It is an absolute fight. It's the fight of our lives to keep the left from which completely dominates public education, by the way, but the teachers unions But it is the fight of our lives, prevent the left from completely dominating public education and teaching our Children to be anti American. That is their agenda. They want to raise a generation of young people who hate America and who because they hate America will be malleable and can easily be turned into the far left Socialist. Direction that the left is seeking, and if we don't do something about it, they're going to succeed. This is a fight. It's going on in all 50 states and every American who cares about the future of our country needs to be Engaged in it. We're gonna go to a break now, and when we come back, we're going to talk with Steve Hayward about radicalism of the Joe Biden administration. The Dennis Prager show live from the Relief Factor Pain free studio. This is Carol Platt Lee Bow of Yankee Institute for Town Hall. Calm.

Steve Hayward Carol Platt Central America Senate Education Committee February 17 Prager University Mike Tom New York Middle East Revolutionary War Dennis Prager Minnesota Cem Arthur United States Minnesota Senate Joe Biden California southern Texas
"jefferson world" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

The Kindle Chronicles

04:33 min | 11 months ago

"jefferson world" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

"So you know I could portray Jefferson as kind of a modern liberal. which he which she might be. I can portray him as as he actually was, and so I chose to portray him as he actually was. So that means the state's rights limited government no national debt the no fema, no no social security, no welfare state you're kind of on your own that government is best which governs least and so this is what I love about Joe Biden came up afterwards and he said man. He likes to use the word man man you're you're Pat Buchanan and is true. So we're not the Democratic Party is no longer Jeffersonian and in the of those senses and I, do believe that Jefferson is right that we should have. Real suspicion about government's capacity to answer human challenges I think Jefferson understood something but but he lived in and we live now. I. I think that you could. There was an article written in the fifties by Clinton Rossiter call which Jefferson do you quote and he he discerned that there are seven different Jefferson's and you get to quote the one that happens to fit, and so the idea that that government is best which governs least and and the national government United States has no obligation to the people beyond refereeing. I think that's been. Lost that's been gone for at least one hundred years. And it's not coming back in. So I object to the Libertarians. Who wanted to live in Jeffersons world and you think, well, what would that look like? Would you get on a plane if there were no, FAA, would you get a penicillin for your child if there were no food and Drug Administration, you know what? I don't think they're telling the truth I. think that they're saying we need a lot less government if that's what they're saying I can understand it. If they're saying, let the buyer beware I'm not with them because we depend the world. So complex now that we depend upon government to supervise..

Jefferson Pat Buchanan Joe Biden Democratic Party Clinton Rossiter Jeffersons fema FAA United States penicillin Drug Administration
"jefferson world" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

The Kindle Chronicles

04:33 min | 11 months ago

"jefferson world" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

"So you know I could portray Jefferson as kind of a modern liberal. which he which she might be. I can portray him as as he actually was, and so I chose to portray him as he actually was. So that means the state's rights limited government no national debt the no fema, no no social security, no welfare state you're kind of on your own that government is best which governs least and so this is what I love about Joe Biden came up afterwards and he said man. He likes to use the word man man you're you're Pat Buchanan and is true. So we're not the Democratic Party is no longer Jeffersonian and in the of those senses and I, do believe that Jefferson is right that we should have. Real suspicion about government's capacity to answer human challenges I think Jefferson understood something but but he lived in and we live now. I. I think that you could. There was an article written in the fifties by Clinton Rossiter call which Jefferson do you quote and he he discerned that there are seven different Jefferson's and you get to quote the one that happens to fit, and so the idea that that government is best which governs least and and the national government United States has no obligation to the people beyond refereeing. I think that's been. Lost that's been gone for at least one hundred years. And it's not coming back in. So I object to the Libertarians. Who wanted to live in Jeffersons world and you think, well, what would that look like? Would you get on a plane if there were no, FAA, would you get a penicillin for your child if there were no food and Drug Administration, you know what? I don't think they're telling the truth I. think that they're saying we need a lot less government if that's what they're saying I can understand it. If they're saying, let the buyer beware I'm not with them because we depend the world. So complex now that we depend upon government to supervise..

Jefferson Pat Buchanan Joe Biden Democratic Party Clinton Rossiter Jeffersons fema FAA United States penicillin Drug Administration
Horse named for Dr. Anthony Fauci finishes second in debut

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Horse named for Dr. Anthony Fauci finishes second in debut

"Hi hi Mike Mike a race Rossi Rossi horse a a named reporting reporting for Virginia's the doctors infectious kept governor disease a close is to announce eye expert on the president removal Dr Anthony trump's of a statue use Fauci of a of malaria the came confederacy's in second drug place top in according the general Belmont to the White Park House doctor Virginia race president governor and Ralph Donald appear Northam to Trump be practicing was is set monitored to announce social closely plans distancing while to take he took down a two one week of the course nation's of most the a malaria two iconic year old drug edifice colt in a bid named of to found monuments prevent she the to corona the confederacy would virus have made his namesake writing a in senior the president's proud northern administration latest leaving physical official plenty Dr of tells distance Shawn the Associated Conley between himself says Press trump and the underwent governor first is place expected at finisher least to one announce prisoner electrocardiogram Thursday and a third statue place as of he indoctrinate took general a two Robert week course E. of Lee hydroxy this was will clerk Betty's be removed when debut from after state two at Belmont White land House on staffers Richmond's name prominent tested for the director positive monument of the for Avenue National coalbed Institute nineteen or the will of direct allergy trump the frequently statue and infectious championed be put diseases in storage the unproven while hydroxy by input Italian Cork is sought when on American during a new the location pandemic co owner Philip on the president Wednesday antenna was Richmond evaluated G. mayor twice levar into for the Stoney the physical IT announced says first he he wanted to plans November to to honor seek twenty the nineteen the removal service and of statues then the doctor in April of Confederate found overall she's president given calmly the Jefferson world said Davis the president in fighting and remains Confederate dangerous healthy general Stonewall diseases Mike Crossey Jackson up and Washington Jeb he says Stuart he was also which hoping are on to city name a land Philly on monument after Avenue doctor Deborah I might Burke's cross yep other pandemic named horses registered with the Jockey Club social distancing flatten the curve and herd immunity hi Jackie Quinn

Stuart Jockey Club Deborah I Washington G. Avenue National Coalbed Instit Director Robert Official Corona White Park House Doctor Virgin Fauci Rossi Rossi Jackie Quinn Burke Philly Mike Mike Mike Crossey Jackson Davis Jefferson World
Horse named for Dr. Anthony Fauci finishes second in debut

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Horse named for Dr. Anthony Fauci finishes second in debut

"Hi hi Mike Mike a race Rossi Rossi horse a a named reporting reporting for Virginia's the the president's infectious governor doctors disease is to announce watched expert the his removal Dr heart Anthony closely of a statue Fauci as he of took the came confederacy's a malaria in second drug place top unproven in the general Belmont as treatment Park for Virginia race cold at governor nineteen and Ralph appear Northam to be practicing is set the White to announce House social medical plans distancing team to closely take down monitored one of president the nation's Donald most the two iconic trump's year old heart edifice colt rhythms named out of of found monuments concern she for to potential the confederacy would have side made his effects namesake a as senior trump proud northern took administration a two week leaving course official plenty of of tells a malaria distance the Associated between drug to himself prevent Press the corona and the governor first virus is place expected finisher in to the announce president's prisoner Thursday latest physical and a third statue place Dr of indoctrinate general Shawn Conley Robert writes E. Lee trump this was will underwent Betty's be removed debut at from least state at one Belmont land electrocardiogram on Richmond's name prominent for the during director monument his treatment of the Avenue National with hydroxy Institute or Cork the will of direct allergy went the statue on and infectious Wednesday be put diseases in the storage New England journal while of by input medicine Italian is published sought on American results a new location of co the first owner large Philip on Wednesday antenna high quality Richmond G. mayor study levar into testing Stoney the IT hydroxy announced says he Clark he wanted plans one's to effectiveness to honor seek the the removal service in people of statues the who doctor were in close of Confederate found contact she's president given with someone the Jefferson world with covert Davis nineteen in fighting and Confederate dangerous the study general showed Stonewall diseases the drug Jackson was no and better Jeb he than says Stuart placebo he was also which pills hoping are on to city name at preventing a land Philly illness on monument from after the Avenue corona doctor Deborah virus I might Burke's cross micron yep other CEO pandemic Washington named horses registered with the Jockey Club social distancing flatten the curve and herd immunity hi Jackie Quinn

E. Lee Jackson JEB Burke Ceo Pandemic Washington Jackie Quinn Rossi Rossi Fauci Official Davis Belmont Director Richmond G. Stuart Philly Deborah Jockey Club Shawn Conley Robert Virginia President Trump
"jefferson world" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

09:46 min | 2 years ago

"jefferson world" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Let's go by. News on in Pasadena. Of. You're sick. This way. Seti been way just concerned tendon. Spas. They don't carry your say we some capable of. Non. Come. Gentle song for brave people by the Venezuelan. Musician alley Premera, this is democracy. Now, I'm Amy Goodman, our guests or McGill tinker Selous Venezuelan, professor Pomona college in California Jeffrey Sachs's with us here in New York leading communist and director of the center for sustainable development at Columbia University. He's recently authored co authored a report for the center for economic and policy research, headlined economic sanctions as collective punishment the case of Venezuela so much is being used against the presidency of Maduro saying he's brought the country to an economic standstill. You make a different case Jefferson world, it's not an economic standstill to complete economic collapse catastrophe in Venezuela. There was crisis for sure. Before Trump came to office. But the idea of the Trump administration from the start has been to overthrow Madero. That's not a hypothesis. Trump was very explicit in discussions with presidents of Latin America where he asked them why shouldn't the US adjust invade a he said that already in twenty seventeen. So the idea of the Trump administration has been to overthrow Madero from the start. Well, the Latin leader said, no, it's not a good idea. We we don't want military action. So the US government has been trying to strangle the Venezuelan economy. It started with sanctions in twenty seventeen that prevented essentially the country from accessing international capital markets and the oil company from restructuring its loans that put Venezuela into a hyperinflation that was. The utter collapse. Oil earnings plummeted the earnings that are used to buy food and medicine collapsed. That's when the social humanitarian crisis went spiraling out of control. And then in this year is with this idea. Very naive. Very stupid in my view that there would be the self-proclaimed president which was all choreographed with the United States, very very closely. A another round of even tighter sanctions, essentially, confiscating the earnings and the assets of the Venezuelan government took place now Venezuela's in complete utter catastrophe a lot of it brought on by the United States deliberately creating massive massive suffering. We know there's hunger. We know there's incredible shortage of medical supplies. We can only imagine because we won't know. Oh, really until the dust settles and careful studies are done how much excess mortality there is put surely in in a context like this. This is a catastrophe largely created by the US because as was said earlier, this is an all or nothing strategy. What the US what Trump just doesn't understand? And then what Bolton of all? Of course, never agrees to is the idea of negotiations. This is an attempted and overthrow it's very crude. It's not working, and it's very cruel because it's punishing thirty million people. The number forty thousand dead as a result of these crippling US, let me be clear nobody knows this was a very basic simple calculation based on estimates of universities in Venezuela. That mortality had increased by certain proportion after the sanctions, I don't want anyone to think that there's precision in these numbers. What is certain though, staring us in the face is that there is a humanitarian catastrophe deliberately caused by the United States by what I would say are illegal sanctions because they are deliberately trying to bring down a government and trying to create chaos for the purpose of an overthrow of a government. Why are they doing that? This is normal US right wing foreign policy. Nothing different. This is the same foreign policy. See that we saw throughout Latin America in the twentieth century. It's the same foreign policy that we saw catastrophically in the Middle East. This is Mr. Bolton this is Mr. Bolton's idea of diplomacy. This is Trump's idea of diplomacy. You punch someone in the face you crush your opponent. You try whatever way you can to get your way. It's very simple minded, it's very crude. And it never works. It just leads to catastrophe. I wanna bring Miguel tinker Sal back into this conversation, professor Pomona college as these protests were taking place in or this coup attempt was taking place in Venezuela and Honduras, there were massive protests against privatization, also huge demonstrations in Paris, you certainly don't get the same kind of coverage. You don't and the reality is that what's happening in on Dudas is fundamental. You have an effort of privatization, you have a layoffs of of doctors, and professors and teachers and there's a massive street protests in in happening in guided by all the major cities and the attention is all in Venezuela. At the same thing is happening and other other context for Central America, the immigration that's happening as a result of failed US policies as Kali was saying earlier, the reality is this was tried elsewhere the regime change is being tried in. Venezuela has been tried elsewhere in Latin America, and as lead to to humanitarian crisis throughout Central America on Dudas what they might lie ill, Sal, or in Mexico until very recently. So again, we know the formula we know it doesn't produce the change that most people want, and what it does is it aggravates conditions for the majority of the population. So you have in the case of. Mistakes made by the minute administration. That are now exacerbated by the sanctions, and that take a toll on on humans and on the population of the country. We've been showing for our radio audience video just to let you know of the teargassing of people in Paris and Honduras right now, of course, Honduras is US ally. We're not getting as much coverage of this. Finally, I wanted to ask Jeffrey Sachs about this issue. You raise of collective punishment and saying that collective punishment of a civilian population. As described by both the Geneva and Hagen national conventions to which the US is a signatory. And that way, and I would say of the OAS also which explicitly prohibits this kind of hostile action against another country. US sanctions are now being imposed to bring down governments everywhere you have similarly in Iran yesterday big announcement of the collapse of the rainy and economy and the IMF attributed to US sanctions. So this is what the Trump administration is trying to do also vis-a-vis Nicaragua. Trump said yesterday total blockade on Cuba of they don't smart up. This is pure bullying. It is completely against international law. It creates havoc. It's hard enough to achieve economic progress. But when the US is using its political power to break, other countries, the results absolutely can be devastating. And we see it in Venice. Swail that it was the kick that pushed Venezuela into this catastrophic spiraling decline and hyperinflation this. It's always blamed in our press on on Maduro, put people don't even look and understand how the US has the instruments of sanctions blocking access to financial markets pushing enterprises into default blocking trade confiscating the assets owned by the Venezuelan government precisely to and with the design of creating this kind of crisis because the ideas if if the pain is enough in the thinking of people like Bolton, then there

US Venezuela Trump Latin America Mr. Bolton Venezuelan government Jeffrey Sachs Pomona college Honduras Paris Pasadena Madero alley Premera Amy Goodman Nicaragua Maduro
"jefferson world" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

14:09 min | 2 years ago

"jefferson world" Discussed on KPCC

"Kofsky, if you learn any geology in grade school, it may have included this picture of the earth. The rocky crossed we walk on in to that a solid slowly shifting mantle under that a liquid. Outer core made of iron nickel and at the very center of solid inner core also made of iron and nickel possibly as hot as the surface of the sun. But geologists also think that there would have been a time when that inner core was also liquid when our planet actually formed with a fully more molten core and how they're figuring out when that changed happened. Well, it has a lot to do with our magnetic field. New research in nature. Geosciences tries to put a date on our solid core. Suggesting this big change happened relatively recently in geologic time just over five hundred million years ago. Dr Richard Bono is a post doctoral researcher at the university of Liverpool in the United Kingdom L Dr Welby science Friday, thanks for being here. Hi, thank you for having me. So first of all five. Eight hundred million years is pretty young in geologic terms, tell us about that. That is young as an yes, so earth is about four and a half billion years old, and we've had a magnetic field for what appears to be most of that certainly three and a half and maybe as far back as four point two billion years so for the inner core to a formed five hundred million years ago or so that's quite recent guitar too. Yeah. It's recent. So so why why are you concluding the solid core? So young. So we in our study, we looked at a few different things. Our work started with trying to understand the magnetic field itself, which is generated in the liquid part of the core is the iron swirls and moves it creates a magnetic field, which we see on earth. And we looked in particular at the strength of this field. And we found that about five hundred sixty five million years ago. The field was incredibly weak about ten times weaker than it is today. And then trying to understand the history of this field strength. We found that it. Five hundred million years ago and going further back it started out at a strength similar to maybe how it is today. And then it was getting weaker and weaker until it was on the verge of collapsing at that time. And then we combined this operation with computer simulations about how the magnetic field could be generated and the core itself, and how it would involve in change to produce this magnetic field, and we found that these computer simulations predicted a much younger inner core one that's about five hundred million years old is most consistent with our observations from the geologic rock record. So I wanna talk about that geologic rock record a moment. But but I will tell us how exactly does a solid core power. This magnetic field. So it's in the transition from a liquid core to an inner core growing, and there's growth actually changes the chemistry inside the core. And this chemical change. It's a buoyancy. It's it's like oil and water, and as it flows around that helps derive the magnetic field in the liquid outer part. So it's a chemically powered dynamo as it is today. And how do we know how it solidified exactly what happened? That's still a bit of an open. Question of exactly what the physics are at allows this this. Inner core to start to grow. Okay. So this all kind of sounds like magic to me because I'm not quite sure how we're looking at the center of the earth five hundred million years ago. Explain exactly how you're doing this. So this is one of the exciting parts about this type of research, which is called paleo magnetism. And that's because we get to see the magnetic field on the surface of earth. But it's being generated much deeper in this outer core. So when a rock forms there are tiny, magnetic, grains inside of it in our case, these little nanometer size magnetic needles, and when the rock cools below a critical temperature ill lock in the magnetic field at that time and preserve it. And then we're able to take that rock back to a lab and measure it it's much like a compass. Needle it can tell us both what direction the magnetic field is pointing. But also how strong it is. And that's somewhat unique in that. We're able to. Pierre both back in time. But also deep into the earth to where the magnetic field was being formed even though we're looking at the surface today. Why is it so important that we're able to understand what's going on at the center of the earth, whether it's five hundred million years ago or or today, so magnetic field is part of this picture that makes earth a special planet and one that has life and an atmosphere and liquid water because the magnetic field acts as a shield that protects the earth and its atmosphere from solar radiation without this shield solar radiation, Solar Winds, streaming from the sun can come and strip away the atmosphere and would allow for the water to to leave. So this magnetic field in its history and its evolution is directly linked to our ability on earth for there to be life. So this is. Critical connection. So it's pretty important. Well, okay. So now, let's go back to this time five hundred million years ago when we're looking at this gigantic dip in the magnetic field. You're talking about you explained that it's one tenth of the strength. That is today. So what could that possibly have done to life on earth at that time? It's hard to say exactly we've never seen something that week in the historical record where we have direct observations. But if the field was ten times weaker than it is today, we'd expect that solar radiation would be able to penetrate much further into earth into the atmosphere, and that radiation could be harmful to to life. DNA, and there's been some speculation about what that could mean about how life as volved in changed in response to this increase in solar radiation. I you've you've discussed the possibility that the magnetic field didn't just dip a lot that it just completely went away. At that time is is there that possibility? So we don't have any evidence that the magnetic field completely collapsed or disappeared. It got very weak. But it's still above the minimum amount. We would expect just from a sort of background signals. So it never completely disappeared. But he did get much much weaker in till something changed, and what we think that change was was that the inner car core started to grow and that allowed the dynamo to be repower and to rise back up to what we see today. So what's interesting here is this happened at around this time at which we also see the Cambrian explosion all of us. All this life on earth happening here. Maybe you can explain if there's any sort of correlation here between this dip in the magnetic field in what happened with life on earth at that time. So that's there's been speculation about that. It's very difficult to try to directly connect something. Like this the strength of the magnetic field to evolution life. But it is intriguing and that these are happening at about the same time and could be a relation. But before this happened before this dip that we're talking about here. What was powering the magnetic field of the earth? So it was strong. And then it was weak. And then it was strong again when the core solidified what was powering this beforehand. So that's a nother big question that are discipline is trying to address there's a lot of uncertainty, but one model is that it's just due to cooling, and that's a thermally powered dynamo. But this couldn't last forever, and we would expect that as the core continues the cool. There's less power available to to drive the magnetic field, and it will get weaker and weaker until it would reach this point of collapse. And that seems somewhat consistent with what we found in our study earlier in the hour. We're talking about the the news this week that the magnetic North Pole is actually been moving around a little bit. It seems very scary to us. What do you see when you look at? That is is that something that concerns you something that you can learn anything from what what do you? What do you think when you hear that? So I wouldn't be concerned, but I'd be interested. So that's one of the fascinating parts about our magnetic field is that it changes on all these different time scales. As we're seeing in this study about the magnetic North Pole. It moves around on yearly timescales, and it can also change on hundreds to thousands of years. There's this what's termed the Celtics Lennox anomaly, a weak point on earth's field that we're trying to understand if it's hundreds or thousands of years old or even older going back to millions and even billions of years, so it's all these different time scales. That it's changing that we're trying to understand how and why. And can we even predicted? That remains a key part of our studies. We just have we just have thirty seconds left. Mars doesn't have a magnetic field. It used to. But it doesn't have one today from the best that we can tell in what happened. We know. We don't really know this open question, and hopefully some missions that will be looking at trying to collect samples Mike allow us to gain some insight into the history of Mars and it's magnetic field. I love these big open questions, but there's a lot of cool stuff in here. Thanks to Dr Richard Bono of post doctoral, fellow at the university of Liverpool in the UK. Thanks for joining us and science Friday. Thank you for having a now, you may have noticed that we're talking a lot about geosciences on the program the last few weeks, and there's a reason for that are Sifi book club is reading n que Jefferson's the fifth season. It's a story about a world in constant geological turmoil volcanoes earthquakes, even shifting magnetic poles. We've heard about those they're all disasters. Plaguing the story and one place. Our book club is meeting is on Facebook. Share some gems from that discussion that's happening on Facebook science Friday, digital producer Johanna mayor Johanna. Welcome John and radio producer, Christy Taylor. Hi there. Hey, don. So when I think book club, I think about people sitting in a room together talking over wine, maybe a how are we doing this radio? Well, we kind of can't I love I do love the way that we're able to dive into a piece of literature and really explore it with our guest experts and listeners, but a lot of the time our on air conversations can only include so many voices. People don't get to talk to each other. We have limited time and so on. So that is where the science Friday book club. Facebook group comes in. We really kind of wanted to try to put that club back in the, but cloud and people have really delivered some thoughtful conversations as they've been reading. I'm really interested to hear about these conversations because the fifth season has some heavy stuff. End of the world personal loss earthquake magic what kind of questions who've been chewing on. Yes. So for starters, we've been talking about this theme of disaster a lot how the society and the story itself has adapted to. A disaster. And also how people respond to it on an individual level. I mean characters in the story are walking away from their entire lives as they know it because of a giant volcano. So this idea of individual resilience was really intriguing to one of our listeners Denise from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. As a person who survival instinct is waning during our own times. I find myself wondering what it must be like to have a wish to survive that is so strong that one is prepared to live with brutality or to brutalize others in the name of survival. They hope is lost. What are people living on? What is it like to live with a brain a mind? A will like that. I'm John Dan Kowalski, and this is science Friday from WNYC studios, and John we've also been talking about how groups of people respond to disasters. Yes. So another listener named Jude made a really interesting comparison between the tight knit communities Jefferson's world and monasteries in the middle ages. Yeah. And she said, so when Roman civilisation was breaking up, these institutions, really encouraged an ethical approach to communal life. The -mongst just hanging around praying. They also taught those outside the monastery the agriculture knowledge and the skills they needed to survive, and they transcribed written material for future preservation. I thought those communities in Jefferson's book in comparison entirely infielder unwilling to reach out unless they got something in return. So I thought that was a great point about different reactions to disaster and social upheaval so social upheaval. I I'm guessing people probably had some feelings about how science was portrayed in the story. Well, this is a science show. We did ask about that. And that's one thing we've really really wanted to explore with people the fifth season is a work of fantasy or maybe science fiction, but it's rooted in a lot of real geological turmoil. There are these characters who can do earthquake magic. But they're also stopping aftershocks. They're trying to plug up volcanoes. But you know, so the pressure lavas Safeway rerouted they're talking about fall. Outlines and friction and vibrations carrying through different materials, different kinds of volcanic ash, ecological effects that cetera. So we asked people how they related to that kind of information density, and Erin from Fairfield, Connecticut, had this to say, I think consumers of science fiction are already tuned into science and are looking for science to be based in reality. It is expected that the author will take scientific liberties to advance the story, but one of the things I love most about Gina is how smart some of these authors are and how much time they must spend studying about the science to make it believable. I love how Jameson worked geology into the core of her story. It is. So unique I found myself using her appendices and looking up more information about the science as I read the book..

Dr Richard Bono John Dan Kowalski Facebook university of Liverpool Geosciences North Pole Kofsky Jefferson researcher producer Pierre repower Safeway Fairfield Cambrian UK Jameson Connecticut Gina
"jefferson world" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"jefferson world" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A disaster. And also how people respond to it on an individual level. I mean characters in the story are walking away from their entire lives as they know it because of a giant volcano. So this idea of individual resilience was really intriguing to one of our listeners Denise from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. As a person whose survival instinct is waning during our own times. I find myself wondering what it must be like to have a wish to survive that is so strong that one is prepared to live with brutality or to brutalize others in the name of survival. They hope is lost. What are people living on? What is it like to live with a brain a mind? A will like that. I'm John Dan Kowalski, and this is science Friday from WNYC studios, and John we've also been talking about how groups of people respond to disasters. Yes. So another listener named Jude made a really interesting comparison between the tight knit communities in Jefferson's world and monasteries in the middle ages. Yeah. And she said, so when Roman civilisation was breaking up, these institutions, really encouraged an ethical approach to communal life. The monks weren't just hanging around praying. They also taught those outside the monastery the agriculture knowledge and the skills they needed to survive, and they transcribed written material for future preservation. I thought those communities and Jefferson's book in comparison entirely in sealer unwilling to reach out unless they got something in return. So I thought that was a great point about different reactions to disaster and social upheaval so social upheaval. I I'm guessing people probably had some feelings about how science was portrayed in the story. Well, this is a science show. We did ask about that. And that's one thing. Team. We really really wanted to explore with people the fifth season is a work of fantasy or maybe science fiction, but it's rooted in a lot of real geological turmoil. There these characters who can do earthquake magic. But they're also stopping aftershocks. They're trying to plug up volcanoes. But you know, so the pressure lavas safely rerouted they're talking about faultlines and friction and vibrations carrying through different materials, different kinds of all-cash ecological effects that cetera. So we asked people how they related to that kind of information density, and Erin from Fairfield, Connecticut, had this to say, I think consumers of science fiction are already tuned into science and are looking for science to be based in reality is expected that the author will take scientific liberties to advance the story, but one of the things I love most about the Gina is how smart some of these authors are and how much time they must spend studying about the science to make it believable. I love how Jameson work geology into the core of her story. It is. So unique I found myself using her appendices and looking up more information about the science. As I read the book that said, this is a book about disasters and about violence and Jemison as a black woman writing about this oppressed group of people and the origins. These people in the book could do earthquake magic are treated in ways that pretty directly parallel, slavery and racism in America. And some of our readers have been reacting to this as well. So you von gonna from Santa Cruz, California said she found those parallels overwhelming. I recently finished this book the fifth season while reading chapters on the civil war and restoration and Jill Lepore, snooze civics book, these truths and watching movies like sorry to bother you. And was struck about how all three seemed to spend the same tale one of slavery and equity dehumanisation and hard choices at times this book felt so real and so current I had to put it down just to get some space. It sounds like people are digging into this a lot. Yeah. Yeah. They they really are John and we wanna keep digging next Friday on the show we're going to complete this book club with a conversation with seismologist, Lucy Jones and sociologists Laurie peak on the air, so far we've been talking about little Keno earthquake geosciences the center of the earth. But we really plan to explore disaster sociology with this conversation, Laurie peak has researched a lot of the social dynamics around Hurricane Katrina, and who was hurt most in that situation, for example. And they're both people have a lot to say about what makes a natural hazard into a human scale disaster. Those are two very different things. So so next week on the show is going to be back for that conversation. But let's just say I wanted to get involved. Yes, we have one more discussion question that we want people to think about as safe finish up their ratings. So here it is. This is a book where there are many different voices and many different storytellers from the shifting narratives to the way that societal knowledge and history is transmitted through this concept of stone more so how do all of these voices shape? Our understanding of the story, and you can think about that a little bit John and then joined the science Friday book club on Facebook. But we also really really want you to send us your comments as voice memos. So we can include them in next week's show kinda like we did.

John Dan Kowalski Bethlehem Laurie peak Pennsylvania Denise Jefferson Jill Lepore Facebook WNYC studios Jude Jemison Jameson America Fairfield Connecticut Santa Cruz Hurricane Katrina California
"jefferson world" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"jefferson world" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Of a high. Profile kidnapping and accusations of murder. American history. Tellers sponsored by the art of shaving if you've been listening to our show for a while. Then you've probably heard how life in the past could be pretty rough and shaving was no exception. But the past the past and the art of shaving his hair to make sure that you enjoy a close, comfortable shave today. And everyday it all started with handmade recipe for pre shave oil and humble single store in the heart of New York City. The four elements of the perfect shave soon. Followed a start to finish shaving experience solves most everyday grooming issues and now you'll find over one hundred retail locations across America, the art of shavings dedication, to using high quality essential oils and botanical ingredients in their award. Winning products has now evolved into a collection that will help you with all your grooming needs from head to toe. Other brands tell you they'll deliver a great shave a great compared to what we're giving. You a chance to see what the four elements of the perfect shave really fee like American history. Tellers listeners are now invited to get fifteen percent off their first order by using the promo code tellers at checkout on. Online or at any of the art of shaving stores, use the code tellers to get fifteen percent off your first order and starting joining your shave again. American history. Tellers is sponsored by the great courses as fans of history. We know that the most compelling remarkable stories are the ones about real people and events and with the great courses, plus you can explore fascinating people places and time periods anytime, you want like in their course, the skeptics guide to American history. Professor Mark Stoler filters through the myths and misconceptions about America's pass to offer new perspectives on pivotal events, including the conflict between Hamilton Jefferson World, War, Two, even the Cold War with the great courses. Plus, you can enjoy this course, and any of their thousands of fascinating, lectures. Learn about anything that interests.

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"jefferson world" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"jefferson world" Discussed on WTVN

"Marbury was a brilliantly conceived political strategy crafted by john marshall a master politician marshall the chief justice of the supreme court wrote the decision not the city revolutionary precedent but to deny the new president thomas jefferson is longtime political rival an opportunity to rebuff a supreme court controlled by jefferson's federalist opposites marbury was precipitated by the election of eighteen hundred in which thomas jefferson the incumbent vice president and a leader of the republicans ran for president against the incumbent president john adams leader of the federalists the federalist controlled both the house both houses of congress but were torn between the followers of atoms and alexander hamilton hamilton and adams hate each other's guts hamilton's faction withheld its support for adams reelection bid in one thousand nine hundred and the race ended in electoral college tie between jefferson and his vice presidential running mate aaron burr the constitution by the way was amended as a result of all with the twelfth amendment adams came in third the election was then thrown into the house of representatives to decide who would be the president realizing he would not win reelection adams move to solidify his party's influence in the federal government the passage of the judiciary act of eighteen o one creating sixteen new federal circuit judge was part of a strategy and just prior to leaving office adams selected and the federalist controlled lame duck senate confirmed nominees to fill the posts adams turn ran out however before john marshall who was then secretary of state could actually deliver the commissions of office to some of the designates you understand marshall was secretary of state involved in the matter he could he he time ran out before he could deliver the commissions of office to some of the designates marceau's successor is secretary state was james madison and he refused to deliver the commission's as president jefferson's direct directed and william marbury among others filed suit in federal court seeking an order rid aman damis directing madison to deliver his commission as justice of the peace marshall long a rival of jefferson's in virginia politics is one of the most articulate leaders in the federalist party the atoms party marshall at served in the virginia state house the us house of representatives as president adams representatives to france in seventeen ninety seven and then as secretary of state was nominated to be chief justice by adams and assumed the post on february for eighteen o one exactly one month before adams presidential term ended with a republican majority elected to both houses of congress in eighteen hundred marshall realize that jefferson and his republicans could denude the supreme court of authority that he has now chief justice and could be impeached and removed from office marshall understood that in the marbury case if he ordered secretary state madison to deliver marbury is commissioned office jefferson world order madison to ignore the supreme court's writ and the courts authority will be seriously weakened and marshall was also concerned that he not be seen as protecting the interests of federalist jurists like marbury would assumed his position as justice of the peace and had been hearing cases in issuing judgments for a year bearing all this in mind marshal's decision in marbury versus madison while upsetting the constitution's balance of power in the relationship between the federal government and the states was a master political stroke marshall stated that marbury consistent with legal doctrine at the time had something akin to a property right to the office to which he had been nominated and confirmed martial law said that the federal.

Marbury john marshall one month
"jefferson world" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"jefferson world" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"The posts adams turn ran out however before john marshall who was then secretary of state could actually deliver the commissions of office to some of the designates you understand marshall was secretary of state involved in the matter he could he he time right before he could deliver the commissions of office to some of the designates marceau's successor is secretary state was james madison and he refused to deliver the commission's as president jefferson's direct directed and william marbury among others filed suit in federal court seeking an order rhythm and damis directing madison to deliver his commission as justice of the peace marshall along a rival of jefferson's in virginia politics is one of the most articulate leaders in the federalist party the atoms party marshall at served in the virginia state house the us house of representatives as one of president adams representatives to france in seventeen ninety seven and then as secretary of state was nominated to be chief justice by adams and assume the post on february for eighteen o one exactly one month before adams presidential term ended with a republican majority elected to both houses of congress in eighteen hundred marshall realize that jefferson and his republicans could denude the supreme court of authority that he is now chief justice and could be impeached and removed from office marshall understood that in the marbury case if he ordered secretary state madison to deliver marbury is commissioned office jefferson world order madison to ignore the supreme court's writ and the courts authority would be seriously weakened and marshall was also concerned that he not be seen as protecting the interests of federalist jurists like marbury would assumed his position as justice of the peace and have been hearing cases issuing judgments for a year bearing all this in mind marshal's decision in marbury versus madison while upsetting the constitution's balance of power in the relationship between the federal government and the states was a master political stroke marshall stated that marbury consistent with legal doctrine at the time had something akin to a property right to the office to which he had been nominated and confirmed marshall also said that the federal judiciary should be able to issue an order directing the appointment of marbury but because the constitution did not enumerate such an original right for the supreme court the court was powerless to do so okay fine but there's more marshall went well beyond the specific issues in the case he said that the court had a responsibility to set aside acts of congress that violate principles enumerated in the constitution so having already ruled in a way that settled the issue this is where the seizure of power occurs he wrote in part between these alternatives there is no middle ground the constitution is either a superior paramount law i'm changeable by ordinary means or it is on a level with ordinary legislative acts like other acts is alterable when the legislature shop pleased to alternate if the former part of the alternative be true any legislative act contrary to the constitution is not law the latter part be true then written constitutions are absurd attempts on the part of the people to limit a power in its own nature illimitable certainly all those who have framed written constitutions contemplate them as forming the fundamental in paramount law the nation consequently the theory of every such government must be that an act of the legislature repugnant to the constitution is void the judicial power of the united states is extended to all cases arising under the constitution could it be the these are the with the important parts could it be the intention of those who gave this power to say that and using it the constitution should not be looked into that a case arising under the constitution should be decided without examining the instrument under which it arises this is too extravagant to be maintained so marshall's federalist party had lost the presidency and congress but marshall was determined to fight back and so the doctrine of.

adams john marshall one month
"jefferson world" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"jefferson world" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"Which doesn't come until eighteen 12 and almost entirely through the efforts of a wrench in russia doctor benjamin rush who who knew both man but new adams best he brings them together teeth today pulled a little move that i see in sitcom sometimes where he like he didn't trick adams but he told them about a dream and so why does it well he what do we do is talk to each of them say look the other one said that he loves you yes and then offending to go to the other one and say he loves you an and they he sets them up but he had to work on it two years i mean it wasn't something happen overnight but once it breaks then the letters flow as speaker of the car spun says a historian you have to live in the world of your subject stra after just like live with their words may become up for air every few minutes did you enjoy living in jefferson's world more than adams now i enjoy living in ads read his diary and you see there's nothing like it in in in american literature i know of no diary like it certainly know founder wrote each started writing college that right after collagen he sounds like an adolescent because he tells you about every little moment of anxiety or like your kid coming back from a party saying what what i say did i say the wrong things that i fend that woman that i he's just he says everything that he's feeling and whoever does that i mean they're very few diaries twitter which are quite as explicit as his job and then he's a president for are anxious age right exactly where he the roddick president he suffers that anxiety until he gets married and then the thing becomes mature and he becomes a different somewhat different person so it horton's may is a fan of history in a patriot to see that they made up they both on the same date exactly fifty years after signing the declaration of independence but that's a personal story and as i was reading the book i wondered in terms of having an impact on america does their thawing of relationship does it mean does it did it actually mean anything inter.

benjamin rush adams jefferson founder twitter president anxiety america russia horton fifty years two years
"jefferson world" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"jefferson world" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"Where's the carpet deemed now there are twenty thousand goldfish year were being sent out by members of congress to citizens and at one point a third of all residents of the district of columbia had at their home a bab cock lake goldfish also there's this other weird piece of it which is that they would they need to keep down the ills and catfish which like to eat the karp so they would drain the lakes partially drain the lakes every spring and then go into murder all the yeltsin cat the original draining the swamp so there we cut exactly this is what happened so it finally in the eighteen i i think in the eighteen nineties they realize this is a terrible congressional boondoggle were sending goldfish all over the country and they're like we got to stop doing this so they they got rid of it and they ultimately they literally drain them and the although than they part of it became the title based in part olympic in the title basin and then they built at jefferson world so it was in fact the the draining the swamp came from these karp these karp lakes think about how simple we were back then again instead of building the wall oh it like a goldfish blake strain be better definitely karp for all one more announcement which is that jessica is wherever you are jason is madly in love with you so you need to just have that affirmed by me it just came in over strangely james combing sent an email about that too so i don't know what you've been doing but.

congress columbia karp murder yeltsin jefferson world karp lakes jessica jason bab cock lake