35 Burst results for "Jeff Yang"

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

03:46 min | Last month

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce, a nut filtered conversation about what's happening in Asian America. I'm Phil eu, and I'm Jeff Yang, and I have the honor of introducing a friend of ours. A friend of the podcast and one of our favorite congressional candidates. None other than Jay Chen, who is running for Congress as a Democrat in California 45. Welcome Jay to the podcast. Welcome. Thank you. Thank you, Jeff. Thank you, Phil. It's an honor to be here. It is our honor.

Asian America Phil eu Jeff Yang Jay Chen Bruce Congress Jay California Jeff Phil
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

03:46 min | 4 months ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"I see, okay. And so I feel that way sometimes, right? I mean, there's a vibe that, but you know, look, I can't take all the vaccinations for everyone, right? So yeah, this is what it's down to. We will get through this. We can't get through this, but we can only do it together. And I think that's part of the messaging that in the especial. And in this campaign. And we've gotten through this one. Together. Yeah, we did it. The three rounds. This concludes our very special bonus edition of the good, the bad, and the WTF. Paid for by the U.S. Department of Health and human services, we can do this campaign. We can do this. And we're back, all right, on this second half of day calls Bruce, this is where we do our signature segment. The good, the bad, and the WTF. Jeff Yang, would you please take us into the good bed and WTF? I will. But before we do that, there's something which I wanted to just bring up. Because it is the kind of thing. It's the stuff again, of which parents both dream and dread in some ways. So honestly, just looking back at the fossil record of your education and your accomplishments, it's just stunning. You have a master's degree from Stanford and biology. You've got a PhD from Harvard in microbiology like 9 years, perhaps plus of advanced education, and the reason I actually bring this up is twofold. One is, you know, this is the kind of thing again. I've known letters after my name and it's something my parents just still keep on going home for Thanksgiving kicked me in the butt. Why don't you go get some additional education because you're useless and we need to put something on your gravestone.

U.S. Department of Health and WTF Jeff Yang Bruce Stanford Harvard
"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

03:26 min | 6 months ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Book, <Speech_Male> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> you know. <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Male> For design purposes, <Speech_Male> I think it's <Speech_Male> excellent, hyper <Speech_Male> Collins did a fantastic <Speech_Male> job. <Speech_Male> The fold out pages, <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> richness of the color, <Speech_Male> the quality <Speech_Male> of every <Speech_Male> component of it, fantastic. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> to fill earlier <Speech_Male> point, at some point, <Speech_Male> this book <Speech_Male> becomes the book <Speech_Male> that no one knows how to <Speech_Male> ask for described <Speech_Male> because it doesn't <Speech_Male> even have our names <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> the title and the spine. <Speech_Male> There's no indicator <Speech_Male> of the publisher. <Speech_Male> It's like without <Speech_Male> that one little strip of <Speech_Male> paper, you have <Silence> 500 pages <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> anonymous <Speech_Male> content at <Speech_Male> this point. <Speech_Male> So we got to figure <Speech_Male> out something for <Speech_Male> future. There will <Speech_Male> be a paperback. <Speech_Male> There will be a paperback. It's <Speech_Male> a weird figure out. <Speech_Male> We haven't <Speech_Male> started talking <SpeakerChange> about that yet, <Speech_Male> but there will be one, <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> I'm trying to imagine <Speech_Male> this in public <Speech_Male> libraries. <Speech_Male> And in school libraries, <Speech_Male> right? They put <Speech_Male> plastic over the <Speech_Male> whole thing. Okay, stick <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> belly <Speech_Male> band directly on it. <Speech_Male> So somebody <Speech_Male> gets gets <Speech_Male> covered. We're not sure who <Speech_Male> depending on <Speech_Male> where they <Speech_Male> cover it. That's <Speech_Male> true. Phil had <Speech_Male> a great idea <Speech_Male> of actually <Speech_Male> selling replacement <Speech_Male> belly bands <Speech_Male> by different designers. <Speech_Male> And illustrators, <Speech_Male> which I kind of <Speech_Male> love. <SpeakerChange> Yeah. We may <Speech_Male> have to do that. Yeah, <Speech_Male> yeah. You guys are <Speech_Male> full of ideas. <Speech_Male> Thank you <Silence> so much for doing this <Speech_Male> book. <Speech_Male> It is <Speech_Male> a work of art. It <Speech_Male> is a work of love, <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> you have <Speech_Male> done a service <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> our very diverse <Speech_Male> Asian American communities <Speech_Male> by <Speech_Male> putting this down, <Speech_Male> putting this together, <Speech_Male> assembling all <Speech_Male> these writers and illustrators, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it is <Speech_Male> unique, <Speech_Male> it is <Speech_Male> precious <Speech_Male> and people <Speech_Male> you got to get yourself <Speech_Male> a copy of <Speech_Male> it. And don't <Speech_Male> just buy it because <Silence> you want to say you <Speech_Male> own it. <Speech_Male> Young or old, <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> incredibly <Speech_Male> something that <Speech_Male> we've been <Speech_Male> waiting for, <Speech_Male> but we didn't know <Speech_Male> three <SpeakerChange> fools that would <Speech_Music_Male> actually attempt to <Speech_Music_Male> actually <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> hit us. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But we found you guys. <Speech_Male> Yeah. So <Speech_Male> thank you so <Silence> so much for doing that, <Speech_Male> guys. <Silence> Thank you. <SpeakerChange> Thank <Speech_Male> you, Ken. <Speech_Male> And you're welcome. <Speech_Male> Yeah, <Speech_Male> social <Speech_Male> media. Does this have its <Speech_Male> own social <Speech_Male> media presence? <Speech_Male> Or is it on your <Speech_Male> respective social media <Speech_Male> sites? On our <Speech_Male> respective social media <Speech_Male> sites we promote it, <Speech_Male> but it <Speech_Male> does have its own <Speech_Male> own <Speech_Male> presence, your own personality. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> rise AA <Speech_Male> book is <Speech_Male> the handle on pretty <Speech_Male> much every social <Speech_Male> media, I guess, and <Speech_Male> that's the best <Speech_Male> place to get updates <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Male> signings and <Silence> book talks and things like <Speech_Male> that. Yeah, <Silence> check <SpeakerChange> it out. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> They will. <Speech_Male> Again, <Speech_Male> just can't be happier <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> have this conversation <Speech_Male> with you guys. Phil, you were <Speech_Male> one of my first guests. <Speech_Male> I know. <Speech_Male> When I started my fake, <Speech_Male> that's right. <Speech_Male> I was <Speech_Male> one of the first. I'm still <Speech_Male> plugging away here. <Speech_Male> Yeah, no, congratulations. <Speech_Male> I really <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> respect the work ethic <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> how far you've <SpeakerChange> gotten with this. <Speech_Male> It's pretty great. <Speech_Male> Especially since <Speech_Male> two years ago, I <Speech_Male> inherited all <Speech_Male> the technical <SpeakerChange> site after <Speech_Male> everything. <Speech_Male> But hey, I'm retired. <Speech_Male> We know how that is. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You get that, man. <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Male> Hey, <Speech_Male> love you guys. Love what <Speech_Male> you're doing. Love <Speech_Male> how you represent <Speech_Male> us and <Speech_Male> this book is just <Speech_Male> another contribution <Speech_Male> that you guys, <Speech_Male> including Philip, have <Speech_Male> all made to the <Speech_Male> greater conversation. <Speech_Male> So I <Speech_Male> hope you just sell <Speech_Music_Male> a ton of these. <Speech_Music_Male> You can do a reprint <Speech_Music_Male> and that <Speech_Male> you stimulate <Speech_Male> all the other people <Speech_Music_Male> that will chronicle <Speech_Music_Male> this <Speech_Music_Male> ongoing story. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you. Thank you. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> We

Collins Phil Ken
"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:48 min | 6 months ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Book lists, right? We're seeing entire new canons being invented in genres being exploded by us now. No one could try to write a history of the last 30 years of whiteness, right? Of white America. And the fact that we have to or try to or could with rise for Asian Americans really just speaks to how compressed our narratives were. But they're not going to be like that anymore, I don't think. It's being written now on TikTok. Everywhere. On podcasts. That's right. That's right. Listeners, you need to get your hands on this book. I don't recommend you put it in your lap because your thighs will go to sleep. Put it on a table right in front of you. It's a page Turner. You know, I'm one of those people. I read from front to back, even though I feel like you can just jump in anywhere, but I feel like I would be doing a disservice one to the work that you guys did to lay out this chronology. And two, I kind of like seeing the evolution of things. So even though I was like, okay, we can. No, no, you got to work through these things. This is available wherever people can buy a book. That is correct, yes. Is it accurate? Is it true to say even is in an audiobook for? There is an audiobook. Yeah. It's blowing my mind. I know, it's hard for you to understand that, right? To wrap your head around that. We too were like, this is gonna be an audiobook. And we even recorded our own portions of our big essays, you know what I mean? Yeah. And we were like, how is this gonna be assembled, you know? 'cause we knew that they were running like narrators by us. And we hired narrators and there's a team of narrators covering all the pieces. And we were like, how does this work? I have listened to the audiobook. It works quite well actually. They have people reading in our voices, like in the syllabus, you know, when it's like a conversation, they've sort of assigned narrator to each of our vocals. Yeah, yeah, yeah. And then even if it's just like an illustrated list, like stuff Asians like that piece is just, you know, it's just a list. The guy's like, really enthusiastic. He's like, he's like, you know, stuff Asians like, and he's like, Costco. You know, and you're like, okay, okay, you know, so. What about when you get to the graphic novels? It still started. It's like, so they're being discussed. So then this guy actually is gesturing towards the other person. I mean, they can't be doing that. No, they're not, yeah, they're not doing description of description of illustrations. They're just reading the dialog and it more or less actually works, you know? Okay. I'm just so visual, it's like, I can't imagine that because I like seeing the pictures and the docking bubbles. Yeah, yeah, I mean, the audiobook works. And even the digital version of the book, the ebook works, but nothing beats nothing beats holding it in your hand. The fold outs and all that stuff, yeah. There's nothing really. No, I would say even if people have gotten used to these other forms, this particular book, the premier experience, is having the book and turning the pages. That's not the way any other sales, but I'm saying this book is best experienced by actually having the book. We do apologize for the belly band, because it's a pain in the butt. I mean, in concept, as a work of art, actually, I'm very proud of the way the book looks, the way it's designed and sort of the Titleist cover with all the faces, and then the belly band kind of being like sort of the cherry on top, at least we thought. But in practicality, the belly button has proven to be such a pain in the butt. It slides around. When you open it up to sign it, it's like hanging out, it's more or less getting bent, but it's not, I like it in concept. In practice, it has turned out to be kind of a colossal pain in the butt. Well, I was going to use it as my bookmarker, but then I felt it was too precious for that. And so I just neatly folded it and stuck it on the inside cover because by trying to keep it in its original location. It was getting shot more as like, no, I can't have that. Yeah. I think that the concept of it was that we wanted to give people unrestricted view of all the faces on the book, which are amazing, right? Julia cuo, who did our artwork or a lot of our work. She did hundreds of these self portraits. But in practice, all of the identifying information about the book is on the belly band, which is like the first thing you're gonna lose. People are telling us like, oh, you know, I got shipped a book and it was missing a belly band. Now it's just the Facebook. People having a hard time on the secondhand market, like just on the shelf, it's just gonna be like, what is this thing all these faces? Well, before I heard your explanation, guys, I thought, okay, they did a lot of thinking about this. And so they didn't want anything words or whatever. Even the title of the book, even the subtitle of the book to mar this compendium of Asian American Hall of Fame, right? That speaks for itself. So that's the way I read it when I look at this. Now maybe ten years now, what is that book on my shelf? But to me, that's what it kind of comes across as is you're saying these faces speak for themselves. I still like it as a work of art. So as a statement, it's very bold. I understand from marketing purposes like not having the bell band is kind of like a dumb idea, but I do like I actually think it's.

Turner Costco America Julia cuo Asian American Hall of Fame Facebook
"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:31 min | 6 months ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"It's like, oh, they're from Sacramento, and that's in your book, right? My best friend in junior high was a Filipino kid whose last name was millington. In Sacramento, is there a connection? So when I contacted her, I'm like, did you have a little brother named Jim? And she's like, yeah, I'm like, I was at your house. I don't know how many times you know high. In your attic, messing around, right? Yeah, and she's like, well, that's where Fannie began. I said, so while we're messing around up there, he never said, oh, so I have these two older sisters that you're not going to see because they're opening for Led Zeppelin. They never talked about you guys, right? It was hilarious. But it's discovering the interweaving, right? It's those kind of things that I experienced as I was going through your playlist. I was going through the movie notes, right? And all these kind of things, I felt like, yeah, I'm not just an observer, you know, maybe this is the POV of an Asian American. It's like, I'm being brought back into what I lived myself. And I forgotten a lot of this stuff. Or it never really jumped out at me as really essential. This was a milestone. This is a turning point. I think we're much more able to do that, see that kind of stuff today. And I'm talking even pre 90, 'cause you guys cover that a little bit. I think what you guys have done in this book is you have now put a marker down. This happened. And the things that we take for granted now, especially you young buck Asian Americans. Like, I'm not making this up. This was not possible. No one your age back then could have imagined all these things being true today, so I think that is incredibly valuable that now we have a place to go. And as you said, to me, it's like, okay, if I want to know more about the music scene, then I got to go beyond what the article says. But you give us enough where if I'm intrigued, there's all kinds of ways to find the holding dive into it. What I want to focus on now is you end the book with beyond. And since I haven't gotten there yet, that to me is another one of the challenges of writing book like this is where do you put the end? Because as you said, Phil, you're fishing the book and the Atlanta shootings happened, right? And it's like, this weekend, the Taiwanese church, you know, an Orange County. How do you just say, okay, done. But at the same time acknowledging, this is a moving train. Where do you see it all going? First of all, what you said about the book, I mean, your observation is very astute, I think. Ken fong clearly gets the book. Because even though he's in the 1990s still. But you understand, one of the things that one of the things we've been saying a lot is that, you know, you don't really realize it's history when you're living it. When you're going through it, right? At the moment you just don't know. And so our book is our attempt to capture that. And validate and canonize things that people may not have realized like, oh, this lived experience was worth putting in a history book, you know? Like, oh, somebody gets it. Somebody gets this thing though. My community went through. So that said, finishing the book, where do we cut it off? 90s to now is a very, you know, it's kind of an amorphous thing you could say, right? Depending on when you pick up the book, I suppose. Yeah, I mean, it was a challenge because everything in the last couple of years is just like, you know, milestone after milestone after milestone, that as we're finishing the book, things were already changing. We got one chance to tweak something like that was like inaccurate as of as we're writing one an Oscar and we were like, oh, that's statistic about Asian American actresses, not winning the Oscars since blah, blah, blah. It's not true anymore. Let's go. We had an opportunity to tweak that one line at some point, but yeah, this wasn't moving train one of our safety nets was that we called Asian America itself in progress as is this book, right? Okay. But that also leaves it open. Like, hey, it's time for someone else to write the next part of this book. Well, that was my natural question. Are you guys thinking that you're the three who's going to keep, you know, the second volume, not the reprint, but the second volume, or are you going to start encouraging the next people to step up? Because as you're saying, it's an ongoing evolving thing. So we talk a lot about the idea of what if there were to be one a second volume quote unquote might look like. And I honestly don't think that there will be a second volume. In the sense that I don't think we need rise again. You know what I mean? That's a good title though. It's actually very, very Christian, actually. It is resurrection. But blasphemous. But I don't think that we need another 500 page book that covers 30 years. And I don't think we need to wait 30 years for it. First of all, we are moving so fast at this point in the world. Like the world's so accelerated and there's so much more stuff happening around us, that we don't have to wait 30 years to see a lot of change. And if anything, I mean, you know, Phil and I have sort of loosely talked about without even having yet pulled Philip into the conversation. What if we did something on an annual basis, just sort of an update and annex or something, right? You know, the other thing is this. It's like. The book is intended to cover 30 years that were absent, right? 30 years that have been overlooked or elated from the narrative in a lot of ways. But now it kind of isn't, or at least there's a placeholder, right? And people can go out and do additional work around that to flesh out all the places we did not completely cover. But we're here now. And I think that people's attitudes towards telling stories is different. We're not willing to let ourselves be submerged in the same way anymore. Not to say that we were quote unquote willing before, but we have power now. We have voice. We have an awareness that we have the right to demand that our stores be told in full and through our voices, I hope that it won't be the case that the next 30 years is going to require that kind of re papering of history. I think it's going to be, we're going to document this as we go along. It is impossible to do a top 25 list of books to read in Asia Pacific American heritage month anymore. We're seeing.

Sacramento Taiwanese church Ken fong millington Fannie Asian America Phil Jim Orange County Atlanta Oscars Oscar Philip Asia
"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:11 min | 6 months ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"That's a better word. At different times, I did have conversations with both of them in which it was just like staring into the distance and sort of saying, I don't know how we're going to be able to get this done, right? We never said we can't get this done. We never actually said we're going to give up. But there were definitely moments with both Phil and Philip where it's like, we have X number of days to do Y number of things. The number of things is so far greater than the number of days we have left that it seems unimaginable that we'll get this in on time. I just remember these conversations and think to myself, well, either I actually am honest and say, yeah, you're right, this is completely impossible. We're going to deliver late, or we're going to kill ourselves or our families will hate us, or maybe all of the above, which I think was the reasonable approach, right? The honest reality of where we were. Or I could say buck up guys, we're almost there. No big deal. You know, let's just look into this way. We break it up this way and this way, divide it by this, and then maybe miracle happens here. And then yes, we'll be fine, guys. I remind myself that if we ever remember how much pain and effort it takes for us to do anything, we'll never do that again. You know, the reason why we've endorphins we run is because nobody likes running, running sucks, right? But ask a woman who burst a baby. Oh my God. A 100%, right? If you could not erase the dark memory, the trauma of giving birth to human species, completely extinct. Everyone should be an only child on a bed. Exactly. That's right. But the reality is that I've been through this process a bunch of times, right? And in every single one, I've been staring down the barrel of a deadline and thinking to myself, this is impossible. And as soon as you get yourself into a position where you believe it's impossible, it is impossible. And to their credit, I mean, Phil, his off Philip pulled his off. I just kept on cracking and pulled my stuff. If we had ever lost faith, let's just put it that way. Then I think the book would have ground to a halt. So we just had to keep on plugging that way. So you guys pull it off, it exists. The baby is out, right? And now people are picking it up, they're reading it. There's definitely in the whole Asian American culture movement and identity. And East Asian ethnocentrism. And again, I noticed that you guys worked very clearly to make sure that to be broader. But it still feels a little East Asian. And from my bias experience POV, a lot of this movement has happened from the east Asians, but then I'm not in those other communities. So first of all, what kind of reaction have you gotten so far from the academic crowd? Even though you didn't try to write an academic book, what did they say about it? How do they see it? And then how did you deal with writing the book and then now that people aren't East Asian, but they fit under this tent, how they feel about the book. Jeff, have you talked to academics about the book? I'm trying to think. I mean, I think most of the people I've talked to who are academics find the book to be a refreshing way to tackle a period of history that has not really been covered in any substance at all, right? I haven't heard anyone coming at us and say, oh, this is too thin. This is not scholarly. This is what. I mean, or even challenging its inclusiveness in part because we up front want to make clear where those gaps are, where the thin parts of the narrative are. And as much as anything, try to invite people to find other ways of filling them, because they need to be filled. 500 pages is a long ass book, but it's nothing compared to what it could have, right? If we were really, truly as substantive as we could have been. But I don't think that's quite what was needed or what we intended, right? When we look at the book, I will say, all right, it is phenomenal. We wouldn't collecting these pictures. It is phenomenal to see some people reading it so incredibly carefully, right? They're annotating pages. Oh. We have people with people coming up to signings holding up books where there are tabs all around the book. In different colors and with notes on them or anything, where people are literally having revelations on pages and just making sure they can bookmark them for later, physically in the book. I love that. I feel like it's the most rewarding thing to see that people have so much connection to things in the book that they not only want to remember them. They actually have things to share about them, right? And then we also are seeing a lot of people talking about reading it with their kids, their teenage kids, or even younger kids, because for them it allows them to talk about peers in their life that maybe their own kids might never have imagined they went through themselves. So that shared conversation has been just incredibly powerful. Yeah. If there's anything that we were aiming at, it was that. It was that ability to spark conversations among people and spark reflections among people. We're never going to be exhaustively academic and scholarly complete and all that stuff. That's not the intent. But having those experiences more than covers it for us. Yeah, I think that the book is even in its 500 pages like we say this often like every single piece, every subject we tackle is worthy of its own book length exploration. We really are just kind of just dipping our toe in a lot of these areas and if reading the book inspires people to do further research and create more stuff like write more like creating books, documentaries, whatever about these subjects. Honestly, you could take most things in here and you can spin a narrative and create a new movie or something like that on a lot of these topics. That would be awesome, right? So we were the first ones to acknowledge there's no way we could capture this in the original 300 page plan or even the 500 page plan. And the other thing that we did say to answer your second question, we said from the outset and we said it in our internal planning meetings and we said it even outwardly in the first piece where we're like, we know that we can not cover everything, we know that our three perspectives come from very specific place. And we know that specific place sometimes is the one that edges out other communities within this large unwieldy umbrella of Asian America. We know all this. We're gonna try our best and I think we did try our best with blind spots, obviously accounted for, I think. So we actually have anybody who comes at us with that kind of like, how could you forget this or how could you do that? I'll be the first one to like, you know what? I mean, if you knew the way we made this book, like obviously some things were just gonna let out, like forgotten or on the cutting floor or just completely just like, wow, we did not see that. So I am willing to accept all criticisms of the book, the fair ones about why did you not include this because inevitably something was not going to be included, right? Yeah, that's the hardest thing. One of my recent guests was June millington of fanny. I was like, look, it's fanny's in here, right? And what I discovered was when I found out about fanny, which was only three months ago, okay?.

Philip Phil Jeff Asian America millington
"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:38 min | 6 months ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"And Rachel, to her credentials, look, I want to have, you know, next time you come to New York, I want to have breakfast to you. Let's talk this through. And I straight up said, we want to do this in a way that merits the topic that is as big as the topic to us. We want this to feel like a big book. We want this to look like a big book. We want this to sell like a big but ultimately. And we're looking for somebody who believes in it enough that they can go out there and shop it that way. Rachel's like, I believe in it. And I believe in you. And she got on the phone with the other guys who fill up. She is smart. She has a sense of humor. She's not Asian, by the way. She's not Asian. But she understood the content. She understood the assignment, shall we say? She was fantastic. She is a fantastic. I kind of wonder if somehow you didn't have an Asian American editor. You know, it's not like you went out and picked one. How the process would have been different. We took meetings with other editors with other publishers. Okay. We did. And we had a couple of moments where I was like, I don't know what this guy. You know what I mean? Sure. That's why I had to ask that. Yeah, I mean, there's a moment when you talk to someone, particularly if you're talking to someone who's not Asian and they say something that kind of gives away their cards. Like you're like a 100%. You know what I mean? And you're like, that's not, yeah, you're not, if you don't get this now, then you're not gonna get this, you know? And so we had a couple like that. I don't exactly remember what one of them said that made me go, like, no, I forget this, you know, let's get this meeting over with as soon as possible. Don't waste our time. I think I don't know. Yeah, no, there are a couple of things we had like that. One in particular, I believe, big house and probably would have made a very big bid on it if we hadn't. We basically got a preempt from Jenny, but which means like she said, take this offer and we'll take it off the table, right? Take it off the market. But this particular editor, I remember was like talking heavily about how important was going to be to cover the Asia side of things, right? Sort of like saying, oh, you know, I mean, those are important. Anime and it's like, yes, those are in the book, but they're like four pages or 5 pages. This is part of the story, right? And when we try to talk about the historical context and why it was that this was important almost like the biography of a community or an identity, they kind of glazed over. They wanted the pop culture side of it, but not the popular history inside of it. And that wasn't going to work for us. That would have been too lightweight for what you actually did. Thank God you guys stuck to your guts. I grew up before even you, Jeff, but I lived through these three too, right? And so I'm seeing names that I recognize, but I never put this together with that, or you're introducing players that was completely out of my circle, right? Maybe because they're not East Asian or what have you. And I felt like it's learning history, but in an engaging way. And I think if you would have, I'm just thinking that editor was thinking, oh, we'll have even more sales if we did them to buy it in Asia. And it's just like, yeah, I could see the logic of that. I understand that, but you're diluting our focus. This is not what's motivating us to capture. That idea of like, oh, this might be a good in Asia, this will be good to sell in Asia. Has been floated to us in different capacities as well. To me, I'm like, nope. That's not what we're trying to do. And if you understood this, you would know that that's not what we're trying to do actually. I think that even convincing people that Asian America as a concept, as a place, as a community, and as a history, even exists, has been a challenge, you know. And I hope that this book will advance sort of the idea that this is possible that this is even a thing, because all those conversations we had are evident that that was not the popular narrative. I believe that this book has done that. One of my former guests is a longtime professor at UCLA, and she's from Mainland China, and she was telling me she goes 500 Chinese scholars who are setting Asian American culture. Oh, wow. Right? She goes, oh yeah, we're all on, you know, whatever that Chinese version of Twitter is. She was like, oh, you know, you should sign up for that. Yeah, 'cause I think they would be interested in some of the stuff you guys are talking about, because as you got into it, she said, they are fascinated that people who have ancestors who came from China in this case have birthed this entirely distinct culture. So there are people out there and these are happy to be academics. I met a guy one time he was from Japan and he was a sushi chef at pretty high end restaurants here in LA and he started listening to my podcast or in the early days because he says, okay, I'm from Japan, but there's something else about Asian Americans. So where do I find that out? And so he started Googling stuff. I'm sure he found your show. You didn't have they call us Bruce at the time. And he's just like, I can't get enough of this because I'm not from here. I can see the distinctiveness and I'm intrigued, but I don't know how to understand it. I don't know how to put together. And so to me, that's what you honored in.

Rachel Asia Asian America New York Jenny Jeff China UCLA Mainland Japan Twitter LA Bruce
"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:57 min | 6 months ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Then also she's like considerably younger than the three of us or at least younger than me and Jeff. And so she was a very vital voice. In addition to being a woman and Southeast Asian and of a certain generation, she would also be able to suggest people like, you know, you guys, maybe you should think about writing something about this or including a piece about this or including this voice. I think that would be really good for this piece that you're working on. I mean, invaluable. The whole vibe of this book is collaboration. Bringing a lot of things together. And so she was immensely invaluable in that respect as well. Yeah, and the thing is, we didn't even know sometimes what we had, right? Because Jess would just sort of offhandedly in our chats or in our Zoom meetings, say, well, you know what? You should probably reach out to blankety blank, right? And we're like, oh yeah, that sounds a good idea. And then we'd be so swamped. We wouldn't follow up on it. So, you know, actually somebody that Jess, you know what, I think I can actually get you in touch with this gymnast. She's going to go to the Olympics, I think. Her name is Nisa Lee. And we're like, oh, her, yeah. That sounds, we were like, yeah, that sounds cool. And she's not East Asian. And then we, and then we promptly forgot about it, honestly. And then it didn't make it into the book. It didn't make in the book. And she wasn't sure either, right? It was like a sort of, but she pointed out that sunisa would be a great interview and we totally agreed. But at that point it was like almost like the 11th hour for us, right? We were absolutely in a death march to just close the book. Not even finish the book. Look, I think everything that was suggested even at that 11th hour was good and important. But I literally dreaded opening up texts and seeing Philip, who is not here so I can say that. You know, guys, we can not publish this book unless you include X and I'm like, what do you mean? We have to ship this in the month. It's like, no, we have to include this or the book is basically garbage. Oh. No, I'm inventing those. Yeah, you know, it's like, it's essential. And he was right. I mean, it was like gaming. We had an importuning in the mix. But you know, it's like, we kept on stumbling over things that we know we needed to include. And some we got in, some we couldn't was just too hard, especially at a late hour to do. But then they pride the draft from our hands. It became like hourly check, it's like, hey, are you guys doing with it? Guys. We had, by the way, we had the best editor, Jenny shoe, and Harper Collins. I mean, like oh my God, yeah. She, from the outset, like, this is a story about the people behind the story that really make things happen, right? I think that something like, you'll hear the story about how Crazy Rich Asians got made, and it was because it was a confluence of people in the studio and the directors you could read the story. But it wasn't just like this great book, or it wasn't just a star, you know, it was all these things coming together at this moment that made it right for this movie to happen right now, that bus up and everything. For us, it was the story of our editor at our publisher at the time, helped him live in harcourt, which later became bought by Harper Collins. Jenny shoe, she got our proposal and she fought for this book. She was clearly saw something in it. Her also being Asian American, she saw what we were trying to do even more than we did actually. And so she helped usher this book, you know, their offer was competitive. We were like, we felt good about it. I mean, the whole process was very smooth. Our agent was like, you know, you guys kind of really, really lucked out with your editor, because this is kind of a dream scenario. And so it really is, you have to also have, it's not enough for us three to be the authors and go through this process. You have to have the people behind the scenes who are fighting for you and have also shared that vision. I want to shout out Rachel too. Rachel Vogel, who is our agent. Before we went shopping with this thing, we went out and looked for an agent for the idea. And it was nothing at the time. We didn't have a proposal. We just had a general sense. We kind of want to do this book. I literally threw it on Twitter because my old agent since my last book had actually retired. So I needed a new age of myself anyway. And so I was like, hey, anybody interested in aging us. And when I said us, it's like it's going to be me. It's going to be Phil use. We fill up one. Here's we are. You know who we are more or less. If you don't know who we are, you would not care. So just ignore this. And we actually got obviously a lot of people reaching out. But then when we described the book, it's like, the book we want to do is going to look at these last three decades of Asian America, and we want to do it in kind of a visual way, telling this journey from invisibility to a place where we're kind of standing at this edge of the spotlight, right? So many people, most of them, Asian American, were like, oh, that's a really important thing. I don't know, it feels a little niche. There's so much skepticism from people saying, not so much that it wasn't publishable, because it was clearly, right? But they saw it as like, oh, it could be kind of academic, couldn't it? It's like, no, no, no, that's not what we're thinking of. It's like, or wouldn't this be better as like a set of memoirs from the three of you? Like if you wanted to actually tell this as like your own autobiographies, like that's not what we're trying to do. We'll include some perspective here. But this really is about the community itself. And we think it's needed, and we think especially in the world that we're in right now, because we're selling this right into the teeth of COVID almost, right? Yeah. That we need to uplift and celebrate what we.

Jenny shoe Nisa Lee Jess sunisa Harper Collins Jeff Olympics Rachel Vogel Philip harcourt Asian America Rachel Phil Twitter
"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:17 min | 6 months ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"All these interviews and stuff that the pandemic kind of make it easier because people kind of used to doing zoom. You know things, do you think it would have been any different if you were actually able to pull off in person, but then that assumes people can all get to you? Yeah, I think the slimmest silver lining of the pandemic was that a, the three of us authors and our project manager Jess vu, we were ourselves sort of isolated under locked out and so we could concentrate some time working on this book and B, the people we reached out to interview, there was a good chance that they too were also at home and kind of like, you know, like board out of their minds. I won't say that more, but talk to you. I don't say they're bored, but they were much more like, you know, willing and able to just sit in front of a computer and then talk to talk to some folks about this book that that's the other thing though, like you have to convince people that what we're doing is serious, it is like a real, we're not just some cranks, we're coming, you know, and obviously we come with our own reputations, so that was also like a 100%. That was definitely an open doors for us. But even then, people were like, hey, we're going to write a book. And trying to describe it to somebody, you know, it's hard to describe what this book ended up being, you know what I mean? So I give a lot of credit to our subjects and the people we interviewed because they also kind of bought into the vision. Yeah, I mean, man, when you actually try to create something as ambitious, I guess, as a relief map of 30 years of history. You're going to need a lot of help, right? And I mean, we talk a lot about how at the very outset of this, we recognize that even though we had perspectives, we had ringside seats for a lot of the biggest changes that were occurring these decades, that our vision was still limited by who we were. I mean, literally our POVs, three East Asian guys, of certain ages, all of us coming from a certain kind of experience. We knew that that was not going to be enough to tell the story, even though the story in some ways is a story about a lot of people who did share some of the same journeys, certain regards, right? And we can talk more about that as well. So we actively reached out to people who we knew could tell their own stories and the stories of people around them in their communities better than we ever could. And again, that's part of the reason why the book is 500 pages, because they all came and said, oh, yeah, I'll absolutely write that piece. But you know what, you need to do these three other pieces too. So everybody came with ideas. But it's important because books like this are like stone soup, you know? You start with this rock and then everybody else brings the carrots and potatoes and onions and chicken feet and whatever rolls goes in there. So yeah, I think that that was one of the great benefits of doing this during the pandemic as well in that I will say that even though it was hard to stay in touch with people just on a daily basis, having this book actually gave me gave us an excuse to recreate communities that I think in many cases we hadn't been connected to for years, right? We actually forged this like, I don't know, this network within a network in order to create this book. One of the unexpected hilarious parts that you guys went into on your podcast and was on the eve of the book launch. Was your brilliant idea to get a transcription of these interviews and then what you actually had to work with? Could you tell that story? Are you talking about just generally like yeah, the process of machine translating. Honestly, without that technology, we could not have done this book, right? Because we were talking about sometimes two, three hour long conversations with multiple multiple people. But the problem is the technology is limited in certain ways. So to be kind to be kind. I was just thinking about how one of the challenging things of this just giant text transcript of an interview is that it's really hard to distinguish voices when you have multiple participants, right? Of course, after we have done most of the transcription using a hybrid of using the bulk text and then us going through and editing it, Jeff finds something in the transcription service like, hey, what is this button do? And it's a feature that helps you distinguish and separate out between participants in the transcript, more like, oh, that would have been nice to know. Yes, although, I will say this. It's not designed to actually identify voices for you. It's not going to be like, oh, that's sung Kang. All it says is this is a person and this is a different person, right? It won't even necessarily say that. This is the same person as the person before. It just would break it out into chunks that were more semantically like, oh, these are separate people. So at least you can go back and listen to the tape and say, oh yeah, so that's the person who was talking. But we kind of ended up doing that anyway because or I will suggest it a lot of it. One of Jess vuz our project managers and kind of fourth collaborator. Her superpower was being able to just take these masses of text and long form audio recordings and somehow like overnight convert them through sheer willpower and word butchery. Into a pile of fillets that we could then use to fry up a two page piece or something. And, you know, again, I'm too precious about words in general, right? Like, it's really hard for me to write short. Everything's long, and then I have to kill myself to cut it down. So having somebody who's ruthless in chopping is very useful. The butcher, Jess. The butcher. Since we're talking about Jess and talking about that superpowers, her other superpowers is that she's way connected and then also she's like considerably younger than the three of us or at least younger than me and Jeff. And so she was a very vital voice..

Jess vu Kang Jess Jeff
"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:48 min | 6 months ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Started. Rise is the love letter two by and four Asian Americans of vivid scrapbook of voices, emotions, and memories, and a way to preserve both the headlines and the intimate conversations that have shaped our community into who we are today. And this was put together by Phil, Jeff Yang, and Philip Wong, and I am happy that at least I have two out of the three of the three musketeers here tonight. Phil and Jeff, welcome to my podcast. Thank you. Good to be here, Ken. Now, you know, I thought twice about inviting you guys during probably the busiest month of the year for pop culture mavens that you are. But I was thinking, hey, but they also introduced this book that's all about AAPI culture. So this is the month that people got to know about the work that you have done. First of all, huge salute. This is an enormous accomplishment. Thank you. Thank you. Thanks. Apologies for numbing your legs and your lap. With the sheer weight of the book. It is a tome. It is. And the thing is, it's like, we didn't really intend for it to be that big. It's certainly not the way we'd proposed it, but these are things that grow with the telling, right? It's like the more we found the more we realized we had to include the more we included, the more we found. So yeah, it was rough. It was supposed to be 300. I mean, it really was supposed to be 300 pages max. And then double spaced. Become a thing where we were like coming back to our editor. I think we need to add this. We need to have this and then balloon to almost now what is almost 500. So all of this begs the question, that first concept of 300 pages, were you actually being realistic that you could fit everything that maybe you hadn't put it all on a spreadsheet yet. What do you think, oh, we're going to talk about three decades of the growth of Asian American culture. Yeah, we can do a 300 pages. Was that really naive of you or I mean, in retrospect, maybe. But at the time, it barely you thought it was workable. 300 seemed like a lot, right? It did seem like and I knew we could fill it. I just didn't know that in the telling and all the stuff we were writing and the interviews we did were like, it is really, we can not condense this. Interviews that would last like ten pages, and we'd have to cut it down to two or three. Honestly, and then it just didn't seem fair, you know, but even that was as we added more stuff and realized like, oh, we have a blind spot about this particular topic. We should add this. And then we've got to go back more pages, you know? Yeah. Yeah. Look, I mean, 300 pages, ten pages per year, 30 years. Oh, okay. Seemed about right. No, I mean, obviously, I'm being facetious. Yeah, yeah. I think that originally when we thought about this book, I will say that the way it's organized right now is it's three. Well, it's 5 chapters, actually, right? So that's part of the reason why it's longer than we expected. But the three middle chapters, each focus on a decade, and then there's a chapter bookend chapters, one that's called before and one called beyond, right? But then each of those middle chapters was supposed to be kind of individually curated more or less by each of us. So I came up with the oldest. In the 1990s, Phil in the 2000s and Philip mostly in the 2010s, and even when Philip says, like, I didn't even know what I was getting into when I got it because it was like, you know, I had originally told him. It's like, oh, don't worry about it. We're really going to be leaning on you to think about the 2010s. And just sort of curate the stuff that's going to be in there. And yeah, write a little introduction just for sharing your story. Under those terms, 300 pages can be reasonable, right? I mean, it was going to be more of us basically telling our stories and then a bunch of listicles. Something literally, I think, when you and I were first talking about it, it's like, something like that, right? But I think that's the ambitions of the book got bigger, even as the sense of responsibility for what we're doing got larger. Did you imagine that the outset there was going to be graphic novel? I'm turning to different section. I'm just surprised, this part folds out. And so it's not like reading through the farmer's almanac. There are graphical different artists that you've secured to do all this amazing original artwork. It's not boring. I think that's a rave. It's not boring, it's like Ken fong. Put that on the cover, guys. Yeah. Yeah. I think it was always our intention for it to be kind of a multi format. Wow. Lots of different kinds of ways to tell this story because I just felt like we were just not going to. If it was going to be like a straight prose book, I would have done it. And I can't, I said this a lot in the beginning. I was like, I don't know if I can write a lot about one thing, but I can write a little bit about a lot of things, you know, and that felt like an easier way to approach this. And the thing that got me excited about it was being able to tell it in different ways and like funny graphs and humorous lists and because these are the ways that I categorize and organize my thoughts about Asian America in a lot of ways, right? Coming up with a running list of people we quote undercover Asians and that kind of playlist of the decade. Yeah. And that's the thing. Like all this stuff actually is out there. If you do enough research on the Internet or just had enough conversations about it, it's all out there, we were just kind of organizing it under one tome, I think, is what we were trying to do. I mean, I agreed to a certain extent in the sense that the basic information of all the stuff is out there somewhere. But I do think that even in the original iteration of what this book might have been, this was going to be a book with opinions and perspectives, right? I mean, it was going to be seen through the eyes of the three of us. And all the people we've pulled in to contribute to the book. This is not encyclopedia. This is not like objective remote writing about stuff that people, again, can look up on whatever. And Wikipedia or whatever. This was meant to be a first person experiential dive into these three decades that were so pivotal to us and we think to Asian America. So from that perspective, I mean, we wanted to feel like what we felt. We wanted people to feel like they were swimming through these decades. And the visualized part of it, the graphical essays, charts and pull out maps and fold out annotated illustrations, it was all kind of part of getting it to be immersive, you know? I would say it's definitely an immersive experience. And I would take it one step further, guys. I would say, I think what's genius about how you put it together, it's not just describing those decades and the culture, it's actually giving us an experience of the culture. Which, you know, most of the time, you don't expect that from a book that's describing something, but by going through the book by working through the material in there, and even the different voices that you guys picked, it was refreshing, it was like, oh, I've heard of that first. Oh, I'd love to hear their perspective on this, or I'm at that place where you got the four Asian actors who played in the joy luck club. All the friends, right? It's just like, oh, yeah, that's intriguing. You were doing this though during the pandemic, weren't you?.

Jeff Yang Philip Wong Phil Asian America Philip Ken fong Ken Jeff swimming joy luck club
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

03:09 min | 8 months ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Hello and welcome to another edition of Nick, Alice Bruce, an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America. I'm Phil you. And I'm Jeff Yang, but I'm really excited. I feel a little bit like that's been my mode now for the last couple of episodes we've been doing because we're talking about our favorite film of the year with some of our favorite people from that favorite film. And that is everything everywhere all at once. Today, in particular, we have one of the directors. One of Daniel's, as it were, Daniel Kwan, with us. And we have the star, one of the stars of the show. Somebody who wanted to talk to for a while, Stephanie, Sue. On board, joy, welcome, welcome to the show. Be here. Very excited to talk to you guys. I'm a little, I have a little secret since you probably will edit this together. My last name is actually pronounced shoe. It is my, it is my deep mission to start the shoe revelation revolution. It's an ongoing, it's an ongoing thing in which people correct Jeff on how to pronounce people. I might add, by the way. Like we were in an Asian space..

Alice Bruce Asian America Jeff Yang Daniel Kwan Nick Phil Daniel Stephanie Sue Jeff
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

03:36 min | 10 months ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Hello, I'm Phil eu, and I'm the host of all the Asians on Star Trek. The podcast in which I interview all the Asians on Star Trek. I'm talking to actors, writers, directors, stunt people, background extras. You know, all the Asians on Star Trek. Find out more at all the Asians on Star Trek dot com. Part of the potluck podcast collection. Live long and prosper. And we're back, all right, on this second part of they call us Bruce. This is where we do our favorite segment. Our signature segment, the good, the bad and the WTF. Jeff Yang, as is our custom, would you please lay down the rules of engagement? I will. This, of course, our roundtable format segment in which we serve a single topic three ways. The first way, the first round is the good, the positive the warm, the fuzzy part of that topic. And then the bad, the negative, the frustrating the challenging the difficulty ugly part of the thing. And then finally, the WTF, which doesn't have to be good or bad. It could be both if we neither, but mostly it's the thing you're still sort of puzzling over. The thing that you're still like, did that happen? And of course, we always use a topic that's aligned with our guests. And obviously, it makes a 100% sense for us to do the good, the bad, and the WTF of making the fabulous Filipino brothers. So Dante Basco, will you actually tell us round one? What the good of making this movie was all about? The good is family. Like being able to actually work with your family and it being a really pleasurable and amazing experience and not just my brothers, my parents play my parents in the movie. I mean, I went back to my hometown and literally I feel the town hall, the association with me and my brothers grew up doing our first performances ever with all my uncles and aunts and my extended uncles and aunts and cousins. And it was like, every day kind of got emotional cathartic with people just coming and supporting and it really, I don't know, there's like these crazy moments where my uncles would come to the set in the middle of the night when.

Phil eu Jeff Yang WTF Dante Basco Bruce
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"And you can catch video versions of marvel makeup on our YouTube channel. So please rate review and subscribe. And please give us 5 stars so our Asian moms will understand why we buy so much electronic equipment. Because it's for this podcast, marvel and makeup. And we're back. All right, on this second half of the call is Bruce, this is where we do our favorite segment. Our signature segment, the good, the bad and the WTF. Jeff Yang, would you please lay down the rules of engagement? I will. This is, of course, our three ring circus of a segment. Where we take a single topic and slices and dice it and serve it up three different ways. This of course begins with the good. You know, the positive side of whatever we're talking about, followed by a helping of the bad. The frustrating negative enraging, perhaps aspect of it. And then finally, the WTF, which doesn't have to be either good or bad. It could just be puzzling. You know, something you're still thinking about. And as always, we try to pick something that our guest and maybe we can talk about with a lot of relevance. And so we thought we'd actually do a little bit of a curveball here. And do the good, the bad and the WTF of being the good Asian. Not just about the book, although certainly we encourage you to talk about examples from the good Asian, or examples from your own personal perspective and experience. And we'll join in. So porn site because you are a guest. We're going to talk about how to first. So let us let us hear from your perspective, what is the good of being the good Asian? Go ahead. Yeah. I was just going to say, I think that one thing that really is interesting is that, again, I haven't neither of us have seen the full story yet until you actually release it to the world. But you do have this example of Terence Chang, who is sort of the perfect Asian, right? And he's set up as kind of this potential counterweight slash nemesis slash something. It's not even clear in the first few issues. But it's very clear that the protagonist kind of hates the hell out of him. In some ways, just 'cause he's so perfect. Yeah. We also have a Terence Chang in our lives. Yeah, exactly. Exactly. Come on guys..

Jeff Yang WTF YouTube Bruce Terence Chang
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

06:38 min | 1 year ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Reaction and all of my film communities is how much this didn't need to happen. This shouldn't ever have happened. That there was such an extreme breakdown of safety that had to be to allow it because even our very most basic safety procedures that are absolutely a 100% standard on film sets would have prevented it. And so it's so angering to know that this was so avoidable and so preventable. And almost any film set that you're ever going to be on ever, this would never have happened. I just want to I just wanted to note that I know that people don't always necessarily write what they know, but in your case, you kind of do in the sense that the so the series I think your best known for is the castle Russell series, which is actually it's near science fiction, but it stars a woman who is both a firearms expert and a mathematician. When I was writing this book, I was living in Los Angeles, you know, and I was working as an armor, very regularly. And people, my friends knew I was working on a book, and they would ask me what it was about. And I would say. Math and guns. And they would look at me and they would always just laugh and say, only you. Only you. Well, you know, it's unique and it's at least rare, I think that one is able to kind of take one's passions and pursuits and put them all together that way. Oh, thank you. But you know what? I always appreciate it when people, you know, because it is about math as a superpower, basically my anti urine can use her mathematics to basically break through armies if she wants to. And people who are not into math will come up to me as signings and stuff and I was like, oh my gosh. And they always sound a little embarrassed and they apologize. I'm so sorry. I hate math. I love your book. You know what, that's the greatest compliment. I hate math, but I loved your book, like how much better can you get? So I just saw that you don't have to apologize, you know? It's totally fine. At one layer to that, I'm like, I'm patient, but I hate math, but I loved your book. I love it. I absolutely love it. Yeah. Yeah, you know, I was trying to share the joy that I get in mathematics, you know, in a way. And a bit of an action roll ride kind of fiction for people. And so it is definitely the type of book that I would write with my experiences. But I will add that my main character is not based on me or any of her gun safety is absolutely not what I would espouse ever. She gets home after by the other character. She's an antihero. She's not really a good guy, so she's going to get that out there. But you would know. I mean, you would know. As we know, yeah. I feel like we're talking very seriously about gun safety, right? So I feel like I have to say that. But I do try to call her after that. So just for reference, that's the cast Russell series. And those books are zero sum game, null set and critical point. So this is a good time for us to take a break. But when we return, we'll do our favorite segment. The good, the bad and the WTF with SL one. So stick around, we'll be right back. Hello, I'm fill you, and I'm the host of all the Asians on Star Trek. The podcast in which I interview all the Asians on Star Trek. I'm talking to actors, writers, directors, stunt people, background extras. You know, all the Asians on Star Trek. Find out more at all the Asians on Star Trek. Part of the potluck podcast collection live long and prosper. And we're back, all right, on the second half of the call is Bruce. This is where we do our favorite segment. Our signature segment, the good, the bad and the WTF. Jeff Yang, as is our custom, would you please lay down the rules of engagement? Yes. Number one, safety first. But beyond that, the rules of engagement for this are roundtable segment of the show are pretty straightforward. We go around three times with our guests who will share with us first. The good, the positive of a particular topic, the second, the bad, the frustrating, the negative, the awful of that particular subject. And then finally, the WTF. But WTF again doesn't have to be good or bad. It could just be something you're still puzzling over after all this time. And as what we usually do, we try to make the topic something that our guest actually is expert in, or very familiar with. In this case, we actually wanted to ask you the good, the bad and the WTF of being a Hollywood film armorer, I know that's just one of your hats, but that's the one we're talking about most here. No, it's all good. It's a very, very relevant right now, and I'm happy to talk about it. So let's start with the good. All right. I would say one of the things I love most about working in movies and this is in particular, particularly true, I think, for work in firearms and movies is that it is never boring. It's never the same. You know, which is it's good. It's actually both good and can be quite difficult because every shoot is different every director wants different things and is looking to make a different movie. So we really have to, you know, I mentioned earlier how long I trained to be able to do this job. And another aspect of the profession is to help the director get these shots and to do it in a safe manner. So not only do I have to know about firearms, I have to know about building. And I have to know all the tricks.

WTF Jeff Yang Los Angeles Russell Bruce Hollywood
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"And we're back, all right, on the second half of they call us Bruce. This is where we do our favorite segment. Our signature segment, the good, the bad and the WTF. Jeff Yang, we do, please lay down the rules of engagements. I shall. So this is, of course, our round table segment where we ask our guest or guests to share a little about a single topic three different ways. The first is the positive aspect of it, the good, right? The second is the negative, challenging, frustrating part of it. The bad. And then finally, the part that's still leads you to wonder a little bit. The WTF. And of course cat as our guest. We've got you in the hot seat. So we would like you to talk about the good, the band and WTF of seeing ghosts. And again, that could be interpreted in many ways, both the title of your book and the process of writing it, but also kind of curious about any figurative or literal encounters you might have had with. Oh my gosh. This is so funny to me because yeah, I am a scaredy cat. You know, literally. Of course. As a kid, I was so afraid of ghosts. I was so afraid of all of these things that I'm honestly still afraid of. I'm not the type of person who would ever want to go on a haunted house tour. So anyway, though, writing this book, seeing ghosts was so good in a way that it really connected me to myself and it connected to me to these ideas of ancestor worship and Jeff like what you were saying before how when we grieve someone, they sort of just remain with us, you know, through their memories. And I found that really good and profound. You know? Yeah. That is fantastic. And so, you know, maybe we can actually talk about ghosts here without actually invoking them. But let's start it off. Let's kick off with the good of seeing ghosts. What to you was the good, the good of. The good, the good of it was it really brought me closer to my family and a lot of ways where we had to talk about things that we never would have talked about before. And to, you know, my mom for a long time was like a bad word. And speaking her name was so painful. And really getting to know her origin story and know my father's. And understand also how my sisters thought of our parents and how my aunt and my uncle and other people in our family saw my mom's passing. It was just it was really enlightening as someone who grew up in a household of silence around these topics and a household of silence in general. And I mean, that doesn't mean that it's still easy right now or it's so easy right now in my family to talk about these things. But it opened a window in a way. And I really appreciated that. You know, it was something that really did resonate throughout the feeling that the way that you were telling the story and even one kind of central revelatory beat within that story that involves your uncle. And your mom's other siblings felt a lot like aspects of the farewell. Lulu Wang's movie in the sense that there are things that people just don't talk about in our families, not because and sometimes not because we are afraid of talking about those topics, but sometimes because we're afraid of that bringing them up will bring ghosts into our lives..

Jeff Yang WTF Bruce Jeff Lulu Wang
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Hello and welcome to another dish. They call us bruce. An unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asian america. I feel you. And i'm jeff yang and once again we have a fantastic guest on this episode. Somebody who's an old friend of ours over the podcast. And who has just evolved into one of those interesting attorneys filmmakers creators actors writers in the business of asian american filmmaking and that is justin chon who has a new film coming out blue by you which we have seen and i'm just so deeply my feels. I just. I q much to talk about that. I can almost like talk Welcome welcome to the show. Welcome thanks guys. Thanks is so great evac back on with you guys. You know. I just first off. I want to say that this has been some kind of a ride for asian americans. You know There was a time when felt like we couldn't tell any story is truly not them the way we wanted them to and when we did they had to be a certain kind of story over just the last a three four years. We started more idiosyncratic and yet really masterful new kinds of of narrative exploring explaining and just giving experiences around very different ways of being asian american and blue by us is right up there In in that world of like the minorities so just wanted to give you props for that and maybe ask bit. What the origin story in some ways of of this film. Was you know what i mean. You know Being asian american we all know. Adopt these you know it's I'm sure we all know that. Adoption originated the idea of international. Adoption originated in south korea after the korean war. And you know the whole family went there and the kids off the streets or whatever the case that needed families place a nice christian families in the united states and over the years become a big business in and you can't tell an asian narrative that's inclusive without including that storyline Without including that experience in this in this country So you know i. I'm friends quite a few adoptees and and I've grown up with few. And i started hearing that this was taking place at adopted. These were being imported in. I thought it was absolutely shocking..

jeff yang justin chon bruce united states south korea
They Call Us Justin Chon

They Call Us Bruce

02:29 min | 1 year ago

They Call Us Justin Chon

"Hello and welcome to another dish. They call us bruce. An unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asian america. I feel you. And i'm jeff yang and once again we have a fantastic guest on this episode. Somebody who's an old friend of ours over the podcast. And who has just evolved into one of those interesting attorneys filmmakers creators actors writers in the business of asian american filmmaking and that is justin chon who has a new film coming out blue by you which we have seen and i'm just so deeply my feels. I just. I q much to talk about that. I can almost like talk Welcome welcome to the show. Welcome thanks guys. Thanks is so great evac back on with you guys. You know. I just first off. I want to say that this has been some kind of a ride for asian americans. You know There was a time when felt like we couldn't tell any story is truly not them the way we wanted them to and when we did they had to be a certain kind of story over just the last a three four years. We started more idiosyncratic and yet really masterful new kinds of of narrative exploring explaining and just giving experiences around very different ways of being asian american and blue by us is right up there In in that world of like the minorities so just wanted to give you props for that and maybe ask bit. What the origin story in some ways of of this film. Was you know what i mean. You know Being asian american we all know. Adopt these you know it's I'm sure we all know that. Adoption originated the idea of international. Adoption originated in south korea after the korean war. And you know the whole family went there and the kids off the streets or whatever the case that needed families place a nice christian families in the united states and over the years become a big business in and you can't tell an asian narrative that's inclusive without including that storyline Without including that experience in this in this country So you know i. I'm friends quite a few adoptees and and I've grown up with few. And i started hearing that this was taking place at adopted. These were being imported in. I thought it was absolutely shocking.

Jeff Yang Justin Chon Bruce United States South Korea
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Dot com or on your podcast. Didn't todd and we're back all right on this second half. They call bruce. This is where we do our signature segment our favorite segment. The good the bad and the wto. Jeff jeff yang. Would you please down the rules of engagement. And i shall so this part of our show you can think of. This is a little bit of a competition. perhaps not really We we are going to be asking our three guests slash shot contestants to share with us their thoughts any particular topic in three different rounds the first being the good the positive the happy fulfilling of the thing. And then the bad. The frustrating the disillusioning enraging aspect of that thing. And then finally w t.f right Nwf doesn't have to good or bad. It could be just puzzling. The thing are still turning over your head. Rotisserie style After that Particularly thing has gone by and we are going to do the good. The bad not f- of competing on the great food truck race. So let's let's start with. Let's ted and then we'll go to young and then we'll go to haunt for the first round. What is the good..

Jeff jeff yang todd bruce ted
They Call Us Seoul Sausage

They Call Us Bruce

02:23 min | 1 year ago

They Call Us Seoul Sausage

"Hello and welcome to another edition of call us bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asia. America i'm phil you and i'm jeff yang and we are here with some very special guests fresh from reality television and maybe a window serving delicious food near you. We're talking here to ted. Kim yong kim and on one of seoul sausage who competed just now in the great food truck race all-stars season and we'll talk a little bit about that finale which just happened What it was like being on on the all stars of this competition whereas like winning season three of that competition and just in general what. It's like to be trying to sell sausage or things other than sausage in a pretty rough environment for selling any kind of stuff right now. Welcome to the show guys It's so good to have you guys here as you guys know. I've been a fan and a supporter of sociologist Since before day one. I think yeah i knew guys before you guys didn't started in was a huge fan of season three and everything you've done of course have been a big consumer of your your wears a since then fan of your sausages know. I was wondering maybe we could start by. Maybe talking about 'cause 'cause when you guys compete in season three this season that you won you guys had never actually run as a food truck before and i'm kind of wondering like and we still don't know how to do can't jump into that like i i. I do starting this venture even before the food truck race. But what was the impetus to get started. Where you up the short story version or the long version cast on the show and you know We want a food. Truck aussies three so. It was never part of our plans. But here we are. You know We open our store and we have a truck and a and a store at the same time. So yeah that's how we started

Jeff Yang Kim Yong Kim Bruce Phil TED Asia America
HEADLINE CAPITALIZATION  NTSB Releases Preliminary Report on Fatal Tesla Crash Capitalize Words With Four or More Letters (Associated Press style) Capitalize Words with Five or More Letters (APA Style) Do Not Capitalize Words Based on Length (Chicago Manual of Style) Capitalize Major Words and Those With Four or More Letters (MLA Style) You are likely here because you need a headline checker to make sure your title and headlines are properly written. That's exactly what Headline Capitalization does. It's a free tool to make sure what you capitalize online for publications like blogs and news articles, or for academic papers, is correct. This headline checker should help you to correctly format all your titles in the future. It's important to accurately capitalize titles and headlines for articles and papers. Headline Capitalization is a free headline checker that correctly capitalizes titles for all your writing. Article Title and Headline Capitalization Rules When it comes to creating headlines and titles for articles, it can get confusing what words to capitalize and what words should remain lower case. There are several styles of title and headline capitalization which different publications may use. For the most part, there are general rules that all publications follow with a few minor deviations between them. For those who write, it's important to understand these rules about which words to capitalize when creating headlines and titles. Major Headline Capitalization Styles There are four major title capitalization styles. These are: AP Style APA Style Chicago Style MLA Style There is no single authoritative style guide when it comes to capitalizing headlines and titles, although some are used for certain types of writing. For example, the Associated Press Stylebook (AP Style) is often used by news organizations, the Chicago Manual of Style (Chicago Style) is more comprehensive for in-depth writing, and the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (MLA style) is used for academic papers. While this is where the different styles are usually used, it's not mandatory to use a particular style for a particular type of writing. If you are unsure of which style to use, the best method is to seek out which style the course, editor, or teacher prefers so that you know, and then use that specific style. If you're in a certain field, you should learn the style that's most prominent in your field. For example, the AP Style for those in journalism, and the MLA style if you're in academics. In all cases, it's best to ask for each project to make sure since each style has its own rules. General Headline Style Rule: Title Case How to write headlines and titles is usually referred to as "headline style" or "title case." As mentioned, all styles are not the same, but there are a few general rules they all follow. These are: Capitalize the first word in the title Capitalize the last word in the title Capitalize the important words in the title The first two points are clear cut and easy to follow. The next question is, what are considered "important" words in a headline? In most cases, they include the following words: Adjectives (beautiful, large, hopeful) Adverbs (forcefully, silently, hurriedly) Nouns (computer, table, manuscript) Pronouns (they, she, he) Subordinating conjunctions (as, so, that) Verbs (write, type, create) Words in Headlines That Aren't Capitalized The above words are the ones generally capitalized, so what words are usually written in lowercase when creating headlines and titles? These tend to be shorter words (under five letters long). The following types of words are generally not capitalized: Articles (a, an, the) Coordinating Conjunctions (and, but, for) Short (less than 5 letters) Prepositions (at, by, from) Alternative Headline Capitalization: Sentence Case One style of headline and title capitalization which doesn't follow the rules is Sentence Case style. This is where editors decide to write titles as if they were a typical sentence. In this case, the first word of the headline would be capitalized while the rest of the title would be in lower case, except for proper nouns. Below are a few examples of Sentence Case style headlines: How to properly write article titles A review of a hike at Grand Canyon national park The best value meal when eating at Chipotle Referencing Titles of Publications No matter what style of headline capitalization you decide to use in your writing, if you ever reference the title of a book, article, or journal, you should write the title of it as it has been written, even if it happens to be a different style than you're using for your writing. You should not change them to fit your style, and they should always be written as they appear in the publication. Copyright © Headline Capitalization 2021. All rights reserved.

Asian Enough

01:39 min | 1 year ago

HEADLINE CAPITALIZATION NTSB Releases Preliminary Report on Fatal Tesla Crash Capitalize Words With Four or More Letters (Associated Press style) Capitalize Words with Five or More Letters (APA Style) Do Not Capitalize Words Based on Length (Chicago Manual of Style) Capitalize Major Words and Those With Four or More Letters (MLA Style) You are likely here because you need a headline checker to make sure your title and headlines are properly written. That's exactly what Headline Capitalization does. It's a free tool to make sure what you capitalize online for publications like blogs and news articles, or for academic papers, is correct. This headline checker should help you to correctly format all your titles in the future. It's important to accurately capitalize titles and headlines for articles and papers. Headline Capitalization is a free headline checker that correctly capitalizes titles for all your writing. Article Title and Headline Capitalization Rules When it comes to creating headlines and titles for articles, it can get confusing what words to capitalize and what words should remain lower case. There are several styles of title and headline capitalization which different publications may use. For the most part, there are general rules that all publications follow with a few minor deviations between them. For those who write, it's important to understand these rules about which words to capitalize when creating headlines and titles. Major Headline Capitalization Styles There are four major title capitalization styles. These are: AP Style APA Style Chicago Style MLA Style There is no single authoritative style guide when it comes to capitalizing headlines and titles, although some are used for certain types of writing. For example, the Associated Press Stylebook (AP Style) is often used by news organizations, the Chicago Manual of Style (Chicago Style) is more comprehensive for in-depth writing, and the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (MLA style) is used for academic papers. While this is where the different styles are usually used, it's not mandatory to use a particular style for a particular type of writing. If you are unsure of which style to use, the best method is to seek out which style the course, editor, or teacher prefers so that you know, and then use that specific style. If you're in a certain field, you should learn the style that's most prominent in your field. For example, the AP Style for those in journalism, and the MLA style if you're in academics. In all cases, it's best to ask for each project to make sure since each style has its own rules. General Headline Style Rule: Title Case How to write headlines and titles is usually referred to as "headline style" or "title case." As mentioned, all styles are not the same, but there are a few general rules they all follow. These are: Capitalize the first word in the title Capitalize the last word in the title Capitalize the important words in the title The first two points are clear cut and easy to follow. The next question is, what are considered "important" words in a headline? In most cases, they include the following words: Adjectives (beautiful, large, hopeful) Adverbs (forcefully, silently, hurriedly) Nouns (computer, table, manuscript) Pronouns (they, she, he) Subordinating conjunctions (as, so, that) Verbs (write, type, create) Words in Headlines That Aren't Capitalized The above words are the ones generally capitalized, so what words are usually written in lowercase when creating headlines and titles? These tend to be shorter words (under five letters long). The following types of words are generally not capitalized: Articles (a, an, the) Coordinating Conjunctions (and, but, for) Short (less than 5 letters) Prepositions (at, by, from) Alternative Headline Capitalization: Sentence Case One style of headline and title capitalization which doesn't follow the rules is Sentence Case style. This is where editors decide to write titles as if they were a typical sentence. In this case, the first word of the headline would be capitalized while the rest of the title would be in lower case, except for proper nouns. Below are a few examples of Sentence Case style headlines: How to properly write article titles A review of a hike at Grand Canyon national park The best value meal when eating at Chipotle Referencing Titles of Publications No matter what style of headline capitalization you decide to use in your writing, if you ever reference the title of a book, article, or journal, you should write the title of it as it has been written, even if it happens to be a different style than you're using for your writing. You should not change them to fit your style, and they should always be written as they appear in the publication. Copyright © Headline Capitalization 2021. All rights reserved.

"Sandra thank you so much for joining us today itself. So good view. Oh jen tracy. It's a pleasure to be here. It goes without saying that. I'm usually the cheesiest one on this podcast. So i had to start this off by saying to one and all welcome to asian enough. The it's an honor just to be asian. I worry that. The t shirt. And i i could. I could tell from the font at the top the bottom of the screen. I know t shirt. You're wearing he. S how could. I not wear the shirt on a day that i get to talk to you. It's an honor just to be asian anton view. Let's say thank you jeff yang for picking that up and making tee shirt. That's right what's it like to see like your quote. It's not a destination and it's credited to sandra credited. it's a wonderful writers. I don't know if they were at that time on live. I think it was frank. Lesbian sudi green. Yes and i've been trying to kind of like give them credit for writing that line but unhappy because i understand what that line is and what it means and it pleases me greatly. That has become a t shirt. I remember someone my friend in canada. She sent me a picture because her her boys are really into basketball. And it was jeremy lin. Who had that does walking out the t shirt. And i'm like oh the something is happening with this t shirt and i think it's just a really nice very shorthand identifier of a moment where we could just step into the forefront to Claim pride for second you know and so i'm really really happy when i see anyone wearing the t shirt

Jen Tracy Jeff Yang Sudi Green Sandra Frank Jeremy Lin Basketball Canada
They Call Us Angry Asian Man

They Call Us Bruce

05:28 min | 1 year ago

They Call Us Angry Asian Man

"Hello and welcome to another edition of call us bruce an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asia america. I'm phil you. And i'm jeff yang and on this very special episode of they call cost bruce. We have well. We have a special guest special guest. Is you literally feel you because you're marking the twentieth anniversary of angry asian man the blog that kind of started all this stuff and ended up launching. I don't know maybe a a million people into the asian american digital space A million stories million posts and build a community of sorts that continues even now today and has extended itself with this. This podcast right here. Phil you welcome back to your own hottest f from the intro. Just couple of seconds ago. Yeah i mean it feels a little self-indulgent to dedicate our podcast to a observing the twenty th anniversary of the blog that i started but I figured twenty. If i'm going to do it anytime. It's got to be this twentieth anniversary. It's significant significant enough. And i didn't want it to just pass by doing nothing. So hey you know. I gotta record record episode anyway right through. This is just an easy way out really. But the fact is i mean. It's something i would have wanted to do to because obviously we would not have had become friends if it hadn't been for the fact that you created this blog and in a lot of ways picked up On the rubric in some ways the mantle of asian american media in in fashion from that sort of prior generation of media creators. Of which i was apart right. I mean you know back. When we first met i was i had been running magazine. A magazine inside asia america. It literally you know passed into the great beyond like ripe founding angry asian man and it just it felt good to see that these these stories these ideas and frankly these emotions were were still being put out there into the into the world do you. Do you remember when we first met ver. I first time we met like face to face the very first time. Damn i'm not sure actually i remember. I remember us meeting multiple times. I mean i was living in new york. The time right and i came out here a couple times various events. But i don't remember actually. The very first time we met was so the first time we met was was the launch of star tv molly. Well of course. I remember thirteen dirt. Tv was the Sort of asian-american magazine style. Show that you produced And you guys held a press conference sorts in san francisco right. Yeah so. I went over there on my lunch break. Actually i went to the. I got an invitation so i went and then that's where i met. That's where we met. I knew who you were and then like you remember when when we came up. You're that guy right and you're like yes in fact time that guy but you know it's funny 'cause yeah that was our first meeting and i do remember that now It was it was really an interesting errand some ways because i feel like there was this brief moment when the literally at that moment it felt like all these things are happening in asia america. We had like five asian american cable channels. That had all been lost the same time you know. Internet was big. Oh my god asian app you know all these things that were happening at once and then none of those things like literally. None of them are still around except for angry asian man. Let's be real right. The magazines are gonna you know. I and i think that the staying power twenty years a long time between anything you know but but you wait so you launch this. It was february thirteenth right. Very technically february fourteen thousand one well past midnight every team. That's right. yeah. Valentine's day in two thousand one and you've basically uninterrupted been running the black since then but when you actually i hit the keystroke to put this live what were you doing. What were you thinking like. Did you think that this was even going to be around this long. I mean obviously an absolutely not not in even any way like you know because I was angry. men was Kind of a subsection of a personal website. That i i put i put together This was around. The time of this is two thousand one so like i was hard coding in html uploading via ftp to you know like to this domain and And angry men was just kind of a section of that website which also had like my resume. Like all you know like random you put on a personal website back then right

Jeff Yang Bruce Asia America Asia Phil America American Magazine Molly San Francisco New York Valentine
They Call Us Bugs Bunny

They Call Us Bruce

04:42 min | 2 years ago

They Call Us Bugs Bunny

"Low end. Welcome to another edition of they. Call us bruce. An unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asia america which now includes bugs. Bunny what's up. Asian americans you and i'm jeff yang and i'm just going to be cracking up the whole time but here it is here we are. We have with us a very special guest. The man the voice the magic eric. Abou- za the new voice of bugs. Bunny has it going guys. Well this is my real voice. This is my asian canadian plane. Pundit salt voices pianos it just regular filipino bread voice. This is the one. That i think iraq customize wanna hear you know for repeat business in all i mean it's amazing how you can slip in and out of it. I mean that's what strikes me like as we were getting ready to record. I'm like oh my god and made me wonder like. Are you like this all the time. Like are people just cracking up around you time. I'm the fattest of my friends. Because i'm the one that makes all the jokes. No one makes me laugh. So i haven't had an an ab workout in like years. Everyone everyone benefits around me but me But that's that's my lot in life you know like i don't mind and i love i love making people laugh And you know thank you for first of all thank you for inviting me on your podcast and and your show and You know the last two weeks have been Insane as far as just wanting to talk you know suddenly paying attention. This show that. I've been on looney tunes cartoons. Has it premiered in march And only now it's like. I'm getting the attention but you know what else premiered march is covid. So that's exactly. Why only now. After a whole year of chasing covert stories. You know so tragic all like so much so much sadness so much like the news has been so heavy. And there's been very light hopeful inspiring moments with vis this pandemic You know just supporting our frontline workers in the current social climate that we're living in you know black lives matter and there's so much see i mean biden. Hello you know like and then all of a sudden this filipino kid from candidates. The voice of bugs bunny like what a way to end the year. Right like what a strange who held out on their bingo card. Nobody has no one. You know the scratch tickets like cherry cherry filipino. Voices bugs bunny damn but so as we're talking on the run up to this. I actually feel like it's remarkable that just in the last couple of years it it feels like we are finally starting to integrate childhood right. That is the voices not just adding diverse programming in the form of look. Let's put an asian kid in the back row you know. Let's let's add franklin to peanuts back when it was probably as that that attempted bussing in ended up being. We're actually starting to see these. Hallowed these hallowed i don't like institutions finally populated by by people who can bring a very different context but the same context to them. I mean obviously bugs. Bunny is a big one of them. I i would also point to blues clues right and yeah your your fellow filipino. north american stepped into that that arena as well I mean like let's let's Let's go back to our youths right. I'm i'm forty one now. And the first real exposure to seeing a face that was like mine and represented in mind. Film in movies was Short round and data from goonies. Jonathan kwan- it's crazy. I met him in toronto. And i was just like you don't understand man like you're you're my hero like you were and i think that goes for a lot of young asian boys and girls just to see like there's the there's the kid that's like me and the group of friends and that they bothered to include him in in you know even something like goonies. I know it was one movie but it was the best movie. It was like the only movie you really needed to see

Jeff Yang Bruce Asia Eric Iraq America Biden Jonathan Kwan Franklin Toronto
They Call Us House of Ho

They Call Us Bruce

05:19 min | 2 years ago

They Call Us House of Ho

"N welcome to another edition of they call the spruce not filter conversation about what's happening in eastern america and reality television and i'm jeff yang and as the ho- holidays approach. We are here. Yes yes yes because this is this a moment for plans. We are here to talk about the brand new reality tv. Show on the block. House of ho show that does seem to exist primarily to make about the name. Ho shonda for asians. Everyone knows getting. It's it's a fun show. Show that Is definitely worth talking about. And we have some great people talk about it with us first of all our friends. Our colleague Our collaborator jammu. Who is producer of the podcasts southern friday and the forthcoming movie daughter and has the morgan with fillon myself in fill one. I don't know a little bit of a book project which we can talk about some other time and welcome to the podcast jess. Thank talk about this. Yes you are not alone. We would also love to welcome to they. Call bruce both you guys. First time right hon win. Who is the senior culture editor at salon and co host of good pop culture club. Another podcast in our Podcast family so welcome to the show. Yeah a happy to be here. I'm yeah shocked that it's taken so long for me. Ask but i feel like this is the one i meant to be on me. We definitely we definitely asked to vietnamese american women to be on the pike. Ask very specifically to talk about this show. And i like han when i asked you. I may have been like kind of presumptuous. And that like you know you're you're an entertainment journalist. Who's vietnamese american. I was like. I just assumed that you had watched you like interested and watch watched house of hope when i asked you. I presume that was true that you did and so and so. That's why you're like. Yeah i'll be on the on the podcast. It was funny because you know. I should've expected it and yet you asked me. I was like oh. Of course. Because i'm actually from houston perfect practically a ho hos and they were none of them though. 'cause toes what to private school system so we should say that house of hose on hbo. Max it is a Reality television series in the vein of all those shows that you that no one wants a care to admit to watch like the cardiac shahs of sunset and The real housewives that genre But it specifically focusing on a very wealthy vietnamese american family in houston Have i covered all the bases. I think pretty much. I mean know we we can say that the the cast of characters is What you might expect for a family drama whether fictional or not set in an asian context right you've got sort of the patriarch matriarch the siblings they all have different dramas individually collectively. They gathered together. Eat a lot basically. This is the nonfiction crazy rich issue. Because that's exactly what what was clearly developed to be right right right. It's definitely created in the wake of the cruiser cheese But that said i mean we've all watched it in varying degrees varying varying number of episodes. I will admit to having watched the first episode and a later episode. That i was told i should watch because it was worth watching and the guys are pretty finished. A lot of it right. So unless the jump in Just start with you. What's what's your take coming up. Well i guess well i. I actually ended up catching it early. Screener of it before so. Luckily i only watch more so It to be blunt. It was not as trashy as what i expected it to be. Maybe no expectations. And like i feel like new money. Beat amuse people like there are certain type and how the show presented was Surprisingly a a lot. More layered than i thought you know especially particularly when You know you go deeper into the series because at first episode definitely like leaned into like this this like you know american dream poll by the bootstraps model minority and all that jazz and and then it starts off like that and then just breaks it down and just show us like just all the dysfunctions of the family. So you know actually was an keep in mind. I don't really watch. the family. Reality shows is just not my thing. But you know i had to see it. 'cause beat me representation and you know all my worries and concerns

Jeff Yang House Of Ho Ho Shonda Fillon Salon And Co Host Of Good Pop Jammu Jess Houston Morgan Bruce America HBO MAX
They Call Us Election 2020

They Call Us Bruce

04:14 min | 2 years ago

They Call Us Election 2020

"Low end. Welcome to another edition of us bruce. None kilter conversation about what's happening in asia america which includes the white house. I'm bill you. And i'm jeff yang and yes. The white house got a little bit less white over the last couple of days. We are exhausted. We are mentally physically may even spiritually very very tired. All of us as americans i think. But we're also tonight kind of exultant and sitting the essentially the stoop of history. So we thought it'd be a fantastic opportunity for us to just get our thoughts out there with some are are close closest friends in just smartest hot takers. That could actually reach out to We want to welcome to the podcast to talk about the election election. Twenty twenty gen fang Friend of ours. Friend of the show blogger behind the appropriate and aisha sultan who is a syndicated columnist based at the st louis post dispatch and just as personal round many many different hyphen. Tash her. i walked thank you so much. Thanks for having me on for the very first time now. Welcome and thank you much for having me two guys. Welcome back your back boy. So okay so this one this episode together pretty quickly because you know. We woke up this morning to some major news and after the shock of that and are quick twitter takes. I texted jaffna like yo. I think we got record episode tonight. So let's get some smart people on and let's let's do this so smart people welcome. What were your respective first thoughts when you heard the news and let's be honest here we've been we've been all just far too far out on that limb of wondering whether or not the future of our republic was strong aisha I mean how did it feel. What did you feel so I'm a public writer In writing in a red state. I'm in missouri and i write too frequently Ideas and things that challenge a lot of my readers here Humanely disagreed little Some of the things. I have to say and ever since the last election cycle the response to a lot of where i wrote got much more personal much more bigoted. Much more violent nasty. I think you know all all of us probably experienced that to some extent but And you know we're used to as journalists public writers. We're used to harsh criticism but it felt very different and I feel like i did take an emotional toll on me. And i felt like for the i. Guess almost five years because it started before the last election I feel like. I was really questioning whether the work i did even mattered. I was wondering if truth even mattered in this country. I wondered if people even had enough empathy to care about the stories. I was telling and honestly jeff i was ready to Look for different job or do something different. If this election it turned out differently. I had thought this all through. Because i didn't see any meaning in it and so there is so much and beyond being a muslim woman. A brown woman a south asian woman and mother I just felt like there was so much personally writing on his election for me. And so when i heard that it was official they called it. i don't know that i could even intellectually process that moment because there was such a physiological flood of emotion in my body.

Jeff Yang Aisha Sultan St Louis Post Tash White House Bruce Asia America Twitter Missouri Jeff
An Election 2020 Conversation

They Call Us Bruce

04:14 min | 2 years ago

An Election 2020 Conversation

"Low end. Welcome to another edition of us bruce. None kilter conversation about what's happening in asia america which includes the white house. I'm bill you. And i'm jeff yang and yes. The white house got a little bit less white over the last couple of days. We are exhausted. We are mentally physically may even spiritually very very tired. All of us as americans i think. But we're also tonight kind of exultant and sitting the essentially the stoop of history. So we thought it'd be a fantastic opportunity for us to just get our thoughts out there with some are are close closest friends in just smartest hot takers. That could actually reach out to We want to welcome to the podcast to talk about the election election. Twenty twenty gen fang Friend of ours. Friend of the show blogger behind the appropriate and aisha sultan who is a syndicated columnist based at the st louis post dispatch and just as personal round many many different hyphen. Tash her. i walked thank you so much. Thanks for having me on for the very first time now. Welcome and thank you much for having me two guys. Welcome back your back boy. So okay so this one this episode together pretty quickly because you know. We woke up this morning to some major news and after the shock of that and are quick twitter takes. I texted jaffna like yo. I think we got record episode tonight. So let's get some smart people on and let's let's do this so smart people welcome. What were your respective first thoughts when you heard the news and let's be honest here we've been we've been all just far too far out on that limb of wondering whether or not the future of our republic was strong aisha I mean how did it feel. What did you feel so I'm a public writer In writing in a red state. I'm in missouri and i write too frequently Ideas and things that challenge a lot of my readers here Humanely disagreed little Some of the things. I have to say and ever since the last election cycle the response to a lot of where i wrote got much more personal much more bigoted. Much more violent nasty. I think you know all all of us probably experienced that to some extent but And you know we're used to as journalists public writers. We're used to harsh criticism but it felt very different and I feel like i did take an emotional toll on me. And i felt like for the i. Guess almost five years because it started before the last election I feel like. I was really questioning whether the work i did even mattered. I was wondering if truth even mattered in this country. I wondered if people even had enough empathy to care about the stories. I was telling and honestly jeff i was ready to Look for different job or do something different. If this election it turned out differently. I had thought this all through. Because i didn't see any meaning in it and so there is so much and beyond being a muslim woman. A brown woman a south asian woman and mother I just felt like there was so much personally writing on his election for me. And so when i heard that it was official they called it. i don't know that i could even intellectually process that moment because there was such a physiological flood of emotion in my body.

Jeff Yang Aisha Sultan St Louis Post Tash White House Bruce Asia America Twitter Missouri Jeff
They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

They Call Us Bruce

05:02 min | 2 years ago

They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call Bruce Non filtered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and Jeff Yang, and this week we have a very special set of guests who are the authors, the creators of a very, very special book when his right in. The heart bone. Shall we say? It is a book called Chinatown Pretty. It is a book of incredible photographs and some just lovely words celebrating the elders who Don't just make up a the generation, the greatest generation of our community but who? Make. It beautiful with their very presence? So. We left a welcome to they cost Bruce. Valerie Lou in. Andrea Lo. Thank you guys so much for joining us. Thanks for having US have come. You guys have put together a really great project. Know it started off as kind of a Website Project And then is now an a full-fledged published book. It's Chinatown Pretty. Is Just A. Really. Great tribute to Chinatown Elders grandmas and GRANDPAS, but it hits on a very specific. Aesthetic. A fashion aesthetic. I think what's really great about is that you've taken sort of the The the style photography mold and apply to kind of the more most unlikely subjects I think. People who are very special in our community so Maybe, you guys could describe actually what is Chinatown Pretty Yeah. This is Valerie Chinatown pretty as a style that's common and chinatowns across North America It's really a patchwork of different. Eras right close from Hong Kong? They've had for thirty years mixed with like say supreme hat that they got from who knows where? A lot of colors. A lot of patterns sometimes I, four shades of pink or four different floral patterns in one outfit. And that's about keeping warm mostly So you could have a big puffy jacket but also keeping the sun out at the same time. So really white built a hats. I love that description just viscerally but I think for people who have not seen your blog and the book itself. Just a little bit more kind of literal color around that. So. When we talk about transparency pretty we're talking about people who are usually immigrants for immigrants who but who have lived here a while and who have. Synthesized a look and the fascinating thing is the look is different from person to person but somehow it all still fits this mold of Chinatown pretty it blends Western clothing it blends. Traditional clothing from. Historical closets as it were. Sometimes across gender lines. It's often incredibly colorful like you said, is layered it's branded, but it's also unique like there's a signature to how people. In that generation dress that feels so much more vibrant than you know those of us, who are I mean in in quarantine were like the sweatpants anyway. But I guess, what was it? That first struck you about the look of Of these elders and kind of lead you to coin the term and decided to actually explore it photographic in words. Yeah. This is Andrea I'm I'm the photographer behind the project and I think we would. have. Known each other for. Several years now, and we would hang out in Chinatown get dim sum and just people watch in the park. And that press was really fascinating Chinatown I feel like has some of the best people watching and I think what we? Both intuited without really realizing why is that? A lot of the outfits we would see on the senior so people sixty five and plus. They there's all this history woven into their outfits I think. For us we might think, oh, it's like this vintage jacket from the seventies but you know for them it's like close. It had ended preserved for decades. Mixed with with newer Chinatown fines and let the handmade clothing as well. So there's so much. Shown in one outfit it's like there's a lot you can extract from it, and so we were really curious about you know. Not only like where did you get these cool shoes but also yeah, how did this? Is just such A. Look in. So we're really curious. About the stories and the people behind it and so that's that was sort of the seed of. What led us to investigate. So

Bruce Non Jeff Yang Valerie Lou Andrea Lo Valerie Chinatown Asia Bruce America North America Hong Kong Andrea
They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

They Call Us Bruce

05:02 min | 2 years ago

They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call Bruce Non filtered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and Jeff Yang, and this week we have a very special set of guests who are the authors, the creators of a very, very special book when his right in. The heart bone. Shall we say? It is a book called Chinatown Pretty. It is a book of incredible photographs and some just lovely words celebrating the elders who Don't just make up a the generation, the greatest generation of our community but who? Make. It beautiful with their very presence? So. We left a welcome to they cost Bruce. Valerie Lou in. Andrea Lo. Thank you guys so much for joining us. Thanks for having US have come. You guys have put together a really great project. Know it started off as kind of a Website Project And then is now an a full-fledged published book. It's Chinatown Pretty. Is Just A. Really. Great tribute to Chinatown Elders grandmas and GRANDPAS, but it hits on a very specific. Aesthetic. A fashion aesthetic. I think what's really great about is that you've taken sort of the The the style photography mold and apply to kind of the more most unlikely subjects I think. People who are very special in our community so Maybe, you guys could describe actually what is Chinatown Pretty Yeah. This is Valerie Chinatown pretty as a style that's common and chinatowns across North America It's really a patchwork of different. Eras right close from Hong Kong? They've had for thirty years mixed with like say supreme hat that they got from who knows where? A lot of colors. A lot of patterns sometimes I, four shades of pink or four different floral patterns in one outfit. And that's about keeping warm mostly So you could have a big puffy jacket but also keeping the sun out at the same time. So really white built a hats. I love that description just viscerally but I think for people who have not seen your blog and the book itself. Just a little bit more kind of literal color around that. So. When we talk about transparency pretty we're talking about people who are usually immigrants for immigrants who but who have lived here a while and who have. Synthesized a look and the fascinating thing is the look is different from person to person but somehow it all still fits this mold of Chinatown pretty it blends Western clothing it blends. Traditional clothing from. Historical closets as it were. Sometimes across gender lines. It's often incredibly colorful like you said, is layered it's branded, but it's also unique like there's a signature to how people. In that generation dress that feels so much more vibrant than you know those of us, who are I mean in in quarantine were like the sweatpants anyway. But I guess, what was it? That first struck you about the look of Of these elders and kind of lead you to coin the term and decided to actually explore it photographic in words. Yeah. This is Andrea I'm I'm the photographer behind the project and I think we would. have. Known each other for. Several years now, and we would hang out in Chinatown get dim sum and just people watch in the park. And that press was really fascinating Chinatown I feel like has some of the best people watching and I think what we? Both intuited without really realizing why is that? A lot of the outfits we would see on the senior so people sixty five and plus. They there's all this history woven into their outfits I think. For us we might think, oh, it's like this vintage jacket from the seventies but you know for them it's like close. It had ended preserved for decades. Mixed with with newer Chinatown fines and let the handmade clothing as well. So there's so much. Shown in one outfit it's like there's a lot you can extract from it, and so we were really curious about you know. Not only like where did you get these cool shoes but also yeah, how did this? Is just such A. Look in. So we're really curious. About the stories and the people behind it and so that's that was sort of the seed of. What led us to investigate.

Bruce Non Jeff Yang Valerie Lou Andrea Lo Valerie Chinatown Asia Bruce America North America Hong Kong Andrea
They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

They Call Us Bruce

05:01 min | 2 years ago

They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call Bruce Non filtered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and Jeff Yang, and this week we have a very special set of guests who are the authors, the creators of a very, very special book when his right in. The heart bone. Shall we say? It is a book called Chinatown Pretty. It is a book of incredible photographs and some just lovely words celebrating the elders who Don't just make up a the generation, the greatest generation of our community but who? Make. It beautiful with their very presence? So. We left a welcome to they cost Bruce. Valerie Lou in. Andrea Lo. Thank you guys so much for joining us. Thanks for having US have come. You guys have put together a really great project. Know it started off as kind of a Website Project And then is now an a full-fledged published book. It's Chinatown Pretty. Is Just A. Really. Great tribute to Chinatown Elders grandmas and GRANDPAS, but it hits on a very specific. Aesthetic. A fashion aesthetic. I think what's really great about is that you've taken sort of the The the style photography mold and apply to kind of the more most unlikely subjects I think. People who are very special in our community so Maybe, you guys could describe actually what is Chinatown Pretty Yeah. This is Valerie Chinatown pretty as a style that's common and chinatowns across North America It's really a patchwork of different. Eras right close from Hong Kong? They've had for thirty years mixed with like say supreme hat that they got from who knows where? A lot of colors. A lot of patterns sometimes I, four shades of pink or four different floral patterns in one outfit. And that's about keeping warm mostly So you could have a big puffy jacket but also keeping the sun out at the same time. So really white built a hats. I love that description just viscerally but I think for people who have not seen your blog and the book itself. Just a little bit more kind of literal color around that. So. When we talk about transparency pretty we're talking about people who are usually immigrants for immigrants who but who have lived here a while and who have. Synthesized a look and the fascinating thing is the look is different from person to person but somehow it all still fits this mold of Chinatown pretty it blends Western clothing it blends. Traditional clothing from. Historical closets as it were. Sometimes across gender lines. It's often incredibly colorful like you said, is layered it's branded, but it's also unique like there's a signature to how people. In that generation dress that feels so much more vibrant than you know those of us, who are I mean in in quarantine were like the sweatpants anyway. But I guess, what was it? That first struck you about the look of Of these elders and kind of lead you to coin the term and decided to actually explore it photographic in words. Yeah. This is Andrea I'm I'm the photographer behind the project and I think we would. have. Known each other for. Several years now, and we would hang out in Chinatown get dim sum and just people watch in the park. And that press was really fascinating Chinatown I feel like has some of the best people watching and I think what we? Both intuited without really realizing why is that? A lot of the outfits we would see on the senior so people sixty five and plus. They there's all this history woven into their outfits I think. For us we might think, oh, it's like this vintage jacket from the seventies but you know for them it's like close. It had ended preserved for decades. Mixed with with newer Chinatown fines and let the handmade clothing as well. So there's so much. Shown in one outfit it's like there's a lot you can extract from it, and so we were really curious about you know. Not only like where did you get these cool shoes but also yeah, how did this? Is just such A. Look in. So we're really curious. About the stories and the people behind it and so that's that was sort of the seed of. What led us to investigate.

Bruce Non Jeff Yang Valerie Lou Andrea Lo Valerie Chinatown Asia Bruce America North America Hong Kong Andrea
They Call Us We Bare Bears

They Call Us Bruce

05:38 min | 2 years ago

They Call Us We Bare Bears

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce and unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America. I'm bill you. And I'm Jeff Yang and we are so incredibly pleased tonight to have with us a very special guest, a friend of ours, a friend of the PODCAST and a brilliant animation creator. That's kind of a big drum roll right now who's it going to be? But I'm here to tell you that it is in fact, Daniel Chong the creator of we bear bears one of our favorite animated series Daniel welcomes the fogcast. Welcome. Thank you for that intro. Man I don't know what to do with that that. Good now. All right. No for real. Huge. Admirers of yours and big fans of of we bear bears I've you know as much as possible I've I've kept up with it given. The fact of the world is basically a rolling apocalypse I'd. Things things we've your bears are the things that make life feel less like a total and utter shit show. And I will say We're particularly excited because we have the chance to actually take a look at the. We are bears movie, which is sort of like an exclamation point on the series and it was fantastic. I mean I have so many things to ask about say about it especially the fact that it feels like. I don't want to say this to overstate this in some ways, but it feels Kinda like an important movie in ways that I will elaborate. Thank you perfect for twenty twenty I'll say that But let's begin actually Daniel. By talking about how this got started in I mean for those of you who have not yet watch, we bear bears. It actually began as a web comic called the bear bears right. Three bear bears right shortly there and tells how that where that came from and I guess how this how this turned into. What it is today. Yeah It was a web comic that I had created it. You know I was working in the industry in the animation industry ad. I just wanted to make my own thing. And at the time you know people are posting things on blogs and stuff. So I created this comic on my own called three bear bears is kind of a play on Goldilocks, three bears and so Yeah it was. It was a comic that It was very like free for me. I. Didn't like really right out anything ahead of time I just kind of like A. Free associated as I was drawing it and nobody read it and nobody cared and just completely I remember going onto comic forums and trying to post it like, Hey, guys check this out in like nobody wanted to talk to me on forum. So it was just like. But but the thing is I was already working. So it's not like it was so debilitating. What was it? The only thing I had? It was just You know it is it is that was just it was my outlet that my special hobby I guess at the time. So but as I was in the animation industry working as a story artist for about ten years run by fifth year I was starting to get antsy I just wanted to create my own things. So I started taking these comics different ideas that I had started just flushing them out into pitches into stories and or. TV shows, and that's where three bears became weaver bears. I got to change that title for legal reasons apparently. Some what's called a some company owned I think there were a taxidermy company, they own something similar. So. You know now the title really means nothing at it makes no sense but it's So. Yeah. We're not responsive opportunity right there if you. Off. So. When you when you came up with this for the idea when he became a cartoon a series, like what were the kind of the things that you were like how did you pitch it honestly when I tried tried to explain this series to people who've never seen it? Yeah. It's kind of a weird thing to try to like I like the concept is such a It's so simple and yet it. So it's too simple in a lot of ways. Yeah and then trying to explain to the emotional complexity of is difficult. You know. I think the pitch itself was was. The visuals help a lot. I'm not just pitching words so. I think there are two things that were very crucial to well, maybe three. Crucial things to the the Bible ever the pitch that I did that help sell at one was the visual of stack these three bear stack them each other which you know I it was a very iconic thing in the comic and that was definitely the thing carried into the pitch, and so you know I pretty much started off the Bible by showing this image of the three bears together. So it just. kind of it's sort of just evokes a very strong image up the top. The second image that I put in the Bible was an image of the three bears mingling at a party with a bunch of Humid's holding like cups at a party and nobody is freaking out by them. They're just all mingling together as if they're like, you just talking about the weather or something like that, and that was another like. Important image to kind of sell here's the joke. Is that these three years nobody freaks out when they see them they're just one of you guys except there bears. So that was the other really important image to sell this project

Jeff Yang Daniel Chong Daniel Bruce Asia America Bible
They Call Us The Paper Tigers

They Call Us Bruce

06:09 min | 2 years ago

They Call Us The Paper Tigers

"Hello, and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America. I bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and we are here. With the director and writer of I gotTA. Say just one of my favorite films to have come out this year not just because it hits square and kind of like the intersection of. Sweet spots for me. But also because it really revives John that is kind of synonymous with. They cost Bruce in some ways, and that film is the paper tigers and the filmmaker in question is bow tran. Bow. Thank you for joining us on the PODCAST. Welcome. Hello. Hello. Thanks for having. Me Guess. Big Fan. At. Likewise. No seriously about so this film is basically about a set of martial arts enthusiasts young young guys who have grown up learning under a master. who have kept on growing up as a were. Gotten Kinda midlife and found themselves in a situation where they have to kind of recover the skills that they've lost and like I said for me, it really is just at the intersection of a lot of stuff that I care about and or am. So. Thank you for making it. And Yeah, thank you for talking to us about. My pleasure. Thanks for watching. Really glad to hear you guys enjoy. I let me say like, let me express a little bit of. Sorrow and regret. and sadness on your behalf because. The world being what it is the circumstances being what it is. Many people are going to experience. This movie are not going to experience movie the way I really think they should. Experience it which is with an audience because this is such a fun crowd-pleasing movie We should say like I saw it advertised as a as a martial arts comedy which it is. But it's a bummer that we're not people aren't going to really get to see it in that ideal situation. Yeah I. Mean it's kind of a it's kind of a surreal thing to go through this year with all festivals. Now pivoting to virtual and we had a world premiere couple of weeks ago at Fantasia, which is usually out of Montreal and We did have a zoom QNA afterwards. And is actually fun because it was the first time. The actors saw the movie for the first time and all that and then Cuny was over and I got kicked out of the Zoom Room. There I was sitting in the dark? The World Premiere. Back. But. You know you know we we may do I, mean. That's kind of the way things are, and we just have to Kinda forge on. But Yeah we all had always hoped in envisioned to be able to play this in front of crowd because I think that's kind of like the best experience at least for me growing up as well. Just watching movies that I love. And then be able to kind of bring that. Old old-timey feeling back again. But hopefully, maybe oh Soon soon, enough will be a on our recovery in fields. Kind of have a place when we can share it altogether. I. I kinda figured out what the the genre of this sort of ends up being in white works for me. So well, it's basically old school meets old just. But. I mean these AVIV, the the issue of where we are. Now how this all landing I I will say that. There's something really special about seeing the movie mean it's taken a while to get here and I know this of course, I was fortunate enough smart enough to be early on the bandwagon on this thing asked for it in the kick starter as was Hudson Yang. And Shout shout out. Yeah and it feels a little bit like it's bringing with it. A breath of what it was like before all this happened I. Mean you know we're for me the the things that make the movie just. Feel, special to me is. It's it's the kind of film that you can't really make in quarantine at all. It's film that it's not like a giant. You Know Effects Laden blockbuster, but it has the the effects that you can only do with people are trained and skillful right which is. People finding hand hand. Real. Martial, artists in. Most cases. Who are are going head to head with choreography that you can't hide right there. This does really feel to me and we seen other attempts before. Like A legit revival of that The film right and? I mean I wanted to kind of dig a little into your inspirations and influences in deciding to. Revive this Jonah to begin with. And here a little more about the way this journey started. Yeah I mean I could have imagined. No. You guys have been tracking project for a long time. We've been you know I, I was with Mike Alaska's my producer and we pitched this at the C. Three Project Market V. C. You know twenty eleven in front of like Daniel Day Kim and Desirous Yamashita in. A Teddy Zee. Like nine years ago when I had a one page treatment and it was just like. A hair we are. So I wish I could say we planned it, but we really just got in by Cheney chin-chin in terms of just shooting this film at the at the end of summer last year two, thousand nineteen, and then we were imposed all the way up until you know when the lockdown started happening and all that stuff. So yeah I mean literally is that Snapshot Wife Before. the pandemic and a lot of ways. So it's just it's just kind of worked out that way and if we waited any any additional months or waited, you know in any way to to shoot the film I, don't think we re we would be here having this conversation. Yeah. So it's Kinda trippy looking back on just the timing of it all.

Bruce Jeff Yang Teddy Zee Asia America Montreal John Midlife Director Zoom Room Hudson Yang Jonah Cheney Cuny Writer Mike Alaska Daniel Day Kim Desirous Yamashita Producer
They Call Us Sujata Day

They Call Us Bruce

05:32 min | 2 years ago

They Call Us Sujata Day

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call Bruce An unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm Phil You Jeff Yang, and we have a fantastic guests this episode somebody who wanted to have on for a while somebody loves and whose work Meyer and that is Giada Day. Actor filmmaker and the creator of a new film definition please which were incredibly excited to be talking about now Sujata welcome to the episode. Thank you for having me. Welcome. It's a power to Sunday night party. Suggest a day. You get that all the time. Oh yes. Nothing. Nothing like being agent and you know leaning into the name things because we get that. But SUJATA. Again, we have kind of all known each other ish like we've been in the same circles for a while and obviously been admirers of the stuff even doing since way back you know awkward black girl and of course you're working insecure. But this is a new thing right? Like a feature film and it's a feature film that seems. Very much rooted in your reality if you will. Since you wrote it and directed it and are starring in it. Yeah I Have you know done? Awkward Black Run I was on insecure and? Watching East race journey from the very beginning of you know s meeting on twitter and then going to her dad's doctor's office in Inglewood to shoot a twenty minute. Seen me walking out of there being like what the heck did. I get myself into. And watching her put awkward black girl on her credit cards and then US getting picked up by Ferrall for the second season and then HBO for insecure and. That entire journey alongside ISA. was such a huge learning experience for me which. All, culminated in the creation of definition please and me having the confidence to write the script and produce it and directed and starring it is all. Just snow grateful to have been part of ISA's. Happen in that gave me the confidence to embark on my own feature film and just get right into it and do it and. So I'm just so thankful that people are watching it now and enjoying it and. Sending me responses to the trailer and the film if they're watching it festivals. And it's just been really exciting to watch and. Also the it's not an autobiographical film, but it is really personal to me like all of my projects I start from a real place. So it'll be like a real person or a real situation that I was in, and then I will fictional is it from there so for example, this script started with me winning my spelling bee in fourth grade I don't know if you guys have been in spelling bees. Not Personally I I'm actually quite a good speller. Ford is worth. Much better that than like mass, for instance. But I've never competed and I'm sure you would crush me even at your fourth grade level. No I don't think you know what it's. It's probably because you were you always an avid reader. I was I was A. Kid, who kind of snuck books? Under the covers at night right and stayed up reading. Yeah. Yeah. Me Too and and I never trained for spelling bees and my parents never pushed me to do. I don't even think they were aware that spelling bees were a thing and in my tiny class of ten people in Fourth Grade One my spelling the which you know when you win out of ten people at doesn't feel like a huge win. But but it felt like a big deal everyone was proud. My teachers were proud of me. Mrs Lewis you know she took me to regionals. and. Once I went to regionals. It was just a whole other experience because there was a huge stage and it wasn't in the cafeteria anymore and there was a microphone and there was an audience and I think I got really nervous and I went out. On the first round and I misspelled radish. And I spelled it with two DS instead of one, and then I came down and Mrs Lewis Hugged me and I could tell that she knew that I was I was nervous and disappointed in myself but she was so comforting and I went back to my school and my friends just started. Me and making. Because I missed our such easy easy word. And and you know what I accepted the you know I accepted the bowling for that because I was like you know what? It wasn't easy word and and I should've gone out on a hard word.

ISA A. Kid Sujata Mrs Lewis United States Jeff Yang Bruce An Giada Day Twitter Asia Meyer Inglewood Ford HBO Ferrall
They Call Us Mulan

They Call Us Bruce

07:03 min | 2 years ago

They Call Us Mulan

"Low, and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and this will indeed be an unfiltered podcast. It is one which we are going to used to. You know spend talking about something that we've been wanting to talk about for a while waiting to see for awhile, and that is Disney's live. On which released this weekend right before Labor Day and immediately generated quite a lot of opinions some of which we have. And we have guests, schools, opinions in some of them our guests We've seen quite a lot of in somewhere new. Who have with us? Phil? We have making her third appearance on they call US Bruce. Quite possibly a record. Record record. Our good friend formerly journalists of the with the Hollywood reporter most recently, she did a profile of Tima in Vanity Fair. Are Powell Rebecca Son Rebecca. Welcome. Thank you. I'm here to reinforce and ensure that my title as most frequent they call us first guest. On. Challenged. Bring honor to us all. We also have a first timer on the show hopefully, not the last frankie. Hong who is a freelance writer and illustrator and Frankie also grew up until age nine in China and has a pretty solid grasp. I think of some of the larger context around the film both as somebody personally in in more immerse perhaps in Chinese culture than those who grew up here but also just from being able to read and understand the conversations that are going on in. Chinese about this. Conversation's. Break Welcome, to the show. Thank you for having me. So excited to chat with you about this. Well, the conversation has been proceeding Apace has a not I mean literally the show. The movie itself debuted Friday, and I think that's we don't have any metrics yet that feels like a lot of people in have been streaming it despite the way that it's being presented and I mean, maybe that's the first thing to talk about a little bit like. The film. You know how the film has changed over time how it was what was meant to be in where it is now today in this time of Of Covert in quarantine in theaters basically being shot I think I wanted to ask if maybe everybody could share their relationship with the original film because that's that will serve you know color a lot of people's. The way they perceive this this new one right. Rebecca. What was it like watching the original Milan and how did that impact actually shape? This one for you. Yeah. Well, for me, I you know sort of your classic ABC asian-american Crawl one in the bay area you know live here lived in America, my whole life, and so I was I'm looking this up now and I was actually not cured with anime tomatoes teenagers. So I think I was sixteen when I came out Even, though I was no longer a small child I, what I remember most palpably was bursting into tears at the end of the animated film when Milan she's at the Forbidden City and she turns around and it feels like the entire country is kneeling and bowing and Reverend before her and the swell like I remember for years after that, like you know even without we watching the film just thinking about that moment. Just swallow emotion. Kind of being unprepared to see that image of of somebody who representative you know about as exactly. Who I was, you know just a small Chinese girl could be treated with such respect and honor. Listen. you know and reverence that was so moving. So that's what I remember most about you know the animated law and I think the way that made me feel is is sort of what I treasured about that movie even though it was, you know I haven't seen it in such such a long time. And Frankie in you grew up until age nine in China, right? Yeah in Beijing was. Yes. But you but you did also see Milan and I'm atrophies theaters or at home or so I was already living in the US by the time Mulan came out. So I washed it in Missouri were I was in the fifth grade and I think. My first exposure to Mulan the figure was actually when my mother taught me the ballot of Milan and made me memorize recited back to her. So this character was already one of my favorites. You know this cross dressing heroine who bests all the boys that was basically my dream I wanted to. Show everyone how amazing I could be. So you know I wasn't super. I had very mixed feelings about it because even as a ten year old I was you know I had trepidation about whether or not Disney was going to do a good job representing my culture, my country. So but at the same time, of course, I was really proud to see that they chose a Chinese story to bring to the big screen. So when I saw it I think I continue to feel mixed because there were these moments like the one that Rebecca described was incredibly moving but there were also these little things that day I guess. I don't know if I would say they got wrong because you can tell a story a story Harry you want, but it's more like there were very clear league. American narrative elements that were meant to. Get, a reaction out of American audiences. It makes sense but as a Chinese viewer I just thought while if you're going to represent my culture, why don't you get it right? Why don't you think that the? Quote Unquote correct representation can't also get a reaction out of Americans I remember when she dressed up for the matchmaker in the face was all white I just thought well, this reminds me of Geishas much more so than Address up Cheney's lady and maybe geishas is much more recognizable symbol. But why can't you just make her look uncomfortable as? A Chinese woman rather than something that looks more, Japanese. Their stuff like that.

Rebecca Son Rebecca Disney Milan Bruce Frankie China Mulan Jeff Yang Phil Geishas Forbidden City Asia Missouri Beijing Hollywood United States ABC
A conversation about Mulan

They Call Us Bruce

04:35 min | 2 years ago

A conversation about Mulan

"Low, and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and this will indeed be an unfiltered podcast. It is one which we are going to used to. You know spend talking about something that we've been wanting to talk about for a while waiting to see for awhile, and that is Disney's live. On which released this weekend right before Labor Day and immediately generated quite a lot of opinions some of which we have. And we have guests, schools, opinions in some of them our guests We've seen quite a lot of in somewhere new. Who have with us? Phil? We have making her third appearance on they call US Bruce. Quite possibly a record. Record record. Our good friend formerly journalists of the with the Hollywood reporter most recently, she did a profile of Tima in Vanity Fair. Are Powell Rebecca Son Rebecca. Welcome. Thank you. I'm here to reinforce and ensure that my title as most frequent they call us first guest. On. Challenged. Bring honor to us all. We also have a first timer on the show hopefully, not the last frankie. Hong who is a freelance writer and illustrator and Frankie also grew up until age nine in China and has a pretty solid grasp. I think of some of the larger context around the film both as somebody personally in in more immerse perhaps in Chinese culture than those who grew up here but also just from being able to read and understand the conversations that are going on in. Chinese about this. Conversation's. Break Welcome, to the show. Thank you for having me. So excited to chat with you about this. Well, the conversation has been proceeding Apace has a not I mean literally the show. The movie itself debuted Friday, and I think that's we don't have any metrics yet that feels like a lot of people in have been streaming it despite the way that it's being presented and I mean, maybe that's the first thing to talk about a little bit like. The film. You know how the film has changed over time how it was what was meant to be in where it is now today in this time of Of Covert in quarantine in theaters basically being shot I think I wanted to ask if maybe everybody could share their relationship with the original film because that's that will serve you know color a lot of people's. The way they perceive this this new one right. Rebecca. What was it like watching the original Milan and how did that impact actually shape? This one for you. Yeah. Well, for me, I you know sort of your classic ABC asian-american Crawl one in the bay area you know live here lived in America, my whole life, and so I was I'm looking this up now and I was actually not cured with anime tomatoes teenagers. So I think I was sixteen when I came out Even, though I was no longer a small child I, what I remember most palpably was bursting into tears at the end of the animated film when Milan she's at the Forbidden City and she turns around and it feels like the entire country is kneeling and bowing and Reverend before her and the swell like I remember for years after that, like you know even without we watching the film just thinking about that moment. Just swallow emotion. Kind of being unprepared to see that image of of somebody who representative you know about as exactly. Who I was, you know just a small Chinese girl could be treated with such respect and honor. Listen. you know and reverence that was so moving. So that's what I remember most about you know the animated law and I think the way that made me feel is is sort of what I treasured about that movie even though it was, you know I haven't seen it in such such a long time.

Rebecca Son Rebecca Bruce Milan Phil Disney Jeff Yang Forbidden City Asia China Frankie Representative Hollywood ABC Reporter Hong Writer America
A Conversation On The Live Action Mulan Movie

They Call Us Bruce

04:35 min | 2 years ago

A Conversation On The Live Action Mulan Movie

"Low, and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and this will indeed be an unfiltered podcast. It is one which we are going to used to. You know spend talking about something that we've been wanting to talk about for a while waiting to see for awhile, and that is Disney's live. On which released this weekend right before Labor Day and immediately generated quite a lot of opinions some of which we have. And we have guests, schools, opinions in some of them our guests We've seen quite a lot of in somewhere new. Who have with us? Phil? We have making her third appearance on they call US Bruce. Quite possibly a record. Record record. Our good friend formerly journalists of the with the Hollywood reporter most recently, she did a profile of Tima in Vanity Fair. Are Powell Rebecca Son Rebecca. Welcome. Thank you. I'm here to reinforce and ensure that my title as most frequent they call us first guest. On. Challenged. Bring honor to us all. We also have a first timer on the show hopefully, not the last frankie. Hong who is a freelance writer and illustrator and Frankie also grew up until age nine in China and has a pretty solid grasp. I think of some of the larger context around the film both as somebody personally in in more immerse perhaps in Chinese culture than those who grew up here but also just from being able to read and understand the conversations that are going on in. Chinese about this. Conversation's. Break Welcome, to the show. Thank you for having me. So excited to chat with you about this. Well, the conversation has been proceeding Apace has a not I mean literally the show. The movie itself debuted Friday, and I think that's we don't have any metrics yet that feels like a lot of people in have been streaming it despite the way that it's being presented and I mean, maybe that's the first thing to talk about a little bit like. The film. You know how the film has changed over time how it was what was meant to be in where it is now today in this time of Of Covert in quarantine in theaters basically being shot I think I wanted to ask if maybe everybody could share their relationship with the original film because that's that will serve you know color a lot of people's. The way they perceive this this new one right. Rebecca. What was it like watching the original Milan and how did that impact actually shape? This one for you. Yeah. Well, for me, I you know sort of your classic ABC asian-american Crawl one in the bay area you know live here lived in America, my whole life, and so I was I'm looking this up now and I was actually not cured with anime tomatoes teenagers. So I think I was sixteen when I came out Even, though I was no longer a small child I, what I remember most palpably was bursting into tears at the end of the animated film when Milan she's at the Forbidden City and she turns around and it feels like the entire country is kneeling and bowing and Reverend before her and the swell like I remember for years after that, like you know even without we watching the film just thinking about that moment. Just swallow emotion. Kind of being unprepared to see that image of of somebody who representative you know about as exactly. Who I was, you know just a small Chinese girl could be treated with such respect and honor. Listen. you know and reverence that was so moving. So that's what I remember most about you know the animated law and I think the way that made me feel is is sort of what I treasured about that movie even though it was, you know I haven't seen it in such such a long time.

Rebecca Son Rebecca Bruce Milan Phil Disney Jeff Yang Forbidden City Asia China Frankie Representative Hollywood ABC Reporter Hong Writer America
A Conversation About The Postal Service

They Call Us Bruce

07:04 min | 2 years ago

A Conversation About The Postal Service

"Low. Welcome. To another edition of call us, Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America. I'm Phil You and Jeff Yang and this week on the podcast we have been thinking and talking about doing something for a while and our wishes are finally coming true as if delivered to us. Our. I'm sorry we've come. A Dad jokes attention but we we've been talking a lot about the postal service, not just amongst ourselves but in society right I mean the relevance of the US mail to our society internal democracy has been more prominent now more than the headlines now than ever before, and one of the things that we recognized is that the postal service actually plays a really critical role even. Specifically in our communities and there are. There are a lot of Asian Americans who work at the Post Office The post office connects us are far-flung relatives and friends, and in general we just thought it was time to give a little shine to this institution that. Is taking a few bumps, these days, and so we actually found. A postal. Service employees who was. Happy to talk to us about this profession and about the stories and. The world behind the scenes at the post. Office. As, well, as other things going on his life as well. So we love to welcome to they call us Bruce Kevin Again UN. He is a musician and multimedia. A graphic designer, a fan of A. Pretty Amazing Music. I can tell social platforms and also a employee of the PS Kevin Welcome to the show. Hi. Welcome guys. Ola. So Kevin you're in Oakland right. Yeah. I wouldn't opened. And did you reborn in scripture? I was actually born in southern California and. Always, knew that I would end up in the bay area. So sometime around two thousand and two, thousand five moved up here. And I found myself. Here. To sort of blend in. Oh Yeah Oh. Yeah. And and you say you're from southern California originally like a like Los Angeles or or. Montebello okay. And now A. End, up actually working for the postal service. Honestly. I was laid off in rather time the pandemic. was. Gaining momentum. and. I was desperately looking for work and I I had heard this echoing my head, my mom's voice. You know like you should go work work at the post office like your uncles grandfather. Finally listen to the voice. And Sure Enough I. went onto the USPS site. And, saw their openings locally and swint for and they ask for references. Internal references and. Plugged in some family members names, and I was pretty much and within twenty four hours. In the family. It's a family business. It really is. Yeah. How many of your other family members worked for the postal service that are alive to? But. But it's it's been like kind of multigenerational thing or it has absolutely. Is there. Is there something about the post office or the Postal Service that has been? particularly. Peeling I'm guessing in some ways it's because it's eighth always there be. It. You know like they're always jobs in the postal. I. I just Kinda remember Hollywood shuffle under if you've seen that movie Robert Townsend movie. where? Kind of what you're saying is one of the themes in the movie that. His family's like A. Get A job. The Postal Service it's it's you know it's it's a secure job. You know it's comfortable. It's something which you can rely on and Robert Townsend characters like I wanna be a star in Hollywood but you know as a black actor in Hollywood. You gotta deal with a whole lot of bullshit and movies about the bullshit and. Kind of like you know no spoilers or yes boilers. Movement. You haven't seen it. You should see it but. In the end in the end, actually the post service ends up being a where he lands and and you know he's it's sort of like a celebration affected like you can still do when you dream of but other things can also be part of that dream and anyway I'm kind of curious if if that's kind of the story of how how like your uncles and other folks in working for the post office to. For my grandfather. I believe he went in right after he was discharged from the military e- so he. He had served in the Cold War came back They relocated to Daly City from Dallas. and. I think he that's it hired pretty much on the spot. And it's still the case to this day So he he was there until I moved up here. And two, hundred five. I remember him getting village. One Am and coming home. And afternoon. He. Yeah it's interesting my Uncle Sam deal with him in Minneapolis. He got out of the Air Force and became a carrier pretty much immediately. And my uncle Kennedy in. Hawaii. I think he started in Minneapolis, but then transferred to Hawaii, which is apparently. The most requested transfer. Why And he's been a mechanic for. Sixty years. He's he's been there for a long time I. Think he's been here the longest. Everyone fixing like postal trucks, postal trucks, the machinery he's he's really handy guy i. mean he used to build birdhouses? Similar skills I guess.

Postal Service Bruce Kevin Robert Townsend Phil You California United States Kennedy Minneapolis Asia America Jeff Yang Usps Hawaii A. End Oakland Hollywood Los Angeles Montebello Air Force Daly City