35 Burst results for "Jeff Yang"

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

05:53 min | 2 weeks ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"And you can catch video versions of marvel makeup on our YouTube channel. So please rate review and subscribe. And please give us 5 stars so our Asian moms will understand why we buy so much electronic equipment. Because it's for this podcast, marvel and makeup. And we're back. All right, on this second half of the call is Bruce, this is where we do our favorite segment. Our signature segment, the good, the bad and the WTF. Jeff Yang, would you please lay down the rules of engagement? I will. This is, of course, our three ring circus of a segment. Where we take a single topic and slices and dice it and serve it up three different ways. This of course begins with the good. You know, the positive side of whatever we're talking about, followed by a helping of the bad. The frustrating negative enraging, perhaps aspect of it. And then finally, the WTF, which doesn't have to be either good or bad. It could just be puzzling. You know, something you're still thinking about. And as always, we try to pick something that our guest and maybe we can talk about with a lot of relevance. And so we thought we'd actually do a little bit of a curveball here. And do the good, the bad and the WTF of being the good Asian. Not just about the book, although certainly we encourage you to talk about examples from the good Asian, or examples from your own personal perspective and experience. And we'll join in. So porn site because you are a guest. We're going to talk about how to first. So let us let us hear from your perspective, what is the good of being the good Asian? Go ahead. Yeah. I was just going to say, I think that one thing that really is interesting is that, again, I haven't neither of us have seen the full story yet until you actually release it to the world. But you do have this example of Terence Chang, who is sort of the perfect Asian, right? And he's set up as kind of this potential counterweight slash nemesis slash something. It's not even clear in the first few issues. But it's very clear that the protagonist kind of hates the hell out of him. In some ways, just 'cause he's so perfect. Yeah. We also have a Terence Chang in our lives. Yeah, exactly. Exactly. Come on guys..

Jeff Yang WTF YouTube Bruce Terence Chang
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

03:44 min | Last month

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"And we're back, all right, on the second half of they call us Bruce. This is where we do our favorite segment. Our signature segment, the good, the bad and the WTF. Jeff Yang, we do, please lay down the rules of engagements. I shall. So this is, of course, our round table segment where we ask our guest or guests to share a little about a single topic three different ways. The first is the positive aspect of it, the good, right? The second is the negative, challenging, frustrating part of it. The bad. And then finally, the part that's still leads you to wonder a little bit. The WTF. And of course cat as our guest. We've got you in the hot seat. So we would like you to talk about the good, the band and WTF of seeing ghosts. And again, that could be interpreted in many ways, both the title of your book and the process of writing it, but also kind of curious about any figurative or literal encounters you might have had with. Oh my gosh. This is so funny to me because yeah, I am a scaredy cat. You know, literally. Of course. As a kid, I was so afraid of ghosts. I was so afraid of all of these things that I'm honestly still afraid of. I'm not the type of person who would ever want to go on a haunted house tour. So anyway, though, writing this book, seeing ghosts was so good in a way that it really connected me to myself and it connected to me to these ideas of ancestor worship and Jeff like what you were saying before how when we grieve someone, they sort of just remain with us, you know, through their memories. And I found that really good and profound. You know? Yeah. That is fantastic. And so, you know, maybe we can actually talk about ghosts here without actually invoking them. But let's start it off. Let's kick off with the good of seeing ghosts. What to you was the good, the good of. The good, the good of it was it really brought me closer to my family and a lot of ways where we had to talk about things that we never would have talked about before. And to, you know, my mom for a long time was like a bad word. And speaking her name was so painful. And really getting to know her origin story and know my father's. And understand also how my sisters thought of our parents and how my aunt and my uncle and other people in our family saw my mom's passing. It was just it was really enlightening as someone who grew up in a household of silence around these topics and a household of silence in general. And I mean, that doesn't mean that it's still easy right now or it's so easy right now in my family to talk about these things. But it opened a window in a way. And I really appreciated that. You know, it was something that really did resonate throughout the feeling that the way that you were telling the story and even one kind of central revelatory beat within that story that involves your uncle. And your mom's other siblings felt a lot like aspects of the farewell. Lulu Wang's movie in the sense that there are things that people just don't talk about in our families, not because and sometimes not because we are afraid of talking about those topics, but sometimes because we're afraid of that bringing them up will bring ghosts into our lives..

Jeff Yang WTF Bruce Jeff Lulu Wang
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

03:40 min | Last month

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Home. Low and welcome to another addition of they. Call us bruce. An unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asia. America i will you and i'm jeff yang and this episode is a special enforce because it's part of something we've been talking about in the wake of the arrival of the new information from the us census was of course is really important to our society. Our politics are civics and very specifically to our community because once again the data shows that asian americans are the fastest growing population america but right up alongside it and overlapping with it is multiracial americans. Over one in five multiracial americans is asian and twelve percent of asian americans are multiracial that two point seven million of us and we thought it was time to have some conversations around multiracial identities in our communities. And we thought we'd kicks it off with a conversation with now me glide vice president of product and social impact at facebook. Not just because you know being a facebook she's at entity it where a lot of these conversations are happening because she posted this really incredible essay on medium called fully both talking about her own identity as somebody who is multiracial asian and jewish and again feeling fully both now me. Welcome to the podcast. Well thank you guys so much for having me. I'm really excited to be here. I always great to see a fellow brooklyn in the house directly. I am originally from brooklyn. I am now. I'm i'm now an ex pat in los angeles. But i actually. Here's the funny thing. I went to church at garfield temple on sundays. It was it was rented out to a to the church. That i attended which was significantly asian-american so i feel like there's a little bit of a shared space thing going on right there anyway. So crazy park slope. Is that where you grew up to ally deaf. I grew. I was born at methodist hospital. And i grew up in park slope in staten island and then moved back to parks after college. So anyway here we are. We're back at home. I always feel left out of new york. Talk guys paolo. Alto area so Yeah guys. I feel like i'm both of you. Actually i'm i'm the both and california and because i've been in california for the past twenty years in powell also. That is amazing. I mean it's important to note though. Because i think part of what makes this conversation particularly interesting. Is that going from brooklyn. I mean even the brooklyn's very multicultural and asian markets will represented and even back. When you know when we were out there it was It must be very different to go from a multi-racial you know park. Slow brooklyn to the bay area. Where asian-americans are a plurality of the population and especially working in tech. I mean maybe even specific facebook where we kind of just found out the like four in ten people facebook asian asian american. That's amazing totally. An you know. I think it was both a function of location and time. I grew up in the eighties in brooklyn. There weren't a lot of old..

jeff yang brooklyn america garfield temple facebook bruce asia methodist hospital staten island los angeles california paolo powell new york bay area
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

02:30 min | 2 months ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Hello and welcome to another dish. They call us bruce. An unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asian america. I feel you. And i'm jeff yang and once again we have a fantastic guest on this episode. Somebody who's an old friend of ours over the podcast. And who has just evolved into one of those interesting attorneys filmmakers creators actors writers in the business of asian american filmmaking and that is justin chon who has a new film coming out blue by you which we have seen and i'm just so deeply my feels. I just. I q much to talk about that. I can almost like talk Welcome welcome to the show. Welcome thanks guys. Thanks is so great evac back on with you guys. You know. I just first off. I want to say that this has been some kind of a ride for asian americans. You know There was a time when felt like we couldn't tell any story is truly not them the way we wanted them to and when we did they had to be a certain kind of story over just the last a three four years. We started more idiosyncratic and yet really masterful new kinds of of narrative exploring explaining and just giving experiences around very different ways of being asian american and blue by us is right up there In in that world of like the minorities so just wanted to give you props for that and maybe ask bit. What the origin story in some ways of of this film. Was you know what i mean. You know Being asian american we all know. Adopt these you know it's I'm sure we all know that. Adoption originated the idea of international. Adoption originated in south korea after the korean war. And you know the whole family went there and the kids off the streets or whatever the case that needed families place a nice christian families in the united states and over the years become a big business in and you can't tell an asian narrative that's inclusive without including that storyline Without including that experience in this in this country So you know i. I'm friends quite a few adoptees and and I've grown up with few. And i started hearing that this was taking place at adopted. These were being imported in. I thought it was absolutely shocking..

jeff yang justin chon bruce united states south korea
They Call Us Justin Chon

They Call Us Bruce

02:29 min | 2 months ago

They Call Us Justin Chon

"Hello and welcome to another dish. They call us bruce. An unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asian america. I feel you. And i'm jeff yang and once again we have a fantastic guest on this episode. Somebody who's an old friend of ours over the podcast. And who has just evolved into one of those interesting attorneys filmmakers creators actors writers in the business of asian american filmmaking and that is justin chon who has a new film coming out blue by you which we have seen and i'm just so deeply my feels. I just. I q much to talk about that. I can almost like talk Welcome welcome to the show. Welcome thanks guys. Thanks is so great evac back on with you guys. You know. I just first off. I want to say that this has been some kind of a ride for asian americans. You know There was a time when felt like we couldn't tell any story is truly not them the way we wanted them to and when we did they had to be a certain kind of story over just the last a three four years. We started more idiosyncratic and yet really masterful new kinds of of narrative exploring explaining and just giving experiences around very different ways of being asian american and blue by us is right up there In in that world of like the minorities so just wanted to give you props for that and maybe ask bit. What the origin story in some ways of of this film. Was you know what i mean. You know Being asian american we all know. Adopt these you know it's I'm sure we all know that. Adoption originated the idea of international. Adoption originated in south korea after the korean war. And you know the whole family went there and the kids off the streets or whatever the case that needed families place a nice christian families in the united states and over the years become a big business in and you can't tell an asian narrative that's inclusive without including that storyline Without including that experience in this in this country So you know i. I'm friends quite a few adoptees and and I've grown up with few. And i started hearing that this was taking place at adopted. These were being imported in. I thought it was absolutely shocking.

Jeff Yang Justin Chon Bruce United States South Korea
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

05:55 min | 4 months ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Dot com or on your podcast. Didn't todd and we're back all right on this second half. They call bruce. This is where we do our signature segment our favorite segment. The good the bad and the wto. Jeff jeff yang. Would you please down the rules of engagement. And i shall so this part of our show you can think of. This is a little bit of a competition. perhaps not really We we are going to be asking our three guests slash shot contestants to share with us their thoughts any particular topic in three different rounds the first being the good the positive the happy fulfilling of the thing. And then the bad. The frustrating the disillusioning enraging aspect of that thing. And then finally w t.f right Nwf doesn't have to good or bad. It could be just puzzling. The thing are still turning over your head. Rotisserie style After that Particularly thing has gone by and we are going to do the good. The bad not f- of competing on the great food truck race. So let's let's start with. Let's ted and then we'll go to young and then we'll go to haunt for the first round. What is the good..

Jeff jeff yang todd bruce ted
They Call Us Seoul Sausage

They Call Us Bruce

02:23 min | 4 months ago

They Call Us Seoul Sausage

"Hello and welcome to another edition of call us bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asia. America i'm phil you and i'm jeff yang and we are here with some very special guests fresh from reality television and maybe a window serving delicious food near you. We're talking here to ted. Kim yong kim and on one of seoul sausage who competed just now in the great food truck race all-stars season and we'll talk a little bit about that finale which just happened What it was like being on on the all stars of this competition whereas like winning season three of that competition and just in general what. It's like to be trying to sell sausage or things other than sausage in a pretty rough environment for selling any kind of stuff right now. Welcome to the show guys It's so good to have you guys here as you guys know. I've been a fan and a supporter of sociologist Since before day one. I think yeah i knew guys before you guys didn't started in was a huge fan of season three and everything you've done of course have been a big consumer of your your wears a since then fan of your sausages know. I was wondering maybe we could start by. Maybe talking about 'cause 'cause when you guys compete in season three this season that you won you guys had never actually run as a food truck before and i'm kind of wondering like and we still don't know how to do can't jump into that like i i. I do starting this venture even before the food truck race. But what was the impetus to get started. Where you up the short story version or the long version cast on the show and you know We want a food. Truck aussies three so. It was never part of our plans. But here we are. You know We open our store and we have a truck and a and a store at the same time. So yeah that's how we started

Jeff Yang Kim Yong Kim Bruce Phil TED Asia America
HEADLINE CAPITALIZATION  NTSB Releases Preliminary Report on Fatal Tesla Crash Capitalize Words With Four or More Letters (Associated Press style) Capitalize Words with Five or More Letters (APA Style) Do Not Capitalize Words Based on Length (Chicago Manual of Style) Capitalize Major Words and Those With Four or More Letters (MLA Style) You are likely here because you need a headline checker to make sure your title and headlines are properly written. That's exactly what Headline Capitalization does. It's a free tool to make sure what you capitalize online for publications like blogs and news articles, or for academic papers, is correct. This headline checker should help you to correctly format all your titles in the future. It's important to accurately capitalize titles and headlines for articles and papers. Headline Capitalization is a free headline checker that correctly capitalizes titles for all your writing. Article Title and Headline Capitalization Rules When it comes to creating headlines and titles for articles, it can get confusing what words to capitalize and what words should remain lower case. There are several styles of title and headline capitalization which different publications may use. For the most part, there are general rules that all publications follow with a few minor deviations between them. For those who write, it's important to understand these rules about which words to capitalize when creating headlines and titles. Major Headline Capitalization Styles There are four major title capitalization styles. These are: AP Style APA Style Chicago Style MLA Style There is no single authoritative style guide when it comes to capitalizing headlines and titles, although some are used for certain types of writing. For example, the Associated Press Stylebook (AP Style) is often used by news organizations, the Chicago Manual of Style (Chicago Style) is more comprehensive for in-depth writing, and the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (MLA style) is used for academic papers. While this is where the different styles are usually used, it's not mandatory to use a particular style for a particular type of writing. If you are unsure of which style to use, the best method is to seek out which style the course, editor, or teacher prefers so that you know, and then use that specific style. If you're in a certain field, you should learn the style that's most prominent in your field. For example, the AP Style for those in journalism, and the MLA style if you're in academics. In all cases, it's best to ask for each project to make sure since each style has its own rules. General Headline Style Rule: Title Case How to write headlines and titles is usually referred to as "headline style" or "title case." As mentioned, all styles are not the same, but there are a few general rules they all follow. These are: Capitalize the first word in the title Capitalize the last word in the title Capitalize the important words in the title The first two points are clear cut and easy to follow. The next question is, what are considered "important" words in a headline? In most cases, they include the following words: Adjectives (beautiful, large, hopeful) Adverbs (forcefully, silently, hurriedly) Nouns (computer, table, manuscript) Pronouns (they, she, he) Subordinating conjunctions (as, so, that) Verbs (write, type, create) Words in Headlines That Aren't Capitalized The above words are the ones generally capitalized, so what words are usually written in lowercase when creating headlines and titles? These tend to be shorter words (under five letters long). The following types of words are generally not capitalized: Articles (a, an, the) Coordinating Conjunctions (and, but, for) Short (less than 5 letters) Prepositions (at, by, from) Alternative Headline Capitalization: Sentence Case One style of headline and title capitalization which doesn't follow the rules is Sentence Case style. This is where editors decide to write titles as if they were a typical sentence. In this case, the first word of the headline would be capitalized while the rest of the title would be in lower case, except for proper nouns. Below are a few examples of Sentence Case style headlines: How to properly write article titles A review of a hike at Grand Canyon national park The best value meal when eating at Chipotle Referencing Titles of Publications No matter what style of headline capitalization you decide to use in your writing, if you ever reference the title of a book, article, or journal, you should write the title of it as it has been written, even if it happens to be a different style than you're using for your writing. You should not change them to fit your style, and they should always be written as they appear in the publication. Copyright © Headline Capitalization 2021. All rights reserved.

Asian Enough

01:39 min | 7 months ago

HEADLINE CAPITALIZATION NTSB Releases Preliminary Report on Fatal Tesla Crash Capitalize Words With Four or More Letters (Associated Press style) Capitalize Words with Five or More Letters (APA Style) Do Not Capitalize Words Based on Length (Chicago Manual of Style) Capitalize Major Words and Those With Four or More Letters (MLA Style) You are likely here because you need a headline checker to make sure your title and headlines are properly written. That's exactly what Headline Capitalization does. It's a free tool to make sure what you capitalize online for publications like blogs and news articles, or for academic papers, is correct. This headline checker should help you to correctly format all your titles in the future. It's important to accurately capitalize titles and headlines for articles and papers. Headline Capitalization is a free headline checker that correctly capitalizes titles for all your writing. Article Title and Headline Capitalization Rules When it comes to creating headlines and titles for articles, it can get confusing what words to capitalize and what words should remain lower case. There are several styles of title and headline capitalization which different publications may use. For the most part, there are general rules that all publications follow with a few minor deviations between them. For those who write, it's important to understand these rules about which words to capitalize when creating headlines and titles. Major Headline Capitalization Styles There are four major title capitalization styles. These are: AP Style APA Style Chicago Style MLA Style There is no single authoritative style guide when it comes to capitalizing headlines and titles, although some are used for certain types of writing. For example, the Associated Press Stylebook (AP Style) is often used by news organizations, the Chicago Manual of Style (Chicago Style) is more comprehensive for in-depth writing, and the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (MLA style) is used for academic papers. While this is where the different styles are usually used, it's not mandatory to use a particular style for a particular type of writing. If you are unsure of which style to use, the best method is to seek out which style the course, editor, or teacher prefers so that you know, and then use that specific style. If you're in a certain field, you should learn the style that's most prominent in your field. For example, the AP Style for those in journalism, and the MLA style if you're in academics. In all cases, it's best to ask for each project to make sure since each style has its own rules. General Headline Style Rule: Title Case How to write headlines and titles is usually referred to as "headline style" or "title case." As mentioned, all styles are not the same, but there are a few general rules they all follow. These are: Capitalize the first word in the title Capitalize the last word in the title Capitalize the important words in the title The first two points are clear cut and easy to follow. The next question is, what are considered "important" words in a headline? In most cases, they include the following words: Adjectives (beautiful, large, hopeful) Adverbs (forcefully, silently, hurriedly) Nouns (computer, table, manuscript) Pronouns (they, she, he) Subordinating conjunctions (as, so, that) Verbs (write, type, create) Words in Headlines That Aren't Capitalized The above words are the ones generally capitalized, so what words are usually written in lowercase when creating headlines and titles? These tend to be shorter words (under five letters long). The following types of words are generally not capitalized: Articles (a, an, the) Coordinating Conjunctions (and, but, for) Short (less than 5 letters) Prepositions (at, by, from) Alternative Headline Capitalization: Sentence Case One style of headline and title capitalization which doesn't follow the rules is Sentence Case style. This is where editors decide to write titles as if they were a typical sentence. In this case, the first word of the headline would be capitalized while the rest of the title would be in lower case, except for proper nouns. Below are a few examples of Sentence Case style headlines: How to properly write article titles A review of a hike at Grand Canyon national park The best value meal when eating at Chipotle Referencing Titles of Publications No matter what style of headline capitalization you decide to use in your writing, if you ever reference the title of a book, article, or journal, you should write the title of it as it has been written, even if it happens to be a different style than you're using for your writing. You should not change them to fit your style, and they should always be written as they appear in the publication. Copyright © Headline Capitalization 2021. All rights reserved.

"Sandra thank you so much for joining us today itself. So good view. Oh jen tracy. It's a pleasure to be here. It goes without saying that. I'm usually the cheesiest one on this podcast. So i had to start this off by saying to one and all welcome to asian enough. The it's an honor just to be asian. I worry that. The t shirt. And i i could. I could tell from the font at the top the bottom of the screen. I know t shirt. You're wearing he. S how could. I not wear the shirt on a day that i get to talk to you. It's an honor just to be asian anton view. Let's say thank you jeff yang for picking that up and making tee shirt. That's right what's it like to see like your quote. It's not a destination and it's credited to sandra credited. it's a wonderful writers. I don't know if they were at that time on live. I think it was frank. Lesbian sudi green. Yes and i've been trying to kind of like give them credit for writing that line but unhappy because i understand what that line is and what it means and it pleases me greatly. That has become a t shirt. I remember someone my friend in canada. She sent me a picture because her her boys are really into basketball. And it was jeremy lin. Who had that does walking out the t shirt. And i'm like oh the something is happening with this t shirt and i think it's just a really nice very shorthand identifier of a moment where we could just step into the forefront to Claim pride for second you know and so i'm really really happy when i see anyone wearing the t shirt

Jen Tracy Jeff Yang Sudi Green Sandra Frank Jeremy Lin Basketball Canada
They Call Us Angry Asian Man

They Call Us Bruce

05:28 min | 10 months ago

They Call Us Angry Asian Man

"Hello and welcome to another edition of call us bruce an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asia america. I'm phil you. And i'm jeff yang and on this very special episode of they call cost bruce. We have well. We have a special guest special guest. Is you literally feel you because you're marking the twentieth anniversary of angry asian man the blog that kind of started all this stuff and ended up launching. I don't know maybe a a million people into the asian american digital space A million stories million posts and build a community of sorts that continues even now today and has extended itself with this. This podcast right here. Phil you welcome back to your own hottest f from the intro. Just couple of seconds ago. Yeah i mean it feels a little self-indulgent to dedicate our podcast to a observing the twenty th anniversary of the blog that i started but I figured twenty. If i'm going to do it anytime. It's got to be this twentieth anniversary. It's significant significant enough. And i didn't want it to just pass by doing nothing. So hey you know. I gotta record record episode anyway right through. This is just an easy way out really. But the fact is i mean. It's something i would have wanted to do to because obviously we would not have had become friends if it hadn't been for the fact that you created this blog and in a lot of ways picked up On the rubric in some ways the mantle of asian american media in in fashion from that sort of prior generation of media creators. Of which i was apart right. I mean you know back. When we first met i was i had been running magazine. A magazine inside asia america. It literally you know passed into the great beyond like ripe founding angry asian man and it just it felt good to see that these these stories these ideas and frankly these emotions were were still being put out there into the into the world do you. Do you remember when we first met ver. I first time we met like face to face the very first time. Damn i'm not sure actually i remember. I remember us meeting multiple times. I mean i was living in new york. The time right and i came out here a couple times various events. But i don't remember actually. The very first time we met was so the first time we met was was the launch of star tv molly. Well of course. I remember thirteen dirt. Tv was the Sort of asian-american magazine style. Show that you produced And you guys held a press conference sorts in san francisco right. Yeah so. I went over there on my lunch break. Actually i went to the. I got an invitation so i went and then that's where i met. That's where we met. I knew who you were and then like you remember when when we came up. You're that guy right and you're like yes in fact time that guy but you know it's funny 'cause yeah that was our first meeting and i do remember that now It was it was really an interesting errand some ways because i feel like there was this brief moment when the literally at that moment it felt like all these things are happening in asia america. We had like five asian american cable channels. That had all been lost the same time you know. Internet was big. Oh my god asian app you know all these things that were happening at once and then none of those things like literally. None of them are still around except for angry asian man. Let's be real right. The magazines are gonna you know. I and i think that the staying power twenty years a long time between anything you know but but you wait so you launch this. It was february thirteenth right. Very technically february fourteen thousand one well past midnight every team. That's right. yeah. Valentine's day in two thousand one and you've basically uninterrupted been running the black since then but when you actually i hit the keystroke to put this live what were you doing. What were you thinking like. Did you think that this was even going to be around this long. I mean obviously an absolutely not not in even any way like you know because I was angry. men was Kind of a subsection of a personal website. That i i put i put together This was around. The time of this is two thousand one so like i was hard coding in html uploading via ftp to you know like to this domain and And angry men was just kind of a section of that website which also had like my resume. Like all you know like random you put on a personal website back then right

Jeff Yang Bruce Asia America Asia Phil America American Magazine Molly San Francisco New York Valentine
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Low end. Welcome to another edition of they. Call us bruce. An unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asia america which now includes bugs. Bunny what's up. Asian americans you and i'm jeff yang and i'm just going to be cracking up the whole time but here it is here we are. We have with us a very special guest. The man the voice the magic eric. Abou- za the new voice of bugs. Bunny has it going guys. Well this is my real voice. This is my asian canadian plane. Pundit salt voices pianos it just regular filipino bread voice. This is the one. That i think iraq customize wanna hear you know for repeat business in all i mean it's amazing how you can slip in and out of it. I mean that's what strikes me like as we were getting ready to record. I'm like oh my god and made me wonder like. Are you like this all the time. Like are people just cracking up around you time. I'm the fattest of my friends. Because i'm the one that makes all the jokes. No one makes me laugh. So i haven't had an an ab workout in like years. Everyone everyone benefits around me but me <hes>. But that's that's my lot in life you know like i don't mind and i love i love making people laugh <hes>. And you know thank you for first of all thank you for inviting me on your podcast and and your show and <hes>. You know the last two weeks have been <hes>. Insane as far as just wanting to talk you know suddenly paying attention. This show that. I've been on looney tunes cartoons. Has it premiered in march <hes>. And only now it's like. I'm getting the attention but you know what else premiered march is covid. So that's exactly. Why only now. After a whole year of chasing covert stories. You know so tragic all like so much so much sadness so much like the news has been so heavy. And there's been very light hopeful inspiring moments with vis this pandemic <hes>. You know just supporting our frontline workers in the current social climate that we're living in you know black lives matter and there's so much see i mean biden. Hello you know like and then all of a sudden this filipino kid from candidates. The voice of bugs bunny like what a way to end the year. Right like what a strange who held out on their bingo card. Nobody has no one. You know the scratch tickets like cherry cherry filipino. Voices bugs bunny damn but so as we're talking on the run up to this. I actually feel like it's remarkable that just in the last couple of years it it feels like we are finally starting to integrate childhood right. That is the voices not just adding diverse programming in the form of look. Let's put an asian kid in the back row you know. Let's let's add franklin to peanuts back when it was probably as that that attempted bussing in ended up being. We're actually starting to see these. Hallowed these hallowed i don't like institutions finally populated by by people who can bring a very different context but the same context to them. I mean obviously bugs. Bunny is a big one of them. I i would also point to blues clues right and yeah your your fellow filipino. <hes> north american stepped into that that arena as well <hes>. I mean like let's let's <hes>. Let's go back to our youths right. I'm i'm forty one now. And the first real exposure to seeing a face that was like mine and represented in mind. Film in movies was <hes>. Short round and data from goonies. Jonathan <hes> kwan- it's crazy. I met him in toronto. And i was just like you don't understand man like you're you're my hero like you were and i think that goes for a lot of young asian boys and girls just to see like there's the there's the kid that's like me and the group of friends and that they bothered to include him in in you know even something like goonies. I know it was one movie but it was the best movie. It was like the only movie you really needed to see

jeff yang bruce asia eric america iraq biden
They Call Us Bugs Bunny

They Call Us Bruce

04:42 min | 1 year ago

They Call Us Bugs Bunny

"Low end. Welcome to another edition of they. Call us bruce. An unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asia america which now includes bugs. Bunny what's up. Asian americans you and i'm jeff yang and i'm just going to be cracking up the whole time but here it is here we are. We have with us a very special guest. The man the voice the magic eric. Abou- za the new voice of bugs. Bunny has it going guys. Well this is my real voice. This is my asian canadian plane. Pundit salt voices pianos it just regular filipino bread voice. This is the one. That i think iraq customize wanna hear you know for repeat business in all i mean it's amazing how you can slip in and out of it. I mean that's what strikes me like as we were getting ready to record. I'm like oh my god and made me wonder like. Are you like this all the time. Like are people just cracking up around you time. I'm the fattest of my friends. Because i'm the one that makes all the jokes. No one makes me laugh. So i haven't had an an ab workout in like years. Everyone everyone benefits around me but me But that's that's my lot in life you know like i don't mind and i love i love making people laugh And you know thank you for first of all thank you for inviting me on your podcast and and your show and You know the last two weeks have been Insane as far as just wanting to talk you know suddenly paying attention. This show that. I've been on looney tunes cartoons. Has it premiered in march And only now it's like. I'm getting the attention but you know what else premiered march is covid. So that's exactly. Why only now. After a whole year of chasing covert stories. You know so tragic all like so much so much sadness so much like the news has been so heavy. And there's been very light hopeful inspiring moments with vis this pandemic You know just supporting our frontline workers in the current social climate that we're living in you know black lives matter and there's so much see i mean biden. Hello you know like and then all of a sudden this filipino kid from candidates. The voice of bugs bunny like what a way to end the year. Right like what a strange who held out on their bingo card. Nobody has no one. You know the scratch tickets like cherry cherry filipino. Voices bugs bunny damn but so as we're talking on the run up to this. I actually feel like it's remarkable that just in the last couple of years it it feels like we are finally starting to integrate childhood right. That is the voices not just adding diverse programming in the form of look. Let's put an asian kid in the back row you know. Let's let's add franklin to peanuts back when it was probably as that that attempted bussing in ended up being. We're actually starting to see these. Hallowed these hallowed i don't like institutions finally populated by by people who can bring a very different context but the same context to them. I mean obviously bugs. Bunny is a big one of them. I i would also point to blues clues right and yeah your your fellow filipino. north american stepped into that that arena as well I mean like let's let's Let's go back to our youths right. I'm i'm forty one now. And the first real exposure to seeing a face that was like mine and represented in mind. Film in movies was Short round and data from goonies. Jonathan kwan- it's crazy. I met him in toronto. And i was just like you don't understand man like you're you're my hero like you were and i think that goes for a lot of young asian boys and girls just to see like there's the there's the kid that's like me and the group of friends and that they bothered to include him in in you know even something like goonies. I know it was one movie but it was the best movie. It was like the only movie you really needed to see

Jeff Yang Bruce Asia Eric Iraq America Biden Jonathan Kwan Franklin Toronto
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"N welcome to another edition of they call the spruce not filter conversation about what's happening in eastern america and reality television and i'm jeff yang and as the ho- holidays approach. We are here. Yes yes yes because this is this a moment for plans. We are here to talk about the brand new reality tv. Show on the block. House of ho show that does seem to exist primarily to make about the name. Ho shonda for asians. Everyone knows getting. It's it's a fun show. Show that <hes>. Is definitely worth talking about. And we have some great people talk about it with us first of all our friends. Our colleague <hes>. Our collaborator jammu. Who is producer of the podcasts southern friday and the forthcoming movie daughter and has the morgan with fillon myself in fill one. I don't know a little bit of a book project which we can talk about some other time and welcome to the podcast jess. Thank talk about this. Yes you are not alone. We would also love to welcome to they. Call bruce both you guys. First time right hon win. Who is the senior culture editor at salon and co host of good pop culture club. Another podcast in our <unk>. Podcast family so welcome to the show. Yeah a happy to be here. I'm yeah shocked that it's taken so long for me. Ask but i feel like this is the one i meant to be on me. We definitely we definitely asked to vietnamese american women to be on the pike. Ask very specifically to talk about this show. And i like han when i asked you. I may have been like kind of presumptuous. And that like you know you're you're an entertainment journalist. Who's vietnamese american. I was like. I just assumed that you had watched you like interested and watch watched house of hope when i asked you. I presume that was true that you did and so and so. That's why you're like. Yeah i'll be on the on the podcast. It was funny because you know. I should've expected it and yet you asked me. I was like oh. Of course. Because i'm actually from houston perfect practically a ho hos and they were none of them though. 'cause toes what to private school system so we should say that house of hose on hbo. Max it is a <hes>. Reality television series in the vein of all those shows that you that no one wants a care to admit to watch like the cardiac shahs of sunset and <hes>. The real housewives that genre <hes>. But it specifically focusing on a very wealthy vietnamese american family in houston <hes>. Have i covered all the bases. I think pretty much. I mean know we we can say that the the cast of characters is <hes>. What you might expect for a family drama whether fictional or not set in an asian context right you've got sort of the patriarch matriarch the siblings they all have different dramas individually collectively. They gathered together. Eat a lot basically. This is the nonfiction crazy rich issue. Because that's exactly what what was clearly developed to be right right right. It's definitely created in the wake of the cruiser cheese <hes>. But that said i mean we've all watched it in varying degrees varying varying number of episodes. I will admit to having watched the first episode and a later episode. That i was told i should watch because it was worth watching and the guys are pretty finished. A lot of it right. So unless the jump in <unk>. Just start with you. What's what's your take coming up. Well i guess well i. I actually ended up catching it early. Screener of it before so. Luckily i only watch more so <hes>. It to be blunt. It was not as trashy as what i expected it to be. Maybe no expectations. And like i feel like new money. Beat amuse people like there are certain type and how the show presented was <unk>. Surprisingly a a lot. More layered than i thought you know especially particularly when <hes>. You know you go deeper into the series because at first episode definitely like leaned into like this this like you know american dream poll by the bootstraps model minority and all that jazz and and then it starts off like that and then just breaks it down and just show us like just all the dysfunctions of the family. So you know actually was an keep in mind. I don't really watch. the family. Reality shows is just not my thing. But you know i had to see it. 'cause beat me representation and you know all my worries and concerns

jeff yang House of ho Ho shonda fillon salon and co host of good pop jammu jess america morgan bruce houston hbo Max
They Call Us House of Ho

They Call Us Bruce

05:19 min | 1 year ago

They Call Us House of Ho

"N welcome to another edition of they call the spruce not filter conversation about what's happening in eastern america and reality television and i'm jeff yang and as the ho- holidays approach. We are here. Yes yes yes because this is this a moment for plans. We are here to talk about the brand new reality tv. Show on the block. House of ho show that does seem to exist primarily to make about the name. Ho shonda for asians. Everyone knows getting. It's it's a fun show. Show that Is definitely worth talking about. And we have some great people talk about it with us first of all our friends. Our colleague Our collaborator jammu. Who is producer of the podcasts southern friday and the forthcoming movie daughter and has the morgan with fillon myself in fill one. I don't know a little bit of a book project which we can talk about some other time and welcome to the podcast jess. Thank talk about this. Yes you are not alone. We would also love to welcome to they. Call bruce both you guys. First time right hon win. Who is the senior culture editor at salon and co host of good pop culture club. Another podcast in our Podcast family so welcome to the show. Yeah a happy to be here. I'm yeah shocked that it's taken so long for me. Ask but i feel like this is the one i meant to be on me. We definitely we definitely asked to vietnamese american women to be on the pike. Ask very specifically to talk about this show. And i like han when i asked you. I may have been like kind of presumptuous. And that like you know you're you're an entertainment journalist. Who's vietnamese american. I was like. I just assumed that you had watched you like interested and watch watched house of hope when i asked you. I presume that was true that you did and so and so. That's why you're like. Yeah i'll be on the on the podcast. It was funny because you know. I should've expected it and yet you asked me. I was like oh. Of course. Because i'm actually from houston perfect practically a ho hos and they were none of them though. 'cause toes what to private school system so we should say that house of hose on hbo. Max it is a Reality television series in the vein of all those shows that you that no one wants a care to admit to watch like the cardiac shahs of sunset and The real housewives that genre But it specifically focusing on a very wealthy vietnamese american family in houston Have i covered all the bases. I think pretty much. I mean know we we can say that the the cast of characters is What you might expect for a family drama whether fictional or not set in an asian context right you've got sort of the patriarch matriarch the siblings they all have different dramas individually collectively. They gathered together. Eat a lot basically. This is the nonfiction crazy rich issue. Because that's exactly what what was clearly developed to be right right right. It's definitely created in the wake of the cruiser cheese But that said i mean we've all watched it in varying degrees varying varying number of episodes. I will admit to having watched the first episode and a later episode. That i was told i should watch because it was worth watching and the guys are pretty finished. A lot of it right. So unless the jump in Just start with you. What's what's your take coming up. Well i guess well i. I actually ended up catching it early. Screener of it before so. Luckily i only watch more so It to be blunt. It was not as trashy as what i expected it to be. Maybe no expectations. And like i feel like new money. Beat amuse people like there are certain type and how the show presented was Surprisingly a a lot. More layered than i thought you know especially particularly when You know you go deeper into the series because at first episode definitely like leaned into like this this like you know american dream poll by the bootstraps model minority and all that jazz and and then it starts off like that and then just breaks it down and just show us like just all the dysfunctions of the family. So you know actually was an keep in mind. I don't really watch. the family. Reality shows is just not my thing. But you know i had to see it. 'cause beat me representation and you know all my worries and concerns

Jeff Yang House Of Ho Ho Shonda Fillon Salon And Co Host Of Good Pop Jammu Jess Houston Morgan Bruce America HBO MAX
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Low end. Welcome to another edition of us bruce. None kilter conversation about what's happening in asia america which includes the white house. I'm bill you. And i'm jeff yang and yes. The white house got a little bit less white over the last couple of days. We are exhausted. We are mentally physically may even spiritually very very tired. All of us as americans i think. But we're also tonight kind of exultant and sitting the essentially the stoop of history. So we thought it'd be a fantastic opportunity for us to just get our thoughts out there with some are are close closest friends in just smartest hot takers. That could actually reach out to <hes>. We want to welcome to the podcast to talk about the election election. Twenty twenty gen fang <hes>. Friend of ours. Friend of the show blogger behind the appropriate and aisha sultan who is a syndicated columnist based at the st louis post dispatch and just as personal round many many different hyphen. Tash her. i walked thank you so much. Thanks for having me on for the very first time now. Welcome and thank you much for having me two guys. Welcome back your back boy. So okay so this one this episode together pretty quickly because you know. We woke up this morning to some major news and after the shock of that and are quick twitter takes. I texted jaffna like yo. I think we got record episode tonight. So let's get some smart people on and let's let's do this so smart people welcome. What were your respective first thoughts when you heard the news and let's be honest here we've been we've been all just far too far out on that limb of wondering whether or not the future of our republic was strong aisha <unk>. I mean how did it feel. What did you feel so <hes>. I'm a public writer <unk>. In writing in a red state. I'm in missouri and i write too frequently <hes>. Ideas and things that challenge a lot of my readers here <hes>. Humanely disagreed little <hes>. Some of the things. I have to say and ever since the last election cycle the response to a lot of where i wrote got much more personal much more bigoted. Much more violent nasty. I think you know all all of us probably experienced that to some extent but <hes>. And you know we're used to as journalists public writers. We're used to harsh criticism but it felt very different and <hes>. I feel like i did take an emotional toll on me. And i felt like for the i. Guess almost five years because it started before the last election <hes>. I feel like. I was really questioning whether the work i did even mattered. I was wondering if truth even mattered in this country. I wondered if people even had enough empathy to care about the stories. I was telling and honestly jeff i was ready to <hes>. Look for different job or do something different. If this election it turned out differently. I had thought this all through. Because i didn't see any meaning in it and so there is so much and beyond being a muslim woman. A brown woman a south asian woman <hes> and mother <hes>. I just felt like there was so much personally writing on his election for me. And so when i heard that it was official they called it. <hes> i don't know that i could even intellectually process that moment because there was such a physiological flood of emotion in my body.

white house aisha sultan jeff yang asia missouri writer st louis
They Call Us Election 2020

They Call Us Bruce

04:14 min | 1 year ago

They Call Us Election 2020

"Low end. Welcome to another edition of us bruce. None kilter conversation about what's happening in asia america which includes the white house. I'm bill you. And i'm jeff yang and yes. The white house got a little bit less white over the last couple of days. We are exhausted. We are mentally physically may even spiritually very very tired. All of us as americans i think. But we're also tonight kind of exultant and sitting the essentially the stoop of history. So we thought it'd be a fantastic opportunity for us to just get our thoughts out there with some are are close closest friends in just smartest hot takers. That could actually reach out to We want to welcome to the podcast to talk about the election election. Twenty twenty gen fang Friend of ours. Friend of the show blogger behind the appropriate and aisha sultan who is a syndicated columnist based at the st louis post dispatch and just as personal round many many different hyphen. Tash her. i walked thank you so much. Thanks for having me on for the very first time now. Welcome and thank you much for having me two guys. Welcome back your back boy. So okay so this one this episode together pretty quickly because you know. We woke up this morning to some major news and after the shock of that and are quick twitter takes. I texted jaffna like yo. I think we got record episode tonight. So let's get some smart people on and let's let's do this so smart people welcome. What were your respective first thoughts when you heard the news and let's be honest here we've been we've been all just far too far out on that limb of wondering whether or not the future of our republic was strong aisha I mean how did it feel. What did you feel so I'm a public writer In writing in a red state. I'm in missouri and i write too frequently Ideas and things that challenge a lot of my readers here Humanely disagreed little Some of the things. I have to say and ever since the last election cycle the response to a lot of where i wrote got much more personal much more bigoted. Much more violent nasty. I think you know all all of us probably experienced that to some extent but And you know we're used to as journalists public writers. We're used to harsh criticism but it felt very different and I feel like i did take an emotional toll on me. And i felt like for the i. Guess almost five years because it started before the last election I feel like. I was really questioning whether the work i did even mattered. I was wondering if truth even mattered in this country. I wondered if people even had enough empathy to care about the stories. I was telling and honestly jeff i was ready to Look for different job or do something different. If this election it turned out differently. I had thought this all through. Because i didn't see any meaning in it and so there is so much and beyond being a muslim woman. A brown woman a south asian woman and mother I just felt like there was so much personally writing on his election for me. And so when i heard that it was official they called it. i don't know that i could even intellectually process that moment because there was such a physiological flood of emotion in my body.

Jeff Yang Aisha Sultan St Louis Post Tash White House Bruce Asia America Twitter Missouri Jeff
An Election 2020 Conversation

They Call Us Bruce

04:14 min | 1 year ago

An Election 2020 Conversation

"Low end. Welcome to another edition of us bruce. None kilter conversation about what's happening in asia america which includes the white house. I'm bill you. And i'm jeff yang and yes. The white house got a little bit less white over the last couple of days. We are exhausted. We are mentally physically may even spiritually very very tired. All of us as americans i think. But we're also tonight kind of exultant and sitting the essentially the stoop of history. So we thought it'd be a fantastic opportunity for us to just get our thoughts out there with some are are close closest friends in just smartest hot takers. That could actually reach out to We want to welcome to the podcast to talk about the election election. Twenty twenty gen fang Friend of ours. Friend of the show blogger behind the appropriate and aisha sultan who is a syndicated columnist based at the st louis post dispatch and just as personal round many many different hyphen. Tash her. i walked thank you so much. Thanks for having me on for the very first time now. Welcome and thank you much for having me two guys. Welcome back your back boy. So okay so this one this episode together pretty quickly because you know. We woke up this morning to some major news and after the shock of that and are quick twitter takes. I texted jaffna like yo. I think we got record episode tonight. So let's get some smart people on and let's let's do this so smart people welcome. What were your respective first thoughts when you heard the news and let's be honest here we've been we've been all just far too far out on that limb of wondering whether or not the future of our republic was strong aisha I mean how did it feel. What did you feel so I'm a public writer In writing in a red state. I'm in missouri and i write too frequently Ideas and things that challenge a lot of my readers here Humanely disagreed little Some of the things. I have to say and ever since the last election cycle the response to a lot of where i wrote got much more personal much more bigoted. Much more violent nasty. I think you know all all of us probably experienced that to some extent but And you know we're used to as journalists public writers. We're used to harsh criticism but it felt very different and I feel like i did take an emotional toll on me. And i felt like for the i. Guess almost five years because it started before the last election I feel like. I was really questioning whether the work i did even mattered. I was wondering if truth even mattered in this country. I wondered if people even had enough empathy to care about the stories. I was telling and honestly jeff i was ready to Look for different job or do something different. If this election it turned out differently. I had thought this all through. Because i didn't see any meaning in it and so there is so much and beyond being a muslim woman. A brown woman a south asian woman and mother I just felt like there was so much personally writing on his election for me. And so when i heard that it was official they called it. i don't know that i could even intellectually process that moment because there was such a physiological flood of emotion in my body.

Jeff Yang Aisha Sultan St Louis Post Tash White House Bruce Asia America Twitter Missouri Jeff
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call Bruce Non filtered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and Jeff Yang, , and this week we have a very special set of guests who are the authors, , the creators of a very, , very special book when his right in. . The heart bone. . Shall we say? ? It is a book called Chinatown Pretty. . It is a book of incredible photographs and some just lovely words celebrating the elders who Don't just make up a the generation, , the greatest generation of our community but who? ? Make. . It beautiful with their very presence? ? So. . We left a welcome to they cost Bruce. . Valerie Lou in. Andrea . Lo. . Thank you guys so much for joining us. . Thanks for having US have come. . You guys have put together a really great project. . Know it started off as kind of a Website Project And then is now an a full-fledged published book. . It's Chinatown Pretty. . Is Just A. Really. . . Great tribute to Chinatown Elders grandmas and GRANDPAS, , but it hits on a very specific. . Aesthetic. . A fashion aesthetic. . I think what's really great about is that you've taken sort of the <hes>. . The the style photography mold and apply to <hes> kind of the more most unlikely subjects I think. . People who are very special in our community so Maybe, , you guys could describe actually what is Chinatown Pretty Yeah. . This is Valerie Chinatown pretty as a style that's common and chinatowns across North America <hes>. . It's really a patchwork of different. . Eras right close from Hong Kong? ? They've had for thirty years mixed with like say supreme hat that they got from who knows where? ? A lot of colors. . A lot of patterns <hes> sometimes I, , four shades of pink or four different floral patterns in one outfit. . And that's about keeping warm mostly <hes>. . So you could have a big puffy jacket but also keeping the sun out at the same time. . So really white built a hats. . I love that description <hes> just viscerally <hes> but I think for people who have not seen your blog and the book itself. . Just a little bit more kind of literal color around that. . So. . When we talk about transparency pretty we're talking about people who are usually immigrants for immigrants who but who have lived here a while and who have. . Synthesized a look and the fascinating thing is the look is different from person to person but somehow it all still fits this mold of Chinatown pretty it blends Western clothing it blends. . Traditional clothing from. . <unk>. . Historical closets as it were. . Sometimes across gender lines. . It's often incredibly colorful like you said, , is layered <hes> it's branded, , but it's also unique like there's a signature to how people. . In that generation dress that feels so much more vibrant than you know those of us, , who are I mean in in quarantine were like the sweatpants anyway. . But I guess, , what was it? ? That first struck you about the look of Of these elders and kind of lead you to coin the term and decided to actually explore it photographic in words. . Yeah. . This is Andrea I'm I'm the photographer behind the project and I think we would. . have. . Known each other for. . Several years now, , and we would hang out in Chinatown get dim sum and just people watch in the park. . And that <hes> press was really fascinating Chinatown I feel like has some of the best people watching and I think what we? ? Both intuited without really realizing why is that? ? A lot of the outfits we would see on the senior so people sixty five and plus. . They there's all this history woven into their outfits I think. . For us we might think, , oh, , it's like this vintage jacket from the seventies but you know for them it's like close. . It had ended preserved for decades. . Mixed with <hes> with newer Chinatown fines and let the handmade clothing as well. . So there's so much. . Shown in one outfit it's like there's a lot you can extract from it, , and so we were really curious about you know. . Not only like where did you get these cool shoes but also yeah, , how did this? ? Is just such A. . Look in. . So we're really curious. . About the stories and the people behind it and so that's that was sort of the seed of. . What led us to investigate. . So

Valerie Chinatown Chinatown Bruce Non Valerie Lou Jeff Yang Andrea Lo Hong Kong Asia North America
They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

They Call Us Bruce

05:02 min | 1 year ago

They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call Bruce Non filtered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and Jeff Yang, and this week we have a very special set of guests who are the authors, the creators of a very, very special book when his right in. The heart bone. Shall we say? It is a book called Chinatown Pretty. It is a book of incredible photographs and some just lovely words celebrating the elders who Don't just make up a the generation, the greatest generation of our community but who? Make. It beautiful with their very presence? So. We left a welcome to they cost Bruce. Valerie Lou in. Andrea Lo. Thank you guys so much for joining us. Thanks for having US have come. You guys have put together a really great project. Know it started off as kind of a Website Project And then is now an a full-fledged published book. It's Chinatown Pretty. Is Just A. Really. Great tribute to Chinatown Elders grandmas and GRANDPAS, but it hits on a very specific. Aesthetic. A fashion aesthetic. I think what's really great about is that you've taken sort of the The the style photography mold and apply to kind of the more most unlikely subjects I think. People who are very special in our community so Maybe, you guys could describe actually what is Chinatown Pretty Yeah. This is Valerie Chinatown pretty as a style that's common and chinatowns across North America It's really a patchwork of different. Eras right close from Hong Kong? They've had for thirty years mixed with like say supreme hat that they got from who knows where? A lot of colors. A lot of patterns sometimes I, four shades of pink or four different floral patterns in one outfit. And that's about keeping warm mostly So you could have a big puffy jacket but also keeping the sun out at the same time. So really white built a hats. I love that description just viscerally but I think for people who have not seen your blog and the book itself. Just a little bit more kind of literal color around that. So. When we talk about transparency pretty we're talking about people who are usually immigrants for immigrants who but who have lived here a while and who have. Synthesized a look and the fascinating thing is the look is different from person to person but somehow it all still fits this mold of Chinatown pretty it blends Western clothing it blends. Traditional clothing from. Historical closets as it were. Sometimes across gender lines. It's often incredibly colorful like you said, is layered it's branded, but it's also unique like there's a signature to how people. In that generation dress that feels so much more vibrant than you know those of us, who are I mean in in quarantine were like the sweatpants anyway. But I guess, what was it? That first struck you about the look of Of these elders and kind of lead you to coin the term and decided to actually explore it photographic in words. Yeah. This is Andrea I'm I'm the photographer behind the project and I think we would. have. Known each other for. Several years now, and we would hang out in Chinatown get dim sum and just people watch in the park. And that press was really fascinating Chinatown I feel like has some of the best people watching and I think what we? Both intuited without really realizing why is that? A lot of the outfits we would see on the senior so people sixty five and plus. They there's all this history woven into their outfits I think. For us we might think, oh, it's like this vintage jacket from the seventies but you know for them it's like close. It had ended preserved for decades. Mixed with with newer Chinatown fines and let the handmade clothing as well. So there's so much. Shown in one outfit it's like there's a lot you can extract from it, and so we were really curious about you know. Not only like where did you get these cool shoes but also yeah, how did this? Is just such A. Look in. So we're really curious. About the stories and the people behind it and so that's that was sort of the seed of. What led us to investigate. So

Bruce Non Jeff Yang Valerie Lou Andrea Lo Valerie Chinatown Asia Bruce America North America Hong Kong Andrea
They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

They Call Us Bruce

05:02 min | 1 year ago

They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call Bruce Non filtered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and Jeff Yang, and this week we have a very special set of guests who are the authors, the creators of a very, very special book when his right in. The heart bone. Shall we say? It is a book called Chinatown Pretty. It is a book of incredible photographs and some just lovely words celebrating the elders who Don't just make up a the generation, the greatest generation of our community but who? Make. It beautiful with their very presence? So. We left a welcome to they cost Bruce. Valerie Lou in. Andrea Lo. Thank you guys so much for joining us. Thanks for having US have come. You guys have put together a really great project. Know it started off as kind of a Website Project And then is now an a full-fledged published book. It's Chinatown Pretty. Is Just A. Really. Great tribute to Chinatown Elders grandmas and GRANDPAS, but it hits on a very specific. Aesthetic. A fashion aesthetic. I think what's really great about is that you've taken sort of the The the style photography mold and apply to kind of the more most unlikely subjects I think. People who are very special in our community so Maybe, you guys could describe actually what is Chinatown Pretty Yeah. This is Valerie Chinatown pretty as a style that's common and chinatowns across North America It's really a patchwork of different. Eras right close from Hong Kong? They've had for thirty years mixed with like say supreme hat that they got from who knows where? A lot of colors. A lot of patterns sometimes I, four shades of pink or four different floral patterns in one outfit. And that's about keeping warm mostly So you could have a big puffy jacket but also keeping the sun out at the same time. So really white built a hats. I love that description just viscerally but I think for people who have not seen your blog and the book itself. Just a little bit more kind of literal color around that. So. When we talk about transparency pretty we're talking about people who are usually immigrants for immigrants who but who have lived here a while and who have. Synthesized a look and the fascinating thing is the look is different from person to person but somehow it all still fits this mold of Chinatown pretty it blends Western clothing it blends. Traditional clothing from. Historical closets as it were. Sometimes across gender lines. It's often incredibly colorful like you said, is layered it's branded, but it's also unique like there's a signature to how people. In that generation dress that feels so much more vibrant than you know those of us, who are I mean in in quarantine were like the sweatpants anyway. But I guess, what was it? That first struck you about the look of Of these elders and kind of lead you to coin the term and decided to actually explore it photographic in words. Yeah. This is Andrea I'm I'm the photographer behind the project and I think we would. have. Known each other for. Several years now, and we would hang out in Chinatown get dim sum and just people watch in the park. And that press was really fascinating Chinatown I feel like has some of the best people watching and I think what we? Both intuited without really realizing why is that? A lot of the outfits we would see on the senior so people sixty five and plus. They there's all this history woven into their outfits I think. For us we might think, oh, it's like this vintage jacket from the seventies but you know for them it's like close. It had ended preserved for decades. Mixed with with newer Chinatown fines and let the handmade clothing as well. So there's so much. Shown in one outfit it's like there's a lot you can extract from it, and so we were really curious about you know. Not only like where did you get these cool shoes but also yeah, how did this? Is just such A. Look in. So we're really curious. About the stories and the people behind it and so that's that was sort of the seed of. What led us to investigate.

Bruce Non Jeff Yang Valerie Lou Andrea Lo Valerie Chinatown Asia Bruce America North America Hong Kong Andrea
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call Bruce Non filtered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and Jeff Yang, , and this week we have a very special set of guests who are the authors, , the creators of a very, , very special book when his right in. . The heart bone. . Shall we say? ? It is a book called Chinatown Pretty. . It is a book of incredible photographs and some just lovely words celebrating the elders who Don't just make up a the generation, , the greatest generation of our community but who? ? Make. . It beautiful with their very presence? ? So. . We left a welcome to they cost Bruce. . Valerie Lou in. Andrea . Lo. . Thank you guys so much for joining us. . Thanks for having US have come. . You guys have put together a really great project. . Know it started off as kind of a Website Project And then is now an a full-fledged published book. . It's Chinatown Pretty. . Is Just A. Really. . . Great tribute to Chinatown Elders grandmas and GRANDPAS, , but it hits on a very specific. . Aesthetic. . A fashion aesthetic. . I think what's really great about is that you've taken sort of the <hes>. . The the style photography mold and apply to <hes> kind of the more most unlikely subjects I think. . People who are very special in our community so Maybe, , you guys could describe actually what is Chinatown Pretty Yeah. . This is Valerie Chinatown pretty as a style that's common and chinatowns across North America <hes>. . It's really a patchwork of different. . Eras right close from Hong Kong? ? They've had for thirty years mixed with like say supreme hat that they got from who knows where? ? A lot of colors. . A lot of patterns <hes> sometimes I, , four shades of pink or four different floral patterns in one outfit. . And that's about keeping warm mostly <hes>. . So you could have a big puffy jacket but also keeping the sun out at the same time. . So really white built a hats. . I love that description <hes> just viscerally <hes> but I think for people who have not seen your blog and the book itself. . Just a little bit more kind of literal color around that. . So. . When we talk about transparency pretty we're talking about people who are usually immigrants for immigrants who but who have lived here a while and who have. . Synthesized a look and the fascinating thing is the look is different from person to person but somehow it all still fits this mold of Chinatown pretty it blends Western clothing it blends. . Traditional clothing from. . <unk>. . Historical closets as it were. . Sometimes across gender lines. . It's often incredibly colorful like you said, , is layered <hes> it's branded, , but it's also unique like there's a signature to how people. . In that generation dress that feels so much more vibrant than you know those of us, , who are I mean in in quarantine were like the sweatpants anyway. . But I guess, , what was it? ? That first struck you about the look of Of these elders and kind of lead you to coin the term and decided to actually explore it photographic in words. . Yeah. . This is Andrea I'm I'm the photographer behind the project and I think we would. . have. . Known each other for. . Several years now, , and we would hang out in Chinatown get dim sum and just people watch in the park. . And that <hes> press was really fascinating Chinatown I feel like has some of the best people watching and I think what we? ? Both intuited without really realizing why is that? ? A lot of the outfits we would see on the senior so people sixty five and plus. . They there's all this history woven into their outfits I think. . For us we might think, , oh, , it's like this vintage jacket from the seventies but you know for them it's like close. . It had ended preserved for decades. . Mixed with <hes> with newer Chinatown fines and let the handmade clothing as well. . So there's so much. . Shown in one outfit it's like there's a lot you can extract from it, , and so we were really curious about you know. . Not only like where did you get these cool shoes but also yeah, , how did this? ? Is just such A. . Look in. . So we're really curious. . About the stories and the people behind it and so that's that was sort of the seed of. . What led us to investigate. .

Valerie Chinatown Chinatown Bruce Non Valerie Lou Jeff Yang Andrea Lo Hong Kong Asia North America
They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

They Call Us Bruce

05:01 min | 1 year ago

They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call Bruce Non filtered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and Jeff Yang, and this week we have a very special set of guests who are the authors, the creators of a very, very special book when his right in. The heart bone. Shall we say? It is a book called Chinatown Pretty. It is a book of incredible photographs and some just lovely words celebrating the elders who Don't just make up a the generation, the greatest generation of our community but who? Make. It beautiful with their very presence? So. We left a welcome to they cost Bruce. Valerie Lou in. Andrea Lo. Thank you guys so much for joining us. Thanks for having US have come. You guys have put together a really great project. Know it started off as kind of a Website Project And then is now an a full-fledged published book. It's Chinatown Pretty. Is Just A. Really. Great tribute to Chinatown Elders grandmas and GRANDPAS, but it hits on a very specific. Aesthetic. A fashion aesthetic. I think what's really great about is that you've taken sort of the The the style photography mold and apply to kind of the more most unlikely subjects I think. People who are very special in our community so Maybe, you guys could describe actually what is Chinatown Pretty Yeah. This is Valerie Chinatown pretty as a style that's common and chinatowns across North America It's really a patchwork of different. Eras right close from Hong Kong? They've had for thirty years mixed with like say supreme hat that they got from who knows where? A lot of colors. A lot of patterns sometimes I, four shades of pink or four different floral patterns in one outfit. And that's about keeping warm mostly So you could have a big puffy jacket but also keeping the sun out at the same time. So really white built a hats. I love that description just viscerally but I think for people who have not seen your blog and the book itself. Just a little bit more kind of literal color around that. So. When we talk about transparency pretty we're talking about people who are usually immigrants for immigrants who but who have lived here a while and who have. Synthesized a look and the fascinating thing is the look is different from person to person but somehow it all still fits this mold of Chinatown pretty it blends Western clothing it blends. Traditional clothing from. Historical closets as it were. Sometimes across gender lines. It's often incredibly colorful like you said, is layered it's branded, but it's also unique like there's a signature to how people. In that generation dress that feels so much more vibrant than you know those of us, who are I mean in in quarantine were like the sweatpants anyway. But I guess, what was it? That first struck you about the look of Of these elders and kind of lead you to coin the term and decided to actually explore it photographic in words. Yeah. This is Andrea I'm I'm the photographer behind the project and I think we would. have. Known each other for. Several years now, and we would hang out in Chinatown get dim sum and just people watch in the park. And that press was really fascinating Chinatown I feel like has some of the best people watching and I think what we? Both intuited without really realizing why is that? A lot of the outfits we would see on the senior so people sixty five and plus. They there's all this history woven into their outfits I think. For us we might think, oh, it's like this vintage jacket from the seventies but you know for them it's like close. It had ended preserved for decades. Mixed with with newer Chinatown fines and let the handmade clothing as well. So there's so much. Shown in one outfit it's like there's a lot you can extract from it, and so we were really curious about you know. Not only like where did you get these cool shoes but also yeah, how did this? Is just such A. Look in. So we're really curious. About the stories and the people behind it and so that's that was sort of the seed of. What led us to investigate.

Bruce Non Jeff Yang Valerie Lou Andrea Lo Valerie Chinatown Asia Bruce America North America Hong Kong Andrea
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce and unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America. . I'm bill you. . And I'm Jeff Yang and we are so incredibly pleased tonight to have with us a very special guest, , a friend of ours, , a friend of the PODCAST and a brilliant <hes> animation creator. . That's kind of a big drum roll right now who's it going to be? ? But I'm here to tell you that it is in fact, , Daniel Chong the creator of we bear bears one of our favorite animated series Daniel welcomes the fogcast. . Welcome. . Thank you for that intro. . Man I don't know what to do with that that. . Good now. . All right. . No for real. . Huge. . Admirers of yours and big fans of <hes> of we bear bears <hes> I've you know as much as possible I've I've kept up with it given. . The fact of the world is basically a rolling apocalypse I'd. . Things things we've your bears are the things that make life feel less like a total and utter shit show. . And I will say <hes>. . We're particularly excited because we have the chance to actually take a look at the. . We are bears movie, which , is sort of like an exclamation point on the series and it was fantastic. . I mean I have so many things to ask about say about it especially the fact that it feels like. . I don't want to say this <hes> to overstate this in some ways, , but it feels Kinda like an important movie in ways that I will elaborate. . Thank you perfect for twenty twenty I'll say that But let's begin actually Daniel. . By talking about how this got started in I mean for those of you who have not yet watch, , we bear bears. . It actually began <hes> as a web comic called the bear bears right. . Three bear bears right shortly there and tells how that where that came from and I guess how this how this turned into. . What it is today. . Yeah <hes>. . It was a web comic that I had created it. . You know I was working in the industry in the animation industry ad. . I just wanted to make my own thing. . And at the time you know <hes> people are posting things on blogs and stuff. . So I created this comic on my own called three bear bears is kind of a play on Goldilocks, , three bears and so <hes>. . Yeah it was. . It was a comic that <hes>. . It was very like free for me. . I. . Didn't like really right out anything ahead of time I just kind of like A. . Free associated as I was drawing it and nobody read it and nobody cared and just completely I remember going onto comic forums and trying to post it like, , Hey, , guys check this out in like nobody wanted to talk to me on forum. . So it was just like. . But but the thing is I was already working. . So it's not like it was so debilitating. . What was it? ? The only thing I had? ? It was just You know it is it is that was just it was my outlet that my special hobby I guess at the time. . So but <hes> as I was in the animation industry working as a story artist for about ten years <hes> run by fifth year I was starting to get antsy I just wanted to create my own things. . So <hes>, , I started taking these comics different ideas that I had started just flushing them out into pitches into stories and or. . TV shows, , and that's where three bears <unk> became weaver bears. . I got to change that title for legal reasons apparently. . Some <hes> what's called a some company owned I think there were a taxidermy company, , they own something similar. . So. . <hes>. . You know now the title really means nothing at it makes no sense but it's So. . Yeah. . We're not responsive opportunity right there if you. . Off. . So. . When you when you came up with this for the idea when he became a cartoon a series, , like what were the kind of the things that you were <hes> like how did you pitch it honestly when I tried tried to explain this series to people who've never seen it? ? Yeah. . It's kind of a weird thing to try to like I like the concept is such a <hes>. . It's so simple and yet it. . So it's too simple in a lot of ways. . Yeah and then trying to explain to the emotional complexity of is difficult. . You know. . I think the pitch itself was was. . The visuals help a lot. . I'm not just pitching words so. . I think there are two things that were very crucial to well, , maybe three. . Crucial things to the the Bible ever the pitch that I did that help sell at one was the visual of stack these three bear stack them each other which you know I it was a very iconic thing in the comic and that was definitely the thing carried into the pitch, , and so you know I pretty much started off the Bible by showing this image of the three bears together. . So it just. . kind of it's sort of just evokes a very strong image up the top. . The second image that I put in the Bible was an image of the three bears mingling at a party with a bunch of Humid's holding like cups at a party and nobody is freaking out by them. . They're just all mingling together as if they're like, , you just talking about the weather or something like that, , and that was another like. . Important image to kind of sell here's the joke. . Is that these three years nobody freaks out when they see them they're just one of you guys except there bears. . So that was the other really important image to sell this project

Daniel Chong Jeff Yang Bruce Asia America weaver
They Call Us We Bare Bears

They Call Us Bruce

05:38 min | 1 year ago

They Call Us We Bare Bears

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce and unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America. I'm bill you. And I'm Jeff Yang and we are so incredibly pleased tonight to have with us a very special guest, a friend of ours, a friend of the PODCAST and a brilliant animation creator. That's kind of a big drum roll right now who's it going to be? But I'm here to tell you that it is in fact, Daniel Chong the creator of we bear bears one of our favorite animated series Daniel welcomes the fogcast. Welcome. Thank you for that intro. Man I don't know what to do with that that. Good now. All right. No for real. Huge. Admirers of yours and big fans of of we bear bears I've you know as much as possible I've I've kept up with it given. The fact of the world is basically a rolling apocalypse I'd. Things things we've your bears are the things that make life feel less like a total and utter shit show. And I will say We're particularly excited because we have the chance to actually take a look at the. We are bears movie, which is sort of like an exclamation point on the series and it was fantastic. I mean I have so many things to ask about say about it especially the fact that it feels like. I don't want to say this to overstate this in some ways, but it feels Kinda like an important movie in ways that I will elaborate. Thank you perfect for twenty twenty I'll say that But let's begin actually Daniel. By talking about how this got started in I mean for those of you who have not yet watch, we bear bears. It actually began as a web comic called the bear bears right. Three bear bears right shortly there and tells how that where that came from and I guess how this how this turned into. What it is today. Yeah It was a web comic that I had created it. You know I was working in the industry in the animation industry ad. I just wanted to make my own thing. And at the time you know people are posting things on blogs and stuff. So I created this comic on my own called three bear bears is kind of a play on Goldilocks, three bears and so Yeah it was. It was a comic that It was very like free for me. I. Didn't like really right out anything ahead of time I just kind of like A. Free associated as I was drawing it and nobody read it and nobody cared and just completely I remember going onto comic forums and trying to post it like, Hey, guys check this out in like nobody wanted to talk to me on forum. So it was just like. But but the thing is I was already working. So it's not like it was so debilitating. What was it? The only thing I had? It was just You know it is it is that was just it was my outlet that my special hobby I guess at the time. So but as I was in the animation industry working as a story artist for about ten years run by fifth year I was starting to get antsy I just wanted to create my own things. So I started taking these comics different ideas that I had started just flushing them out into pitches into stories and or. TV shows, and that's where three bears became weaver bears. I got to change that title for legal reasons apparently. Some what's called a some company owned I think there were a taxidermy company, they own something similar. So. You know now the title really means nothing at it makes no sense but it's So. Yeah. We're not responsive opportunity right there if you. Off. So. When you when you came up with this for the idea when he became a cartoon a series, like what were the kind of the things that you were like how did you pitch it honestly when I tried tried to explain this series to people who've never seen it? Yeah. It's kind of a weird thing to try to like I like the concept is such a It's so simple and yet it. So it's too simple in a lot of ways. Yeah and then trying to explain to the emotional complexity of is difficult. You know. I think the pitch itself was was. The visuals help a lot. I'm not just pitching words so. I think there are two things that were very crucial to well, maybe three. Crucial things to the the Bible ever the pitch that I did that help sell at one was the visual of stack these three bear stack them each other which you know I it was a very iconic thing in the comic and that was definitely the thing carried into the pitch, and so you know I pretty much started off the Bible by showing this image of the three bears together. So it just. kind of it's sort of just evokes a very strong image up the top. The second image that I put in the Bible was an image of the three bears mingling at a party with a bunch of Humid's holding like cups at a party and nobody is freaking out by them. They're just all mingling together as if they're like, you just talking about the weather or something like that, and that was another like. Important image to kind of sell here's the joke. Is that these three years nobody freaks out when they see them they're just one of you guys except there bears. So that was the other really important image to sell this project

Jeff Yang Daniel Chong Daniel Bruce Asia America Bible
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Hello, and , welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America. . I bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and we are here. . With the director and writer of I gotTA. . Say just one of my favorite films to have come out this year not just because it hits square and kind of like the intersection of. . Sweet spots for me. . But also because it really revives John that is kind of synonymous with. . They cost Bruce in some ways, , and that film is the paper tigers and the filmmaker in question is bow tran. . Bow. . Thank you for joining us on the PODCAST. . Welcome. . Hello. . Hello. . Thanks for having. . Me Guess. . Big Fan. . At. Likewise. . . No seriously about so <hes> this film is basically about a set of martial arts enthusiasts young young guys who have grown up learning under a master. . who have kept on growing up as a were. . Gotten Kinda midlife and found themselves in a situation where they have to kind of recover the skills that they've lost and like I said for me, , it really is just at the intersection of a lot of stuff that I care about and or am. . So. . Thank you for making it. . And Yeah, , thank you for talking to us about. . My pleasure. . Thanks for watching. . Really glad to hear you guys enjoy. . I let me say like, , let me express a little bit of. . Sorrow and regret. . and sadness on your behalf because. . The world being what it is the circumstances being what it is. . Many people are going to experience. . This movie are not going to experience movie the way I really think they should. . Experience it which is with an audience because this is such a fun crowd-pleasing movie <hes>. . We should say like I saw it advertised as a as a martial arts comedy which it is. . But it's a bummer that we're not people aren't going to really get to see it in that ideal situation. . Yeah I. . Mean it's kind of a it's kind of a surreal thing to go through this year with all festivals. . Now pivoting to virtual and we had a world premiere <hes> couple of weeks ago at Fantasia, , which is usually out of Montreal and <hes>. . We did have a <hes> zoom QNA afterwards. . And <hes> is actually fun because it was the first time. The . actors saw the movie for the first time and all that and then <hes> Cuny was over and I got kicked out of the Zoom Room. . There I was sitting in the dark? ? The World Premiere. . Back. . But. You . know you know we we may do I, , mean. . That's kind of the way things are, and , we just have to Kinda forge on. . But Yeah we all had always hoped in envisioned <hes> to be able to play this in front of crowd because I think that's kind of like the best experience at least for me growing up as well. Just . watching movies that I love. . And then be able to kind of bring that. . Old old-timey feeling back again. . But hopefully, , maybe oh Soon soon, , enough will be a on our recovery in fields. . Kind of have a place when we can share it altogether. . I. . I kinda figured out what the <hes>, , the genre of this sort of ends up being in white works for me. . So well, , it's basically old school meets old just. . But. . I mean these AVIV, , the the issue of where we are. . Now how this all landing I I will say that. . There's something really special about seeing the movie mean it's taken a while to get here and I know this of course, , <unk> <hes> I was fortunate enough smart enough to be early on the bandwagon on this thing asked for it in the kick starter as was Hudson Yang. . And Shout shout out. . Yeah and it feels a little bit like it's bringing with it. . A breath of what it was like before all this happened I. . Mean you know we're for me the <HES>, , the things that make the movie just. . Feel, , special to me is. . It's it's the kind of film that you can't really make in quarantine at all. . It's film that it's not like a giant. . You Know Effects Laden blockbuster, , but it has the the effects that you can only do with people are trained and skillful right which is. . People finding hand hand. . Real. . Martial, , artists in. . Most cases. . Who are are going head to head with choreography that you can't hide right there. . This does really feel to me and we seen other attempts before. . Like A legit revival of that The film right and? ? I mean I wanted to kind of dig a little into your inspirations and influences in deciding to. . Revive this Jonah to begin with. . And here a little more about the way this journey started. . Yeah I mean I could have imagined. . No. . You guys have been tracking project for a long time. . We've been you know I, , I was with Mike Alaska's my producer and we pitched this at the C. Three Project Market V. C. You know twenty eleven in front of like Daniel Day Kim and Desirous Yamashita in. . A Teddy Zee. . Like nine years ago when I had a one page treatment and it was just like. . A hair we are. . So I wish I could say we planned it, , but we really just got in by Cheney chin-chin in terms of just shooting this film at the at the end of summer last year two, , thousand nineteen, , and then we were imposed all the way up until you know when the lockdown started happening and all that stuff. . So <hes> yeah I mean literally is that Snapshot Wife Before. . <hes> the pandemic and a lot of ways. . So it's just it's just kind of worked out that way and if we waited any any additional months or waited, , you know in any way to to shoot the film I, , don't think we re we would be here having this conversation. . Yeah. . So it's Kinda trippy looking back on just the timing of it all. .

Bruce Jeff Yang Asia America midlife director John writer
They Call Us The Paper Tigers

They Call Us Bruce

06:09 min | 1 year ago

They Call Us The Paper Tigers

"Hello, and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America. I bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and we are here. With the director and writer of I gotTA. Say just one of my favorite films to have come out this year not just because it hits square and kind of like the intersection of. Sweet spots for me. But also because it really revives John that is kind of synonymous with. They cost Bruce in some ways, and that film is the paper tigers and the filmmaker in question is bow tran. Bow. Thank you for joining us on the PODCAST. Welcome. Hello. Hello. Thanks for having. Me Guess. Big Fan. At. Likewise. No seriously about so this film is basically about a set of martial arts enthusiasts young young guys who have grown up learning under a master. who have kept on growing up as a were. Gotten Kinda midlife and found themselves in a situation where they have to kind of recover the skills that they've lost and like I said for me, it really is just at the intersection of a lot of stuff that I care about and or am. So. Thank you for making it. And Yeah, thank you for talking to us about. My pleasure. Thanks for watching. Really glad to hear you guys enjoy. I let me say like, let me express a little bit of. Sorrow and regret. and sadness on your behalf because. The world being what it is the circumstances being what it is. Many people are going to experience. This movie are not going to experience movie the way I really think they should. Experience it which is with an audience because this is such a fun crowd-pleasing movie We should say like I saw it advertised as a as a martial arts comedy which it is. But it's a bummer that we're not people aren't going to really get to see it in that ideal situation. Yeah I. Mean it's kind of a it's kind of a surreal thing to go through this year with all festivals. Now pivoting to virtual and we had a world premiere couple of weeks ago at Fantasia, which is usually out of Montreal and We did have a zoom QNA afterwards. And is actually fun because it was the first time. The actors saw the movie for the first time and all that and then Cuny was over and I got kicked out of the Zoom Room. There I was sitting in the dark? The World Premiere. Back. But. You know you know we we may do I, mean. That's kind of the way things are, and we just have to Kinda forge on. But Yeah we all had always hoped in envisioned to be able to play this in front of crowd because I think that's kind of like the best experience at least for me growing up as well. Just watching movies that I love. And then be able to kind of bring that. Old old-timey feeling back again. But hopefully, maybe oh Soon soon, enough will be a on our recovery in fields. Kind of have a place when we can share it altogether. I. I kinda figured out what the the genre of this sort of ends up being in white works for me. So well, it's basically old school meets old just. But. I mean these AVIV, the the issue of where we are. Now how this all landing I I will say that. There's something really special about seeing the movie mean it's taken a while to get here and I know this of course, I was fortunate enough smart enough to be early on the bandwagon on this thing asked for it in the kick starter as was Hudson Yang. And Shout shout out. Yeah and it feels a little bit like it's bringing with it. A breath of what it was like before all this happened I. Mean you know we're for me the the things that make the movie just. Feel, special to me is. It's it's the kind of film that you can't really make in quarantine at all. It's film that it's not like a giant. You Know Effects Laden blockbuster, but it has the the effects that you can only do with people are trained and skillful right which is. People finding hand hand. Real. Martial, artists in. Most cases. Who are are going head to head with choreography that you can't hide right there. This does really feel to me and we seen other attempts before. Like A legit revival of that The film right and? I mean I wanted to kind of dig a little into your inspirations and influences in deciding to. Revive this Jonah to begin with. And here a little more about the way this journey started. Yeah I mean I could have imagined. No. You guys have been tracking project for a long time. We've been you know I, I was with Mike Alaska's my producer and we pitched this at the C. Three Project Market V. C. You know twenty eleven in front of like Daniel Day Kim and Desirous Yamashita in. A Teddy Zee. Like nine years ago when I had a one page treatment and it was just like. A hair we are. So I wish I could say we planned it, but we really just got in by Cheney chin-chin in terms of just shooting this film at the at the end of summer last year two, thousand nineteen, and then we were imposed all the way up until you know when the lockdown started happening and all that stuff. So yeah I mean literally is that Snapshot Wife Before. the pandemic and a lot of ways. So it's just it's just kind of worked out that way and if we waited any any additional months or waited, you know in any way to to shoot the film I, don't think we re we would be here having this conversation. Yeah. So it's Kinda trippy looking back on just the timing of it all.

Bruce Jeff Yang Teddy Zee Asia America Montreal John Midlife Director Zoom Room Hudson Yang Jonah Cheney Cuny Writer Mike Alaska Daniel Day Kim Desirous Yamashita Producer
They Call Us Sujata Day

They Call Us Bruce

05:32 min | 1 year ago

They Call Us Sujata Day

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call Bruce An unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm Phil You Jeff Yang, and we have a fantastic guests this episode somebody who wanted to have on for a while somebody loves and whose work Meyer and that is Giada Day. Actor filmmaker and the creator of a new film definition please which were incredibly excited to be talking about now Sujata welcome to the episode. Thank you for having me. Welcome. It's a power to Sunday night party. Suggest a day. You get that all the time. Oh yes. Nothing. Nothing like being agent and you know leaning into the name things because we get that. But SUJATA. Again, we have kind of all known each other ish like we've been in the same circles for a while and obviously been admirers of the stuff even doing since way back you know awkward black girl and of course you're working insecure. But this is a new thing right? Like a feature film and it's a feature film that seems. Very much rooted in your reality if you will. Since you wrote it and directed it and are starring in it. Yeah I Have you know done? Awkward Black Run I was on insecure and? Watching East race journey from the very beginning of you know s meeting on twitter and then going to her dad's doctor's office in Inglewood to shoot a twenty minute. Seen me walking out of there being like what the heck did. I get myself into. And watching her put awkward black girl on her credit cards and then US getting picked up by Ferrall for the second season and then HBO for insecure and. That entire journey alongside ISA. was such a huge learning experience for me which. All, culminated in the creation of definition please and me having the confidence to write the script and produce it and directed and starring it is all. Just snow grateful to have been part of ISA's. Happen in that gave me the confidence to embark on my own feature film and just get right into it and do it and. So I'm just so thankful that people are watching it now and enjoying it and. Sending me responses to the trailer and the film if they're watching it festivals. And it's just been really exciting to watch and. Also the it's not an autobiographical film, but it is really personal to me like all of my projects I start from a real place. So it'll be like a real person or a real situation that I was in, and then I will fictional is it from there so for example, this script started with me winning my spelling bee in fourth grade I don't know if you guys have been in spelling bees. Not Personally I I'm actually quite a good speller. Ford is worth. Much better that than like mass, for instance. But I've never competed and I'm sure you would crush me even at your fourth grade level. No I don't think you know what it's. It's probably because you were you always an avid reader. I was I was A. Kid, who kind of snuck books? Under the covers at night right and stayed up reading. Yeah. Yeah. Me Too and and I never trained for spelling bees and my parents never pushed me to do. I don't even think they were aware that spelling bees were a thing and in my tiny class of ten people in Fourth Grade One my spelling the which you know when you win out of ten people at doesn't feel like a huge win. But but it felt like a big deal everyone was proud. My teachers were proud of me. Mrs Lewis you know she took me to regionals. and. Once I went to regionals. It was just a whole other experience because there was a huge stage and it wasn't in the cafeteria anymore and there was a microphone and there was an audience and I think I got really nervous and I went out. On the first round and I misspelled radish. And I spelled it with two DS instead of one, and then I came down and Mrs Lewis Hugged me and I could tell that she knew that I was I was nervous and disappointed in myself but she was so comforting and I went back to my school and my friends just started. Me and making. Because I missed our such easy easy word. And and you know what I accepted the you know I accepted the bowling for that because I was like you know what? It wasn't easy word and and I should've gone out on a hard word.

ISA A. Kid Sujata Mrs Lewis United States Jeff Yang Bruce An Giada Day Twitter Asia Meyer Inglewood Ford HBO Ferrall
They Call Us Mulan

They Call Us Bruce

07:03 min | 1 year ago

They Call Us Mulan

"Low, and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and this will indeed be an unfiltered podcast. It is one which we are going to used to. You know spend talking about something that we've been wanting to talk about for a while waiting to see for awhile, and that is Disney's live. On which released this weekend right before Labor Day and immediately generated quite a lot of opinions some of which we have. And we have guests, schools, opinions in some of them our guests We've seen quite a lot of in somewhere new. Who have with us? Phil? We have making her third appearance on they call US Bruce. Quite possibly a record. Record record. Our good friend formerly journalists of the with the Hollywood reporter most recently, she did a profile of Tima in Vanity Fair. Are Powell Rebecca Son Rebecca. Welcome. Thank you. I'm here to reinforce and ensure that my title as most frequent they call us first guest. On. Challenged. Bring honor to us all. We also have a first timer on the show hopefully, not the last frankie. Hong who is a freelance writer and illustrator and Frankie also grew up until age nine in China and has a pretty solid grasp. I think of some of the larger context around the film both as somebody personally in in more immerse perhaps in Chinese culture than those who grew up here but also just from being able to read and understand the conversations that are going on in. Chinese about this. Conversation's. Break Welcome, to the show. Thank you for having me. So excited to chat with you about this. Well, the conversation has been proceeding Apace has a not I mean literally the show. The movie itself debuted Friday, and I think that's we don't have any metrics yet that feels like a lot of people in have been streaming it despite the way that it's being presented and I mean, maybe that's the first thing to talk about a little bit like. The film. You know how the film has changed over time how it was what was meant to be in where it is now today in this time of Of Covert in quarantine in theaters basically being shot I think I wanted to ask if maybe everybody could share their relationship with the original film because that's that will serve you know color a lot of people's. The way they perceive this this new one right. Rebecca. What was it like watching the original Milan and how did that impact actually shape? This one for you. Yeah. Well, for me, I you know sort of your classic ABC asian-american Crawl one in the bay area you know live here lived in America, my whole life, and so I was I'm looking this up now and I was actually not cured with anime tomatoes teenagers. So I think I was sixteen when I came out Even, though I was no longer a small child I, what I remember most palpably was bursting into tears at the end of the animated film when Milan she's at the Forbidden City and she turns around and it feels like the entire country is kneeling and bowing and Reverend before her and the swell like I remember for years after that, like you know even without we watching the film just thinking about that moment. Just swallow emotion. Kind of being unprepared to see that image of of somebody who representative you know about as exactly. Who I was, you know just a small Chinese girl could be treated with such respect and honor. Listen. you know and reverence that was so moving. So that's what I remember most about you know the animated law and I think the way that made me feel is is sort of what I treasured about that movie even though it was, you know I haven't seen it in such such a long time. And Frankie in you grew up until age nine in China, right? Yeah in Beijing was. Yes. But you but you did also see Milan and I'm atrophies theaters or at home or so I was already living in the US by the time Mulan came out. So I washed it in Missouri were I was in the fifth grade and I think. My first exposure to Mulan the figure was actually when my mother taught me the ballot of Milan and made me memorize recited back to her. So this character was already one of my favorites. You know this cross dressing heroine who bests all the boys that was basically my dream I wanted to. Show everyone how amazing I could be. So you know I wasn't super. I had very mixed feelings about it because even as a ten year old I was you know I had trepidation about whether or not Disney was going to do a good job representing my culture, my country. So but at the same time, of course, I was really proud to see that they chose a Chinese story to bring to the big screen. So when I saw it I think I continue to feel mixed because there were these moments like the one that Rebecca described was incredibly moving but there were also these little things that day I guess. I don't know if I would say they got wrong because you can tell a story a story Harry you want, but it's more like there were very clear league. American narrative elements that were meant to. Get, a reaction out of American audiences. It makes sense but as a Chinese viewer I just thought while if you're going to represent my culture, why don't you get it right? Why don't you think that the? Quote Unquote correct representation can't also get a reaction out of Americans I remember when she dressed up for the matchmaker in the face was all white I just thought well, this reminds me of Geishas much more so than Address up Cheney's lady and maybe geishas is much more recognizable symbol. But why can't you just make her look uncomfortable as? A Chinese woman rather than something that looks more, Japanese. Their stuff like that.

Rebecca Son Rebecca Disney Milan Bruce Frankie China Mulan Jeff Yang Phil Geishas Forbidden City Asia Missouri Beijing Hollywood United States ABC
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Low, , and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and this will indeed be an unfiltered podcast. . It is one which we are going to used to. . You know spend talking about something that we've been wanting to talk about for a while waiting to see for awhile, , and that is Disney's live. . On which released this weekend right before Labor Day and immediately generated quite a lot of opinions some of which we have. . And we have guests, , schools, , opinions in some of them <hes> our guests <hes>. . We've seen quite a lot of in somewhere new. . Who have with us? ? Phil? ? We have making her third appearance on they call US Bruce. . Quite possibly a record. . Record record. . Our good friend <hes> formerly journalists of the with the Hollywood reporter most recently, , she did a profile of Tima in Vanity Fair. . Are Powell Rebecca Son Rebecca. . Welcome. . Thank you. . I'm here to reinforce and ensure that my title as most frequent they call us first guest. . On. . Challenged. . Bring honor to us all. . We also have a first timer on the show hopefully, not , the last frankie. . Hong who is a freelance writer and illustrator and Frankie also grew up until age nine in China and has a pretty solid grasp. . I think of some of the larger context around the film both as somebody personally in in more immerse perhaps in Chinese culture than those who grew up here but also just from being able to read and understand the conversations that are going on in. . Chinese about this. . Conversation's. . Break Welcome, , to the show. . Thank you for having me. . So excited to chat with you about this. . Well, , the conversation has been proceeding Apace has a not I mean literally the show. . The movie itself <hes>. . debuted Friday, , and I think that's we don't have any metrics yet that feels like a lot of people in have been streaming it despite the way that it's being presented and I mean, , maybe that's the first thing to talk about a little bit like. . The film. . You know how the film has changed over time how it was what was meant to be in where it is now today in this time of Of Covert in quarantine in theaters basically being shot I think I wanted to ask if <hes> maybe everybody could share their relationship with the original film because that's that will serve you know color a lot of people's. . The way they perceive this this new one right. . Rebecca. . What was it like watching the original Milan and how did that impact actually shape? ? This one for you. . Yeah. . Well, , for me, , I <hes> you know sort of your classic ABC asian-american Crawl one in the bay area you know live here lived in America, , my whole life, , and so I was I'm looking this up now and I was actually not cured with anime tomatoes teenagers. . So I think I was sixteen when I came out <hes>. . Even, , though I was no longer a small child I, , what I remember most palpably was bursting into tears at the end of the animated film when Milan she's at the Forbidden City and she turns around and it feels like the entire country is kneeling and bowing and Reverend before her and the swell like I remember for years after that, , like you know even without we watching the film just thinking about that moment. . Just swallow emotion. . Kind of being unprepared to see that image of of somebody who representative you know about as exactly. . Who I was, , you know just a small Chinese girl could be treated with such respect and honor. . Listen. . <hes> you know <hes> and reverence that was so moving. So . that's what I remember most about you know the animated law and I think the way that made me feel is is sort of what I treasured about that movie even though it was, , you know I haven't seen it in such such a long time. .

Bruce Rebecca Son Rebecca Phil Disney Jeff Yang Asia ABC Frankie Milan China Hollywood reporter America Hong writer
A conversation about Mulan

They Call Us Bruce

04:35 min | 1 year ago

A conversation about Mulan

"Low, and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and this will indeed be an unfiltered podcast. It is one which we are going to used to. You know spend talking about something that we've been wanting to talk about for a while waiting to see for awhile, and that is Disney's live. On which released this weekend right before Labor Day and immediately generated quite a lot of opinions some of which we have. And we have guests, schools, opinions in some of them our guests We've seen quite a lot of in somewhere new. Who have with us? Phil? We have making her third appearance on they call US Bruce. Quite possibly a record. Record record. Our good friend formerly journalists of the with the Hollywood reporter most recently, she did a profile of Tima in Vanity Fair. Are Powell Rebecca Son Rebecca. Welcome. Thank you. I'm here to reinforce and ensure that my title as most frequent they call us first guest. On. Challenged. Bring honor to us all. We also have a first timer on the show hopefully, not the last frankie. Hong who is a freelance writer and illustrator and Frankie also grew up until age nine in China and has a pretty solid grasp. I think of some of the larger context around the film both as somebody personally in in more immerse perhaps in Chinese culture than those who grew up here but also just from being able to read and understand the conversations that are going on in. Chinese about this. Conversation's. Break Welcome, to the show. Thank you for having me. So excited to chat with you about this. Well, the conversation has been proceeding Apace has a not I mean literally the show. The movie itself debuted Friday, and I think that's we don't have any metrics yet that feels like a lot of people in have been streaming it despite the way that it's being presented and I mean, maybe that's the first thing to talk about a little bit like. The film. You know how the film has changed over time how it was what was meant to be in where it is now today in this time of Of Covert in quarantine in theaters basically being shot I think I wanted to ask if maybe everybody could share their relationship with the original film because that's that will serve you know color a lot of people's. The way they perceive this this new one right. Rebecca. What was it like watching the original Milan and how did that impact actually shape? This one for you. Yeah. Well, for me, I you know sort of your classic ABC asian-american Crawl one in the bay area you know live here lived in America, my whole life, and so I was I'm looking this up now and I was actually not cured with anime tomatoes teenagers. So I think I was sixteen when I came out Even, though I was no longer a small child I, what I remember most palpably was bursting into tears at the end of the animated film when Milan she's at the Forbidden City and she turns around and it feels like the entire country is kneeling and bowing and Reverend before her and the swell like I remember for years after that, like you know even without we watching the film just thinking about that moment. Just swallow emotion. Kind of being unprepared to see that image of of somebody who representative you know about as exactly. Who I was, you know just a small Chinese girl could be treated with such respect and honor. Listen. you know and reverence that was so moving. So that's what I remember most about you know the animated law and I think the way that made me feel is is sort of what I treasured about that movie even though it was, you know I haven't seen it in such such a long time.

Rebecca Son Rebecca Bruce Milan Phil Disney Jeff Yang Forbidden City Asia China Frankie Representative Hollywood ABC Reporter Hong Writer America
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Low, , and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and this will indeed be an unfiltered podcast. . It is one which we are going to used to. . You know spend talking about something that we've been wanting to talk about for a while waiting to see for awhile, , and that is Disney's live. . On which released this weekend right before Labor Day and immediately generated quite a lot of opinions some of which we have. . And we have guests, , schools, , opinions in some of them <hes> our guests <hes>. . We've seen quite a lot of in somewhere new. . Who have with us? ? Phil? ? We have making her third appearance on they call US Bruce. . Quite possibly a record. . Record record. . Our good friend <hes> formerly journalists of the with the Hollywood reporter most recently, , she did a profile of Tima in Vanity Fair. . Are Powell Rebecca Son Rebecca. . Welcome. . Thank you. . I'm here to reinforce and ensure that my title as most frequent they call us first guest. . On. . Challenged. . Bring honor to us all. . We also have a first timer on the show hopefully, not , the last frankie. . Hong who is a freelance writer and illustrator and Frankie also grew up until age nine in China and has a pretty solid grasp. . I think of some of the larger context around the film both as somebody personally in in more immerse perhaps in Chinese culture than those who grew up here but also just from being able to read and understand the conversations that are going on in. . Chinese about this. . Conversation's. . Break Welcome, , to the show. . Thank you for having me. . So excited to chat with you about this. . Well, , the conversation has been proceeding Apace has a not I mean literally the show. . The movie itself <hes>. . debuted Friday, , and I think that's we don't have any metrics yet that feels like a lot of people in have been streaming it despite the way that it's being presented and I mean, , maybe that's the first thing to talk about a little bit like. . The film. . You know how the film has changed over time how it was what was meant to be in where it is now today in this time of Of Covert in quarantine in theaters basically being shot I think I wanted to ask if <hes> maybe everybody could share their relationship with the original film because that's that will serve you know color a lot of people's. . The way they perceive this this new one right. . Rebecca. . What was it like watching the original Milan and how did that impact actually shape? ? This one for you. . Yeah. . Well, , for me, , I <hes> you know sort of your classic ABC asian-american Crawl one in the bay area you know live here lived in America, , my whole life, , and so I was I'm looking this up now and I was actually not cured with anime tomatoes teenagers. . So I think I was sixteen when I came out <hes>. . Even, , though I was no longer a small child I, , what I remember most palpably was bursting into tears at the end of the animated film when Milan she's at the Forbidden City and she turns around and it feels like the entire country is kneeling and bowing and Reverend before her and the swell like I remember for years after that, , like you know even without we watching the film just thinking about that moment. . Just swallow emotion. . Kind of being unprepared to see that image of of somebody who representative you know about as exactly. . Who I was, , you know just a small Chinese girl could be treated with such respect and honor. . Listen. . <hes> you know <hes> and reverence that was so moving. So . that's what I remember most about you know the animated law and I think the way that made me feel is is sort of what I treasured about that movie even though it was, , you know I haven't seen it in such such a long time. .

Bruce Rebecca Son Rebecca Phil Disney Jeff Yang Asia ABC Frankie Milan China Hollywood reporter America Hong writer
A Conversation On The Live Action Mulan Movie

They Call Us Bruce

04:35 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation On The Live Action Mulan Movie

"Low, and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and this will indeed be an unfiltered podcast. It is one which we are going to used to. You know spend talking about something that we've been wanting to talk about for a while waiting to see for awhile, and that is Disney's live. On which released this weekend right before Labor Day and immediately generated quite a lot of opinions some of which we have. And we have guests, schools, opinions in some of them our guests We've seen quite a lot of in somewhere new. Who have with us? Phil? We have making her third appearance on they call US Bruce. Quite possibly a record. Record record. Our good friend formerly journalists of the with the Hollywood reporter most recently, she did a profile of Tima in Vanity Fair. Are Powell Rebecca Son Rebecca. Welcome. Thank you. I'm here to reinforce and ensure that my title as most frequent they call us first guest. On. Challenged. Bring honor to us all. We also have a first timer on the show hopefully, not the last frankie. Hong who is a freelance writer and illustrator and Frankie also grew up until age nine in China and has a pretty solid grasp. I think of some of the larger context around the film both as somebody personally in in more immerse perhaps in Chinese culture than those who grew up here but also just from being able to read and understand the conversations that are going on in. Chinese about this. Conversation's. Break Welcome, to the show. Thank you for having me. So excited to chat with you about this. Well, the conversation has been proceeding Apace has a not I mean literally the show. The movie itself debuted Friday, and I think that's we don't have any metrics yet that feels like a lot of people in have been streaming it despite the way that it's being presented and I mean, maybe that's the first thing to talk about a little bit like. The film. You know how the film has changed over time how it was what was meant to be in where it is now today in this time of Of Covert in quarantine in theaters basically being shot I think I wanted to ask if maybe everybody could share their relationship with the original film because that's that will serve you know color a lot of people's. The way they perceive this this new one right. Rebecca. What was it like watching the original Milan and how did that impact actually shape? This one for you. Yeah. Well, for me, I you know sort of your classic ABC asian-american Crawl one in the bay area you know live here lived in America, my whole life, and so I was I'm looking this up now and I was actually not cured with anime tomatoes teenagers. So I think I was sixteen when I came out Even, though I was no longer a small child I, what I remember most palpably was bursting into tears at the end of the animated film when Milan she's at the Forbidden City and she turns around and it feels like the entire country is kneeling and bowing and Reverend before her and the swell like I remember for years after that, like you know even without we watching the film just thinking about that moment. Just swallow emotion. Kind of being unprepared to see that image of of somebody who representative you know about as exactly. Who I was, you know just a small Chinese girl could be treated with such respect and honor. Listen. you know and reverence that was so moving. So that's what I remember most about you know the animated law and I think the way that made me feel is is sort of what I treasured about that movie even though it was, you know I haven't seen it in such such a long time.

Rebecca Son Rebecca Bruce Milan Phil Disney Jeff Yang Forbidden City Asia China Frankie Representative Hollywood ABC Reporter Hong Writer America
A Conversation About The Postal Service

They Call Us Bruce

07:04 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation About The Postal Service

"Low. Welcome. To another edition of call us, Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America. I'm Phil You and Jeff Yang and this week on the podcast we have been thinking and talking about doing something for a while and our wishes are finally coming true as if delivered to us. Our. I'm sorry we've come. A Dad jokes attention but we we've been talking a lot about the postal service, not just amongst ourselves but in society right I mean the relevance of the US mail to our society internal democracy has been more prominent now more than the headlines now than ever before, and one of the things that we recognized is that the postal service actually plays a really critical role even. Specifically in our communities and there are. There are a lot of Asian Americans who work at the Post Office The post office connects us are far-flung relatives and friends, and in general we just thought it was time to give a little shine to this institution that. Is taking a few bumps, these days, and so we actually found. A postal. Service employees who was. Happy to talk to us about this profession and about the stories and. The world behind the scenes at the post. Office. As, well, as other things going on his life as well. So we love to welcome to they call us Bruce Kevin Again UN. He is a musician and multimedia. A graphic designer, a fan of A. Pretty Amazing Music. I can tell social platforms and also a employee of the PS Kevin Welcome to the show. Hi. Welcome guys. Ola. So Kevin you're in Oakland right. Yeah. I wouldn't opened. And did you reborn in scripture? I was actually born in southern California and. Always, knew that I would end up in the bay area. So sometime around two thousand and two, thousand five moved up here. And I found myself. Here. To sort of blend in. Oh Yeah Oh. Yeah. And and you say you're from southern California originally like a like Los Angeles or or. Montebello okay. And now A. End, up actually working for the postal service. Honestly. I was laid off in rather time the pandemic. was. Gaining momentum. and. I was desperately looking for work and I I had heard this echoing my head, my mom's voice. You know like you should go work work at the post office like your uncles grandfather. Finally listen to the voice. And Sure Enough I. went onto the USPS site. And, saw their openings locally and swint for and they ask for references. Internal references and. Plugged in some family members names, and I was pretty much and within twenty four hours. In the family. It's a family business. It really is. Yeah. How many of your other family members worked for the postal service that are alive to? But. But it's it's been like kind of multigenerational thing or it has absolutely. Is there. Is there something about the post office or the Postal Service that has been? particularly. Peeling I'm guessing in some ways it's because it's eighth always there be. It. You know like they're always jobs in the postal. I. I just Kinda remember Hollywood shuffle under if you've seen that movie Robert Townsend movie. where? Kind of what you're saying is one of the themes in the movie that. His family's like A. Get A job. The Postal Service it's it's you know it's it's a secure job. You know it's comfortable. It's something which you can rely on and Robert Townsend characters like I wanna be a star in Hollywood but you know as a black actor in Hollywood. You gotta deal with a whole lot of bullshit and movies about the bullshit and. Kind of like you know no spoilers or yes boilers. Movement. You haven't seen it. You should see it but. In the end in the end, actually the post service ends up being a where he lands and and you know he's it's sort of like a celebration affected like you can still do when you dream of but other things can also be part of that dream and anyway I'm kind of curious if if that's kind of the story of how how like your uncles and other folks in working for the post office to. For my grandfather. I believe he went in right after he was discharged from the military e- so he. He had served in the Cold War came back They relocated to Daly City from Dallas. and. I think he that's it hired pretty much on the spot. And it's still the case to this day So he he was there until I moved up here. And two, hundred five. I remember him getting village. One Am and coming home. And afternoon. He. Yeah it's interesting my Uncle Sam deal with him in Minneapolis. He got out of the Air Force and became a carrier pretty much immediately. And my uncle Kennedy in. Hawaii. I think he started in Minneapolis, but then transferred to Hawaii, which is apparently. The most requested transfer. Why And he's been a mechanic for. Sixty years. He's he's been there for a long time I. Think he's been here the longest. Everyone fixing like postal trucks, postal trucks, the machinery he's he's really handy guy i. mean he used to build birdhouses? Similar skills I guess.

Postal Service Bruce Kevin Robert Townsend Phil You California United States Kennedy Minneapolis Asia America Jeff Yang Usps Hawaii A. End Oakland Hollywood Los Angeles Montebello Air Force Daly City
"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"If can give us a little bit more background on yourself and how you got to. The position of being kind of an advocate for a fellow adoptees <hes>. Wait on US share. So I was adopted from China in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, seven, when I was three years old, and I was adopted by two wonderful. White adoptive parents and raised in the Midwest <hes>. And my parents I. Give them a lot of credit for. Really trying to keep a lot of my cultural roots I went to Saturday morning Chinese school with my dad for language and dance and <hes> I. Remember growing up. My parents subscribe to women of China magazine, so that I would see women who looked like me in the media <hes>, which does not happen that much in mainstream US media. But it was really in college when I started to process my racial identity and adopt the identify more I took a class taught by an adoptee professor my first year. That really turned everything. I knew about adoption upside down I think the the common narrative that we. Like to believe about adoption. Is that <hes>? Adoption provides homes for children in need and gives children, too <hes> loving people who can't have children or don't yet. Have Children <hes>? But. In my class, we really talked about the history of transracial and transnational adoption, but Has Roots in Australia and an attempt at cultural genocide and. Just a lot of the different layers of trafficking and coercion that happened to frequently <hes> and so when I was processing districts like how I bring this troubling history of adoption and merge it with. My experiences and <hes> what it means to be a part of this system in have my family created in this way I really <hes>. I really <hes> feel lucky that I was in Minnesota when I was doing. All of this processing, because Minnesota has <hes> one of the highest number of adoptees per capita in. The country and I learned a lot from. The Korean adoptees of The generation before. Mine and I started looking at adoptee blogs and. Fila even all started looking at Asia angry Asian man just A. Really trying to piece together how I fit in Asian American history and adoption adoption, history and After I had really grappled with a lot of the hard things I think that. I really wanted to become a voice for adoptees who are often silenced and <hes> when they. Give voice to <hes> some of these more negative sides of adoption and. Bring to light. The issues of. Trafficking or just complicate the narrative that sometimes it's not this heroin decision that a birth mother makes to give their child better life. Sometimes they have no. And what it means to. Have that. Profound loss. As a starting point in life, and what it means to carry that loss of family country, language culture. Throughout the life course and so I think that <hes>. I think yeah, my my goal. Is Not to like add manish adoption and condemn it and people who've been involved, but just to <hes> bring him or nuanced and complete picture to adoption than currently exists.

US Dan Jeff Yang Bruce grace Asia Madison Wisconsin Newton California
"jeff yang" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Seventy eight degrees now at NewsRadio nine seventy WFL. A investigators in Tarpon springs are waiting for the medical examiner's report on the three homicide victims found in a mobile home on New Year's day major Jeff Yang with the police department says it was an extensive crime scene forensics units. Did just get on this morning. So we did clear out of the out of the same this morning. But yes, it was a very extensive process. Out there. There is still no information on the victims identities or cause of death. But young says it was not a random crime. So residents in the meadows mobile home park off Anclote boulevard can rest a little easier. For months Senator Bernie Sanders is under fire over allegations against his staffers during his twenty sixteen presidential campaign that were never addressed some female staffers say they were sexually harassed appearing on CNN Sanders apologized to any women who were treated inappropriately. But said at the time he was unaware of any issues due to his busy schedule on the campaign trail. I'm not gonna sit here and tell you that we did everything right in terms of human resources in terms of addressing the needs that I'm hearing from now that women felt disrespected that there was sexual harassment which was not dealt with as effectively as possible female workers on the Sanders campaign were also reportedly paid less than the men Florida contractors are expecting a shortage of construction workers into nineteen a survey shows nearly eight. Eighty percent of construction firm statewide, expect ongoing difficulties in hiring over half of the firms surveyed in Florida say they are increasing pay and incentives to try to hire workers. The city of Saint Pete has been awarded two point five million dollars by former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg to be spent on climate change efforts. Saint Pete mayor. Rick Christman says the city has already implemented a number of changes to deal with sea level rise and make Saint Pete more environmentally sustainable, having the support of the folks from Bloomberg's can make a huge difference for us in being able to to move the ball forward on these initiatives that we're trying to put in place. We have limited resources and having resources from the outside to help us is really gonna make a big difference. Bloomberg came to downtown Saint Pete today to make the announcement. It's one of twenty five cities that competed for the money from the Bloomberg philanthropic foundation is the space race heating up. Again. China has become the first country to land a probe on the dark side of the moon, which Fox News correspondent, Greg palkot says. Presents a unique challenge. It faces away from the earth at all times. That means it's also impossible to send signals directly from the lunar surface. So China has a communication satellite orbiting the moon to bounce those signals back, and there is a Rover vehicle on board said to explore this unknown lunar surface. China has called this an important milestone. A new chapter in lunar exploration to unlock great palkot. Fox news. Forget that resolution to lose weight girl scout cookie season has begun. Jessica Moore off with the girl scouts of west central. Florida says when you see a scout selling cookies ask her about her business plan and her goals when you're and when you when you meet them at the asked him what they're raising their money. Two different plan. And so definitely,.

Michael Bloomberg Saint Pete Senator Bernie Sanders China Florida Bloomberg Tarpon springs Jeff Yang NewsRadio Jessica Moore Rick Christman harassment New York Fox Greg palkot Fox News
"jeff yang" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"jeff yang" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Tuesday afternoon to do a welfare check Tarpon springs. Major Jeff Yang deceased we're gonna state of advanced decomposition, we can confirm based on evidence discovered inside the location that this scene is that of a triple homicide. Young says the remains of three dogs were also found inside the home on one eat away. The identities of the victims have not been released passengers on a frontier flight from Cleveland were held on the plane for more than an hour after landing in Tampa yesterday. Six of the two hundred twenty six on board suddenly became sick in flight when the plane landed at TIAA around three thirty the sick passengers were removed. A spokesman at the airport in Cleveland says there's a possibility there illnesses connected to a drinking fountain in the frontier. Concourse in Cleveland, it's January that means it's move over month in Florida. There's a state law requiring motorists to slow down and move over for first responders, tow, trucks, and utility crews stopped on the side of the highway. Triple eight Tampa spokesman matinees worthy says it's a matter of safety, they need room to work, and they need they need that safety cushion, they need folks to move over. If they have room to do. So and if you don't slow down at least twenty miles an hour below the posted speed limit to give them that safety net's worthy says more than nineteen thousand citations were issued statewide last year for failing to move over the outback bowl at Raymond James stadium. New Year's day was the first major event of what is expected to be another banner tourism year for the bay area. San Diego Corrado with visit Tampa Bay we're going to break another record this calendar year, and we've been on a seven-year record-breaking stretch here that with all these additional properties in new opportunities around the globe that we would have another record breaking year. It's pretty fantastic. More than forty thousand fans attended the game the Iowa Hawkeyes beat the Mississippi State Bulga BULLDOGS twenty seven twenty two the buccaneers have started their search for a new head coach after showing dirt cutter the door bucks general manager Jason light is in Kansas City today to talk to chiefs offense coordinator, Eric Benhamou. The forty nine year old has been with chiefs since two thousand thirteen and this year, he orchestrated the number one offense in the NFL..

Cleveland Tampa Jeff Yang Eric Benhamou Tarpon springs Tampa Bay Raymond James stadium Iowa Hawkeyes Mississippi State Bulga BULLDO TIAA Florida Young San Diego NFL Kansas City Jason light buccaneers coordinator