22 Burst results for "Jeff Warren"

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:40 min | 2 months ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"It begins <Speech_Male> with deliberately <Speech_Male> trying to cultivate <Speech_Male> an <Speech_Male> attitude <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> gregarious <Speech_Male> good natured <Speech_Male> hilarity. <Speech_Male> So you're <Speech_Male> just sitting there with your <Speech_Male> eyes closed somewhere <Speech_Male> on the Planet Earth. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You're listening to <Speech_Male> my voice, pipe <Speech_Male> in these soothing <Silence> tones, <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> and you're just feeling <Speech_Male> yourself to be a little <Speech_Male> bit ridiculous here. <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So as you're doing this, <Speech_Male> you're just maybe <Silence> beginning to notice <Speech_Male> your breath. <Speech_Male> That's one <Speech_Male> option to pay <SpeakerChange> attention to. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Sitting in the stance <Speech_Male> of bemused <Speech_Male> hilarity as you're <Speech_Male> beginning to breathe, <Speech_Male> each <Speech_Male> breath filling you <Speech_Male> up, inflating <Speech_Male> you like a doll <Speech_Male> with oxygen, <Speech_Male> deflating <Silence> you and you're sitting <Speech_Male> and you're just <Speech_Male> earnestly giving <Silence> yourself over to <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> kind of ridiculous <Speech_Male> activity of sitting <Silence> and breathing with your <Speech_Male> eyes closed. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Then maybe you're <Silence> noticing sounds, <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> sounds. <Speech_Male> Bird <Speech_Male> sounds maybe <Speech_Male> little birdy birds <Speech_Male> going chirp chirp. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Or maybe it's the <Speech_Male> sound of someone <Speech_Male> yelling on the street, <Speech_Male> someone arguing with <Speech_Male> a delivery van. <Speech_Male> You don't really <Speech_Male> care. You're just sitting <Speech_Male> there in the <Speech_Male> mused way listening <Speech_Male> to life <Speech_Male> do things <Speech_Male> in the form <SpeakerChange> of sound. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Maybe <Speech_Male> it's your own thoughts, you're noticing, <Speech_Male> creeping in <Speech_Male> right now. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Just <Speech_Male> sitting with your eyes <Silence> closed in <Speech_Male> some <Silence> corner practicing <Speech_Male> <Silence> practicing what? <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> still and <Speech_Male> serious with your eyes <Silence> closed there. Where are <Speech_Male> you? Where are <Speech_Male> you even going? <Speech_Male> Trying to get <Speech_Male> where to <Speech_Male> where you <SpeakerChange> already <Speech_Male> are. <Speech_Male> It's ridiculous. <Silence> And that's okay. <Speech_Male> We just <Silence> sit here and we meditate <Speech_Male> anyway. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Meditating on the <Speech_Male> breath, on sounds, <Speech_Male> on the body, <Speech_Male> smiling through <Speech_Male> the end of days, <Speech_Male> like <Speech_Male> you're riding one of those <Speech_Male> oxytocin <Silence> hormonal <Speech_Male> surges. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> This is <Silence> a deep training, <Speech_Male> a <Silence> noble training. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> We could <Speech_Male> also just call it <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> having a sense <Speech_Male> of humor. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Silence> Okay, <Speech_Male> when you're ready, <Silence> open your eyes, <Speech_Male> as you <Speech_Male> move back into your day, <Speech_Male> every once in <Speech_Male> a while, see <Speech_Male> if you can channel <Speech_Male> this excellent <Speech_Male> mix of <Speech_Male> irreverence <Silence> and generosity. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I hope <Speech_Male> you enjoyed this <Speech_Male> admittedly, <Speech_Male> utterly ridiculous <Speech_Male> meditation. <Speech_Male> See you later. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Big thanks to Jeff. We'll see you <Speech_Male> right back here on Monday for <Speech_Male> a brand new episode <Speech_Male> on a <Speech_Male> somewhat related <Speech_Male> subject to the <Speech_Male> joys of being <Speech_Male> insignificant. <Speech_Male> I guess <Speech_Male> as Ron Siegel he'll <Speech_Male> explain that concept. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We'll see you <Music> <Advertisement> on Monday. <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Everybody has <Speech_Music_Male> something that <Speech_Music_Male> they would give anything <Speech_Music_Male> for <Speech_Music_Male> and unfortunately <Speech_Music_Male> there's people <Speech_Music_Male> out there who <Speech_Music_Male> will exploit <Speech_Music_Male> that. <Speech_Music_Male> There's nothing that <Speech_Music_Male> can stand between the two. <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Nothing <SpeakerChange> at all. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> From <Speech_Music_Female> wondery comes <Speech_Music_Female> a story <SpeakerChange> about <Speech_Music_Female> true love. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> I love you. <Speech_Music_Female> So, so <Speech_Music_Female> much. <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Female> love you. <Speech_Music_Female> Power. You're going <Speech_Music_Female> to have to completely <Speech_Music_Female> submit to me and give <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> me your <SpeakerChange> complete and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> utter obedience. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> And how far <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> some people are <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> willing to go <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to get <SpeakerChange> what <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> they want.

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:36 min | 2 months ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"The 10% happier podcast. I'm Dan Harris. Hey gang, happy Friday time for a bonus meditation. If you've been listening to the episodes this week, you'd be forgiven for having a little bit of whiplash, we gave you a climate change episode on Monday and then pivoted to an episode about the connection between humor and happiness on Wednesday. Today, in our bonus meditation, we're gonna pick up on the latter subject. If you're new to meditation or, frankly, if you've been at it for years, you might have noticed that the practice can at times feel straight up ridiculous. Today's meditation is guided by my good friend Jeff Warren. He's here to tell you to embrace the ridiculousness because sometimes in life it's the smart move not to take things so seriously, including meditation. And including yourself. Some quick background on Jeff. He's a frequent guest on this show, an incredibly gifted meditation teacher. And the founder of the consciousness explorers club. A meditation adventure group in Toronto. Oh, and he's also the host of his own podcast. The mind bod adventure pod, otherwise known as the consciousness explorers podcast. You can go find it wherever you get your podcasts. Here is Jeff. Hi, I'm Jeff. So this meditation is about appreciating the sometimes ridiculousness of life. In life, we all have this tendency to get contracted and narrowly concerned with I think that's one of the reasons actually that we like to watch comedians. It's to be pulled out of ourselves. We like to be shown. There's a kind of absurdity to life sometimes to how we act, we often arbitrariness of our circumstances. And when we connect to that perspective, it can really be quite liberating. And that's the intention of this practice. It's kind of an experiment. So just try it and see how it works. So we can start by taking a few deep breaths, closing the eyes, finding your meditation perch. And sit in a way that's comfortable for you. As you breathe in, you can stretch up the spine a little bit. And as you breathe out, settling down into your chair or the cushion. So this is an admittedly strange practice. It begins with deliberately trying to cultivate an attitude of gregarious good natured hilarity. So.

Jeff Warren Dan Harris consciousness explorers club Jeff Toronto
"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:10 min | 3 months ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"To 505 hundred. You talk a lot about I think very helpful ways about impulse control and executive function and I actually think maybe it's a challenge for you, but it's also a strength because it's part of what makes you so funny and fun to be around. As part of this, you've described as you already have in this conversation, your challenge is specifically with ADHD and I mentioned earlier we've had some folks reach out to us and ask us to explore this a little bit more on the show. So what kind of practices are helpful for you given your attention regulations struggles? Yeah, great question. Well, one is what I said before, making my ADHD a virtue, letting everything be a practice. That has helped me compassion practices have been really important because when you have ADHD, you get into this pattern of letting a lot of people down because you overcommit because you're not good at figuring out what you need to get done in the right order and all that. So self compassion practices are super valuable. Not all ADH people are the same. There's all kinds of subtypes of ADHD. If you do have an ADHD diagnosis, you kind of have to explore a few different meditation practices to see what clicks. Some folks find typical concentration practices really hard. For the obvious reasons. But others have a kind of hyper focus so they can get into, say, concentration practice, and that actually can be good medicine for them. However, you have to learn how to shave off the fixation part of the hyper focus if that makes sense. It's like you're focusing a life depends on it because it does depend on it because you've so many times let people down by having your attention go all over the place so you're actually holding on to your attention in this desperate way. So you got to let go of the desperateness. So there's a learning there. I think non dual practices are very helpful for ADHD folk, meaning coming back to just present moment awareness because you're always coming back there anyway if you're ADHD because you're just popping back out of whatever the thing that you were supposed to be committed to. You're like, oh, but here again, you can't even forget where you were. And so you can make a virtue of that. Normally when you're ADHD, you pop back into the present moment and you're like, and you pop back full of fear and loathing around what you just forgotten when you think you should have been doing. But if you can pop back into the present moment and not activate that particular fear and loathing circuit, then you're in the refreshment of the present moment. And this is a whole space of profound insight. What is this present moment awareness? Who am I? That can be a very profound direction of inquiry for anybody, but the point of this is it doesn't matter what your neuro unique situation is. We're all neuro atypical to a degree. And your diversity here can actually be a virtue in the sense that it almost always shows that you have an area of competency in some domain. That can then become a place that you really zoom in deep on. You use to bootstrap a deeper practice. And then you can also do balancing practices to try to even that out a bit. But that's kind of what I have learned through this that every mental health challenge you could say is also a kind of window into a particular style of practice or a particular direction of inquiry. Is one potential pitfall of turning everything into a practice that you're just jumping around too much and definitely. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, that's why I understanding what's unique to all that is valuable. What's unique to all of it is it's awareness. It's opening to what's here. It's seeing what's here. That is the glue that binds all of these, where are you at now with your challenges around attention regulation and how have these practices helped how have they not helped? It helped massively. Like humongously. If I just look at my life right now, my suffering is a fraction of what it used to be. A fraction. I just don't get into the suffering loops. In the same way. First of all, I have compassion for my own attentional style, so I don't let that be. The fact that I jump around, I'm just like, I try to just let it the virtue of it, be there. And I try to create structure in my life that makes it okay for me to be like that. And I very clear and transparent with my friends and family. That's who I am, so I feel like the people who are in my life, except that. And I still do shame on the type practices that I find help make me more regulated. So that's the ADHD. The H park, the hyper part, which is related to the hypomania and the ups and downs, that's really changed too, because I have so much more awareness when these start. I could feel the very beginning of these endogenous shifts that want to lead me into a hypomanic place and I can come off that and let it just play out without having to feed it. And I know what to do. I can find structural go to sleep earlier. I know I need to exercise now, so I have these like structures in place. And similarly, when I go down and the other direction, I have reframing that I can do where I'm like, okay. It's just part of how this.

ADHD
Everything You Wanted to Know About Self-Love But Were Afraid to Ask

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:12 min | 1 year ago

Everything You Wanted to Know About Self-Love But Were Afraid to Ask

"Says in jeff. Thanks for doing this. Glad to be here happy to be here. Let's dive in with voice voicemails go. We're going to be playing voicemails listeners. Left us with questions about self love and self compassion and meditation. Before i play that though. I wanna play you a clip of you guys talking. Because after we recorded an episode a few weeks ago we caught you guys talking in ways that revealed your own inner critic. Let me just play that to you. I'll just say quickly feel free to trim whenever you want. I vowed take a little bit too not to be self critical but it took a little while to of me to warm up so i think i kind of rambled a bit off the top so i will not be offended if you decide to take big chunks of that out okay. I know that this is none of my business. I did not hear rambling. And i felt the same as you. So jeff let me start with you clearly. Even after having spent the whole episode which we posted a few weeks ago in which we talked about managing the inner critic yours is not vanquished. Yeah thanks for busting me outing me as a human true. Yeah no i mean it's an ongoing feature of my life actually even during recording something like that you know. There's a part of me that wants to do the best job i can. So i'm thinking about that. And i did a good job and i can recognize when i'm more on point when i'm not now if i were moore economist with that i would know that it would serve all wash out in the end and it would be fine but because i'm not totally because part of me locates except for myself in others in some way i still get hooked so for sure know. That's why do this frigging practice. That's why i could so relate to the whole self compassionate thing. 'cause i need it. Yeah i have no idea what you're talking about. Sorry her no. I realized this is early when we were recording the other day you played a clip of me talking inside. I noticed i was just cringing. I was like oh god. I don't want to listen to my own voice and at the end i said something like well. That's sounds like a know it. All and the second i said it i was like oh crap i just did it. I just dissed myself. And i did feel uncomfortable hearing my voice and all i heard in it was well. She sounds quite holier than thou. And i don't know how it sounded to anyone else and i don't know if i'd heard it on a different day i would have heard something else but yeah that's not gone. That's not gone but what does seem more present. In addition to the just like self owning constantly is seeing that himself owning say where are these elision fields of perfect mental health. Who has the exactly here. You look around. I mean actually when you spend time with people who've been meditating for a longtime senior teachers. They're human foibles. Or right there. And i think that maybe there are some people who really have zero suffering in their life. I how would you know. I am skeptical super skeptical. Yeah dan at one point in a past conversation. You and i talked about this. I went through a period in my life. Where a lot of panic attacks. And if i would tell someone about it they would say well. You're a meditation teacher. Shouldn't you just be able to meditate. And i'll be like no. It doesn't change the truth of being a beautiful messy crazy awesome human and what meditation does enable you to do what appears to experience it more fully with a more open heart. This is such an employer in conversation. The conversation of sort of like what can you change in your life. And what can't you change. You know for me personally. It's either diagnosed with. Add have diagnosis in bipolar. I have this kind of tortured. Inner situation for many years of my life and i thought meditation was going to cure me of that tortured. Inner situation that it was going to bring my attention in so less shooting off in all directions that it would bring my emotional life in which has a natural up and down. That can be quite wild and it's been a very very very very long process of realizing that it's not gonna do that. It rather it does sort of but not in the ways you think that incoming into accepting the weird way your configured so my case this particular sensitively that's going to create a volatility in my attention and my mood incoming to do that then. It shaves off all the suffering in the system. that's amplifying those signals. That's making you more volt. How the mood is making your attention. More strung out and desperate to find some place to land so in other words i had to learn to accept this complicated messy person in order to really receive the gifts of that configuration. And i think that's what every one of us is facing in our life in a way

Jeff Moore DAN Bipolar
Flipping the Stress Switch

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:50 min | 1 year ago

Flipping the Stress Switch

"Hi i'm jeff. So when i was a little kid when i get stressed out about something my mum would sit me down and go. Yeah but honey think about all the people having problems in other parts of the world. It made me feel both wes alone. And my problems were more manageable. So this meditation is dedicated to the wisdom of my mom. It's about getting perspective around stress. I by changing how we experience stress in our bodies and then by seeing if we can connect it to a larger perspective. So let's go the is can be open or closed. We start by taking a few deep breaths so here stretching on the inhale and then on the sale that's kind of downward motion the the relaxing softening so nice long out breath as you do. This just imagine you can breathe out any tension. The belly softens the shoulders. Relax okay good so this. First part of the practice is about exploring how we experience stress in our own body mines so notice where you're experiencing stress right now. How do you know your stress. What are the telltale signs in your body. How is stress coming up for you right now to a little survey so now we're going to do this move. We're going to try to do this. One eighty turn here and try to reframe the way we experience this. We call all this stress but really that's just a word. It's an idea before any idea stress. There's just sensations. The question is can you begin to experience. What was once stress has just different. Sensations happening in flowing sensations connected to other sensations. Saw them slowly changing. You're like oh weather pattern. So seeing if we can experience ourselves ads this swirling pattern of sensations. Obviously our problems are real but we also have the capacity to put them in perspective to see them as part of this larger story. Okay relaxing here. Just chill out here on our cosmic stoop. Nice long exhale just being in your body when you're ready can open your eyes if they were closed and notice how you feel now versus when you began

Jeff
"jeff warren" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"Did, the road trip up was a real fast turnaround in there were some bumps on that road to. Which I talk about it in another podcast and Dan's podcast, and now here we are. So. Creative there's another podcast that I think you'll really like. So how does it opera singer learn a new role? How does an actress find the perfect accent for her character? What is the director of a TV drama actually do all day those are the questions that remain alum Isaac Butler and June Thomas put to creative people every week on working learn how writers outlined novels how composers get jobs and get paid and how Youtube creators learn to look into the camera lens listened to work from slate every Sunday on apple podcasts spotify or wherever you listen. Hi, this is Cara Swisher and I wanNA talk to you about my new podcast for the New York Times called sway if you WanNa know what people who hold power in our world are really all about you need to hear how they answer the tough questions and that is my specialty, and although it might get messy as it always does it's also going to be really fun. You can get sway wherever you get your podcasts. New episodes are available Mondays and Thursdays. Well. So, many questions come from. You know it's funny that you brought up the thing you've alluded to it, and I remember that very distinctly throughout the book. So I am curious I mean as somebody who has built a career that crew clearly requires a level of sustained attention I know this because I'm a writer myself I mean if you're writing pieces for the New York Times, you're reading a book. How do you do that? How do you manage that when you have the attention issues that you do? Yeah. It's a great question Not Easily is what I would say. I mean there's a few different ways to answering one. The big big picture way is what I've found whether people have found is there's are natural proclivity with attention and then there are these cycles underneath that were there are periods in your life. When you find, you may just be naturally a little bit more concentrated ones a little bit last so. When I just naturally cycle into those more concentrated periods, I get more work done. So there is sort of that rhythm that's Kinda and I don't really understand that rhythm it's it seems to be. It's dependent sometimes in what's happening externally, but it also is just its own thing. and. Then there's the meditation. So within meditation, there are periods when your practices, maybe the same correspondence when your practice is going well when it's not going as well when my so in periods when I practice is going well, and in terms of the concentration piece, that's when it's much easier for me to do all that stuff. Easier, to write. Easier. To. Meditate. When the practice is not going as well it tends to be the concentration piece at flags for me, but there are many many many skills that are being developed in meditation concentration is probably the main and most important one. But I would say as important as the skilled equanimity and I can unpack that because it's please dirty much peerless life skill. then. Sensor clarity friendliness so. The equanimity is. This is the one that was a big surprise for me when I started practicing I had no concept for really. The wave, my teacher shins end talks about it is lack of. Friction lack of pushing and pulling on experience. So you could say it's openness, but it's a very particular. Way in which you find this openness by not you really you learn. How most the time we're sort of very subtly braced against certain experiences..

New York Times writer Cara Swisher Dan Youtube director Isaac Butler spotify June Thomas apple
"jeff warren" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on Untangle

"This week. We're going to go on an adventure with Consciousness Explore Jeff Warren. He's the author of the book. The head trip, and the New York Times bestseller meditation for fidgety skeptics. He's also a fantastic meditation teacher and the founder of the Consciousness Explorers Club where he helps. You investigate various states of mind. So get ready to strap on your pith helmets takeout your flashlights because we're gonNA shine them into the darkest corners of the mind. Welcome Geoff. Things me my absolute pleasure tastic time you hear so today. You'RE GONNA. Be Our guide into the brain. Can you start by just letting us know what to use the consciousness explorer? While yes, changed over the years a little bit. When I was younger, it was more. Just It was more about the fun you know. It was about the I guess it emerged from my own. Exploratory experiences, a teenager in my late twenties, second LX and when I first approached practices I very much interested in a special effects in the cool spaces. You could get into and. As any good explorer will tell you the longer you spend exploring, the more the expiration itself starts to change you and it started to become much more about understanding the dynamics of consciousness, more generally understanding how mental health works understanding my own challenges, and beginning to address someone using that understanding to share with other people and kind of cruel insights and resources, so so nabbing conscious explorer is really just more about what it. It means to be conscious what it means to be being how we relate to each other to the world I mean everything has consciousness in the sense that it's the interface which we need everything else, so there's nothing that a conscious explorer doesn't have one toe dip into as it were. Can you describe a little bit about what you've discovered in your consciousness exploration? What are some of these different states that you've encountered? Yeah I mean that's. So many. There's so many it's sort of like where to start, I mean head trip. My first book was an attempt to kind of describe what is the most basic states of consciousness that were available to us through twenty four hours, so it was a lot about sleep and dreaming, and some of the borderline states have been can hit on. was about daydream and trance zone, and let alertness and <hes> and it was about meditation. You can think of those different locations in a spatial sense if you think of a landscape or a house, different rooms or different terrains, but then I started getting into meditation. It becomes less about the destinations inside, but there's also the qualities itself we bring to the expiration, so understanding how equanimity works, which is mind blowing understanding how concentration works the way concentration kind of creates reality unifies the mind understanding the nature of clarity and discernment and Insight Understanding Nature Tranquility, the nature of energy. All those things are now really what I'm most interested in that's. Not Surprising because that's the part that's most directly practical for helping people manage their own inner worlds, so it's really a standing kind of were the dials on all those qualities that I described. You know compassion. Where's the dial on that? And how do you turn it up and some of them? How do you turn it down? Do you <hes>? What does it mean to have a balanced mine? That's all the stuff I'm super into now. So That's interesting. You sort of describe the range of states I, starting with more almost like a neuro scientific approach like water. What do we know about consciousness? We have sleep. We have waking. We can break up sleep into these different aspects. <hes> you moved into more sort of? Almost I would say like Haag Mets Madison three experience, and then he moved into like a clear Buddhist kind of set of terms that we have so at the end the words you're using very defined in very familiar to anybody who was a D., meditation, practice, equanimity, clarity concentration, and so I guess in some ways reflects your own journey through through discovering consciousness I for million scientific now ending up in a more bonus perspective. Although I wouldn't call it a Buddhist actually <hes> my original inspiration, for that was the seven factors of awakening that puts understanding list of seven qualities sort of mind and heart, and then my teacher Shinzan. Really focuses on. WHO's Buddhist ash on concentration, clarity, equanimity, but. Concentration clarity equanimity. Are they're not? There's nothing Buddhist about them. They're I'm not interested. In the Buddhist description of what those things are interested in real time experience that is shared among human beings around what concentration is what equanimity is what clarity is so those you can say the Buddhist categories I helped me find a way in, but I like to move into different cracks outside of anyone tradition, and then sort of see okay. What's going on here? How do they describe it had a science in psychology described how the second therapy describe it you know. And what were they all converging so a Buddhist it? It was a great place to start because it said they're such awesome list makers, but I would say it's <hes> an all respective, but his practice for sure I mean they're they're they're. They're the great explorers you know, but this understanding doesn't belong to anyone tradition. I mean it's really the attempt to try to make it more universal and say hey, this is art of our inheritance. Just like it's just like saying you know the muscle groups like you know succinct. Particular tradition discovered that we have biceps. We have joints or that we have Fausia you know these are all dimensions of having a human body.

cul de sac Daniel Ingram CEDA Aspirin Mo partner Matt Lee
Jeff Warren - A Consciousness Explorer Takes You On A Tour Through Your Mind

Untangle

05:38 min | 2 years ago

Jeff Warren - A Consciousness Explorer Takes You On A Tour Through Your Mind

"This week. We're going to go on an adventure with Consciousness Explore Jeff Warren. He's the author of the book. The head trip, and the New York Times bestseller meditation for fidgety skeptics. He's also a fantastic meditation teacher and the founder of the Consciousness Explorers Club where he helps. You investigate various states of mind. So get ready to strap on your pith helmets takeout your flashlights because we're gonNA shine them into the darkest corners of the mind. Welcome Geoff. Things me my absolute pleasure tastic time you hear so today. You'RE GONNA. Be Our guide into the brain. Can you start by just letting us know what to use the consciousness explorer? While yes, changed over the years a little bit. When I was younger, it was more. Just It was more about the fun you know. It was about the I guess it emerged from my own. Exploratory experiences, a teenager in my late twenties, second LX and when I first approached practices I very much interested in a special effects in the cool spaces. You could get into and. As any good explorer will tell you the longer you spend exploring, the more the expiration itself starts to change you and it started to become much more about understanding the dynamics of consciousness, more generally understanding how mental health works understanding my own challenges, and beginning to address someone using that understanding to share with other people and kind of cruel insights and resources, so so nabbing conscious explorer is really just more about what it. It means to be conscious what it means to be being how we relate to each other to the world I mean everything has consciousness in the sense that it's the interface which we need everything else, so there's nothing that a conscious explorer doesn't have one toe dip into as it were. Can you describe a little bit about what you've discovered in your consciousness exploration? What are some of these different states that you've encountered? Yeah I mean that's. So many. There's so many it's sort of like where to start, I mean head trip. My first book was an attempt to kind of describe what is the most basic states of consciousness that were available to us through twenty four hours, so it was a lot about sleep and dreaming, and some of the borderline states have been can hit on. was about daydream and trance zone, and let alertness and and it was about meditation. You can think of those different locations in a spatial sense if you think of a landscape or a house, different rooms or different terrains, but then I started getting into meditation. It becomes less about the destinations inside, but there's also the qualities itself we bring to the expiration, so understanding how equanimity works, which is mind blowing understanding how concentration works the way concentration kind of creates reality unifies the mind understanding the nature of clarity and discernment and Insight Understanding Nature Tranquility, the nature of energy. All those things are now really what I'm most interested in that's. Not Surprising because that's the part that's most directly practical for helping people manage their own inner worlds, so it's really a standing kind of were the dials on all those qualities that I described. You know compassion. Where's the dial on that? And how do you turn it up and some of them? How do you turn it down? Do you What does it mean to have a balanced mine? That's all the stuff I'm super into now. So That's interesting. You sort of describe the range of states I, starting with more almost like a neuro scientific approach like water. What do we know about consciousness? We have sleep. We have waking. We can break up sleep into these different aspects. you moved into more sort of? Almost I would say like Haag Mets Madison three experience, and then he moved into like a clear Buddhist kind of set of terms that we have so at the end the words you're using very defined in very familiar to anybody who was a D., meditation, practice, equanimity, clarity concentration, and so I guess in some ways reflects your own journey through through discovering consciousness I for million scientific now ending up in a more bonus perspective. Although I wouldn't call it a Buddhist actually my original inspiration, for that was the seven factors of awakening that puts understanding list of seven qualities sort of mind and heart, and then my teacher Shinzan. Really focuses on. WHO's Buddhist ash on concentration, clarity, equanimity, but. Concentration clarity equanimity. Are they're not? There's nothing Buddhist about them. They're I'm not interested. In the Buddhist description of what those things are interested in real time experience that is shared among human beings around what concentration is what equanimity is what clarity is so those you can say the Buddhist categories I helped me find a way in, but I like to move into different cracks outside of anyone tradition, and then sort of see okay. What's going on here? How do they describe it had a science in psychology described how the second therapy describe it you know. And what were they all converging so a Buddhist it? It was a great place to start because it said they're such awesome list makers, but I would say it's an all respective, but his practice for sure I mean they're they're they're. They're the great explorers you know, but this understanding doesn't belong to anyone tradition. I mean it's really the attempt to try to make it more universal and say hey, this is art of our inheritance. Just like it's just like saying you know the muscle groups like you know succinct. Particular tradition discovered that we have biceps. We have joints or that we have Fausia you know these are all dimensions of having a human body.

Consciousness Explorers Club New York Times Jeff Warren Founder Geoff Fausia Haag
"jeff warren" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on Untangle

"This week. We're going to go on an adventure with Consciousness Explore Jeff Warren. He's the author of the book. The head trip, and the New York Times bestseller meditation for fidgety skeptics. He's also a fantastic meditation teacher and the founder of the Consciousness Explorers Club where he helps. You investigate various states of mind. So get ready to strap on your pith helmets takeout your flashlights because we're gonNA shine them into the darkest corners of the mind. Welcome Geoff. Things me my absolute pleasure tastic time you hear so today. You'RE GONNA. Be Our guide into the brain. Can you start by just letting us know what to use the consciousness explorer? While yes, changed over the years a little bit. When I was younger, it was more. Just It was more about the fun you know. It was about the I guess it emerged from my own. Exploratory experiences, a teenager in my late twenties, second LX and when I first approached practices I very much interested in a special effects in the cool spaces. You could get into and. As any good explorer will tell you the longer you spend exploring, the more the expiration itself starts to change you and it started to become much more about understanding the dynamics of consciousness, more generally understanding how mental health works understanding my own challenges, and beginning to address someone using that understanding to share with other people and kind of cruel insights and resources, so so nabbing conscious explorer is really just more about what it. It means to be conscious what it means to be being how we relate to each other to the world I mean everything has consciousness in the sense that it's the interface which we need everything else, so there's nothing that a conscious explorer doesn't have one toe dip into as it were. Can you describe a little bit about what you've discovered in your consciousness exploration? What are some of these different states that you've encountered? Yeah I mean that's. So many. There's so many it's sort of like where to start, I mean head trip. My first book was an attempt to kind of describe what is the most basic states of consciousness that were available to us through twenty four hours, so it was a lot about sleep and dreaming, and some of the borderline states have been can hit on. was about daydream and trance zone, and let alertness and <hes> and it was about meditation. You can think of those different locations in a spatial sense if you think of a landscape or a house, different rooms or different terrains, but then I started getting into meditation. It becomes less about the destinations inside, but there's also the qualities itself we bring to the expiration, so understanding how equanimity works, which is mind blowing understanding how concentration works the way concentration kind of creates reality unifies the mind understanding the nature of clarity and discernment and Insight Understanding Nature Tranquility, the nature of energy. All those things are now really what I'm most interested in that's. Not Surprising because that's the part that's most directly practical for helping people manage their own inner worlds, so it's really a standing kind of were the dials on all those qualities that I described. You know compassion. Where's the dial on that? And how do you turn it up and some of them? How do you turn it down? Do you <hes>? What does it mean to have a balanced mine? That's all the stuff I'm super into now. So That's interesting. You sort of describe the range of states I, starting with more almost like a neuro scientific approach like water. What do we know about consciousness? We have sleep. We have waking. We can break up sleep into these different aspects. <hes> you moved into more sort of? Almost I would say like Haag Mets Madison three experience, and then he moved into like a clear Buddhist kind of set of terms that we have so at the end the words you're using very defined in very familiar to anybody who was a D., meditation, practice, equanimity, clarity concentration, and so I guess in some ways reflects your own journey through through discovering consciousness I for million scientific now ending up in a more bonus perspective. Although I wouldn't call it a Buddhist actually <hes> my original inspiration, for that was the seven factors of awakening that puts understanding list of seven qualities sort of mind and heart, and then my teacher Shinzan. Really focuses on. WHO's Buddhist ash on concentration, clarity, equanimity, but. Concentration clarity equanimity. Are they're not? There's nothing Buddhist about them. They're I'm not interested. In the Buddhist description of what those things are interested in real time experience that is shared among human beings around what concentration is what equanimity is what clarity is so those you can say the Buddhist categories I helped me find a way in, but I like to move into different cracks outside of anyone tradition, and then sort of see okay. What's going on here? How do they describe it had a science in psychology described how the second therapy describe it you know. And what were they all converging so a Buddhist it? It was a great place to start because it said they're such awesome list makers, but I would say it's <hes> an all respective, but his practice for sure I mean they're they're they're. They're the great explorers you know, but this understanding doesn't belong to anyone tradition. I mean it's really the attempt to try to make it more universal and say hey, this is art of our inheritance. Just like it's just like saying you know the muscle groups like you know succinct. Particular tradition discovered that we have biceps. We have joints or that we have Fausia you know these are all dimensions of having a human body.

Geoff Knicks Haag La Bamba Fausia Loehmann
Jeff Warren - A Consciousness Explorer Takes You On A Tour Through Your Mind

Untangle

05:38 min | 2 years ago

Jeff Warren - A Consciousness Explorer Takes You On A Tour Through Your Mind

"This week. We're going to go on an adventure with Consciousness Explore Jeff Warren. He's the author of the book. The head trip, and the New York Times bestseller meditation for fidgety skeptics. He's also a fantastic meditation teacher and the founder of the Consciousness Explorers Club where he helps. You investigate various states of mind. So get ready to strap on your pith helmets takeout your flashlights because we're gonNA shine them into the darkest corners of the mind. Welcome Geoff. Things me my absolute pleasure tastic time you hear so today. You'RE GONNA. Be Our guide into the brain. Can you start by just letting us know what to use the consciousness explorer? While yes, changed over the years a little bit. When I was younger, it was more. Just It was more about the fun you know. It was about the I guess it emerged from my own. Exploratory experiences, a teenager in my late twenties, second LX and when I first approached practices I very much interested in a special effects in the cool spaces. You could get into and. As any good explorer will tell you the longer you spend exploring, the more the expiration itself starts to change you and it started to become much more about understanding the dynamics of consciousness, more generally understanding how mental health works understanding my own challenges, and beginning to address someone using that understanding to share with other people and kind of cruel insights and resources, so so nabbing conscious explorer is really just more about what it. It means to be conscious what it means to be being how we relate to each other to the world I mean everything has consciousness in the sense that it's the interface which we need everything else, so there's nothing that a conscious explorer doesn't have one toe dip into as it were. Can you describe a little bit about what you've discovered in your consciousness exploration? What are some of these different states that you've encountered? Yeah I mean that's. So many. There's so many it's sort of like where to start, I mean head trip. My first book was an attempt to kind of describe what is the most basic states of consciousness that were available to us through twenty four hours, so it was a lot about sleep and dreaming, and some of the borderline states have been can hit on. was about daydream and trance zone, and let alertness and and it was about meditation. You can think of those different locations in a spatial sense if you think of a landscape or a house, different rooms or different terrains, but then I started getting into meditation. It becomes less about the destinations inside, but there's also the qualities itself we bring to the expiration, so understanding how equanimity works, which is mind blowing understanding how concentration works the way concentration kind of creates reality unifies the mind understanding the nature of clarity and discernment and Insight Understanding Nature Tranquility, the nature of energy. All those things are now really what I'm most interested in that's. Not Surprising because that's the part that's most directly practical for helping people manage their own inner worlds, so it's really a standing kind of were the dials on all those qualities that I described. You know compassion. Where's the dial on that? And how do you turn it up and some of them? How do you turn it down? Do you What does it mean to have a balanced mine? That's all the stuff I'm super into now. So That's interesting. You sort of describe the range of states I, starting with more almost like a neuro scientific approach like water. What do we know about consciousness? We have sleep. We have waking. We can break up sleep into these different aspects. you moved into more sort of? Almost I would say like Haag Mets Madison three experience, and then he moved into like a clear Buddhist kind of set of terms that we have so at the end the words you're using very defined in very familiar to anybody who was a D., meditation, practice, equanimity, clarity concentration, and so I guess in some ways reflects your own journey through through discovering consciousness I for million scientific now ending up in a more bonus perspective. Although I wouldn't call it a Buddhist actually my original inspiration, for that was the seven factors of awakening that puts understanding list of seven qualities sort of mind and heart, and then my teacher Shinzan. Really focuses on. WHO's Buddhist ash on concentration, clarity, equanimity, but. Concentration clarity equanimity. Are they're not? There's nothing Buddhist about them. They're I'm not interested. In the Buddhist description of what those things are interested in real time experience that is shared among human beings around what concentration is what equanimity is what clarity is so those you can say the Buddhist categories I helped me find a way in, but I like to move into different cracks outside of anyone tradition, and then sort of see okay. What's going on here? How do they describe it had a science in psychology described how the second therapy describe it you know. And what were they all converging so a Buddhist it? It was a great place to start because it said they're such awesome list makers, but I would say it's an all respective, but his practice for sure I mean they're they're they're. They're the great explorers you know, but this understanding doesn't belong to anyone tradition. I mean it's really the attempt to try to make it more universal and say hey, this is art of our inheritance. Just like it's just like saying you know the muscle groups like you know succinct. Particular tradition discovered that we have biceps. We have joints or that we have Fausia you know these are all dimensions of having a human body.

Consciousness Explorers Club New York Times Jeff Warren Founder Geoff Fausia Haag
Mental health challenged by pandemic

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:35 min | 2 years ago

Mental health challenged by pandemic

"I just want to get back to the pandemic for a second I think it's not a new observation or an original observation. But we're primarily justifiably thinking about the pandemic as a public health issue and as an economic issue but I also think it is going to be am probably already is the largest mental health challenge to the world. Since I don't know World War Two. I don't know what to have all these people on lockdown. At have you know the justice it increases the salience of your own issues in your own mind because as you said before. They external distractions aren't there. You're not getting many of us. Aren't getting the social interactions. We need to feel healthy. Some of us are locked down with our abusers are reluctant with our children who we love but drive US crazy and they're just so many ways in which or where we've got anxiety about the virus who got an anxiety about the economic situation. So many stressors here. I mean I can feel in my own life. I started thinking about this when you talked about how my grounded nece can be a transmission or a social contagion with my neighbour. And I'm like wow. I don't know how grounded I am right now I can feel like I'm regressing. Back to two thousand three levels of anxiety Because of this situation and I'm in the point. Oh a one percent of the luckiest and very mindful of and very aware of through my role in the news media of the people who were really not that lucky and so. That's me I'm just wondering for you have there. Have you noticed Increase in difficulties as a consequence of you know what we're living through together. I have I mean for me. This whole period is inseparable from the fact that I'm a new dad too so this is the first. I'm still in the first seven months of my son's life and so my wife and I are. Life has been turned upside down and that was true before the pandemic and as the pandemic is settled in. It's just exaggerated some of the challenges of new parenthood in terms of the isolation just needing to be there all the time that continual need to be with this kid you know and when your sleep is just shot to hell. I mean. We haven't had a good night's sleep in says probably before he was born so already. There was this sort of attrition happening and now with this added extra stress for me worrying about my parents. My friends who are doctors in those industries and also my friends who have small businesses were falling apart. You know who've lost their jobs I feel like I am talking to a lot of people like that and trying to support a lot of people so I do feel that. I'm you know working at fifty percent. Sixty percent may be but that just for me. It's just been that much more also practicing more than I ever have probably in my life like it's called practices so much more obvious and I find that the practice I have done has massively helped me if this happened to me five years ago even I think you know it would have been a different story. We have been much more. I would have been much more volatile and dysregulates but it's even five years ago but the past five years practices really dropped down to a much deeper level. So I feel much more capable of being with this experience and being able to be present for others and I'm less regulated than I. Even though I'm not nearly at full capacity I still feel like I could have been much worse.

United States
"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Me, it means that I'll do like I spend time doing like a compassionate loving kindness. Practice or I'll do a deliberate concentration practice, which is not about kind of noticing my stuff, but just about kind of trying to going into the softest part of the breath feeling the very softest part and going and even software what's even softer than that like something that can give me. So you're still you still developing the same skills, but you're more on the concentration, and you're more in the kind of like kind of like just letting all of your faculties converge into an activity as opposed to being aware of what's going on in your thoughts. Do you know what it means? Those are two different kinds of techniques. And sometimes also I will. This is really another relevant point for bringing off the cushion. Sometimes I'm just not in the place to do this stuff sitting down just feels like too much to be facing all this or I don't feel like going into it in a sitting practice. But what I know. I need is something just to calm me. Something simple for my nervous system, some kind of some activity like that. And so what I'll do is. That's where I'll go and do slack lining or I'll go and do go rock climbing or I'll go for a run or or I'll do she gone, and like I love to do some physical thing. And I just try to let it be this very simple activity where I I bring all my attention to bear on what my body is doing. And what I find is that gives me a kind of like a peacefulness, and then the peace and was starts to kind radiate out. So I often ask people like where are you getting the peacefulness in your life? It may be that you get from the meditation straight up. That's awesome. Or it may be that for you to find that peacefulness. You may also need to be doing another kind of activity of taking a bath often. It's connected to a self. Hairpiece? But something that brings you into a feeling of just simplicity and peace and all those faculties convergence because that converging because that's where all the a lot of the healing benefits of the practice. Come from. I love that answer and just to amplify it. So there may be times. I've definitely had ties my practice. I just don't feel like meditating often for me. It's not so much that I don't wanna see my stuff. It just like I want to watch Netflix or whatever. But I absolutely relate to the idea that there may be times. We're just you're you're meditating because for a number of reasons, but one of them may be you know, it helps you things -iety. But you know, that when you meditate some of that things that he's going to crop up, and you're gonna have to surf it. So maybe you wanna do a different as Jeff was saying different kind of practice in particular. I found myself recently gravitating toward the supremely sappy loving kindness meditation, which Jeff in the book, very wisely sort of repositions as friendliness meditation or giving a blank about yourself meditation. And and and you can get those meditations in the book, actually, if you get the book that you can get all of the guided audio versions of those meditation on the app for free, and but I found that this creating of an and I talked about this a little bit earlier. This inner atmosphere of boosted warmth and friendliness toward your own stuff. Can just it's it's like a great vacation..

Jeff Netflix
"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"So all of this is connected as you begin to slow down. And and try to notice some of those simple pleasures or just take an extra moment with it. Those will begin to show you the direction that I was talking about. I mean, I wish there was a way to make it even more clear, you know, because it's so it is so elemental it's almost it's people overlook it. But those are the kinds of things at the practice it both at generate more of a practice and deepen the practice, and they're the kind of things the practice leads towards it's both. I thought that was clear and again, well said as much as I hate saying nice things about you. Yeah. Really? Appreciate that. Jeff. Thank you. And it was a great question from the caller. So let's do let's get and let's see if we can squeeze in a few more calls here. Again. Monday miss Stephanie from Chester New York. I have been using your app and a really enjoy it. I really liked the courses because there's kind of deep so it's cool that I'm starting to go on my second round of some of the is just kinda. And I'm learning more by going around the second time. My question is that I do find that attention to be so beneficial for mine variety, but sometimes I find myself or something about me that wants to go back on autopilot and doesn't want to do mindfulness practice anyone? Because even though it's so beneficially find it a little. Challenging at the same time. So I'm just wondering have you ever encountered a time of year meditation practice life that you avoided you kind of didn't want to meditate? And why do you think that happens? What is it almost like your mind is battling with yourself? Not warning to be mindful that makes any sense anyway, just wonder if he ever encountered that in your own practice and kind of what you do do you just keep meditating on or or what works for you. Anyway. Thanks for all you do. And have a great day. Thank you. Bye. Bye. Thank you. That's a great question. There are things I could. And maybe we'll say, but I strongly suspect that Jeff is going to have the more valuable answer to the soup. Jeff. Why don't you go first likely? Well, actually, I I I said another question I really relate to I really feel where she's coming from. And I think that. Maybe one way to say it is. Especially if we've a lot of anxiety. We've lot of difficult stuff going on when we start meditating. It's like we're opening to that. You know, we're opening to it were letting ourselves feel it, and it's like, oh my gosh. It can seem like a lot. And it could seem like it's just going to go on and on and on and it can sometimes feel like, and I've definitely been this. I've longed for previous state of innocence or something where I could just go back and not have to be inside. This does not have to be noticing this stuff. And so what I would say is what developed for me is a really important practice where it was this is where understanding that there are different kinds of practices important. So we're teaching that attention here, but there are different meditations. And there is a time to meditate where you're it's about being really mindful of uncomfortable stuff and noticing what's happening. And and if you're doing that, then you definitely want to be sort of pacing yourself, you know, going into the stuff a little bit and then moving back into moral. Mm based sensation. That's more naturally easy. And you may also want other support when you're working through that kind of material. But there are other times when you really want to just you wanna be giving yourself a kind of gift of something. That's simple something that's enjoyable. So for.

Jeff Stephanie Chester New York
"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"It comes with time. But I would say is to continually in every moment. Look where is that direction? Is it actually there? So you're busy doing something. You realize oh, yeah. I have meditated I meditate what is this quality that emerges. Sometimes when I when I'm practicing actually, it's here. This is the this is the thing that is mind blowing in a practice like there's it's both to that. You're building up these qualities, and then there suddenly it starts to peer in your appearance in your experience. But it's also true that that quality is subtly there all the time. And it's just about learning how to recognize it. So what he's asking for is actually a practice. It's a practice of how to make them moment in the moment. Reorientation to your experience and notice. That there is something simple, or peaceful that is present. Or there is something. And that's often when I say, something like oriented, your own being that is kind of trying to do that or oriented to something very simple or open in your practice that is trying to do that. So everyone's going to have a different q that's going to work for them that so this is like I think this is the most important thing other than having a sitting practice. It's too out in life to be exploring. This idea of what is my cue that's to kind of cue me into some fundamental simplicity or space or openness or peace or connection in my life that it's actually happening right there right now. But can I just begin to see it? And notice it or what's the cue that tips me off. That's there. Yeah. That I was sorry. Sorry. Jeff. I didn't mean to interrupt you. Go ahead. No. No. I just does that does that make sense? Yeah. I mean, there's an aspect of gratitude to it in some ways. I know that's a cognitive sort of addition. But you know, for me the Q one one power powerful cue for me to tune into. This is. When I'm sitting in the tub with my now, four year old I called him three year old, but he just turned four Alexander in of you know, I know he's not gonna let me sit in the tub with them that much longer. And I love that guy. And I just you know, we're not even maybe even talking maybe he's playing with his toys, and I'm just sitting there looking at him, and he just gives me so much pleasure. The fact that he's alive, and I'm just like tuning into the fact that we're to dude sitting in the tub, it's awesome and little cues like that can create a kind of a nostalgia for the present. Which I have found to in my experience would be impossible without the foundation of formal practice. But is a great way to spread the benefits of formal practice into your actual life. The way I talk about that. Sometimes it's just around the idea of valuing simple pleasures that we we pave over. All of these very simple pleasures that are available to us with these more dramatic searches for the big special effects or the big peak experience. And boom, we get when we train ourselves in that way, we stopped to see that all around us all the time. There are these little tiny things that we were taking pleasure in. So it's about slowing that down slowing down the whole the catastrophes ation of the brain's negativity bias and just start to actually look around and say every time that you notice say the light in the trees, and you're just like, oh, yeah. Like take a second to stop. And just notice that you you already appreciate that. Can you create a little bit more that will connect you into that? Or you see someone smiling on the subway reading a book. God, I know I'm sounding cheesy when I'm saying this, but it's true like some, and you just go take a moment to appreciate that feels kind of nice to notice that person's happy or you see someone do something. Nice for someone or I mean all around all the time. There are these very simple little pleasures to be taken or the feeling of the warm sun on your face. But if you don't take the time to just take that moment, then you're not really letting them in..

Jeff Alexander three year four year
"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"More sanely smoothly calmly, so that when we're ambushed by anger restlessness off the cushion in our regular life. We're not so yanked around by it. So the the the that turbulent period of sitting actually can be a period of real growth and the wanting of the com- can be a barrier to the comet self. So I would just say that. I absolutely think see the wisdom and everything Jeff said, I would just add on top of it that that. That the danger of expectations creeps in again here. And the point of sitting is not to feel a certain way, it's to feel whatever you feel clearly so that your emotions and neurotic impulses in random thoughts aren't yanking you around all the time. Absolutely. And that it comes back to that point. I made earlier which is just it's just a sit down and just appreciate that you're sitting down. And then when I have my mind really turning up. I just kind of look at it with bemusement like I'm still getting the basic acceptance of my experience, and I'm just end the thoughts are still there. But now, I'm just it's like, I just watch it. It's like, oh, yeah, there it is. It's hilarious. It's neurotic. It's insane. And it just plays out. And I just listened to it with this sort of bemusement and eventually it will slow down to. So in other words, just what Dan said, you're still developing these skills, even if it feels uncomfortable of the mind is still going in that basic skills. The skill of equanimity skill just like letting. Yourself have this experience as it is. Yeah, you know. And this is another thing I really learned from you in the writing the book that there's equanimity which is. Just being cool with whatever's happening, and there's also friendliness you can train up an inner attitude of friendliness toward whatever you're experiencing. Whatever you may hate about yourself that pops up all the time in meditation in my case, it's a kind of restlessness wanting the next thing all the time, which I kinda hate about myself. But if you can develop an inter attitude of like, oh, yeah. That's that's cool. I get it. Like, that's that's you give that voice in your head a name, which is what you recommended that. I do when we're out on the road trip. When I totally rejected. It reflexively because I thought it was dopey. But now, I actually do it. So whenever you know, the the little chipmunk in my head starts revving up. Just give it a hearty salute. As like, all right. Yeah. Welcome to the party. It's cool. It's okay to feel this. And that really just changes the way you are with yourself enough or nothing the way you are with other people. I love that. This is locked in with you. And they said makes me so happy. It's true. I actually listened to what you're saying. Even though I mock you'll up. No, it's you've you've really changed my life in many, many important ways. So let's do voicemail number five. Hey, dan. My name is Sam, and I I'm fellow broadcaster sports broadcaster. So it's.

Dan Jeff Sam
"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"I enjoy the app and all your interviews, and Jeff you're wonderful teacher. Thank you. I was with it. Right up into the point where she said nice things about you. And then she lost. But man, you're the teacher. So I'm going to let you answer that one. Well, first off I can hugely relate to this. Because I've got like a red hot turbine brain. That's always spinning out. And I think exact same way when I sit down if I just sit cold into a sit when I got a lot of rumination happening, then it's just it takes a long time for that to kind of wind down. And I'm sitting there trying to do always like ninja mindfulness tricks, and moves and breath things and sometimes it just plays out at its own pace. So what I've learned to do is. I would call it. A kind of appreciating the transition move where instead of just going from zero. Because it's any wonder you sit down you go you're going full speed. And you sit down to sit. And you wonder why hasn't just completely stopped because obviously the trains going to keep moving. So what I'll try to do is. I try to take some time to just get into the groove like in terms of a transition. So I might if I know I'm going to meditate I'll sit down I'll like like the candle, you know, like kind of take my meditation cushion and kind of deliberately give it a few wax or whatever. Like, I'm basically trying to get into a kind of ritual space or like what they would almost more of an attitude of like doing something deliberately and it just it's like, I'm making this transition where I'm I'm starting the ritual of doing it. I it gives my body something do something active to do in that transition, and I find when I do that. When I take a few minutes to kind of do these deliberate things with my physical body. And that also includes by the way, sometimes doing. A little bit of movement stuff. Like, I might do some Tai Chi stuff or like often if I'm really a ton energy. I'll go for a run. I I'll do some yoga I or I'll do slack lining or whatever. Like a little physical thing to get that energy out. But it's all the same point, which is like start to do something physical that gets you in to the ritual of moving towards meditation. You know, and and I think traditionally within a contemporary context, that's where people would you know, kind of set their intention for what they're doing. That's where they would like take out their little frigging Buddha statue, or maybe it's like a little Steve Jobs statue, get the shoe polish. Oh, give it a little polish. Delo, bald head whatever. Like, you gotta do to kind of get into the accoutrements of it. But it's all about taking care to move into this different space. And then when you're sitting down a lot of that energy has already dissipated. That's one thing that works for me. Yeah. I mean, I have found that stretching beforehand yoga stretching or any kind of stretching really helps also. So Jeff you talk about this a lot in the book of just starting with a couple of deep breaths just sends a message to the para sympathetic nervous system. Like, all right. It's meditation time, and the other thing is just to know. And we talk we talk about this in the book as well that the the, quote, unquote, bad sits the tough meditation that actually in some ways is like a tough workout in that it actually makes you stronger because what are we trying to do here? We're trying to train ourselves to deal with life's vexations and vicissitudes.

Jeff sympathetic nervous system Steve Jobs
"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Totally free. And it basically just talks about the value of sitting in community and how you can kind of start up a small group on your own. That's just a very simple affair that's true to your values and whatever's going on locally, and it talks about a little bit about the inner game of holding space for people, and how all that can be a real catalyst for deepening your practice. So that is an option for people. Yeah. I recommend people. Check that free guide out. You also talk about it quite beautifully and at length in the book meditation for fidgety skeptics and just just just to bolster your point. I am always a little reluctant to quote, the Buddha because people might come away with the wrong impression that some that I'm super sectarian or something like that. But I'm going to do it. Anyway, there's a great exchange between the Buddha and his right hand man named a non. And a non apparently he's come back from having a very invigorating discussion with some fellow meditators, and he says to the Buddha like that was awesome hanging out with. Quote, unquote, spiritual friends friends who meditate it's like half the path in the Buddhist said, no, no, no, no. It's one hundred percent of the path. So there's a reason why Songa or community is emphasized so strongly by these ancient master meditators. And it's because it really helps it has an HOV lane affect this like your car pooling with other people toward sanity. And it's it is extremely powerful. And I think Jeff's contributions in this area are awesome. It's also going well just say it's like it's a a way of pooling wisdom to you, especially if you get into a situation where you're like you practice a bit. And then you share a little bit about what's going on. Because these. The chins. And my teacher always says subtle is significant a lot of what's happening in a practice is very subtle. And a lot of little ways in which we can get caught up or we can get like we practicing a away that's kind of like feels like it's kind of going in the wrong direction. It's these little subtle things that we're doing that. We don't know that we're doing. But when we hear other people talk about their practice, and what's working for them. And what's not working? And all of a sudden these new things to come into our experiences start to notice new stuff. So you don't need to do it alone as a solitary brain, you can basically pull the wisdom as part of this collective endeavor and hear other people are poaching. And what they're doing. And it just I've had so many breakthroughs because I've heard how someone else someone's asked a question or or given a report or shared an insight about how they've done something. And it's like, oh my God. All of a sudden, I can see something in my experience. Now that I couldn't see before. So that is I can't say enough about how important it is. That's also why we read good books about meditation about practice because they they give you exactly those kinds. Of perspectives to well said, let's do our forth voicemail. Here we go. Hello, dan. And Jeff this is Shannon from California. I have been meditating for a little over two years. And most of that time using the ten percent happier app. And I've really enjoyed it and have been pretty dedicated in my practice. I try to meditate every morning for about fifteen or twenty minutes and what I find. Sometimes oftentimes is that my brain seems to go on overdrive. And then right about the time that the meditation. Is over my brain seems to let go a little bit and get into the groove of the meditation. And I found that one I to run as well. I brain look crazy, and I start thinking about everything and then after a while it would release then I would just get into the groove. And I'm wondering if you have any recommendations other than meditate longer, which I'm having a hard time doing due to my schedule that might help. Set the calm in earlier versus trying to fight with it for fifteen minutes. And then right when things are getting good. Have it be over? Thanks for everything. You do..

Jeff this California Shannon one hundred percent fifteen minutes twenty minutes ten percent two years
"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Your DNA into the next generation. So we're really good at threat detection, and finding sources of pleasure like food or or. Or sexual partners. Not so good at establishing long-term habits. So just knowing that we're wired for failure is is important. But anyway, one of Jeff's signature recommendations is the power of community. So Jeff the floor is yours. Yeah. I mean, it could be community of two. It's a lot of us are fine practicing on her own, you know, it's like we can create the necessary momentum we have the discipline. And we liked the simplicity of that. But for a lot of us there. I'm basically part of this group. There's something about being what other people that creates more accountability for me. So that might even mean like, I practiced with my wife was Sarah. And I like that helps me be more regular when I sit. And it definitely means when it comes to the community piece. That's why I go, and I sit that's where I started. Why I started a conscious explorers club still I have a group of people to sit with and that it's like I'll screw myself over all the time. But I will if I'm accountable to another group or they're expecting me to show up. Whether I'm in a leadership role for holding space, or I'm just like another sitter, I'll do that. And there's something to the motivation of feeling the energy of that. And seeing other people do it it just it gives me a lot of momentum. And so sort of some people the the. Right. Move is just to go. Okay. If I'm having trouble getting this on my own is there another person I could sit with or even or what would even taking it to another level. Like what if I decided that I wanna start my own group? And I don't mean like a big giant thing. I mean, like two or three or friends you get together. You know, you listen to guided meditation or you practice actually guiding each other in a simple way, the the soon as you start to hold space in that bigger way. The there's something else that happens, which is the the practice starts deepened in a new way. Like because when you're getting together, China sit together and be real together. You kinda gotta be real. You can't just be you gotta kind of actually be s- kind of centered to kind of come into yourself in a way. So a lot of my best practice happens. When I'm in a space, where I'm kind of like, I know other people are coming in to meditate, and I gotta kinda be there for them. And I find it draws me into a very present meditative space. So I can't I mean there's so much to say about this. I've written some of this in a I wrote a free guide. For people called the community practice activation kit. It's on the consciousness explorers. Club website C meditate dot com, and it's.

Sarah Jeff China
"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"In fact, it kind of shuts the whole system down it also can get people thinking, oh, I'm a failure. Because meditation sucks for me. Yeah. I mean, it's all about the balance. Right. So I mean, what I that's why I say to people the most simple thing you can bring to a practice by far is just this appreciation for being for just sitting and nothing needing to happen. So you just sit and you're in a way that you're trying to be with yourself. And then you do the best is best. You can you sort of stay. With the breath, but that is the fundamental practice. And for that anything that's going on is fine. You know, whether you're distracted at the time. And you're having thoughts go off whether you're feeling discomfort. Whether there are sounds going on around you like just the act of being able to sit with yourself and letting all those things be there is the basic the absolute baseline, so in that sense. That's that's managing expectations. Because you're not saying it needs to be in any way other than just being there with it. If it's uncomfortable. Then then the maturity is to be okay with the discomfort. If it's pleasurable then you enjoy that. But that the fundamental training is agrees just being open to whatever's happening in experience, I used a phrase we at one point in the road trip. You were talking to one of the hosts of Elvis Duran and the morning show. One of the big morning FM pop and talk shows in America, and you use this phrase with her. Yeah. It's about enjoying your being nece. And she gave you a look that was roughly akin to the to the look that my cats give my three year old, son. When he offers them, his toys, total lack of comprehension. So you you. But I so I made fun of you for using this kind of woo rays of enjoying your being miss..

Elvis Duran America three year
"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"And you really got me to focus on the fact that meditation actually, the act itself can be pleasurable. I I've I tend to dwell on the benefits of the practice, which I hope can get their tendrils into you and make you know, biding meditators because it's working for your diet eater, or depression, or whatever. But your your message is much simpler, which is. No, no, no, actually meditating can be a source of enjoyment. Can so can you say more about that? Yeah. It has a lot to do with the the nature of the concentration that gets developed in a meditation practice, you know, one way to think about what the skill you're building. It's this really this idea of gathering all parts of your tension into doing one thing. So in easiest to kind of describe the opposite of that. Which is say anything else, we're doing like say, your washing the dishes by hand, you know, you could have a really deep meditative experience of that. By just feeling. The water on your hands and being completely in the moment with the sort of sensory experience of it. But instead what happens is we're going over our to do lists or obsessing about this problem or this slight or this thing happened over here where catastrophes we're basically our tension is spread into like five six seven eight nine different tracks. So when we when we noticed that, you know, with mindfulness, and we to come into a practice, the ideas to just like decide that you're going to commit all your faculties to one thing. And let the social you bring everything into sage is feeling the breath or feeling sounds or whatever it is. As we start to do that the mind the body will naturally start to get relaxed. And then the mind starts to feel particular flavor of pleasure. That is really becomes the feedback loop for any long-term practitioner. It's this inherent feeling of just sort of satisfaction of doing this one thing and kind of doing it. Well, like, you're just paying attention to the breath. You're just listening and you start to notice all the parts you that. Side that are think oh, this is boring. This is this is that all that stuff. You bring with you. But you just notice that you come back, and you go you drop back into this one thing, and the more you have the attitude of like this is like a break. You know, the thing I'm so appreciative. I get this moment. I don't have to be exhausted structure at a million different directions. I can just do this one thing. So you create this feedback loop with the appreciation for the simplicity creates more simplicity. Creates more convergence and eventually, you're you're pulled together in a sort of flow state with the practice, and that's what I'm talking about. Is you start to get that going? It doesn't have to take very long. Then you start to look forward to the practice as a place where you're practicing the basic value of doing something simple doing something well, appreciating the simplicity, and it rolls out into your life, and all of these very healing ways. I mean, there's no question about it. That's like one of the central ways the practice can can help us suggest this district's me though. I love everything you just said. It's had a big impact on my own personal practice. But the one fear I have when I when I hear you say, everything you just said is that people might get into this space of expecting to feel a certain way during meditation and expectations are, of course, quite a noxious ingredient to add to the to the recipe here because if you go in desiring some specific outcome in almost guarantees that you're not going to get it..

depression
"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Like, and then how can you take that structure? And then just like add to the structure a little a piece with the meditation fits in. So it can just become something. You don't think about you're just like, you know, you just destructor happens. It's the it's all about environmental design, you design the right structure, and then the just kind of takes care of itself. Because you know, where it fits in the structure when I have that kind of thing going on then by far most likely to do my meditation and stay with my meditation. When I lose the structure, I lose the practice of oh, there's a huge caveat. I can say, and maybe we'll impact it in another question about how you begin to do the applying in life thing, which is another big piece for me. So that's maybe a place to start. Yeah. I think that's a great place to start. I'll just say a few other things to Heather. That come to mind from the research. We did around the book, I get the idea of waiting for the perfect time. But as I think Heather is no realize that rarely arises the perfect time. So I think I think the last piece of advice you had about looking at your schedule and thinking about what are your existing habits? Where are where is there already behavioral momentum? You know? I know I'm going to exercise at this time where I know I'm going to brush my teeth at this time. I know I go to bed at this time. I know I pull my car into the driveway at this time, and and then drafting off of that momentum to say, oh, I think I could add a minute of meditation right there or two minutes of meditation which leads into my next piece of advice, which is lower the expectations about. The commitment. Because one of the things we've learned at the app is that if you tell people, hey, one minute counts, and we have a whole bunch of one minute meditations in the app, and in the book, you you wrote some great one minute meditations that it becomes imminently. Doable. And so I think there's there's a lot of power to that the other thing I would say is thinking about like people often ask what's the right time of day that just remember you if you're not a morning person. Don't try to shove it in there to try to do it at a time of day when it's going to be when it's going to be most likely to to actually stick. And so I think thinking about that there isn't a time of day where it's magic the best time to meditate is when you will actually meditate so really just thinking about what what are the ways to set your life up? So that the odds are the highest and Jeff mentioned willpower, and you may want to say more about this, Jeff, but. Willpower is is not something to be counted on. It's is it is an imagining -ly ephemeral inner resource which tends to evaporate in the face of things like hunger, boredom or loneliness or fatigue. So the a better way to go about this sort of de Monica difficult process of setting up a habit is to instead of relying on willpower to rely on dopamine rely on pleasure. Rely on the pleasure centers of the brain. So so really it's about figuring out once you've established the habit. What are the benefits you may you may find if you try to do a couple of weeks of practice that oh all of a sudden, you're more focused or you're less yanked around by your emotions your calmer? You're sleeping better. Let those benefits drag you forward rather than grit which again, tens tends to evaporate and just one. Last thing we. A couple of less things here. Another concept that we came up with in the book, I think Jeff this was when we visited Newton south high school, my alma mater, where I was a wastrel and near do well in high school, and we had a couple of hundred people that showed up for an evening talk about meditation and one of the.

Jeff Heather Newton south high school dopamine Monica one minute two minutes
"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"jeff warren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Dot com etcetera etcetera, it's called meditation for fidgety skeptics, and in that book, Jeff, and I took a row across country road trip in a very deeply silly orange bus with the big ten percent, happier. Decal on the side of it. We took a road trip across the country met all sorts of people social workers to politicians to celebrities to random people on the street to police officers cadet set, the Virginia Military institute all sorts of people who want to meditate. But can't quite figure out how to get the habit started. And we did this as an information gathering thing. And we really in the process of of of doing this road trip. Identified six seven eight of the biggest hurdles because we kept hearing the same things there common. Hurdles that people have have to get over in order to establish a meditation habit. Like finding the time to do it figuring out. Am I doing it? Right. That's a huge issue. A wrestling with questions about whether this would this practice might make you lose your edge, or whether it's self indulgent or whether it's gonna make you look weird, Jeff, and I use this trip as an information gathering thing. And then and wrote a book about it really giving people useful practical hacks for getting over the hump and establishing this habit. So bringing Jeff back in order to celebrate the release of the paperback edition of meditation for fidgety skeptics, which as I said is available everywhere right now sorry being sales. And also to celebrate new year. Because this is the time of year when people are really thinking about how do I do this? What's the best time of day to do this? Where do I do? It doesn't need to be pristine silence, blah, blah, blah. We're gonna answer all those questions in a second. But first let me sorry. A also in a sales. He tip. Let me just tell you about something that we're doing through the ten percent happier company, which is that we're creating a challenge three week challenge that starts in January seventh that you.

Jeff Virginia Military institute ten percent three week