18 Burst results for "Jeff Wald"

"jeff wald" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

HumAIn Podcast

05:44 min | 3 months ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

"Five years the vehicle itself may be road ready because by the way five years ago every expert not hamas vehicle said in five years. They'll be ready and now every autonomous vehicle expert says in five years. They'll be ready. So i'll believe it when i see it but you know what i'm going to give them credit for it. There's a case to be made by the way that autonomous vehicles are never rode ready and people don't acknowledge that that is a possibility. I don't think it's highly likely but it's possible so we have five years before the autonomous vehicle itself is ready once the vehicle is ready and we understand how it's going to be on the road and that's important meaning. We can't parallel processor. Once that happens then we can begin to get the road itself ready because you can't do it beforehand because you don't know what the vehicles fully gonna look like and what it needs. So then we start to get the road ready that means censoring technologies and roads. All over the united states. That means repair infrastructure. Because that truck can't just pull into its local exxon station honking horns saying my tires. Broken like there has to be specific infrastructure to repair it and then the regulatory environment what happens when that truck hit somebody. What happens if the cargoes damage when it gets hijacked like. There's so many things to think about the need to get together and let me give you my best case scenario on that ten years ten years best case scenario i think i've actually will take much longer and then my friend and then you need to replace the entire trucking fleet in the united states. Let's just look at the large trucking company in the. Us night's swift. they have eighteen thousand trucks. If they were to double the amount they spend each year on purchasing trucks and the first of the truck were to come in maybe half at scale as to what people think it will be now it would take them ten years to replace their entire fleet by the way if we keep those numbers where they are would take them almost twenty to twenty five years to replace their entire fleet. So you start to say five years. Plus ten years and clearly. They're not going to buy a single truck until the road. Itself is ready so again sequential processing. Now you're starting to talk about twenty thirty forty years out before you start seeing significant impact and truck driving employment. Here's the story about truck driving and lime in the united states. People think it's autonomous vehicles and truck. Drivers are gonna go wait. No it isn't the story is there's a shortage of truckers in the united states. We are missing tens of thousands of truckers. And we're probably missing them because people are whispering. Don't go to trucking because it's going to be terrible. Future and trucking is a place where somebody without a college education without even really high school education can earn a minimum middle class wage..

five years Five years ten years eighteen thousand trucks twenty five years tens of thousands five years ago each year united states first twenty thirty forty years single truck almost twenty exxon double
"jeff wald" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

HumAIn Podcast

03:09 min | 3 months ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

"How has the day that trended for these future of jobs or through the history of work well. First of that program is an amazing program and things like that. Give me hope in that. Middle phase that dislocation phase because the dislocation occurs because we're not providing the resources necessary for retraining workers to the jobs the functions. The industry's maybe the geographies. That are losing employment to those that are gaining employment and so to the extent that we do that well. The transition period is much smoother. And so i'm hopeful because of new programs incentives and new technologies that help to drive people because what we see are the go hard jobs growing and by go hard. I mean hard tech or hard human the hard tech jobs. I mean david. You and i know i'm sure the audience knows you know jobs in programming and data and robotics and ai and cyber security and blah blah blah blah blah other jobs are growing by leaps and bounds. They've been going through the pandemic they will grow post pandemic going p dependent not impacting the jobs that are also predicted to grow over the next five to ten years. Our jobs and i'm categorizing into hard human jobs. The hard human jobs or jobs that involve creativity and design and empathy and human connection jobs in health care jobs in customer support and sales and marketing jobs in design itself and other creative functions. Those jobs are also predicted to grow and they're predicted to grow because there is no near or medium term world in which computers. Ai systems can do those jobs just none. The issue becomes is in the middle in the jobs that are repetitive. High volume task driven jobs. Those jobs through history get automated away now. What people miss in this is. It depends on the component tasks within a job makes find that. For a second there seven four different job classifications job functions in each job function. We can analyze what are the component tasks that make up that function if zero to fifty percent of the component tasks are repetitive. Have tasks the same thing over and over again history would tell us that job sees almost no job losses through an industrial revolution If it's fifty to seventy five percent we see a gradation at fifty. We see few job. Losses of seventy five percent of the component tasks we tendency about half the jobs in that job function. Go and seventy five released this magic number because once you get over seventy five you very quickly get to one hundred percent of those jobs go doesn't happen exactly seventy five when you get into eighty boom. We'd entre percent one hundred percent of the jobs in that function. Go now. It depends on when they go..

fifty zero one hundred percent one hundred First seventy five percent fifty percent each job eighty boom percent david seventy five ten years seven four different job class half the jobs five over a second
"jeff wald" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

HumAIn Podcast

01:39 min | 3 months ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

"Back listeners. The humane podcast today. We are continuing to talk about the future of work whether work as the new normal with his work in the post pandemic world and work continues to expand. I'm pleased today to have on the show. Jeff wald who's the founder of work market and. We have some great history together being involved with some of the same company so jeff. Thanks so much for joining us on show david. Thanks so much for having me. I am really looking forward to this conversation today because as we look forward to the future of work in the world. There's so much to talk about. And our shared history is with adp the payroll company which has done break things around payment providers and keeping companies afloat during the pandemic actually for the day to day operations. But before we move into those hot topics and and the future. Let's start with the history. What is work markets. And what is some of the exciting work that you've been doing in this space. So work market is enterprise off. Further enables companies to organize manage and pay their freelance workforce. So we built by far the largest enterprise software platform for the on demand economy not a marketplace where consumers can go but just the software that helps companies to manage that very important and growing part of their workforce. We found the company. Two thousand and ten we raised one hundred million from softbank in union square ventures and a few others and three years ago. We were lucky enough to find a great partner to continue the growth of the company and eighty p as adp purchase work market.

Jeff wald one hundred million jeff today three years ago Two thousand and ten david show
How AI Will Impact the Future of Jobs and Work

HumAIn Podcast

01:39 min | 3 months ago

How AI Will Impact the Future of Jobs and Work

"Back listeners. The humane podcast today. We are continuing to talk about the future of work whether work as the new normal with his work in the post pandemic world and work continues to expand. I'm pleased today to have on the show. Jeff wald who's the founder of work market and. We have some great history together being involved with some of the same company so jeff. Thanks so much for joining us on show david. Thanks so much for having me. I am really looking forward to this conversation today because as we look forward to the future of work in the world. There's so much to talk about. And our shared history is with adp the payroll company which has done break things around payment providers and keeping companies afloat during the pandemic actually for the day to day operations. But before we move into those hot topics and and the future. Let's start with the history. What is work markets. And what is some of the exciting work that you've been doing in this space. So work market is enterprise off. Further enables companies to organize manage and pay their freelance workforce. So we built by far the largest enterprise software platform for the on demand economy not a marketplace where consumers can go but just the software that helps companies to manage that very important and growing part of their workforce. We found the company. Two thousand and ten we raised one hundred million from softbank in union square ventures and a few others and three years ago. We were lucky enough to find a great partner to continue the growth of the company and eighty p as adp purchase work market.

Jeff Wald ADP Jeff David Union Square Ventures Softbank
"jeff wald" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

05:32 min | 6 months ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

"There's a lot of social isolation for kids. And i can't imagine being socially isolated at twelve thirteen fourteen fifteen sixteen lake in my i was growing up i would be. It would be really difficult for me. And so this entire kind of depression and suicide side of kids having social social isolation but also access to all the technology. You tackle that as well about that conversation with parents and maybe you can share with these are again. These are meant to be frameworks. I think the important thing. Tiffany is to have the conversations whether you have them you know. I suggest using the birthday. As you know i guess tongue-in-cheek the annual review of look. You've done a very good job. Managing your social media. Not spending too much time on it. Therefore we're going to allow you to have what's up this year and to say but let's talk about what that means but it's also and now that you're fifteen. Let's talk about drugs and alcohol. What tends to happen. Is that parents if they have conversations those very difficult because nobody wants conversation about oral sex with their their child. But if you're not having the conversation if you're not putting it in context if you're not giving them the critical thinking skills and the way to think about different situations they're getting it somewhere and what tends to happen is that parents have those conversations about those tough topics when there is some sort of negative event that occurred kit overdose at school suddenly. We're gonna talk about drugs if that's the first time you're talking about drugs. Good luck. good luck right. I genuinely mean. Good luck. And i appreciate. It sounds sarcastic. i mean. good luck. I hope it works but you have a much higher degree of having it work if you've had a regular cadence of conversations do you need us birth. Of course not just made that shit up. Whatever birthday every quarter whatever just have a of having a conversation so it's not so awkward. That's the point. Absolutely i think part of it is. This is all uncharted territory. I mean who would have thought you'd be educating your kids from home working from home everything from home such disruption over the course depending on where you're listening to this podcast in almost a year of of this Pandemic that really removed a lot of our choice. The things that. I wanna go see a movie. Oh i can't right. I want to send my kids to school. I can't right and so this sort of level of choice. And so. I think what i really enjoyed about the concept of the birthday rules is how to have these conversations that everybody is feeling uncomfortable that we just have to especially with everything else going on which we don't need to get into but it's what do they think. And what will they think. And how do we help. Shape sort of the next generation of entrepreneurs and leaders in jeff wall to create companies that are very valued. I mean how do we create that next generation. I think is what we should really focus in on why it's important to have these conversations. I agree with everything you said. Except maybe they're being a lot more falls out there. I'm not sure that that's the solution to anything. But my mom. And i don't know that we can find many other people that would agree but but i think you get the point. I can somebody. I'm just saying a jeff wall. Where jeff wald who has created multiple businesses that have been purchased by adp in salesforce and others. And you take your own money and san to create competition. I'm gonna give away ten million dollars for the vision of work in twenty forty like..

jeff wald fifteen ten million dollars Tiffany twenty forty this year Pandemic first time twelve thirteen fourteen fifte jeff jeff wall wall
"jeff wald" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

06:36 min | 6 months ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

"If you seen. You don't need us company names necessarily but you know what have you seen. I should say around this kind of reskilling at a corporate level. So you're now you're listening. You're a manager of a team or your leader of a group or leader of a division or a ceo of a of a business listening to this podcast. And you go. You know what. I've heard this time and time again that i need to really think about reskilling but i don't even know where to begin. What do you say to them. I would say yeah. This is a really messed up area. Nobody knows anything nobody knows. Does the education system on this shy be going to online schools. Chevy going to my local community. College does my company on this. Should i be pushing. Hr and development for more resources do is an individual own. It do. I just say look. I have to find this out on my own. Are their government programs to support my retraining and reskilling. What happens if i lose a job because that job function no longer is done by a human who's responsible then. This is an emerging area and it is something that i am incredibly worried about for our society when we talk about the amount of jobs might be lost to robots and because it is not something society has done very well which is support people that need to be re skilled but the flip side to the concern based on historic perspective is lots of new technologies coming onstream. Maybe mention company and asia. There's a great company called transfer. Vr vr headset two months. Later i mean you take it off from time to time but <hes>. Two months after the program take your shower. Sweep things like that but you know a couple of hours a day few months later you are fully trained in a new skill set. End job ready right. These trains are being done in partnership with corporations and universities in your job ready to start on a manufacturing line that to me is mind blowing amazing and where the world is heading and i think it's so important right that that there's so many things that have been so highly disrupted during this time and i'm just gonna focus on education but the education system like so many other things also have really needed to innovate that kind of classroom. Sit listened to lecture. Go home take a test has been forever. I may listen visual learner. I am not a read learner. So send me home to read three chapters and then test the day i would always do terrible stand in front of me stories. Get me engaged in what you're actually trying to teach me. Give me the test. I'll nail it so it's just a matter of you. Know how do people learn now in with different generations and now kind of being lifelong learners. Not you know you stop learning at twenty one or wherever you're listening to this in the world right when you're finished with your secondary education <unk>. That that's not when you stop learning that's kind of almost when you now you start learning real world. Thanks virtue virtue. There was one person that was one of our contributors. Daniel bianco runs water largest education investment firms and he put forward in his article. Statistic ninety six percent of college presidents. feel like they're preparing their people for the workplace. Ninety four percent of frontline hiring managers think people come in knowing nothing and on capable of starting their jobs. <hes> rhetoric college so huge disconnect going on there <hes>. But to your point people used to learn all the skills they needed by about twenty four usually vocational training internships apprentice ships of the university setting. And then that was it. You just continue your career no longer the case to your point at twenty one or whenever you're starting in the workforce is when your journey of learning is beginning and picking up skills beginning and you will constantly be needing to do that. Well i think that gap between the expectation reality or you know whatever in all kinds of topics. It's like that it even in innovation. We're very innovative. Company employees and customers don't agree executives. Think oh yes employees. Think oh no no no right or we think we invest in our people employees go <unk>. Not really like. I haven't been you train me on things that don't help me do my job so i i just recently finished some research on the power of the employee experience. Sort of being the achilles heel to anything else you wanna do right. If it's a great place to work and they feel like they're enabled innovate more. They innovate faster. They're more resilient they're more open to change their more collaborative kind of all those things and then from technology standpoint right. They have the ability to get trained online just in time. Or whatever technology it is that you're using lends itself to a more compelling customer experience <hes>. And then you know you see greater growth and we saw one dot eight x greater growth from companies that had those two things nailed e accent being employee experience ex being customer experience. But in that to your point you just made a few minutes ago. The executives feel like they're very focused on e. x. yet the employees did not agree right end this they they actually also felt that many of them would talk about how to grow without even talking about the employees. And i think that goes back to this whole reskilling conversations investing in the people that that is the greatest you know. I'm putting acid in air quotes. But i don't like calling humans assets but you get the point right like that's the greatest thing you have. It's really a combination of people. Violent agreement violent violent agreement. You know i will say to companies if you don't have a well-defined culture document. Then you don't really know what your culture is and if you're not an it's it's one thing to have some values up on the wall. The culture document goes through the behaviors and the policies that support those values. If you say that your employee centric and you have no policies to support that if you have no behaviors that supporting it. Then you're not employees center. You just wrote a word on <hes>. On the wall and it means nothing. We would always do the annual exercise of call. Bullshit here's here are here this value. Do we do this. Yes or no and if we don't let's just be honest about it let's change it. Let's see the change the value and be honest with each other. Or let's change our behaviors and policies. So we're really supporting the value. Because if you've got all of those brains bring in their authentic selves to work feeling comfortable to question and challenge feeling comfortable to innovate feeling comfortable that they know exactly where you are. Why they're there and where this company's going you're going be much better off.

Jeff Tiffany seven years three j.p. Morgan two hundred and forty pages ten million dollar Glen rock today three questions third one Third one twenty barrington one Hedge fund twenty forty jess of rules
"jeff wald" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

The Payroll Podcast

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

"It is very evocative for me to not only in the running of the startups that i have built in that have been successful but in the overall narrative of getting out down professionally. I mean i got the call for my mom. Do you need to move back home. And i didn't. I had a month of cash left. I had paid my rent already. And so but i didn't leave my apartment nick for upwards of a month just a deep deep funk and i've had the privilege of going all these great schools and working at all these great companies harbor j. p. morgan cornell end to be broke at thirty two was devastating to me but as with the ups and downs and startup. You have to pick yourself up and you gotta dust yourself off and you gotta keep going and people are surprised about that. Only in as much as i had so much shame associated with it that i never told the story and people would say oh. You know what your career i tell. I started a bunch of startups through various twists and turns. This one got sold win. Say i started my first one. It failed miserably. Bankrupted me at super depressed. I didn't know what to do and i was very despondent but then a few years later we re started that same concept and we eventually eventually got sold to salesforce. I don't say that i'd say oh. We both the country through various twists and turns it got sold to salesforce and so it's only recently after several big that i felt comfortable only through it and that is just to my due to my own insecurities and and bone and not capable being vulnerable but it is a part of my journey of becoming more vulnerable and addressing those insecurities to start talking about it and so over the last few years. I have been talking about publicly. We'll get va. That's a great story. And hopefully it'll help those listening to this as well. Who know to the difficulties. Don't use to the pandemic but maybe due to how they see the future of work. I'm sure you've put some of those concerns to bed a little bit during this this podcast because of as something that sent effecting the mental health professional certainly here in the uk plus a lot of People across the coast. The poem does well on a very regular basis on also have concerns about how which direction the pebble community and industry is gonna take so thank you ever so much for talking us through it Last question.

uk first one both j. p. morgan cornell a few years later last thirty two years a month harbor
"jeff wald" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

The Payroll Podcast

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

"With the tatum who tell us that you're most likely going to fail. And so you keep getting knocked down again and again and so i love it. For that reason the third reason. I love it as it just strikes me as mathematically inaccurate and yet some reason. It's persisted knock down seven times. I should get up seven. Wouldn't get up eight months. Of course i start on the ground which i don't. I started on my feet so a call at that. As good as i've mentioned in the introduction at the start and we've touched on it briefly that there is of course a huge future of work toys competition. So jeff wonder if you could just tell us a little bit more about that would as and and of course wide Such an exciting And i guess he let tell the story about white slides competition. So as part of the book when i decided to do was with the contributors and so had asked thirty people to write essays on what they view the world of work to be in two thousand fourteen. Obviously not just anybody. These were the men and women. That are actually shaping. The future work. And i asked them you know. Can you write your vision for what the world looks like in twenty forty and people like andy stern who ran the largest labor union united states. People like carl cannon rhythm on florida staffing firms in the united states. Johnny taylor who runs sherm society for human resource management and other people that are chr owes huge. Companies that policymakers. That are leading attorneys. In this case and i wanted to make it a competition and so aping the x prize which is one of the most wonderful organizations that i i know in terms of pushing human ingenuity. I said you know what. I'll put out a ten million dollar prize and i was comfortable doing that because it's twenty years from now and so i have put the money aside that under every reasonable scenario would grow to To the ten million At that point in time in that was our friends at adp. Made sure that i do that did that. Because they did not won't be putting out a prize without the money behind it and so you know it has been super fun. I haven't formerly issued a press release announcing it but it's obviously in the book so it's formula in that way and of the thirty people. I asked every single. One of them said yes. Few couldn't get their companies approval. Do it just. Because you're h zero on the largest companies on the planet doesn't mean that you get to do what you want and a few people while they did get their companies approvals the deadlines because this is a book and it does have publisher the deadlines and so in a number of them to get in and then we selected the top twenty two to be formally in the prize and compete and could not be more proud of.

Johnny taylor ten million eight months seven times thirty people One seven ten million dollar third reason one twenty two sherm society carl cannon rhythm two thousand twenty years florida jeff union them stern
"jeff wald" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

The Payroll Podcast

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

"Look at that device that devices more powerful than the technologists but the man on the moon and you to carry in your pocket so these are things that history shows us the get ever better and ever higher ever-higher of living at every few hours on average that is not to say that every human on the planet gets to enjoy that do not by a long shot but a eventually these things permeate to all workers and so we have a lease new with tremendous amount of hope that we will do this transition better. The transition will go much slower than people predict. And that future scenario the rosie jetson scenario versus kind of scenario scenario. There's a robot and everybody's home doing your monday tasks so that you don't have to cook or clean. The robot does everything that is the scenario. I do think we eventually get to but for those out there. They think that they're going to have a row suggestion in their living room and their homes. Anytime soon. let me dispel that notion for you. Over robots are getting cheaper and more dexterous and is important to remember that robots today remain incredibly expensive incredibly clumsy incredibly dumb. The idea that there's gonna be a robot butler in your house. Anytime soon is legitimately laugh. All it will not happen at the next twenty years and that is a prediction of making predictions without data that prediction. I will take any bets. I think you really good summary than of some closely for what is interesting is we. I guess year-by-year we try and get a little bit closer to what we deem as being a family or a personal utopia and using technology to help us get there with some of the technologies that we're seeing it the minute couple of comes to mind really excite you so for example. I'm having a little the news at the minute about five g. We're hearing a lot about blockchain and things i know. It's a very difficult technology to masters the energy consumption but assuming that will improve things that lithium batteries and how you know talking about changing the way that we we. We were building up a fossil fuels. Things that the minute the technologies out the minute that really excite you that you looking forward to seeing them develop an md think might come into the market sooner than others certainly certainly. It's not blockchain. Because i still don't really fully understand what blockchain is.

monday today next twenty years rosie jetson every few hours utopia five
"jeff wald" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

The Payroll Podcast

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

"I don't need someone to hand me a paper menu and then for me to tell them through my voice what i want to eat them for them right down a piece of paper in the to physically walk into a kitchen that does not need to have. I have an ipad on my table. It can ask me all kinds of questions. Do you want assad with this. Can you replace this with that and they can electronically go into the kitchen. I don't need to talk to a person and yet very very very restaurants have done this. Because can you know. Humans are social animal. And i don't want to just look at an ipad and do that. I wanted to stay home. Don't wanna go to a restaurant and what's what's good tonight. Would you like one of that banter as most humans. Do this just technology just to deploy something does not mean. It goes away shop. Sean is actually links. Tonight's question you started. I think what which is uncannily in chest to find out more about listens. We'll be as well and it also ties him with great quotes from sweeney. Tom chief Human self sir. Adp of course we put she pushes us. Business way said said as as executives think about the future of work there was no better than jeff walls. The jobs jeff's research provides insights into how the future may unfold and jeff identifies the next wave of technological change as the services revolution. Of course he just tell us about that. A conclusion that all of us will come to shed. So what i'm injustice know. Then that quote moinuddin with the cut of the policy just started to go down there before. I see in your opinion. Walsall the pros and cons than to a few companies employees. Aww the line will heavily on technology. What are the things that we should be looking. Forward to take your. What should we be nervous about. I let me start presenting. The trini is not only a wonderful person. But incredibly intelligent for that quote is one of the best I've ever encountered you know. It is very difficult to say nick. The the reality is we don't have the future unfolds. But i will tell you this week at a a say in how it does and we get say not only because we all least you and i and hopefully many of your listeners live in democracies and we get to choose the men and women represent us because the regulatory environment is one of the biggest influencers in the future of work and so the thing that gives me the most concern when i think about society as a whole because different industries are going to be impacted in different ways in different companies will adopt two different rates. Then gives me. The biggest pause is the workers that will get left behind the people that are working in retail the people that are working in a number of other industries data entry. That are going to need the retraining necessary. To take the jobs that are created so minorities would say ten to fifteen percent of jobs over the next twenty years are going to be eliminated by automation. But more jobs are created but moving that Ten to fifteen percent the united states is upwards of twenty five million workers deliver twenty year period..

Ten ten Sean Tom moinuddin ipad twenty five million workers Tonight this week tonight twenty year jeff walls one fifteen percent trini two jeff nick united states sweeney
"jeff wald" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

The Payroll Podcast

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

"Can you talk about how businesses and employees have reacted to. We've lost three technological step functions. A listing them. Hey that from your book you've mechanization electrification computerization. I want to talk a little bit. About what those mean. And how how. The future woke has changed each time. We've gone through these technological steps. Sure we'll be mechanization. People might remember from school taking place. I obviously in in england in the textile industry and it is basically moving from hand an animal willpower machine power for tens of thousands of years. Hundreds of thousands of years production was done by hand or strapping some into back animal and suddenly we had machines the spinning jenny. The weaving loom being the most famous technological innovations in the early may asia mechanization and it allowed for mass increases of production. We moved to the second known as electra fixation. In that is flowing power into those machines in that time we see the rise of the first big companies. We see the general electric's standard oil's jp morgan's start to rise. And that is power flowing through those machines allowing for masses in massive increases productivity and then the third is a is computerization at the beginning of the age of automation where computers can do a task or variable. Robot can do a task and that started in kind of the nineteen seventies in his ending. Just about now is we're going to the fourth change each time you had all of these doomsayers that would say. Oh my gosh. Because of the spinning jenny because of the weaving loom. No one's gonna ever have a job again. It'll just take twenty people. Make all the clothes. We need or eight electrification. Oh my gosh railroads crossing the nation and there's gonna be no need for artisans in no need for people that can build things. This is obviously the time in which you see. The production line started by henry ford and again incorrect. The computers came people's at all. My gosh. we're never going to need people and it's going to be a mess and again for a period during those times. That was actually kind of true. You can look at manufacturing employment in the united states. Massively impacted by automation is really the first wave of robots in the late nineteen seventies the first robots In factories basically mechanical arms off of posts and they could do three things they paint. They could well then they could lift. Thanks but nick. That was enough to cause nearly a forty percent reduction in manufacturing employment in the united states. If he's a twenty million nine thousand nine hundred eighty and it stands about twelve million today and it didn't happen overnight and it was slow and steady in the robots. Got better at doing things in moved off. Weren't just mechanical arms. We could do a host of other things and people fear that same. Forty percent reduction in services because of the advancements of robots ai. But it's important to remember that over that period of time yes. Eight million jobs in manufacturing were lost in the united states but tens of millions of jobs created another industry. That's kind of the lesson efficient. Have you ever asked yourself. How can i recruit payroll staff effectively..

Forty percent twenty million england Eight million jobs twenty people tens of thousands of years united states tens of millions of jobs Hundreds of thousands of years nick about twelve million third first each time late nineteen seventies today first robots three things first wave nine thousand nine hundred eig
"jeff wald" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

The Payroll Podcast

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

"Audience would be familiar with the fact that the bbc as she ran report here in the uk that ninety seven percent of payroll positions a lot. It's bound source in the future and are all taken over by automation and knowledgeable. Viable says they also collect now. We know that these articles often headline grabbing. This one certainly was within the payroll community and at the minute just a false ford as well of course reversal in the middle of a global pandemic covid nineteen not certainly changed the way that we're working in the future of what has been a very quick adoption of new technologies having the uk with the likes of remote working software like zoom in and so on saiful love to find out a little bit more from your perspective as an expert in this field about a number one why the pedal community shouldn't be so concerned by studies like the bbc quoting sticks ninety seven percents of roles being replaced by boats. And also i guess how you see the future of of of technology affecting the market as a result of this pandemic well things seen change Sicknesses written a new book Bbc article. I mean look. I have not read that study in depth I wouldn't be qualified to comment on it just yet but i will say this to your point. It was headline-grabbing as with a lot of articles. Oxford university study being. I think the most well known in the world of work. Those headlines often betray the reality of the article and the reality of most articles on this talk about the propensity of certain jobs to be susceptible automation not the much more depth analysis of the competitive environment of other technologies of the regulatory environment of the steamer service aspects of things that actually go into whether or not a job is eliminated than on will all go off on quick tangent here with the story the atm if you will show when when the atm first came out it It wasn't until nineteen about night. Mid nineteen ninety s that it appeared in every bank branch in the united states and at the time there were five hundred thousand bank tellers in the united states. And do you know whatever's in the article said much like this bbc article on payroll. They said oh. My gosh all the bank tellers were going to be out of work. And over the next twenty. Five years bank teller employment in the united states eaten increased by twenty percent. There were more bank tellers now. Some people looked at that and said oh my gosh you know. Everyone had predicted the future. Work is is wrong. And they're going to be more jobs. Maybe and then everybody looked at the increase in the twenty percent and said oh this is a great example of co box. The idea that some of our tasks are taken by robots for the bank teller. The repetitive high volume task. Taking money. giving out.

twenty percent Five years uk ninety seven percent united states bbc Oxford university ninety seven percents Mid nineteen ninety s nineteen about Bbc first five hundred thousand bank tel Viable next nineteen one twenty
"jeff wald" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

The Payroll Podcast

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on The Payroll Podcast

"Joined by author of new book and of jobs. Jeff while jeff is the founder of work market which is a platform for organizing managing payroll ing freelancers and contractors a very successful entrepreneur. That's actually recently sold. That business to adp is actually founded several other technology companies as well including spin back a social sharing platform which was eventually purchased by salesforce dot com jeff mba from harvard university. And as well as author of the new book end of jobs. he's also produce of the. Tony award-winning best musical. A gentleman's guide to love and eta jefferson regular voice of in huffington post and forbes magazine and was named one of the hundred most influential people in stuffing. Now i'm really excited to have jeff on the powerful costs because he's gonna talk to us about something that's fun mind and sensor particularly during this global pandemic and that is the future of work particularly in relation to the payroll industry. And we're going to talk to that in the context of his new book and of jobs. The voice of unabomb workers corporation so stay tuned. Sit back relax and enjoy five quick questions. Tell us what inspired you survive the end of jobs. Well first off nick. Thank you so much for having me. I will tell you. One of the reasons i wrote the book was just an increasing level of frustration with people making predictions of the future of work without using data without using historical trends. And so when i founded work market which enterprise software to help companies manage freelancers. I found a company. Two thousand and ten in the prevailing prediction from everybody in the world of work was that by twenty twenty fifty percent of the labor force was beyond manned and that's an interesting election and certainly for someone building and on demand piece of software. It is a good trend and so it certainly including all my investor decks akao huge this market is and how much it's going to grow but i knew it was never going to be true. It was a ridiculous prediction based no data based on no understanding of corporate purchasing decisions and it was very frustrating to hear. Everyone say it. And i would say why. Why do you think that that that's going to be a case. And as the decade starts unfolds fewer and fewer people would run to that banner above fifty percent by twenty twenty as we stand in twenty twenty the labor market as i predicted in two thousand and ten is about the same size. And so you know when. I started writing. The book was to bring some clarity. Just to the on demand labor market. But as i began the exploration began interviewing people began researching a thought. You know what it's not just the on-demand labor market that has this gap between reality data and predictions. It's the entire labor force. So that's the book can king to be accent. And i started a little bit all fab..

Jeff jeff twenty twenty two thousand twenty twenty fifty percent harvard university five quick questions above fifty percent first Two thousand ten nick one One of huffington post jefferson forbes magazine Tony com hundred
"jeff wald" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

Hire Power Radio

06:48 min | 1 year ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

"And you want the making decisions that reflect the kind of company that you want to lead and the best way to do that is to have it down on paper and a hammer at home again and. And again and again to hire the people and promote the people that are living those values and are living those behaviors. You start the values. The next thing you're gonNA define out is going to be what behaviors and policies it is going to be those behaviors in policies, and they are the norms in which you're company happens market. We are huge fans of our weekly meeting. There is nobody at work market that is not invited to that meeting. We don't hold anything back in that meeting. Let me be clear. We don't say what hurry. Salary is like Hey Sean who makes hundred twenty three thousand dollars like you to answer this question. We don't do that. People's salaries are between the company them, not everyone's business, but beyond that there's almost we don't talk about and one of the important things of that meeting is that if you don't understand something either ascot them meeting or ask after because if you're not asking I, have to assume everybody knows, and it says in that document that we have an open meeting every Monday everybody's invited to that meeting and it says under. Under the People Section we expect you to ask questions always because that is what we expect, and so you need to look at the norms and the behaviors of what's happening today, and hopefully they align with your values, and if not start putting in place, the behaviors in the policies, but those behaviors or things around your calendars around your social events there around how you run that company. Would your cadence on conversations with customers which are? And had you develop new features and products? Those are all how you run your company. Those your norms so just write them down and policies have to support or cultivate, does behaviors absolutely, but let's they were transparency, because it's one of my favorites is at your practice to then send around the board deck. Everybody obviously scripted for some information that's inappropriate in centered around work Margaret was an independent company. That's what we did. We just said Hey we just had a board meeting. Here's the deck for everybody and we'RE GONNA. GonNa do the exact same meeting for all of you, but we're gonNA give you three days as we give our port to read everything, and that was the behavior that was written into our culture document. Because that's what we did, and if we didn't do things like that if we didn't have google, calendar where anyone can put a meeting on anybody else's calendar. If we didn't have a host of other things that I would say, transparency was not a value of ours, too, and then the third piece would be what. There are the people in our document. It says what it means to be a work market team member, and it also says what it means to be market manager, and so to stay with the team member. Do you want people that are questioning everything? Do you want people that are constantly trying to improve or do? You want people that are just punching a clock and going home? I would know. Pine will actually take back a willow pine I think it's ridiculous if you want people that are just punching a clock and go, but that may work. Work for some people as a manager. Do you want people that are just saying? I made a decision nobody talk, which should I say some kind or do you want people that are making decisions based on input? Do you want people that are giving constant feedback or do you want people that just back once a year? Do you want people that are constantly striving to improve as a professional and as a leader or do you want people under complacent? So you have to think about those people because you should describe your ideal employee, you should describe. Describe your ideal manager and your people should strive for those things. Those people you hire should be in alignment one hundred percent with your values. If somebody doesn't do well in a transparent culture, you shouldn't hire one hundred percent regardless of where they come from find companies get themselves into so much trouble with vanity hires I call him that and he hires people who came out of a really big name brand company that looks impressive that their board and I've had many CEO's have been on here, said Yep I've done that and it was the worst. Worst higher ever made, and it was just a bad higher because it wasn't the right fit for the individual or the company. You have to tie those hiring decisions. Specifically to those values, I couldn't agree more, and of course, even with all that because we didn't have a culture doc, we'd ever written down. We did make that mistake. We hired big name executive from big company, and it was a disaster, and you know what a wonderful person remains a dear friend. Terrible higher shouldn't and we all have? It's something everybody's done. Just don't do it again. We can strive not to do it again, but unfortunately sometimes we do make mistakes just not the exact same one again. Exactly you do three times road then. That's a problem that isn't bro, so we're getting pretty close on time. Jeff, what would be two or three key takeaways you can give? The audience plugged into business. Today I one. Is You really need to write down this culture duck and there's. There's never too early a stage to do it. There's definitely to later period, so write it down by one point to it is a living breathing document. You've got to continue to interest on it, and you've got to continue to talk about it again and again and again so you're people really understand and point three. You've got to use that for your hiring your promoting because you are trying to. To build a team that's going to help you succeed, so don't leave. Any stone unturned in your processes in doing that and I will tell you from my experience that this is one of the best tools you have for building the best team that you can. Because if you get everybody rolling in the same direction, you're much more likely to be successful. Yeah, you know what you mentioned promotion evaluating people. People who fit that in exemplify your corporate values. It's much easier to make those decisions rather than I guess he's doing a good job. Promote. You're right the you should be doing the opposite if somebody doesn't live up to your values, the stereotypical brilliant jerk. If you promote that jerk, your good people are GonNa leave. You'RE GONNA say all right now. This means anything if you fire that person which. which should in most circumstances, obviously no hard and fast and anything. If you fire that person in your people are GonNa say well. Yeah, they are. We're living our values. That guy was really good, but he was destructive, so he's gone, and that is something that we did reasonably well, but I can certainly think of an example where we have somebody on way too long. That's a great point. Thank you. You Jeff so much for your time investment today I wanNA welcome to the higher power radio community. Now what would be the best ways in which numbers community reach you find your book all that good stuff well. The book just came out five weeks ago. It is certainly available on Amazon wherever fine books are sold, but not yet in bookstores because we don't have bookstores open just yet but God. God Willing soon. We're fortunate enough to hit number one. All Amazon's HR categories for brief periods at receptions, just been great and you can. Obviously any of your listeners can reach out on link dinner on twitter, always happy to talk about hiring and HR technology, and what's going on in the space? Perfect will link all that in the show notes all right I. WanNa. Thank our listening audience for tuning into. Into this week's episode of Higher Power, a quick thanks to our team Christopher Decker Andrea Balan and our creative director eligible. If you're listening to the PODCAST, please subscribe review in share where listening. We welcome your feedback, and we're just working really hard to make this content much better for you. During the.

Jeff Amazon google twitter Higher Power Pine Margaret CEO executive director Christopher Decker Andrea Balan
"jeff wald" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

Hire Power Radio

07:36 min | 1 year ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

"You have, you have people that are just like because they came there for you. They watch your behaviors nation. That's what they are supposed to do. And that's fine, but again it doesn't scale. It doesn't work if you never see that person then. People don't know why people are behaving a certain. Certain Way and that is the power of this document to have this document, and to share it with everybody that might join your firm to have a yearly meeting an updated and again before every single gathering reaffirm those big four. Who you are while you're there where you're going and your values. I will tell you when you have. People Start Complaining Santa. We do this every time you're about halfway there. You're a halfway to getting everybody to really understand that, says you. Are. You're listening to the higher power. Radio show I'm Rick Girardin for our podcast listeners. We're GONNA. Take a quick educational moment for sponsors. Every employer wants to hire great people, but do you know what a great person looks like? Assessments? Give you a multidimensional view of the individual that you can never see from a resume alone, not only can you make a more informed objective hiring decision, but you can also uncover some hidden gems and your talent poll along the way, the result, higher performance, term retention, and a much stronger team learn more at criteria, Corp Dot Com. That's CRI. C. O. R. CRP DOT COM. Hey, checkout, stride, search dot com, there you'll find additional content and resources to help you win. Great Hires today our guests. His Jeff Wald Jeff is the CEO and Co founder of work, market and ADP Company and we're talking about the importance of having a clearly defined culture doc now. This is what I'm really excited about. Now. Get to how to Peace Jeff now. You have put together and you've shared with us the cultural doc did you guys use? Use So, let's walk our audience. Let's walk an entrepreneur through how you would advise them to do it. Well I as with anything with any earliest days company it starts with you, it starts with the founder. It starts with the executive team. You need to write it all down and go and get examples. There are a bunch of websites out there that actually have a lot of culture. Doxa companies have made public. I don't think that ADP would allow. Allow us to put ours there, but I don't know actually haven't asked, and it'd be is an amazing company that love. There are a lot of examples to be started from the first starting point, really what is culture? What are you putting down and so I would say to look at those examples and to take that first step, but those examples basically give you this framework with his culture I would say that a culture is who you are wire. Wire there where you're going and your values as represented by the behaviors policies in people of accompanying, and it's that last part that a lot of people leave out because without it. You don't have a culture. You have a bunch of words on paper. How People Act around the water cooler? When nobody's looking that is fair, are documents specifically outlines on that first page that one sentence which I can promise you now that the hundreds of employees of work. Work Market can say do the word all in this in games it has our purpose what gets us out of bed in the morning. And it has that Northstar that twenty year vision of where we want to be and I can promise you that every single person at work mark knows all of those stats nights, and so that has been important and again every single meeting we start with that, but at first it was me just sitting and writing. Writing this and then the values I mean the values. We actually just took from our friends at ADP. We can't have different values than ADP and ADP has amazing corporate values than I will again reiterate you've never seen a company. Live up to its values like ADP. They're spectacular this and then you have to go through and start thinking about those behaviors and policies that support your values. If you have a value of transparency, but you aren't having weekly. Weekly meeting or a quarterly meeting where you're sharing all your information. If you don't have opened calendars is a behavior. If you don't openly discuss XYZ company, then you don't have a behavior. This supports the value. So why do you have the value? What's the point of the value transparency? If you don't have the behaviors to do it, so write all that down, but then go and started listening so for work market. When I did this, we had four. Four offices around the world. I got on a plane I spent a day each office and just said. What does it mean to you to be at work market? Why do you guys get out of bed? Where do you think we're going? What are the behaviors and policies that you're proud of what if the things that we do on a regular basis that you don't think we should be doing for some of the policies that we should stop and. And so I asked them and I took all of that data, and then recreated documents shared with everybody made it open for to comment. We use Google docs, but it up in Google docs. Is Everyone have at it? Because one of our values is when a decision is made is will I we have constructive conflict on making a decision. We are very clear the decision making process. It's my decision to make. And once that decision is made and I've. I've heard everybody. It is on border overboard. I don't WanNa hear it I. Want to hear it if you have new data if you tell me something that I did not know what I made the decision by all means come by doors open anytime, but if you're just gonNA rehashing old argument, don't and that is the culture at work market, and it says it in that document that when decisions were on border overboard, so if you were to advise. Advise a startup entrepreneur to build out the core values company. How would you advise them to? Well I would tell them to I. Go and look at his many examples you could, and if you just Google Culture Dr a bunch of companies out there, the posters you websites that aggregate them I read as many of the Michigan I would then think about those big four and what they mean to you at write them down and then I'd start asking. Asking your executive team first and foremost, what is it to you to be here? What brought you here? Where do you think we're going? And you start gathering data, and then as with any other process you listen to as many people as you can. Then as the founder, it is up to you to make a decision, and you put it down, but I would say that the first time you put it down after listening, you should not make your. Your final decision you should use it as iterative project so every year revisited, so if I'm starting with maybe four or five values dead, I think are what the company is. I want to build in the environment that I want to work within. What's a good starting point? You think to start with again. You'RE GONNA be volving this document every year. Again have to look at. Where's a good starting point for an entrepreneur? The starting point honestly rick. Rick is it's themselves. I mean these companies are the reflection of you, and if you're a transparent person, then you should have. Transparency is one of your values. If you are not a-, transparent earth's. If you hold things, close to the vest. I would strongly encourage you not to put transparency because people will look to you. Any of you put in place processes, but you don't follow them. It's no good, so you have to start with yourself. What kind? Kind of person I do I care about the community and am I going to make sure that I spend one day a quarter of doing community service? If that's important, you than yes, do you believe that every person counts? And do you want everyone's opinion or do you not? Do just think you know what everyone else was stupid. Everyone should just do what I say. Shut up! That may be fine I. think that's a terrible way to leave, but. But if that's who you are, then that's who you are, and that's who your company is. Whether you like it or not. Do not put down something that does not reflect you and your behaviors in your values, so the key point here is the honest with who you are in. You got to be brutally honest with who you are. You really do because your team is super smart. I mean that's why you hired them and they will see through. It is you've put down and so be candid with everyone most importantly yourself, yeah, the decisions you make should be questioned against. Does this decision that I'm making reflect our values one hundred percent. Because you want your team to be doing that again, you're gonNA. Hopefully hopefully for everybody is listening. You're going to get to the point where you won't know everybody. You won't see them. On a day-to-day basis in they have to make decisions,.

Work Market ADP Rick Girardin founder executive Jeff Wald Jeff ADP Company CEO and Co founder Corp Dot Com C. O. R. CRP Northstar Google I. Go Michigan
"jeff wald" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

Hire Power Radio

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

"As with who you are where you're going, and while you're there, but the behaviors and the policies and what you expect, if your people, they should know that they should know. Hey, I'm going to. To join this team. They have a happy hour every Thursday. Maybe they don't WanNa. Have a happy hour or we don't do summer. Fridays or were formal dress over desk or that. It is super important that people understand that the disaster scenario for me at any higher is not Get the right person. Is that Stephanie quit? Her job comes in joins you. And then a month later quits and says this just isn't what I thought. It was and so the lack. Lack of transparency that the disaster for Stephanie's a disaster for you. You GonNa, start everything all over again being transparent about what it is to be, there is to me hyper, hyper hyper important. Yeah, in being altered clean, who you are gives your employees a roadmap to evaluate people by one hundred percent. If you say, we have a collegial attitude, person counts, and we like constructive conflict, and you promote the jerk. That's mean to everybody that doesn't listen to anybody, then your behaviors. Behaviors don't align to your values, and so you throw your documentary, and so you're hiring and promotion whether it salary your title. Don't align than you don't have a culture shock. You just have some words down on paper, and that happens way too often. You see people's corporate values. They have written on the wall and nobody's going to be not and especially important that the CEO in the leadership is the prime example of that. Because when you somebody who's not that just. Just kills all your credibility. One hundred percent before the culture doc startups in their nascent stages tend to be called the personality around the founder. You WanNa know what kind of people.

Stephanie WanNa founder CEO
"jeff wald" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

Hire Power Radio

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

"Topic Jeff Hier Radio Show today. Thank you so much for having me Rick Super excited. We're GONNA. Talk about the importance of why not having a clearly defined corporate culture document is the recipe for failure. So the reason why is the culture document is a business plan for how your people are expected to behave interact and resolve conflict. It is your saving grace. When things go sideways, you must provide a clear and accurate picture everyone you interview. Interview about the good, the bad and the ugly of the organization and the expectations of behaviors that result in success in their role, the importance of having a cultural document is something that I know. You feel really strongly about Jeff. Why do you feel that it's something that you have to have as a leader of the mistakes we made since the founding. Founding of work market. This is pretty high on that list. Because we didn't have this until a years ago and in really came home for me during actually the acquisition by ADP during their diligence, one of the ADP executives said to me, he said you know I've asked like twenty people in your company to Describe Work Marketing. They all describe it differently. Differently as like Oh that hurts because the thing is when a company gets beyond that early stage, where the founder is literally sitting in the middle of it I remember the early stages work market and I sat in the middle of the room, and all developers were on my left, and everybody else was on my right operations and sales and customer sport. So I knew everything that was going on. Everybody knew what I thought once the company gets bigger than that. You have people that you'll never maybe even meet that report of your team, and if they can't say who you are than when they're off doing a piece of work. How are they going to really know what exactly to do? You can't be over everybody's shoulder, and so the idea that everybody the company knows who you are why you're there and where you're. You're going is a vital component to increase the probability of success, and it's something that we were successful without it, but I lament is to how much more successful we could have been with it. So, what point do you feel like? You really should have spent time to develop that corporate doc. A Culture I will tell you this when you pass somebody in the hallway and you don't know who they are, you ve already gone too far gone too far without. A member that first time I walked, past was like who's that. Somebody's like. Oh! We heard them three weeks ago. Like what who? Are Realizing people get hired without knowing it which is fine, and they should be hiring people without knowing it, but if it gets that, you've gone too far the ability to put something down on paper about what I call the big four who you are why you're here where you're going and what your values are. If you can put those down on paper, it helps you. You'd be surprised just as a founder when you actually sit down and. And write it that you don't notice well as you think you do, but that is only step one that second step is all the more vital, which is outlining the behaviors, the policies and the people that support those because otherwise they're just words on a piece of paper, and so doing those things well past that point where passing all you know, they are are well before I say is one of the more important things increasing your ability of. Of Success, you know I don't know why more companies don't do it as they're building their business plan, it doesn't take that much time to think about it. Write it down on paper. You're hundred percent correct with is maybe they don't know, but at least get something down on paper because it's GonNa. Be Evolving document anyway I A hundred percent agree with one of the documents we would call a living breathing document is designed to be revisited to. To be updated. Nobody's Northstar nobody's purpose. Nobody's mission statement is written in stone. You adjust as you see the market. is you see how your customers reacting you adjust, but it's important that your team knows that there's an adjustment at should be celebrated. He said something key a little bit earlier, which was we probably could have done that much better if we would have had this document, you think maybe that would have resulted in a bigger sale. Yes? Yes, that is what I think. I think we would have sold the company for all the more than we did, and we had a great outcome. Aren't dusters made money team made money? It was great and I'm not lamenting this in any way I just think. We could have done better. Look, it should be a gut. Punch to anybody that is running a company running a team. If different members of your team think you do something different like they should all be able to say in one sentence what you do, and if they don't I hope I don't have to walk your listeners through why that's a problem why the person seven rungs down the ladder? WHO's actually writing? The code was actually talking. Talking to the customers why having that person really know who you are while you're there and where you're going why that is super super important that everybody is rowing in the same direction. This is like Simon. SYNNEX start with wire if they don't know why they're there or why. You're there, and if you don't know why you're there other than to make money, which is okay, but everybody else is going to be in there for the same. Same reason that is true. It look if you're there to make money. That's fine. Put it down. Put it down on paper. Make sure everybody understands. We're here to make a profit. No matter what, and if that's your culture crate, be very clear about it. One of my favorite examples is our friends at Enron, the whipping boy of Corporate America concerned with the big bankruptcy in corporate, America's rightfully, so but they had as one of their values. Values Integrity Okay I mean. They didn't practice it. They would have been better off and potentially still around today. If they just wrote our values to make money at all costs, screw everybody, break rules and make money then their team would've known. That's what we're doing and the whole organization maybe have done it within the confines of the law as opposed to illegally, and they would have hired the people that resonate with that as opposed to. Did Not Resonate who they had problems bits as ACO. Besides the one you said before. What were some of the implications to company? Think were there any problems arose out of not having that corporate decides that I mean really we could talk for hours about the problems arose. Not just down on the front lines where people were dealing with customers and making promises to customers that we just couldn't do wouldn't do, but importantly, and this is where I think. The culture doc becomes the most important is in your hiring that you should be really really clear about what it is to work there, not just the pace and your aspirations, but what is the day to day? What does that look like what is important to you and if you end up? Up Hiring people that don't align with that then you're really I mean we all know the most important variable whether you're successful is your team and if you aren't hiring the kinds of people that believe in who you are where you're going, and while you're there, then you're just decreasing your profitability, and we certainly had a number of very poor hires on our part, because of when you tie your interview around your corporate values, and you interview for alignment with your corporate values. Values it makes that much stronger of a higher does, and I will tell you the things behind that the behaviors and the policies and what you expect people, even more important the values. They're important. They should be up on your wall. You should mention them for every corporate meeting.

founder Rick Super Jeff ADP Corporate America Enron Simon America
"jeff wald" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

Hire Power Radio

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"jeff wald" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

"This is the higher power radio show before we get started. Let's take care of little housekeeping. Traditional resumes and interviews can be biased and subjective, leading you to overlook high potential talent, who didn't have the perfect resume or cookie cutter background uncover that hint potential learn more at criteria Corp Dot, com. That's Sierra. CRP DOT COM. Most advanced recruiting techniques land the most desirable talent. Your company wants a massive success. This is the higher power radio show with Rick Girard. Welcome.