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Jeff Sessions grapples with new round of Trump attacks

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | Last month

Jeff Sessions grapples with new round of Trump attacks

"President trump's former Attorney General Jeff sessions now under attack by the same man who hired him sessions defending himself after trump slammed him for recusing himself in the Russia investigation and refused to support him in the Alabama Senate race trump tweeting Alabama do not trust Jeff sessions he let our country down sessions pushing back also on Twitter saying the president was lucky that sessions recused himself his tweet look I know your anger but refusal was required by law I did my duty and your damn fortunate I did it protect the rule of law and resulted in your

President Trump Alabama Twitter Attorney Recusing Russia Senate Jeff
Trump and Jeff Sessions trade barbs over Twitter

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:42 sec | Last month

Trump and Jeff Sessions trade barbs over Twitter

"Trump has thrown his support in the Republican Senate race in Alabama behind Tommy Tuberville a former Auburn University football coach CBS news correspondent ical Killian says his opponent is a very familiar name to the president the president is also sparring with his former Attorney General in a tweet he slams Jeff sessions for recusing himself in the Russia probe riding Alabama do not trust Jeff sessions he let our country down sessions who is running for his old Senate seat responded in a series of posts Mr president Alabama can and does trust me as do conservatives across the country perhaps you've forgotten sessions also said that trump was quote damn fortunate that he recused himself from the Russia

Donald Trump Alabama Tommy Tuberville Ical Killian President Trump Russia Senate Auburn University CBS Attorney Jeff
Sessions fires back at Trump after president's scolding

Sean Hannity

00:29 sec | Last month

Sessions fires back at Trump after president's scolding

"Former Attorney General Jeff sessions engaging in a war of words with president trump festivities in a runoff for his old Senate seat in Alabama to get the Republican nomination now he's calling out president trump by name something he hasn't been doing lately this is what he tweeted quote Donald Trump look I know your anger but refusal was required by law I did my duty and your damn fortunate I did it protected the rule of law and resulted in your exoneration your personal feelings don't dictate who Alabama picks as their senator the people of

Alabama Donald Trump Senator Attorney President Trump Senate
Trump blasts Sessions on Twitter

ABC Perspective

00:32 sec | Last month

Trump blasts Sessions on Twitter

"President trump in a series of tweets Friday endorsed a series of Republican candidates but his former Attorney General not only did not drawn endorsement he was disparaged presidents typically avoid attacking their own party members but president trump is urging Alabama to vote against his former Attorney General tweeting Alabama do not trust Jeff sessions the president including a campaign ad for his choice Tommy Tuberville Jeff sessions good on the president's any failed Alabama Mr trump still angry sessions recused himself from the Muller

Donald Trump Alabama President Trump Muller Attorney Jeff Tommy Tuberville
Behind The Scenes With Documented

Latino USA

08:55 min | Last month

Behind The Scenes With Documented

"Magazine. Welcome to let USA thank you. It's nice to be here. Thanks for having us all right. So tell me how you get started with this idea to basically observe every single minute of the immigration court system so people would say that they would never let you in but you guys actually did it. So what was your aim? And why did you do it Max so we had been covering immigration courts since we started publishing which was in the summer of twenty eighteen and we had watched since Jeff sessions was attorney general back then and we had watched him issue policy decision after policy decision that had serious detrimental impact to the people who are passing through the Court System? And we knew this through data and we knew it anecdotally generally harder to ask for asylum and just being the court system. So what we didn't know is what it looked like and immigration court is very different from federal or state courts. You know. It's very closed off their court records accessible to the public. Even court hearings are hard to get into. So there's no real way of sort of opening up the hood and looking inside so we knew what happened and a statistical level but what we didn't know is what it looked looked like and what it felt like and what it was just like to be a person passing through and when you can take us back to that first week and that first day was there something that surprised you that first day. Muslim while the funny actually the first day the immigration calls were closed because of a snowstorm so they we showed up and there were dozens of people waiting outside with no idea why the costs have been closed. What is meant for their hearings People some people you know travel from Long Island and all over the state to come to these hearings to be there eight. Am You know sometimes waking up at four in the morning only so arrive and find out that the the hearing that they've been waiting for for years it's been rescheduled so that was a very good indication of the kind of chaos that The the reports were about. We're going to see over the coming weeks. So this is a pretty massive process right and there are in fact hearings hundreds of hearings a day. So what were the specific things that your reporters were looking for tracking tracking so we would tracking a number of different things For each hearing the court reporters collected the basic information. Yeah the name date of birth. The judge's name Damn Immigration Chinese name the Ice Attorney's name but then they are other factors like did they even have in. Its know we witness a number of immigrants who on represented in the hearings. And we know that that can have huge ramifications for their cases for detained hearings. We also wanted a monitor what it was like for Immigrants who are being video teleconference then one of the things that the trump administration's us a lot more than previous administrations is video teleconferencing of immigrants. Who are in jail and that technology causes a number of issues And there's been a law of malfunctions often leads immigrants spending longer in detention and then we mark the number of the major decisions attorney. General Jeff sessions made during that time making it so the People who are victims of gang violence and domestic violence could no longer use as grounds for asylum. You know changing the ways in which judges could manage their courtrooms preventing them from delaying hearings or terminating hearings or closing hearings. They thought were going on necessarily so we try to track all of those different things and see how they were coming together. Talk to us about how you figured out the issue of access and I'm wondering were there challenges from court officials. When they saw that you were in their courtroom Max. Yes so if the person whose case it is says you're allowed to be in there then it's okay but from the beginning they face just an immense amount of pushback from everyone from immigration judges to ice attorneys. People would do things like the ice attorneys would say to the immigrants. Are you really sure you want all the details of your case broadcast on the Internet and just sort of hammer at that point over and over and over until the person was just like no actually? I don't want you in here. Sometimes some of our reporters would get singled out by ice attorneys by specific ones. You know there was one who would follow our reporters out into the hallway and sort of like a cost them outside of the courtroom but all of our reporters were extremely tough and they just kept going back so all of this work. All of this reporting all of these collection of data and stories It's a lot to sum up. But what would you say are some of the main takeaways that you had when you entered the project? Yeah I just say the New York court historically was was a lot friendlier the immigration call system as a whole. Maybe not but the New York going particular. The judges the work that the system in place. You Know New York because one of the only cities in the country that has a public defender system for immigrants. This is unprecedented. Pretty much all around the country But that system and so many other systems that are in place neil to make them more equitable and and More similar guests the kind of due process rights that you might get an a criminal call which just piece by piece dismantled over the course of three years And it was pretty stunning to see that play out. And and the impact of that hat on on a number of immigrants cases in lives. And this didn't just happen overnight. You know it was a very concerted effort on the behalf of the Department of Justice to make all of these little incremental changes in policy and legal decisions that have amounted to this and now with cove nineteen and this pandemic and New York being the epicenter. The immigration system and the asylum system in many ways has just grown to a complete and total halt. The Department of Justice has halted all hearings for non detained immigrants. They continue to have hearings for those who are currently detained. So can you tell us what about those hearings and our courts able to make this happen with concerns about Cova nineteen spreading? Yeah it's It's a really fascinating time What's happening right now in the immigration calls because this unprecedented alliance is formed between three groups. That rally together on anything so immigration judges immigration lawyers and prosecutors. Who WORKED FOR ICE? Have all come together in this unified front to call on the Justice Department which oversees the immigration courts to shut them down during the pandemic And they've all come together because quite frankly they're scared for their lives. I don't think there's ever been a moment where they worked closely despite this the DOJ insisted on keeping immigration court hearings as you said going for immigrants who are in detention. You know that even includes children who are in shelters as while they also have to pay for their gracious hearings you know. I spoke to in a tiny. He said that she represents children. She went into twenty-six Federal Plaza during the pandemic With a group of children who had the hearing that day and the cost office literally spraying clorox into the air and some sort of way to try and disinfects the environment you know there is not really adequate protections or safety is put in place for the staff that have worked there and a number of course. Staffers have contracted covered nineteen. You know they've been caught closures because courts office have tested positive for the virus the DOJ has now taken up the policy of tweeting out eleven pm the night before to let people know that the court will be closed because somebody has tested positive and then reopening at a few days later with very little

Justice Department Attorney Jeff New York Department Of Justice USA Ice Attorney Long Island Federal Plaza Clorox Cova Neil
Federal Appeals Court Nixes Trump Policy Denying Grant Money to Chicago and other Sanctuary Cities

Steve Cochran

00:27 sec | 2 months ago

Federal Appeals Court Nixes Trump Policy Denying Grant Money to Chicago and other Sanctuary Cities

"In a legal victory for Chicago and other sanctuary cities of federal appeals court says the trump administration can't withhold grant money to sanctuary cities that protect undocumented immigrants in twenty seventeen the former Attorney General Jeff sessions said those cities would have to comply with federal immigration authorities or lose funding but the seventh circuit court of appeals here in Chicago rule that policy violates the separation of powers provisions in the

Chicago Attorney
2020 Democratic Primary Election: Voting Postponed in 6 States Because of Virus

Dave Ramsey

00:17 sec | 3 months ago

2020 Democratic Primary Election: Voting Postponed in 6 States Because of Virus

"Ohio postponed this week's presidential primary Alabama's governor citing coronavirus and pushing back the March thirty first Republican primary runoff off between former senator Jeff sessions and former football coach Tommy Tuberville until July fourteenth Georgia Kentucky Louisiana Maryland also postponed

Ohio Alabama Maryland Coronavirus Senator Jeff Sessions Football Tommy Tuberville Georgia Kentucky Louisiana
Alabama delays GOP Senate runoff until July due to coronavirus

Pacifica Evening News

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

Alabama delays GOP Senate runoff until July due to coronavirus

"Alabama is postponing its Republican primary runoff between former US senator Jeff sessions and arrival because of the corona virus the governor announced today that the runoff between sessions and former Auburn University football coach Tommy Tuberville now be held on July fourteenth the winner of the runoff will face democratic senator Doug Jones in November five other states also have postponed their primaries because of the pandemic Georgia Kentucky Louisiana Maryland and

Alabama Jeff Sessions Tommy Tuberville Doug Jones Maryland United States Senator Auburn University Football Georgia Kentucky Louisiana
Trump spurns Sessions, backs Tuberville for Alabama Senate

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

Trump spurns Sessions, backs Tuberville for Alabama Senate

"President trump is endorsing Jeff sessions opponent in the Senate race in Alabama sessions time in president trump's cabinet did not end well after recusing himself in the Russia investigation I put an Attorney General that never took control of the justice department Jeff sessions never took control of the justice department on Twitter president trump says he's endorsing former Auburn University football coach Tommy Tuberville calling him a winner and then he would be a great senator for Alabama Jeff sessions was not mentioned when he announced he was running sessions defended his work for the trump administration I think he will respect my work hours dire for the trump agenda every day I was in the Senate Jeff sessions posted in a tweet that the president can of course endorse anyone he chooses at Donahue Washington

Donald Trump Tommy Tuberville Senator President Trump Donahue Washington Jeff Senate Alabama Russia Attorney Twitter Auburn University Football
Trump endorses Tommy Tuberville in Alabama, in a blow to Sessions

First Light

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

Trump endorses Tommy Tuberville in Alabama, in a blow to Sessions

"Like president trump has endorsed former Auburn University football coach Tommy Tuberville in the U. S. Senate race in Alabama topper bill is running against trump's former Attorney General Jeff sessions in the March thirty one Republican run off trump tweeted his support for trouble saying that he has his complete and total endorsement he did not mention sessions the winner of the GOP runoff will face democratic senator Doug Jones the current incumbent in November sessions held that Senate seat for twenty years before joining the trump

Donald Trump Tommy Tuberville Doug Jones President Trump Auburn University Football Senate Alabama Attorney GOP Senator
Trump endorses Tommy Tuberville in Alabama, in a blow to Sessions

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 4 months ago

Trump endorses Tommy Tuberville in Alabama, in a blow to Sessions

"Three more political news this morning president trump is apparently not supporting his former Attorney General Jeff sessions president tweeted his endorsement last night a former Auburn University football coach Tommy Tuberville sessions opponents in the Alabama Senate Republican primary runoff the winner of the March thirty first election will face off with democratic senator Doug Jones the incumbents in

Donald Trump President Trump Doug Jones Attorney Auburn University Football Tommy Tuberville Alabama Senate Republican Senator
Jeff Sessions likely headed to a runoff in Alabama Senate race

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:16 sec | 4 months ago

Jeff Sessions likely headed to a runoff in Alabama Senate race

"Gland and one other race of note on super Tuesday in Alabama former Attorney General Jeff sessions faces a battle as he tries to regain his old U. S. Senate seat he failed to win the Republican primary out right and so we have to face a runoff against former Auburn football coach Tommy

Alabama Tommy Attorney Senate Auburn Football
Jeff Sessions likely headed to a runoff in Alabama Senate race

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 4 months ago

Jeff Sessions likely headed to a runoff in Alabama Senate race

"Just presidential primaries held on super Tuesday there were also some prominent congressional races as we hear from WTOP's Capitol Hill correspondent it'll Miller this Wednesday morning of the most closely watched as the Alabama Senate race and there will be a runoff for the Republican nomination between president trump's former Attorney General Jeff sessions and former Auburn head football coach Tommy Tuberville one of them will end up facing democratic senator Doug Jones who is expected to face a tough re election campaign among the other race is getting a lot of attention is the North Carolina Senate race Democrat cal Cunningham a former state senator will face Republican senator Thom Tillis Democrats need to hold all their seats and pick up for to flip control of the

Miller Donald Trump Tommy Tuberville Doug Jones Cal Cunningham Senator Alabama Senate President Trump Attorney Auburn Head Football Coach North Carolina Senate Senator Thom Tillis
Roger Stone sentenced to 40 months for obstruction, witness tampering

Wealth Creator Radio

02:38 min | 4 months ago

Roger Stone sentenced to 40 months for obstruction, witness tampering

"The sentencing recommendation from justice department prosecutors is seven to nine years in a federal penitentiary on average a convicted rapist in this country serves four and a half years in prison so you know something is amiss almost immediately president trump tweeted his outrage targeting the prosecutors a short time later four of them quit that because great joy in The New York Times and Washington post to organizations that are devoted to injuring president trump what in the middle of the chaos is William Barr who then told ABC news that Mr trump's tweeting about active criminal cases makes it hard for the AG to do its job whereupon fox business channel finder Lou Dobbs question bar's loyalty but an attorney general's loyalty is to uphold the constitution not to any human being so now the president and the Attorney General R. well let's use the word on settle and they didn't have to happen all president trump had to do was wait until Roger stone is sentenced and then issue a pardon presto Mr stone to go bowling with us that very night but waiting is not Donald Trump style confrontation is if you read my book the United States of trump you know the president always relishes the fight but a battle with William Barr is not like the dust up with the week former Attorney General Jeff sessions bars not a man to be pushed around and he does not want his professional reputation solely the crucial Dorham investigation into federal corruption is under way and president trump would be well advised to stay out of all justice department business and let those chips fall Mr trump should also understand that the national media is heavily invested in diminishing William Barr because she fears what the dorm investigation might break the president would be foolish to help his enemies marginalize the Attorney General who could expose disturbing FBI corruption that damaged Donald Trump finally president Richard Nixon tried to manipulate the justice department and that finalized his

Richard Nixon FBI Dorham Attorney Lou Dobbs ABC Washington The New York Times Justice Department President Trump Donald Trump United States Mr Stone Roger Stone General R. William Barr
South Korean rocket successfully puts satellite in orbit

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:17 min | 4 months ago

South Korean rocket successfully puts satellite in orbit

"South. Korea has successfully launched the world's first geostationary environment monitoring satellite. Dr David Whitehouse is a space scientist and an author and he joins me on the line now to explain exactly what that means David what is this satellite? It's really important for South Korea it. It's the second of two satellites to monitor their environment. The first one went up a couple of years ago to look at space weather have the sun and particles from the Sun will affect The high atmosphere in the region. But this is more oriented towards the oceans around the Korean Peninsula and about pollution particulates aerosols. And it's the first time one of these pollution sensors has been placed in what we call geostationary orbit so it's positioned above career constantly looking down at the same site rather than picking up career as it passes in its orbiter. It's really important for the Koreans and so it's it's basically monitoring pollution that right which South Korea has a problem with and it interesting that Lot scientists have fascinating by this sense. Not only because it's going to provide real time. High-quality monitoring of air quality of ozone of nitrogen dioxide but also emotions and fisheries and land management. But of course to the North South Korea North Korea which has none of these things which has no industrial infrastructure of any significant. Doesn't have many cars so the comparison between the pollution of South Korea and the and the non pollution of the very agricultural sparsely populated North Korea. And and how one affects the other is going to be very fascinating for scientific weather scientists and climate scientists. So how big an area will it cover well from geostationary orbit which is twenty three thousand miles above the earth? It hovers over the same place. So it's going to have a footprint which is several times larger than the Korean printer in one mode of operation so in order to look at the the ocean current fisheries and the temperature of the oceans excetera rancor you need a wide view than just the Korean Peninsula but this is a very impressive censor The satellites built by career. The centers have been built in Europe and in North America and was launched on the area and rocket germ just a few hours ago. So everybody's very hopeful. By the time this does get to. Jeff sessions will be. It will be there in a few days time at it. Settles down that this is going to give South Korea one of the best Monitoring Systems for its pollution for it's changing climate for its changing oceans in the world. Could it be used for other purposes? It's it's it's a for for the purposes you've you've just outlined but could also be used to have a closer look at North Korea Palm Coast it's North Korea because of its position and it centers it sees North Korea as clearly as it see South Korea. So it's going to have. I'm these these. Disinformation is is known from Military Observation. Satellites it but this is going to be publicly available information that that will tell great deal about the land use about the transport structure about what's going where and where everything is of North Korea and that's going to be available to to the South Koreans twenty four hours a day can technology like this slow down climate change. It's no. I don't think that this does anything to help. Slow down climate change in this but this does actually provide some baseline data because with the debates. About how much climate change? We're going to have him in. Many people say it could be fantastically extreme but of scientists really don't know what the future's going told for us and there's no excuse for getting raw data from the ground from the oceans from the ground temperatures The atmosphere and the oceans etc. So this will provide very high quality baseline information that scientists can go away and think about particularly if this thing's expected to work for ten years. Ten years of this high quality data would be very useful indeed and just before we go. This has been built by the state run. Aerospace Research Institute in many countries. We're nothing private. Plays a big businesses taking on that kind of role where we are examining the data That is going to help us. I hope build a better world. Do we need to see other governments chipping or can we leave it up to the private sector? Well many governments want their own space programs Particularly down in in in Asia because many countries have The economy is booming down there in many respects and they have got money to find to fund these things into get information that they would have had to buy from China from the United States. And of course the tap could always have been turned off so yes private and public institutions like in in career role becoming more mixed up with because more active in what is bound to be in the future more intensive space activity. David thank you very much in data. That's Dr David White

South Korea North Korea South. Korea North Korea Palm Coast Korean Peninsula Dr David Whitehouse David Dr David White North America Scientist Asia Europe Jeff Aerospace Research Institute China United States
Harvard Professor's Arrest Raises Questions About Scientific Openness

Short Wave

10:37 min | 4 months ago

Harvard Professor's Arrest Raises Questions About Scientific Openness

"So it's May of Twenty fifteen. And a researcher named Chichaou. Shing is at his home near Philadelphia. She is a physicist at Temple University who studies SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SPECIAL MATERIALS. That can sometimes lead electricity flow through them with no resistance. There's a ton of applications for it and all of a sudden there's a knock door very very loud and urgency rental open the learns Esau arm agents outside and pointing their guns to my wife and daughters into an Tokyo in Hong Cups and I had absolutely no idea why okay. So why was he arrested? Like what was going on what the. Us government accused him of sharing a special piece of equipment with researchers in China. But here's the thing he did. Do it prosecutors. Were confused because well it turns out. Superconducting technology is just really complicated. But what about the idea that he was helping? The Chinese developed superconducting technology. Just in general. Well Dr she says sure. He works with scientists in China all the time and sometimes he spent summers over there doing research with them. But as you know Mattie one of the basic pillars of fundamental research is openness nothing. He shared was classified or restricted in any way. Qadam ICK espionage. It's a contradiction me. Everything we are doing is fundamental research. There's nothing to steal can. Just sit there and read your paper and sure enough about six months after this whole thing starts. The charges are dropped against doctor she. The government admits he's done absolutely nothing. Wrong I mean honestly it sounds like he just had collaborators which is like a major thing in science unless there was some weird money. Thing being exchanged or going on this is what scientists do. Yeah I mean. They're technologies that are restricted for example stuff to do with rockets that could be used in missile development say. The government has very strict rules about sharing that kind of information but generally scientists open collaborations. Happened all over the world. The thing is China is getting a lot more scrutiny. These days so fast forward to twenty eighteen attorney general. Jeff sessions is really concerned about the theft of scientific knowledge and intellectual property by the Chinese so the Justice Department launches what it calls its China initiative the goal is to crack down on the transfer of US knowledge to China and in the academic community the focus. False really quickly. I'm one program in particular. It's called the thousand Talents Plan. So our understanding is that originally. The purpose of the thousand talents program was to reverse the brain drain. That's Michael Lower. He's deputy director of extramural research at the National Institutes of health. And he's the main guy at NIH dealing with thousand talents. When he says brain-drain an example of that is like scientists. Go abroad to study and then end up staying in whatever country instead of coming back home. Exactly the Chinese government wanted to bring back outstanding scientists to China so as to develop their science and technology and the way the Chinese government does is by offering money so researchers set up labs in China and they spend at least part of their year over there Doing their work in exchange for grants and expenses paid and the program grew pretty quickly to include non-chinese scientists as well right and I think there are these kinds of programs in other countries to yeah. It's not uncommon. Canada had something called the one hundred fifty research chairs. I mean. That's kind of the less ambitious Canadian equivalent. Chevy Sega but with lower says is the thousand talents program has gone too far in the real problem from his perspective is that in a number of cases researchers are not telling their home universities or the. Us government for that matter about Chinese funding and not disclosing that Chinese funding. That's what's actually against the law. Exactly the types of behaviors that we are seeing are not subtle or minor violations What we're seeing is really quite egregious and that brings us back to Charles Lieber. The Harvard Chemist We were talking about earlier. Who is arrested back in January the complaint alleges Doctor Lieber signed a contract with the Chinese University in Wuhan and was paid to fifty thousand dollars per month plus up to one hundred and fifty eight thousand dollars in living expenses and awarded more than one point five million dollars to set up a research lab at the Chinese school and work there on researching nanotechnology that is a lot of money. Jeff that is like ten post docs full of money. At least I love that. Your brain calculates prices in post is seen but the bottom line is. It is a lot of money in the criminal complaint. Alleges not only did he get all this money. Lieber lied about being part of the program to Harvard to the NIH in the Department of Defense. Which together we're also giving him many millions of dollars in research money. I should say Lieber attorneys declined to comment about this case. They didn't WanNa speak to me but Mike clower from the NIH says there's a larger pattern here other scientists have done the same and it's a real problem. Collaboration does not involve offshore offshore bank accounts. collaboration does involve undisclosed cash payments. It does not involve undisclosed employment agreements or undisclosed contracts. It does not involve double dipping. Where a person is being paid salary to work in China and to work in the United States at the same time several scientists and other institutions have been fired over this he says the NIH is currently investigating around one hundred eighty other scientists. He thinks this is a systemic problem. So if these cases involve lying failing to disclose information which we do know is against the law. Why are scientists doing this? It's a really interesting question and I don't have a great answer as I said. Liebers attorneys have declined to speak to me In other cases other scientists who've been fired don't talk to the press generally now lower says. In some cases the thousand talents contracts scientists sign actually come with a nondisclosure agreements. So they're actually told by the Chinese not to say anything which is illegal but there's also more going on I mean it may be then some cases they fear if they disclose money from the Chinese. They are going to get more scrutiny on their work and then something else to consider is the possibility of just plain old greed the criminal complaint against Charles Lieber alleges and I should say alleged here that he was receiving cash payments from the Chinese. That some of this money was just coming straight up cash. Okay so the sounds problematic for sure but is it espionage. Maybe I have like an outdated old timey spy version of espionage but it doesn't necessarily feel like that to me no I mean. It isn't really espionage. I think it's really important to say that. Lieber isn't technically being accused of espionage. The government this is about the money and I think it's very telling the US government's going after the money rather than transfers of technology like you remember that superconducting case earlier. It's really hard to tell of. Someone's doing something illegal when they're collaborating scientifically and that's also got some people wondering whether these sorts of cases really deserve criminal treatment so frank who is somebody I spoke to. He's a professor at the University of California Hastings College of Law and he tracks these espionage cases and says arresting people for issues around what they disclosed for their grants. It just feels heavy handed to him zone. The past if there was a problem somebody would talk to you. Maybe you would face disciplined from your employer but you wouldn't face being fired and going to prison and having your name dragged through the mud as a spy in fact the same day. Lieber was arrested the Justice Department announced the arrest of two Chinese nationals. They say had lied on visa. Applications and illegally transferred biological samples. These aren't exactly the same kind of case. But you know it's the same general flavor. It sounds like a lot of people who have been accused are Chinese nationals or ethnically Chinese. Does we think that racism plays a role in this well would midst. There are some real espionage cases that involve Chinese people and they have been convicted. But they're sort of larger tone around all this. It sounds very familiar to him. No matter how assimilated. You are no matter how much you think yourself. I'm an American just like any other American winner of Chinese background. There's that risk always that people will look at you and suspect you're actually communist agent now. I should say. Us officials categorically denied. This has anything to do with race. I interviewed Andrew Leveling the federal prosecutor. Who ARRESTED LIEBER? And he said this if it was the French governments that was attempting to steal. Us technology in a massive decadelong campaign. We'd look for French people. But it's not it's the Chinese government and he actually points to the Lieber case as an example of how they're willing to prosecute anyone they think is broken the law by lying but even if the government doesn't think it's racial profiling it's definitely having an effect on the Chinese research. Community your remember. Chichaou shing the researcher who was falsely accused that we talked about well. I asked him. Does he still work with colleagues? In China. The short answer is yes but the more Ah Longer answer. Is that to my research. Now is much much smaller than used to be. And that's because he doesn't want to apply for federal grants anymore. He's afraid he'll do something wrong so every time I do all this conflict of interest floor alright to all these Grant applications and check boxes and also I I I I shake I I. I'm scared that if anything I didn't do exactly accurately I could be in

Charles Lieber United States China Researcher Chinese Government Chichaou Shing NIH Esau Justice Department Philadelphia Chinese University Superconductivity Special Mate Chinese School Physicist Hong Cups Canada Temple University Tokyo Mattie
The Most Important Man in Trump's Life is William Barr

Derek Hunter

03:27 min | 5 months ago

The Most Important Man in Trump's Life is William Barr

"The most important man in president trumps life right now is Mister Barr the Attorney General yet Mr trump may not understand that however they hate trump media brigade certainly do if Mr bar where to turn against the president his reelection chances would be damage significantly that's because William bars a tough prosecutor who is trying to uphold the crucial constitutional mandate of equal justice for all that means a corrupt media is not the dispenser of justice nor is a sitting president who may have a personal agenda the latest controversy over Roger stone accompanied by presidential tweets as put the AG in a tough spot Mr stone was convicted of lying to authorities about his role in seeking damaging information against Democrats during the two thousand sixteen presidential campaign this sentencing recommendation from justice department prosecutors is seven to nine years in a federal penitentiary on average a convicted rapist in this country serves four and a half years in prison so you know something is amiss almost immediately president trump tweeted his outrage targeting the prosecutors a short time later four of them quit that cause great joy in The New York Times and Washington post to organizations that are devoted to injuring president trump what in the middle of the chaos is William Barr who then told ABC news that Mr trump's tweeting about active criminal cases makes it hard for the AG to do its job whereupon fox business channel finder Lou Dobbs question bar's loyalty but an attorney general's loyalty is to uphold the constitution not to any human being so now the president and the Attorney General are well let's use the word on several and they didn't have to happen all president trump had to do was wait until Roger stone is sentenced and then issue a pardon press dole Mister strong could go bowling with us that very night when waiting is not Donald Trump style confrontation is if you read my book the United States of trump you know the president always relishes the fight but a battle with William Barr is not like the dust up with the week former Attorney General Jeff sessions bars not a man to be pushed around and he does not want his professional reputation solely the crucial Dorham investigation into federal corruption is under way and president trump would be well advised to stay out of all justice department business and let those chips fall Mr trump should also understand that the national media is heavily invested in diminishing William Barr because it fears what the door I'm investigation might break the president would be foolish to help his enemies marginalize the Attorney General who could expose disturbing FBI corruption that damaged Donald

Justice Department FBI Dorham Donald Trump Mister Strong Lou Dobbs ABC Washington The New York Times Mr Trump Attorney United States William Barr Roger Stone Prosecutor President Trump
Doug Jones's impeachment vote was more courageous than Romney's

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

08:42 min | 5 months ago

Doug Jones's impeachment vote was more courageous than Romney's

"Senator. Doug Jones of Alabama casts. Perhaps the most important vote of his Senate career. He voted to convict president trump on both articles of impeachment. It could cost him his seat this November but the man elect to fill jeff sessions. Seat doesn't care. He says it was the right thing to do. Senator Jones. Thank you for coming back to the PODCAST. No my pleasure enjoyed it last time. And I'm sure I will this time. Well you have had a a momentous few few weeks and by that I mean your vote on both articles of impeachment to convict President Trump and in your speech and on the floor of the Senate you said there will be so there were so many that will simply look at what I'm doing today and say it is a profile in courage it is not it is simply a matter of right and wrong were doing right is not a courageous act. It is simply following your oath and I bring up that quote because it was it was stirring during And cheered it on in a tweet but President Trump won Alabama by twenty eight points in two thousand sixteen eighteen and according to the morning console poll that I just looked at in Jan January his approval rating is sixty percent. Yeah I believe that. By the way the highest in the country. You don't believe that I've seen a number of different things. I don't believe it's not too far off but I do believe it's lower lower than that and what that concept poll also missing out a little bit is negatives have been an gradually growing so that gap is narrowing a considerably. Well I bring I bring up. The election totals in that particular poll result to ask it just a blunt question. Did your vote to convict on the two articles of impeachment. Seal your defeat this November. I don't think so. I not not by any stretch I think that people you know an Alabama they're gonNA it's one thing to support a president and their policies it's another thing to simply the acknowledged right from wrong and people in Alabama hard working folks. They know the difference between right and wrong. They may disagree with whether or not What what he did rose to the level of impeachment? But I don't think it seals the deal whatsoever. I think people are going to be looking at my record. They're going to see a record for people in Alabama on kitchen table issues just like ran in ran on. And that's the message that we're going to get across and the other thing too is I think you know people are going to see that. Vote as someone who had a lot of I put a lot of time minute. Put a lot of thought in and I really. This was an analysis that I did and at the end of the day. I came down and I'm going to be able to explain that I'll tell you Jonathan. I'll just candidly ever ran into A business leader and I won't go into detail so that people can't really identifying but he's I've known him for a long time he's a Republican business leader from an Alabama in Birmingham He was on the plane with me yesterday. And as we were getting off waited the jetway and he walked me down the jetway and he said Doug he said I just really admire you for voting your convictions and I wanNA help you in the campaign pain and got the address to send a check for the campaign. And I think there's going to be a lot of that in Alabama We'll see how it goes. How hard was was it to make that decision? Because I alluded to the fact that I sent out a tweet after watching your your speech. And everyone's given a lot of plaudits to Senator Senator Mitt Romney who should and they should that because he's a republican because he was the the twenty twelve Republican presidential nominee. But he's also from Utah and he's also wealthy and he's someone for he doesn't need this job and he. It does not stand the possibility of losing his seat because of that. Vote and as you said in your speech you know people say what you've done is profiling courage but yours was the the the more courageous vote because you put your career on the line for this vote. How hard was it to make this decision? It let me answer it this way. Okay because I I've said this to people over the last few days. It was not hard from a political standpoint because I honest to God did not consider it from a political standpoint. Okay I mean I'm sixty five years old. I've only been senator for three of those sixty five years. Okay I was a lawyer so this is you know I'm I'm I'm not that career politician that put that calculation in there like that but what I am is a lawyer and I've been trained as a lawyer and I've been trained to do the right thing I've been and trained to try to put the best foot forward for the constitution and what the founders I thought said and what they believed in the and try to put the pieces of that puzzle together so the difficulty of this of this vote had nothing to do with politics having said that it was still a difficult vote. I mean you know. I'm had to make a decision that to cast a vote to remove the president of the United States duly elected. Despite what a lot of people may say around all that he was duly elected he's GonNa be on the ballot. This was a weighty constitutional issue and so when I said that in by the way the quote that you gave was not something that I had prepared you know after we made the announcement which was about thirty minutes before I went to the floor. You know I started getting text messages. I saw twitter blowing up and people saying that in whatever and I'm sitting in the in the chamber listening to Kamla and listening listening to Maggie Hassen and I'm thinking about this and I realized you know people are saying things like that and I'm sitting at John. F Kennedy's desk now. I already have the quote quote from Robert Kennedy and so I'm thinking you know this is just Naronha. Won't people to think that I'm some. You know super courageous just got. I'm just doing the right thing. And so that that was something that I just inserted ad libbed on my own because really believed it and I'd been saying it's been consistent assistant with what I've said from the very beginning. I'M GONNA follow my oath both to defend the constitution and to do impartial justice right in that second oath to do impartial justice. Was this specific. Oath that you that all senators had to write to swear to as a part of the impeachment impeachment trial impeachment process. Did I read correctly. You took hundreds of pages of notes math four hundred thirty close to them. I think handwritten or you know I. They were all handwritten written. What were you? What were you noting? Well I was taking. It was almost like a stenographer. I mean when I'm in a trial my my my my training is a trial lawyer is to take notes because I am most of my clients never had the money to do like real time transcripts in those days as and so. I'm writing as fast as I can so that I can go in and I can look. I can prepare for cross examination or do whatever I need to do. And I've got two different different kind of pins. I got a blue pin because always right and blue and I got my blue Pimm it. I got up. Read one sitting over here because as I'm writing is I'm listening. Something's going to pop in my brain and going to put a star under and I'm going to outline and they wanNA ride in the margin question or a comment or something like that and so. That is my way of just reinforcing. Being the facts I wanted to know those fact. I had a pretty good handle on those with all the research and that we did leading up to this because we started working on this before it became an impeachment inquiry. We started working on this. And so that's what I did. It was just one of those things to try to make sure that because at the end of the day on new however voted I was. I'm going to be called on to justify that vote and I wanted to be able factually to to make that argument argumentatively to make the argument and the best way to do that is to write it. Write it write it write it. Write it and not just sitting there listening and start daydream enough

Alabama President Trump Senator. Doug Jones Senate Senator Senator Mitt Romney Senator Robert Kennedy Twitter United States Jonathan Utah Birmingham Pimm Maggie Hassen Kamla
"jeff sessions" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:27 min | 8 months ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on 1A

"Me last night but We'll have to see they made. I haven't made it joining us here at. WBZ HIM to discuss. Jeff sessions legacy as a state attorney and senator in Alabama is Angela Lewis Professor of political science at the University of Alabama Professor Lewis. Welcome to one A.. Thank you for having me. Thanks for joining us by phone from Jacksonville. Alabama is Laurie. Owens as a professor of political science at Jacksonville State University professor owns welcome. Thank you glad to be here. Professor Owens tell us about what Jeff sessions position on immigration has been like particularly as as Alabama state's attorney and then as a senator well He he does take a strong hard line position on immigration. And that is that is reflected a belief reflected to buy a lot of the people in Alabama Keep in mind. There's a there's a difference in how people feel about immigration and illegal immigration. And so you know over over time. He has attempted to make that distinction I know immigration has has been a hot button issue For many years I I recall back in two thousand and three at the height of the Cold War. One of the Congressmen in Alabama said even at the height of the war in Iraq Doc The bulk of the phone calls that he received in his office had to do with illegal immigration in. So Jeff sessions really hasn't taken a position that would be the at odds with with A majority of the state. They are more in line with With president trump's Policies Professor Louis. I know this is a generalization but if we went walking downtown Birmingham and just grab a group of people and said you know if I say Jeff sessions was the first thing that comes to your mind. No no in Birmingham. Yes because Birmingham is democratic area in the state the larger Republican state of Alabama. And so if nine times out of ten if you walk down Birmingham they was no no no turn run well. And the thing is because of the incumbency effect and the fact that Alabama you know has become has a red state republican state and federal elections then He has an advantage over a Democrat in which was wide Doug Jones victory. I'm with such a historic event for the people in the state of Alabama because no Democrat has won since Howell Heflin before jeff sessions? got that seat and so am Birmingham. You're going to hear people say no. No No. I'm now if you go. Oh to some other places that may be more Republican. They will definitely be more positive about jeff sessions but if they are trump supporters i. I am not sure how they will respond Professor Owens. That's what I was going to ask you about in terms of other parts of Alabama how Republican voters might see jeff sessions well A lot of Republican voters would see him very warmly They would be glad to say that he's in the race. They might wonder why he waited so long to get in the race Sessions was a Republican in this state before it was popular to be a Republican in the state But the trump factor is unknown if if sessions is running exclusively on his record not only just in the US Senate but on the other things that he dealt with while he was the attorney. General for trump than people that support trump would support jeff sessions. Now will the trump separate out jeff sessions recused isn't himself in In the In the election investigation And see the other things. He's done we we don't I don't know the answer to that. And part of it would depend on whether trump decides to take a position in this primary If he doesn't beat up on Jeff Sessions That's that's better for Jeff sessions Keep in mind though to that. Trump did stop for luther. Strange and also Roy Moore and neither one of those were victorious luther strange in the runoff. And then of course Dr Lewis mentioned The the Roy Moore Doug Jones Special election in which Doug Jones one even wiz trump stumping for Roy Moore. I do want to talk more about that. Connection where Jeff sessions and president trump line. And maybe were they diverge as we continue our conversation with professor. Laurie Owens Jacksonville.

"jeff sessions" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"The president's firing of Jeff Sessions in the immediate aftermath of last week's elections his effort to put a federal law enfor put in charge of federal law enforcement in the entire US Justice department a random loyalist who has never approved by the Senate. I think ultimately this may be seen when we look back on it some days. The president's big hail Mary pass at this point in his term in office has one big desperate probably won't work effort to try to fix all of his problems all at once by trying to fix law enforcement. So that it starts to help him out instead of continuing to threaten both him and senior members of his administration. Hell Mary passes, occasionally do work. Right. That's by. It's still a play that people try and football. There are reasons though tonight to think that this one is probably not going to work when we've got that story for you next. Stay with us. Maryland is not that big Maryland is the ninth smallest state in terms of square mileage. It's about the size of Belgium, if you're counting. But that didn't stop Maryland today from taking on President Trump's administration in a punch above its weight. Kind of way back in September. Maryland had filed a lawsuit against the federal government arguing that ObamaCare. The Affordable Care Act is constitutional and the Trump administration should stop trying to sabotage. It lawsuit is little old Maryland against several federal government defendants from the IRS to the Justice department, including specifically attorney general Jeff Sessions, and that ends up being important stick a pin in that for a second. That lawsuit was brought by Maryland in form of the attorney general of Maryland democrat named Brian frosh today. Brian frosh on behalf of Maryland through another wrench at the Trump administration. Try. To stop their works. Maryland today challenged the president in stalling right after last week's elections, Matt Whitaker as acting attorney general the Maryland challenge promises to show that Whitaker's appointment is unlawful in part. Because Matt Whitaker is not Senate confirmed. Unlike deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein, who is which they say would quote make Rosenstein the proper successor successor to Jeff Sessions, Maryland is arguing that because they just in the process of suing Jeff Sessions over the this whole thing needs to be cleared up fast. They don't want Matt Whitaker sticking his nose in their Affordable Care Act lawsuit. If he's not lawfully able to hold that job, quote, once Whitaker appears as acting attorney general it will be difficult to unwind any positions that the attorney general takes. So this is a federal lawsuit. Right. If the judge rules in Maryland favor here, what would happen to Matt Whitaker. Could this federal judge order that he's not really the acting attorney general and effectively installed rod Rosenstein in his place. I mean, if the judge ordered anything like that, right? The Justice department would almost certainly appeal that would ultimately send this case hurtling toward the supreme court. We're sort of in in permanent hearing loss zone now when it comes to alarm bells being sounded over Matt Whitaker being installed to run the Justice department. What that means for the Justice department what that means in particular for the Muller investigation. But now we've got a whole bunch of open questions that need to be answered quickly. The question of whether Whitaker will recuse himself from the Muller investigation, given his history of outspoken public statements against it, including how he thinks the Justice department could undermine the molar investigation all comments that he made before he himself joined the Justice department. He's prejudged the case in the in the Russia investigation. Does that mean he can legally and ethically? Oversee the investigation of that case the Justice department keeps just putting out the same statement saying that Whitaker is fully committed to consultant with ethics officials on whether or not he needs to recuse. But they won't say whether that consultation has happened or whether he Wilbur Hughes if the ethics officials at the Justice department tell him to. Sometime tomorrow, the office of legal counsel at the Justice department is expected to weigh in their expected to issue some sort of letter a ruling explaining why it's okay for Whitaker to have been appointed to that job. Even though he's not Senate confirmed..

Justice department acting attorney general Maryland Jeff Sessions president Senate Trump administration rod Rosenstein Mary attorney deputy attorney general Belgium Trump Brian frosh football Wilbur Hughes supreme court legal counsel
"jeff sessions" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"The current secretary of the interior Ryan Zinke has also been referred to the US Justice department for potential criminal prosecution. So given the Alabama background of the Trump administration environmental official who was indicted today. It's easy to see that maybe as an Alabama scandal. Right. I mean, there's been a lot of Alabama ethics scandals. There's been a lot of Alabama ethics scandals related to the environment. Right. Maybe some Alabama things I will mention that. It's a little bit weird to see a state court indicting. A high ranking federal official rather than these corruption charges being brought as federal charges. And it makes you wonder if maybe the stench of this Alabama case followed Jeff Sessions all the way into the US federal Justice department in one way or another how come the feds are on this. This is a high level public corruption case involving a federal official. But the latest indictment of someone serving in a high level and the Trump administration at this point, whatever the fine points are of his alleged crimes and his culpability. At this point. You also have to see it. As just the latest tilt in a White House ended administration that appears to be going quite wobbly at the moment. Ever since we learned for example, that Ryan Zinke has been referred to the Justice department for criminal prosecution. There's been an open question as to how we can still be in the cabinet right serious questions about how long he can stay in the job when he's under federal criminal investigation. When will he become the next Trump administration cabinet official to resign in an ethics scandal and under the threat of federal corruption prosecution? The last couple of days of also been filled with new stories suggesting that homeland security secretary cares to Nielsen might be about to be fired the president today canceled. What was supposed to be a trip to the southern US border with secretary Nielsen? Maybe that's because he's gonna fire her. Maybe it's because he was afraid it might rain. I don't know. But the White House is sort of gleefully stoking the idea that another cabinet secretary is about to be fired. There have also been a new round of reports including tonight, but the president is on the verge of firing his second White House chief of staff John Kelly, which may or may not be true. Who knows? But that's but there's more right in the middle of the noon today. There was even a brief flurry of weird stories that the first lady of the United States the president's wife. Had somehow arranged the firing of the deputy national security adviser. And I know I know that sounds crazy. I mean, yes, I ladies in the past have clashed with White House staffers up to and including famously the White House chief of staff under President Reagan who was disfavored by and ultimately axed to please first lady Nancy Reagan, White House staff and the first lady sometimes Klatt, but a national security job Malania Trump wants to fire the deputy national security adviser is that how we do things. Nobody knows if that's how we do things. I mean, there were these initial reports today I in the Wall Street Journal that the deputy national security adviser of the United States mirror. Ricardel had been frogmarched out of the White House and had her pass revoked at the insistence of the first lady those reports later turned out to be inaccurate. When other people reliably produced information that in fact, the deputy national security adviser was still inside the White House. None of that conflicting reporting though, could erase this actual statement, which really was put out by the office of the first lady today, quote, it is the position of the office of the first lady that she Miro Ricardo deputy national security adviser, no longer deserves the honor of serving in this White House. It is the position of the office of the first lady. Apparently tonight, the deputy national security adviser still enjoys the honor of serving in this White House..

White House Alabama US Justice department secretary secretary Nielsen United States official president Ryan Zinke Trump chief of staff cabinet President Reagan Malania Trump Wall Street Journal Miro Ricardo Nancy Reagan Ricardel
"jeff sessions" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"I feel like I can answer this question by tying in what you were just talking about Matt about the like Arizona versus rust belt into the broader conversation because like the entire political theory of Trumpism is that Donald Trump is is bringing people out to vote who would otherwise be low propensity because they're white voters without college degrees. Which is to say Donald Trump is making low information voters interested enough in politics to show up to the polls, Donald Trump himself is I don't know who said this. But it's perfect. He's the first low information voter president like Donald Trump will routinely say things that make it clear that he could not have cared less about policy or politics before running for president. Most recently was like, oh, nobody ever paid any attention to the midterms and now military's it's this big thing. No, that's not true of anyone else except for Donald Trump. And maybe some Trump voters like maybe that is legitimately true. And so in that respect having Donald Trump is the president. It's not that he's a political genius. It's just that. He's a good one man focus group yet for what people are going to be into. And so the things that breakthrough to those voters aren't necessarily the like regulations that Jeff Sessions is publishing in the Federal Register, they're these big flashy moves to own the lives, you know, people may not be paying obsessive attention to politics, but they're getting their signals about what to care about from people who do pay obsessive attention to politics and carry great deal about owning the lives. Right. It's not just them at Whitaker stuff that also is some policy stuff like you can say I'm going to do this big brash shutting down the borders kind of move on Silom. Like that is oh you're going to tell me that's illegal. Oh, I'm protecting the country. Combat me, bro. Like, there definitely are ways that you can get a session style agenda in these very brash Trumpian terms. And so what's going to be interesting is seeing if that temptation pools enough that it results in things that are just flash and no substance, or whether you continue to tow this middle ground of we're going to find the things that are actually going to matter that also will make annoys for owning the lips. But something I would I wanna point out. And it's something I've argued a lot is that you and I wrote about this. I think before the vox times is that there are a lot of people who believed in a thing called Trumpism among them Jeff Sessions among them. You know, some of the earliest members of the Trump administration who believed that Trump is um existed apart from Trump Trump never believe that Trump recognized that this is all about him and what he wants to do and that his random flailing at healthcare for everyone or being dove or. Something like that was just saying things time that sounded good in his head. Jeff Sessions believed in a version of Trumpism that was about immigration restrictions and putting America first and etcetera etcetera. And now Jeff Sessions has been fired from the Trump administration. You know, one of the earliest and biggest supporters of thing that people believed called Trumpism the people over journal for American greatness, Michael Anton of the world who believe at this thing. This is a phenomenon they could get on board with and then you saw that when the bombings in Syria. You saw a lot of these people start to recognize like there was no such thing as Trumpism there was just Trump this whole time. And I think it's interesting to see how with the mid terms the people who really attempted to mold themselves into Trumpian figures. It turns out not only is it just about Trump. It is only about Trump on the ballot because you saw candidates in South Carolina with Mark Sanford who lost and the. Person who Trump really supported Katie airing tin who basically became like the Trumpy figure in that Rhys she lost. And you saw a time and time again that candidates who did not already have their kind of their own energy their own oxygen. But who just basically turned themselves into their version of what they thought Trump was. I mean, you saw this a little bit with Corey Stewart who basically in recent weeks was attempting to seem less Trumpian..

Donald Trump Trump administration Trumpism Trump Jeff Sessions Matt Mark Sanford Corey Stewart Arizona South Carolina Whitaker Syria vox America Rhys Michael Anton Katie
"jeff sessions" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"So something I want to get at is. You know, I think that when we're talking about Jeff Sessions, and we're talking about, you know, if you were a conservative who is a quote, unquote law and order conservative, and I hate using that term because a lot of these people are just very much like they're not it's more order than a lotta ordering a lot not that much law. But the idea that your position -ality in the Trump administration is supposed to be transactional. And I think that that's what we were getting at before the break, which is that you Jeff Sessions was there because Jeff Sessions had things he was interested in doing besides just serving Donald Trump. Whereas you've seen people who get close to Trump. I think about this with all the random hangers on within the conservative movement and by conservative movement. I mean, like not the people who write for like national review, a weekly standard. But the people who seem to have like gotten on board the Trump train within the last eighteen months. But you see this idea that he likes them because they like him and they can do something for him. So he might do things for them. It's a very lake like in the movie, Chicago lake what you do for mama mama will do for you. And yet Jeff Sessions was never going to be a part of that. But you know, when he recused himself from the Russian investigation because of his best conflicts. It was Trump's idea of what an attorney general supposed to be very much based on what he thought Eric Holder was and his idea of Eric Holder with someone who defended the president, first and foremost, and that's something you hear a lot on the right? The idea that you know, with fast and furious or this idea of the scandals that conservative saw within the the Obama administration. They viewed Eric Holder as a person who basically like stood in front of Obama, and like made sure that nothing got to him. Which is why they think that a lot of people when people like, oh, it was a scandal free administration. Like, no, no, no. There were lots of scandals. They just never got to bomb. Trump wants what that version of an attorney general is whether or not that is actually how it happened is not important. But his idea that Jeff Sessions was supposed to basically just not be there for what he wants to do not be there because you know, he'd been fighting about gang of eight back a twenty thirteen not be there because this is something, you know, the issues upon which he focused happen to align with the issues Trump talked about, and thus they would have this great working relationship. He should've been there to defend Trump, and that should have been the whole deal. He should have been hit basically his personal journey. Right. And so now, we have acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker who I don't. I don't know what to say about Matthew Whitaker. He appears to be a a small time crook involved in some kind of multilevel marketing scams. He finished fourth in an Iowa Senate primary at one point he worked at some kind of conservative think tank that I never heard of where he did like up ED's about Benghazi, and he appears to have become chief of staff in the Justice department because he did some cable news hits about the Muller investigation saying that it was overreaching, and that it should be shut down now. And when we say appears to it's not this is not like, oh, there is a conspiracy theory. This is like no one has yet put forward alternative theory of how Matthew Whitaker came to the attention of the Trump administration, which is interesting because now you just a couple of minutes ago before we started recording Donald Trump, basically went with the full Mariah Carey, I don't know her excuse about the I don't know who this person is when we. Clift. Clear. Trump often does a good job of like dragging people into questioning reality. But like normally what happens, right?.

Donald Trump Jeff Sessions Matthew Whitaker Eric Holder Obama administration attorney Obama national review Chicago lake Mariah Carey acting attorney general Clift Benghazi Iowa Senate president Muller chief of staff Justice department eighteen months
"jeff sessions" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Gives put on a maga- hat, and it's just so excited about he talks about this specifics that you're going like that was why he got on board with this is worth noting not only good for sessions in like now having an avatar, but also good for Trump in so far as he then is able to put forth some policy. See proposals that are way outside the Republican mainstream but are being developed by members of sessions staff, most notably Stephen Miller. But also, I mean, this is we'll get to this after the break and such it's firing. This is also the problem with sessions in the Trump cabinet is the Jeff Sessions was actually there for reason right necessarily like I don't approve of Jeff Sessions's reasons, but I never thought I didn't think when Jeff Sessions signed on as a Trump endorser. I didn't think wouldn't sessions went onto Torney general. I didn't think when sessions was scrambling to scuttle the twenty thirteen immigration compromise. Like Justice wasn't bullshit. Like, this is really what he thinks. And he believes in it quite seriously and his very committed and was committed to it when it was very politically unfashionable and was like to his good fortune that it became more fashionable. All in Republican circles. But like what Trump really wants is people who will just do stuff for him. Right. Not someone who will sessions was writing the Trump wave in order to promulgate these rules and worse in consent agreements and get some people in place who understand the plumbing of asylum law and wanna try to turn the screws to make it harder for people to get in like he had his reasons. But so then he was reluctant to just go way off script and do what Trump wanted in terms of scoring round with the FBI. Yes. A tidbit of gossip that was interesting to me when it came out on Wednesday. And now what's happened over the last twenty four hours. It's happened. You guys will now understand. Why was interesting to me? And that I think will set us up for the conversation after the break. It was reported on Wednesday that when John Kelly went to Jeff Sessions own Wednesday morning and said you're leaving today sessions. Said please let me stay the week and Kelly said, Nope, sorry. It has to be today and sessions submitted his undated resignation letter and went out the building. And looking at that knowing that they were looking to get this out in the last few days. And now they have knowing that this has really been the baby of Sessions's DOJ much more than Christian Nelson's DHS. It's very interesting to me that sessions wanted to be able to stay through the day that Trump signed this proclamation, and that he was denied the ability to do that what time for a break. Yes. A lot of people we've got bounces on credit cards, maybe a higher interest rate than.

Jeff Sessions Trump Justice Stephen Miller DOJ John Kelly Torney Christian Nelson FBI DHS twenty four hours
"jeff sessions" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Jeff Sessions has just kept on going with kind of following what the Trump administration's version of the law is, and I think that there's there's a saying like, you know, for my friends everything for everyone else the law, and so you saw that criminal Justice reform really took a back seat in the eyes of Jeff Sessions because he believed that criminal Justice reform, basically being mean to police officers, even wild Jared Kushner was working across the island a lot of ways to attempt to get criminal Justice reform on the table. And you heard before the. Elections that Mitch McConnell was like, oh, you know, if we get sixty votes for this. We can get this happening, which means it's not going to happen. But it is interesting. How one of sessions is last X was to ensure that police departments have less oversight. And that has less local ability, keeping my love of these agreements are locally agreed upon and Jeff Sessions, essentially said like, no, the federal government can tell you that you cannot enter into the specific locally agreed upon agreements. I know that's the word agree a lot. But that's the only way to say it, but it's interesting, and I think someone the former head of the civil rights division of DOJ said that, you know, Jeff Sessions, I was always claim to low federalism, and yet at this point like big government. It's great. What I particularly love about this like of all the things that Jeff Sessions has done his stuff on policing has often seemed a little less systematic because like it's been at the level of like, not defending particular consent. Decrees who went into. Kogo? This seems kind of lake. He's on his way out saying, I'm gonna make sure that just in case somebody comes in who isn't as a situa sleep devoted to restricting federal oversight of police as I am that they couldn't do anything about it. Anyway. Right. And it's interesting because I think that one of the major consent agreements people talking about Chicago, but there's also eight central Louisiana because the Zana police departments I believe it was specifically Baton Rouge. But if you know more, please send more information. There have been a lot of issues with those fleece departments. But it's really interesting, and Heather McDonald wrote a piece about this. Now, Heather McDonald wrote a book about the war on Cup. Yes. There has never been an agent of the state to which Heather McDonald. It's not deeply devoted. But it's interesting how her positioning of Jeff Sessions and the Jeff Sessions firing with so based on like, but law enforcement loved him. He was just trying to follow the law. And I think it goes to your point Dr about. How the sessions Justice department while you saw a little bit with other branches of the federal government that it was just kind of more LeRoy Jenkins approach to this the sessions Justice department. Very much was okay. We are going to do this thing. But we are going to do it within the quote unquote letter of the law in such an extent that it seems more subtle, but it's actually worse. But also, I mean, the basic problem which sessions is like when you look at the Trump cabinet. There's some different kinds of characters in there. Right. And you see you have a guy like Steve Mnuchin who nobody ever knew what Mnuchin thought about anything, right? Like, he was a total cypher who clearly had been trying to get somewhere and Republican politics. And so he he took a bet on Donald Trump in the two thousand sixteen campaign when there weren't a lot of people on Wall Street and wanted to raise funds for him. And now he's Treasury Secretary. And who knows why right and Jeff Sessions is the opposite of that..

Jeff Sessions Heather McDonald federal government Mitch McConnell Jared Kushner Steve Mnuchin Trump Justice department DOJ Baton Rouge Louisiana LeRoy Jenkins Zana Chicago
"jeff sessions" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"For the show that at the same time that people were marching essentially in Times Square and other public places basically saying that firing sessions puts Robert Mueller's job in jeopardy, and that's bad. But it's interesting how when we talk about Jeff Sessions in the context of the Mueller investigation. We're talking about a different Jeff Sessions than the Jeff Sessions who for instance, last night signed an order that would dramatically limit the ability of law enforcement officials to use cordon forced agreements known as consent decrees to help overhaul local police departments and consent degrees have all pretty long history. There were used in the early nineties in Pittsburgh. And basically the idea is that it's a type of injunction that allows a federal court to enforce an agreement that's negotiated between say the Justice department and say the Chicago police department, which would be a particular example to which sessions was very deeply opposed. Because he believed that if you don't let the police have, you know, extra judicial powers that. Who knows what might happen? And so they have now the Justice department has limited those agreements in a couple of different ways. One of them is that now they have to be signed off on by a political appointee. And it's not just the career lawyers who are generally in charge of this and another is just kind of making it more complicated to either enter into these types of agreements. It can't just be for police departments breaking the law, and so they have to lay out evidence of additional violations besides unconstitutional paver, which you know, you would think that the violation that is unconstitutional behavior by police department would be enough. But apparently not and that the deals have to have a sunset date. So you have to say that like this deal will go away on July fifth twenty twenty instead of saying like, you know, when the Ferguson police. Department stops using citizens of Ferguson, Missouri as Bank accounts debts one will lift this agreement. And so it's interesting because I wrote about this a little bit during the Connie as flows in that there is I think that this goes to something about Jeff Sessions particular that since the beginning of the.

Jeff Sessions Chicago police department Justice department Robert Mueller Times Square Ferguson Pittsburgh Missouri
"jeff sessions" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on Worldly

"Hello and welcome to worldly on the vox media podcast network. I'm Zack Beecham here with my co hosts generally outward that I'm really happy to be back with you all after my wedding. Because there's a lot of news. We have to work together on Wednesday the day after the American midterm elections. President Trump more or less fired attorney general Jeff Sessions on today's show. We're gonna tackle this news from an international perspective. We're gonna start by talking about what the attorney general. Switch up means for the Russia investigation and close out with a brief chat about the midterms implications for one of America's wars, the war in Yemen. So Jen, let's start from the top here. Give people brief rundown on the molar investigation. So special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation is looking into the Trump campaign's possible collusion with Russia in their interference campaign in the twenty sixteen election, and if that did happen that would be the biggest election scandal in basically American history. So let's talk about Jeff Sessions's role in all of this. Sure. So the reason Muller has the job that he has is because Trump fired former FBI director James Comey in may. Thousand seventeen and at that point that led to this whole notion of like wait is Trump trying to kind of obstruct this collusion investigation. And so right because he was in charge of that investigation at the time. Exactly right from national TV and said, it was because of the Russian investigation would clear right, which you now kinda takes back, but like he said it so accounts. And so as to the Justice department, then sessions should have been the guide oversee the Russian desiccation after it went to molar, right? The problem here, of course, is that sessions got actually caught up with the whole Russia stuff. So what that means is Jeff Sessions should be overseeing the mother investigation. But it turns out that because he was part of the Trump campaign and had some meetings with Russian officials as part of that he had to recuse himself. It's more specific right because during his confirmation hearings. He didn't exactly tell the full truth about his contacts with the Russians. Right. So controversy around that is what forced his refusal. So he req-. Himself, and that means that deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein has been overseeing the Muller pro this whole time. And by overseeing I mean that Robert Mueller has to basically go to rob Rosenstein, every time he wants to do pretty much anything in the investigation if he needs to subpoena someone if he needs to send an indictment to the brand jury if he needs to get warrants to go investigate somebody's office or -partment or whatever or get filed. Rod Rosenstein has to sign off on every one of those steps that Muller takes which means rod Rosenstein has a lot of power and authority over the shape of this investigation. Right. The shape of the entire Russian bay station. Essentially depends on rod Rosenstein being willing to sign off on all of these. And this is the crucial point right because Trump's in Trump's worldview, he thinks has said repeatedly that the job of the Justice department, and the FBI is essentially to serve the president which is not historically accurate. They actually do. Oversight over the president and the executive branch. So he thinks his attorney general Jeff Sessions or as former attorney general now should have been running interference with the Russia probe. And he said this repeatedly publicly that he is furious that sessions recused himself, and he shouldn't have done that. And at one point the Oval Office. He screamed at sessions and appears to have waged a month long campaign to embarrass him in public and eventually force him to resign. He called Mr. Magoo. Right. Remember that actually Mr. Magoo? Wow. He's publicly tweeted saying like, oh, I don't know this attorney general, maybe if you were doing, you know, better things than I don't know about this guy. Maybe I shouldn't have hired like he's openly talked shit about sessions for called his work disgraceful that like he lied to the president like all this stuff. I mean, this is open bashing a major cabinet member. And yet he didn't fire sessions right until the midterms. And this seems to be the key point here is that it's happening. Right now, literally the day after the elections have been less than twenty four hours, in fact. Right. So why now also part of it actually was a lot of people in Trump's inner circle told him if you wanna do this do not do before the midterms because there could be a political backlash some people, especially Democrats might feel..

Jeff Sessions President Trump Russia attorney rod Rosenstein Robert Mueller vox media Muller Justice department Zack Beecham rob Rosenstein president Mr. Magoo FBI deputy attorney general Russian bay station James Comey Jen special counsel cabinet member
"jeff sessions" Discussed on The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

"And that was actually a photo that incensed President Trump after it surfaced online. So that's what likely this was. It's look at me I'm walking out, and you can see the faces on those Justice department employees as Jeff Sessions is leaving. They're not pleased. They they're no they're clapping their thinking him. But no, one looks pleased to be there to be watching Jeff Sessions marched out like this in a lot of people in the White House. Also feel similar to that. They do not think Jeff Sessions deserves the treatment that he's. Gotten from President Trump, they think it's unfair. But a lot of people don't stick up for Jeff Sessions because they see it as just as futile attempt to do anything like that. And we've seen Jeff Sessions lose his defenders inside the west wing. He used to have ranked previous Steve Bannon who all stood up for him and President Trump. I started criticizing him telling the president to lay off of it. And also he would have a weekly lunch when the White House counsel, Don Mcgann who is now gone as well. So there aren't a lot of people in the west wing, except for Stephen Miller whom didn't work for Jeff Sessions, and is largely a big reason why he works for Donald Trump now is still in the west wing still obviously very close to President Trump. You wonder what those people working for him when he was a Senator Jeff Sessions and Stephen Miller was a speech writer at the time. He was working for him when he was the Republican Senator from Alabama. And, you know, Laura, it's interesting because not only are people a lot of people at the White House said because they liked sessions, but a lot of Republican senators work closely with Jeff Sessions he was. Republican Senator from Alabama for a long time. They all have a very good relationship. And many of them are privately saying, why did the president of the United States treat this guy as badly as he did especially since sessions was the first Republican Senator to endorse him when he was a campaign where he was a candidate for the Republican nomination, especially unheard have to have a former US Senator and a total up today, a US attorney attorney general being whipping boy of the president of the United States. That's what he's been treated as and I was a former career prosecutor for DOJ as you enter the building. And as you leave as you as attorney general, you have people lining the hallways support third under both Bush and Obama and to see somebody like Jeff Sessions, the attorneys on the United States have an unceremonious departure is just confounding to most people. I don't agree with his policies and the rollback of a main civil rights agenda, the LGBTQ issues a consent decrees. However, you should give respect to the attorney general, and what you saw there was the people who were actually in the Linux secession. Including rod Rosenstein, and such a general there. And also, of course, his now successor who is not in the line standing there. And I think you had Jeff Sessions trying to be as great as he could to shake his hand. I suspect he was not as he never really had a good relationship with it to begin with pre. Let me thank you very much. Pre Perahera always important for you to be here with you have a final thought before I let you go. Look, I'm worried about who the next attorney general might be remember this person is only in an acting capacity. And I think it's a it's a precarious time as you use that word, I think appropriately it's a fraud time, and it's a contentious time, and that person is very very important. There's a lot of time left in the Trump administration. Not just with respect to the mother pro, but all sorts of issues of law and order and fairness and Justice going on in the country. And so I hope he chooses wisely. Any hope I hope he chooses someone who can get consensus support to tell you. What's moment? Indeed. All right, guys. Thanks very much. There's a lot going on. Let's ticket pick break. We'll resume our special coverage right after this. You know, what's not smart job sites that overwhelm you with tons of the wrong.

Jeff Sessions President Trump president attorney White House Senator Stephen Miller United States Justice department Alabama DOJ rod Rosenstein Don Mcgann Steve Bannon US attorney fraud prosecutor Justice
"jeff sessions" Discussed on The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

"And there are there are some up on Capitol Hill who were expecting this to happen. I talked to a source. GOP source leadership source earlier today wolf who said that that it was widely expected among the Republican leadership up on Capitol Hill that the president would do this. And so what the president doing this today forcing Jeff Sessions to resign while it did change the narrative did change the news cycle of president who was claiming that everything had gone just fine last night. Now, we're all talking about Jeff Sessions being out the door. Instead of what happened last night in the midterms across the country will all right Jim Acosta at the White House. Whereas thanks very much. Let's get some insight from our political legal experts and Evan Perez. You cover this for us. What is the firing of Jeff Sessions mean as far as the Russia probe is concerned. I think there's some real questions will as to what happens to the investigation. Obviously, Matt Whitaker has made clear his points of view that Muller has gone beyond his charge that's gone outside. The lines of what he was supposed to be doing. We know he's written these comments. He's made these comments in an op-ed here at CNN and also in comments here on the. Era's CNN. And so it does raise the question of whether or not not Whitaker should be the person who's in charge of this investigation. This is something obviously that the Justice Department's ethics officials are going to have to review and see whether or not the appearance of conflict is enough for Matt Whitaker to recuse himself. Obviously, this is something that it is clear that the president deliberately chose somebody. Who he already knows has some strong opinions about the mother investigation. Exactly he's made his feelings pretty clear, and it's hard to think that the president and met what occurred never discussed this before. Because Matt Whitaker was seen by a lot of people in the west wing liaison between the Justice department and the White House. He was the one who when President Trump sometimes went for weeks or days without speaking to the attorney general one on one we know they rarely ever met one on one not what was the one who really kind of guided the conversations between the White House and the Justice department. So it's not by accident that he picked Matt Whitaker to take over this position. And that would occur is described by the we know miss kind of. Bull in a China. Shop this gregarious personality. He someone who is going to make his feelings out something that if he doesn't think the Russia investigation is credible and noteworthy he's going to let the president know that. And I'm sure that played into a lot of the reason the president picked him to take over the job instead of picking the deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein would be the norm here, and my colleague Laura Jarrett, and are being told in addition to this a little more detail about what happened with the resignation of Jeff Sessions today. John Kelly, call Jeff Sessions before that press conference at the president had today asked him for his resignation, and we're told by sources that Jeff Sessions asked if he could stay until the end of the week John Kelly was very firm to him according to at larger and are told that he could not stay until the end of the week that it had to be today, which raises the question if he did that before the press conference why during that press conference did President Trump duck that question about how long Jeff Sessions was going to be here. And it's a real rebuke for the deputy attorney general attorney general resigns. Or is fired. The deputy attorney general would move up and become the acting attorney general pending confirmation of whoever the president might nominate to become the permanent returning general assuming that person would be confirmed by the US Senate. The question now is will rod Rosenstein quit himself. Well, he resigned because he in effect was publicly slept by the president of the United States slapped in backhanded as well along with Jeff Sessions who's told by your account you have to leave today..

president Jeff Sessions Matt Whitaker deputy attorney general White House Justice Department CNN Muller attorney acting attorney general Russia John Kelly rod Rosenstein Jim Acosta GOP Evan Perez US Senate Trump Era
"jeff sessions" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

The Lead with Jake Tapper

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

"Anti-catholic March madness we sixty five on this week tradition. I'll be joined by Kansas head coach Bill right now. That's probably one of the biggest weaknesses Of our. our team those guys get outside their comfort zone. He had been good talkers. And really being a great leader. Does he can lead, by example? But he also got to have some people take charge. God's alum. According to get better. Is three sixty five now at apple podcasts. And spotify. Welcome back to breaking news coverage of President Trump's firing of his attorney general Jeff Sessions. The two men had been at odds over sessions decision to listen to the ethics lawyers at the department of Justice and recused himself from the Russian investigation. Joining me on the phone is democratic Senator maisy Rono Hawaii, she serves on the Senate Judiciary committee, and she was reelected last night with I think just seventy seventy one percent of the vote. Senator congratulations, your reaction your reaction to today's developments. It didn't take long for the president to act immediately predictive self because it's always about him all the time every time. So I e fires Jeff Sessions. And then he as Matthew Whitaker as the acting attorney general very very troubling knowing mister Whitaker's us about the investigation. You know, it raises, of course, a conflict of interest. This is our to Whitaker, and it certainly goes to the obstruction of Justice by the president. So by congress has to pass legislation predicts investigation, so you you and your colleagues on the Senate Judiciary committee already passed out of the committee legislation to protect Muller, Senator Mitch McConnell. The majority leader did not bring it up. I think he said he didn't feel there was any need to do. So do you believe that there will be any appetite by Republicans to do? So and and will there be perhaps a push by somebody like you or others to do? So before the end of this congress when you lose even more seats in January. Muller in this nation, basically to protect any special counsel out of the judiciary committee in a bipartisan way. And the only reason that that McConnell then bait on the floor with he says, oh, well, we don't need to do that. Because nothing's going to happen to Muller. And I don't know what it take, you know, maybe a ton of bricks has to fall on McConnell fan before he realizes recognizes what is actually going on. So certainly expect that the Democrats in in the Senate as low as they Democrats in the house will push to protect because that has to go on and the president's actions are so blatantly political to protecting south. That is I said it didn't take long for him to to do it. Obviously your parties your power is being part of the party, the minority party in the Senate are limited compared to your democratic colleagues in the house who are going to soon have the majority. What do you want them to do that? You are not able to do. It'll be able to investigate what's going on with the president. And my friend Jerry Nadler who with whom I search for six years in the US house. I know that he has already said that he wants to know what the president's motives are. I think we can pretty much conclude. What is more Zarin that is to protect itself? So I spent Jerry Nadler to be chairing the judiciary committee in the in the house and then to proceed with the what he needs to do to get to the bottom of this and to protect investigation. Do you think that this is where it ends that the that he he appoints a Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general and Whitaker maybe tries to keep two tries to shrink or or contract. The the bounds of the Muller investigation. Or or do you fear that they're more is going to happen? Investigation continues that this is yet more actions by the president that goes to obstruction of Justice. Does it doesn't Trump have the right to have as attorney general whoever he sees fit as long as that person is ultimately confirmed by the Senate..

Senate Judiciary committee president Senator Mitch McConnell Matthew Whitaker Muller Senate Jerry Nadler acting attorney general Trump congress Senator maisy Rono Hawaii department of Justice Bill Jeff Sessions Senator Kansas spotify
"jeff sessions" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

The Lead with Jake Tapper

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

"Now, I may get involved at some point. If it gets worse. At one low point Trump even going so far as to declare, quote, I don't have an attorney general's good to be with you all because session stepped aside from overseeing the Russian vested Gatien something that overshadowed nearly all of his twenty months at the Justice department. He took the job. And then he said, I'm going to recuse myself. I should what kind of a manage this. And despite all the tweets and withering critiques from his boss put an attorney general that never took control of the Justice department. Jeff Sessions never took control of the Justice department. And it's a sort of an incredible thing sessions rarely push back. The president speaks his mind. He says what's on his mind at the time. And he's been frustrated about my accused and other matters. But we have been so pleased and honored to be given the responsibility to exit his agenda at the department of Justice part of that is just this kind of case. And so I am pleased and honored to have that responsibility in will do. So as long as it's appropriate for me traditional picking his moments carefully and valuing in August that the Justice department will not be improperly influenced by political considerations publicly. He advanced the president's most controversial immigration policies, privately a source close to sessions, tell CNN he too has been frustrated that Muller's investigation is not yet completed and the attorney general hopes he will be remembered for never undermining the integrity of the department with sessions now gone his chief of staff Matt Whitaker will take over the department and the interim Whitaker are former US attorney from Iowa and former CNN contributor has served as sessions right hand man since September twenty seventeen but with sessions now gone the question is who will replace him. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham has. Reportedly been asked about the job and has repeatedly said he's not interested others said to be in the running include former federal prosecutor and current Republican congressman John Radcliffe Boeing general counsel, Michael Ludwig, and others potentially in the mix or federal appeals court judge Edith Jones who sits on the fifth circuit and Janice. Rogers Brown who used to sit on the DC circuit, though, a source close to Brown. Tell CNN she is likely not interested Laura Jarrett, CNN Washington, and our thanks to large Erin for that piece. This just in current democratic minority leader, incoming likely house speaker Nancy Pelosi tweeted, quote, it is impossible career attorney general sessions firing as anything other than another blatant attempt by President Trump to undermine and end special counsel Muller's investigation policy. Also, weighing in on the appointment of the acting attorney general adding quote, given his record of threats to undermine and weaken the Russia investigation, Matthew Whitaker should recuse himself from any involvement in Muller's investigation. Congress must take him meet action to protect the rule of law and integrity of the investigation on quote. And our panel is here with us to discuss this and David urban let me start with you as somebody who is closely allied with the White House. Are you surprised by this? Do you think it's wise? Sure slow news day. So. No, no news out there. So we need to make some news heads is completely surprising j- just for that fact. Right. I mean, the president had a news conference today where he's out there touting look we did great things we move the needle at our great agenda. And then you come to step all over the message. And you're onto another story and other kind of crisis here so to speak and do I did I see coming ever? He's kinda saw coming. We. We all knew the attorney general is kind of living on borrowed time. But today, the timing pretty pretty bad. I think the timing is the question inside the White House to but also Matt Whitaker being named as also a question. I asked several White House officials why not aim why not name the deputy attorney general as the attack. Attorney acting attorney general let's typically the process or something like this..

Jeff Sessions attorney Justice department acting attorney general US attorney president Matt Whitaker President Trump deputy attorney general CNN department of Justice Muller White House David Senator Lindsey Graham general counsel Matthew Whitaker Rogers Brown
"jeff sessions" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

The Lead with Jake Tapper

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

"And that he has contingencies in place while I was going to be sending letters to both the Torney general's office as well as special counsel to say there's been any change in scope of investigation. They need to inform members of congress. And specifically that you disagree committee. Do you think that Muller's job is in jeopardy until Democrats take over the house of representatives, presumably in January? I do not believe Robert Muller's job is in jeopardy right now. I think the president does see that as a red line. I do believe pretty Whitaker is probably red line as well. But we'll see what what has to say. And in terms of firing Robert Mueller under departure Justice regulations. He could still only be fired for good. 'cause he can't just be fired. Just because Whitaker doesn't like him. Or what he's doing? You think that President Trump is not willing to cross the line to fire Robert Muller, or or have Robert Muller fired? Did I get that? Right. I do believe that. And also if the president believes that the only way to clear his name is for the Muller investigation to clear his name, then he would not fire him because otherwise there's no way. Donald Trump gets his main cleared. Do you actually believe that? Or are you just trying to convey that to President Trump? If you're trying to convince him, psychologically, some sort of Vulcan mind meld here that don't don't do this President Trump because you want to clear your name. Do you actually think that he has this red line? I do because I think he would have actually in fact executed a firing of Roure baller. I think he does think in his mind that the majority American people would rise up against him and that the tradition committee and now democratic control of the congress would be a check and balance on his ability to do that. All right. Congressman Ted lieu. Thank you so much and presumably congratulations on your reelection. I'm assuming if you're talking to me, you want relaxing that's night. Yes. Thank you. Jank. Okay. The resignation of Jeff Sessions is attorney general has frankly been a long time coming and CNN's larger reports the frustration and tension between sessions and President Trump goes both ways. President Trump's request Jeff Sessions is out as a Torney general submitting his resignation letter to the president quote. I have been honored to serve as a Torney general and have worked to implement the law enforcement agenda based on the rule of law wrote sessions, Trump has made no secret of his disdain for his attorney general pointed in the attorney general for numerous reasons, but we haven't attorney general on disappointed in the attorney general for many reasons, then you understand. The long expected departure of one of President Trump's earliest supporters attorney general Jeff Sessions coming after months of blistering attacks. I said on the department of Justice, I would stay uninvolved..

President Trump president Robert Muller Jeff Sessions Robert Mueller Whitaker attorney Torney Ted lieu congress department of Justice special counsel CNN Congressman
"jeff sessions" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"The net effect of this in the long run. It seems to me the the only real effect of this in the long run is again just helping Robert Muller put together an obstruction of Justice charge against Donald Trump, that along with the firing of Jeff Sessions, it seems that all Donald Trump is doing with these tweets as he's getting the gun. He's pulling it out. He's aiming at his big toe and shooting at it repeatedly. Yeah, that's right. Look, I don't know what more evidence we would need of the president's corrupt intent. When it comes to his interactions with the Justice department. We've seen over and over again reports of what he says privately about Jeff Sessions what he says privately to Jeff Sessions and other members of the Justice department. What he said to people like Andy MacKay before he was dismissed. And then we see him doing it on Twitter. We seem openly on Twitter calling for the Justice department to do inappropriate things. I think it would be it. You know, with with respect to this tweet, it's interesting because it's not just about the obstruction of Justice investigation that he already faces. You know he already is facing obstruction of Justice. Investigation for trying to end investigations into himself. In the his campaign. This is kind of an obstruction of Justice writ large where he is just asking the Justice department to never bring cases against members of the Republican party as he is asked him before to bring cases against Hillary Clinton and members of the Democratic Party. It is kind of just, I think it's in a way it's larger than any particular instruction of Justice case. And it goes to his fitness as a servant and office, and the way he sees the Justice department and the way he wants to organize his Justice department and how he would expect Jeff Sessions successor. Should he fire? I'm as I think we all expect. He will how he will expect him to lead the Justice department. Let's bring a now member of the judiciary committee, democratic Senator Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island on Saturday. Senator Whitehouse served as a pallbearer at the memorial for Senator John McCain Senator good morning. It's great to have you with us wanna talk to you about that day on Saturday, but I ju- are on the judiciary committee, your reaction to the president's tweet, the latest reminder that he used the Justice department as an institution there to protect. Him or you gotta remember, this is a guy who's campaign began with mob champs of lock her up. So they got off to a really bad start with respect to how the Justice system is supposed to work. And this is just another, I guess, ominous whiff of the generalissimo Justice that this guy seems to like in which the Justice system is not blind does not go forward based on evidence, but goes forward based on politics and the welfare and wishes of the president of the United States just to any former prosecutor, it's just disgusting. Do you see Senator in that tweet obstruction of Justice. Well, you'd need to actually move to a proceeding that was being obstructed. I certainly think that it could be evidence of obstruction of Justice. Once you've got to defining which entity of the Justice system was being obstructed so Senator you also, obviously we'll be seated in just a couple of hours now and hearing the initial hearing for judge cavenaugh Brett cavenaugh president's appointee for the supreme court. What's the first question you'd like to ask him. Well, I don't want to telegraph that, but I do think that what you're going to see is a lot of boiling mad Democrats on the judiciary committee. There has been a real banana Republic process that has gotten here. Those of us who are lawyers think that the obvious comparison is to the discovery process and a trial. Imagine one party in a trial telling the other party while you're do all this discovery rolling can give you about ten or fifteen percent of it, and we're gonna make up a rule that says, you can't talk about that publicly. And now they've claimed this completely phony executive privilege. It's not even a proper assertion of executive privilege and last night after the close of business. On the last day of holiday weekend, we got a document dump of forty two thousand pages of documents. The idea that any judge in the United States would go forward with the trial that day after a document dump like that is preposterous and yet here we are going ahead because they're so desperate to..

Justice department Jeff Sessions Donald Trump judiciary committee Senator president Senator Sheldon Whitehouse Senator John McCain United States Twitter Andy MacKay Robert Muller Democratic Party Republican party executive banana Republic Hillary Clinton Rhode Island supreme court
"jeff sessions" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"Who everybody sees what's going on in the Justice department was for Justice. Now with votes, it's very, very sad day, Jeff Sessions, recused himself, which he shouldn't have done or should have told me even my enemies. Say that Jeff Sessions should have told you that he was going to recuse himself, then you wouldn't have put him in. He took the job and then he said, I'm going to recuse myself. I said, what kind of a man is this? What kind of a man would go from saying? If Jeff Sessions is fired, there will be holy hell to pay to saying the president deserves an attorney general, who will do whatever he wants this kind of man. This effort to basically marginalize in humiliate. The attorney general is not going over well in the Senate. If Jeff session is fired, there will be holy hill. The pay the president's entitled to attorney general. He has faith. We need an attorney general that can work with the president. They can lead the department of Justice. This relationship is beyond repair a think Senator Lindsey, Graham personifies the collapse of support for Jeff Sessions among Republican senators, Republican, Richard, Shelby, these senior Senator from Alabama who was Jeff Sessions partner in the set representing Alabama before Jeff Sessions became an attorney general publicly turned on Jeff Sessions today, saying nothing lasts forever and that the president and the attorney general have a quote, toxic relationship, Jeff Sessions, strongest supporter in the Senate is the most powerful Senator Mitch McConnell. Total confidence attorney general. I think he ought to stay exactly where he is. The Wall Street Journal is reporting tonight that five Republican senators had a private breakfast with Jeff Sessions. Last week in the attorney general's personal dining room at the Justice department headquarters, and they all urged him quote to resist any pressure to quit following criticism from President Trump and to stay in the job, at least through the mid term elections. So just a couple of months worth of encouragement there. The senators reportedly urging Jeff Sessions to remain on the job through the November elections were John Cornyn of Texas, Thom Tillis of North Carolina, Jerry Moran of Kansas. Ben Sasse, rescue and John Kennedy of Louisiana. If Donald Trump does replace during general Jeff Sessions, his new attorney general would immediately be able to control Robert Muller's investigation and possibly much more. Importantly, the new attorney general would be able to decide what would happen to. Robert Muller's written report when his investigation is complete, the attorney general could immediately send that report to congress as evidence supporting the impeachment of the president or the new attorney general could lock that report in a Justice department safe and never allow one word of it to become public leading off our discussion. Now, Matt Miller, former spokesperson for the Torney general, Eric Holder and MSNBC contributor, David Frum senior editor for the Atlantic and author of Trump Crecy and Maya Wiley former counsel to the mayor of New York City. She's also an MSNBC legal analyst. And my even the encourage IRS of Jeff Sessions are simply saying, hang on until after the election. I don't think there's any question that Donald Trump is going to continue to undermine one of his most loyal supporters because of the Mueller investigation, bats clear. And I say that because remember Jeff Sessions is one of the earliest supporters of Donald Trump. One of the earliest inside the beltway establishment people, but he's also been absolutely an unapologetically supporter of Trump's policies that he has been very effective. I, I would say and argue, unfortunately, for Justice in this country, extremely effective at executing whether it's separating families at the border, whether it's reversing efforts to provide support for police accountability and safer communities, or even the way in which we over criminalize, particularly black and Latino communities in terms of sentencing laws..

Jeff Sessions attorney Donald Trump president Jeff session Justice department department of Justice Robert Muller Senate Senator Mitch McConnell Trump Crecy Senator Lindsey John Cornyn Alabama Senator MSNBC Thom Tillis IRS Jerry Moran
"jeff sessions" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

CNN's The Daily DC

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"jeff sessions" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

"Everyone this is david chollian the cnn political director and this is the daily dc thanks so much for listening today on the podcast attorney general jeff sessions in the hotseat that is what is going to be happening in washington tomorrow as you know jeff sessions the attorney general who has a swirl of controversy related to the russian investigation into the into trump campaign associaton their dealings with russians and into how the administration since jerry twentieth has been handling the russian investigation jeff sessions is sort of a central player in a lot of this we'll get to that in a moment but now we have learned that he's going to publicly testify on capitol hill tomorrow before the senate intelligence committee this is the same committee that are heard the testimony from jim colmey last thursday remember session was scheduled this week to testify publicly before the senate and house appropriations committee about the department of justice budget he cancelled that he said i'm not going to do that instead of offering myself to the senate intel committee because he understood there is no way for jeff sessions right now in this context to go up to capitol hill and testify and have it not me all about russia so we sent his deputy attorney general the hill to deal with the budget but then of course there was this back and forth about whether or not it would be a public or private testimony i think what's clear by jeff sessions announcement.

political director washington jerry twentieth capitol hill senate intelligence committee jim colmey senate intel committee russia david chollian cnn attorney senate department of justice deputy attorney general