5 Burst results for "Jeff Schloss"

"jeff schloss" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"jeff schloss" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That's jeff schloss he's a professor of biology at westmont college in california and he and steve talked more about evolution and religious belief in this week's podcast extra also if you'd like to read essays about evolution and morality by jeff schloss and some others you'll find them on the website of humans and nature dot org they were our partners for this episode so you wouldn't think you could find that many scientists whose careers were inspired by mystical experiences but you know what here's another meet andrew newberg my own story with regard to just thinking about the universe started out as a as a kid and i just always asked a lot of questions he's a neuroscientist i wanted to understand why people have different political perspectives different religious perspectives it was to me i felt like wolf we're all looking at the same world should we all come to the same conclusion ultimately i came up with this idea that well if i was really going to figure out what was real and and what we could know that anything that i wasn't really sure of i would put into what i referred to as a kind of realm of doubt it wasn't didn't mean that it was wrong it didn't mean that it was right it just meant that i wasn't sure at that moment and so more and more everything started to go into this realm of down when i got between college and medical school i had a kind of a summer off there and i spent a lot of that summer in fairly deep contemplation philosophical meditations if you will trying to resolve this issue how can i get beyond all of these questions and then one day something happened it was a nice summer day i'd spent some time walking outside and just sort of thinking about things as i keep striving for this i was just getting more and more anxious it was it was very upsetting to me that i couldn't get to an answer and then finally i had this experience where i came to this realization that ultimately there was nothing everything was doubted and there was no way that that anything had any kind of solid foundation everything just blended into this one kind of a deep emptiness but there was this incredible feeling of calm i guess maybe a blissful nece maybe the best way to describe it i mean ultimately i know no other way of describing it other than to call it infinite doubt and with a little meditation or focus he can still summon up that feeling so what started as andrew newberg personal experience of spiritual bliss are lighten men infinite doubt whatever you wanna call it led to his scientific practice andrew is one of.

jeff schloss westmont college california wolf steve andrew newberg one day
"jeff schloss" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:09 min | 3 years ago

"jeff schloss" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Need the police looking resolve your differences individually but grew larger you need some institutions to come disputes and you have to trust is institutions so you're saying then that thousands of years ago big god's helped humans cooperate now you have secular institutions in the common the commonality between both is that both keep people honest and truthful because there's an element of surveillance and accountability built in yes i think that the secular society that surprising surprisingly similar more similar than you think to religious societies that they succeeded instead of wishful d these institutions neurons that encourage cooperation as long as you're part of the group part of the community so they're not that different even though often people think of them as the opposites or or clashing but the are largely serving the same functions well i have to ask if you were to compare secular societies with perhaps more religious ones that believed in big god's i mean what's more effective in making people who operate big gods or secular institutions well if you're if you're definitely is something like corruption or rule of law then clearly secular societies are doing better now not all secular societies have strong rule of la but many do so as societies give up on religion they do so partly because they are developing alternatives to religion in modern society in my world that seems to actually worked pretty well it makes me wonder is more and more places around the world strengthened their secular institutions and establish the rule of law do you think it's inevitable that someday we won't need big odds or religion possibly i mean defense if you look at scandinavia is that's the best case scenario where you you see very strong is situations rule of law cooperative societies very high trust levels and the decline of religion japan might be an example like that the question the big question that i don't have the answer to is is the world moving in that direction inevitably or is this a temporary blip in historical changes there are other things to consider for example as society secularize fertile rates decline quite massively so even the secularization is happening in the world at the same time this sector societies are if anything shrinking because of decline fertility rates whereas societies that are not circularizing the maintaining they're just levels they are actually expanding because of high fertility rates so that will factor in into these kinds of calculations about the future of religion because one very powerful way from peres children that's our our he's a psychology professor at the university of british columbia raymond donkeycart talked with him about his book big gods and now an experiment maybe for you and your kids put a snake and a rat in a box in yes the children who's in the box threatened the snake you've told them beforehand they're both hungry the box shakes now yes the children who in the box and they'll say well just the snake where's the rat well the snake eighth yes the ramp hungry yes so they have this sense of aspects of life or person who had debt endure host body from snakes and rats to the resurrection how humans become believers up next i'm answering champs it's to the best of our knowledge from wisconsin public radio npr x religion says god created humans science says humans created god it's kind of a cosmic chicken and egg question and it seems like the answer has to be one or the other or does it jeff schloss is an evolutionary biologist is also christian as a scientist jeff's interested in the question of whether the human capacity for religious belief is a product of nature inborn or nurture learned he thinks it's probably some of each for example he told steve paulson that we all seem to arrive in this world with something called a hypersensitive agency detection device or had this looks like it emerges very early on even infants make the distinction between animate inanimate objects you'd make sense without avoid predators snakes and and some people argue that well it's better to jump out of the way of a snake there isn't fair and to fail the jump out of the way of a snake who is.

"jeff schloss" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"jeff schloss" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Steve in talking with jeff schloss is a senior scholar at the by a logos foundation and a biologist it was not college and david sloan wilson president of the evolution institute professor of biology an anthropology at sniffing turn so we've had an evening of talking about love and evolution and our purpose if you know the show as always is to animate some big questions to the best of our knowledge is a show that believes in questions more than answers so i hope that we leave you this evening curious or wanting to know more but something else happened here tonight we look around a room full of people came out on a cold winter night in madison wisconsin to talk about love and romance and compassion we invoked we conjured love but the point is to feel it share it bring it grow it this week our staff started building ajyad online photo collage these your pictures of the people places and things that fill our lives with love and we'd like to invite you to join us pose your photos your thoughts on instagram hashtag duty book worse the email to listener at t t book dot org and.

Steve jeff schloss senior scholar president professor madison wisconsin david sloan evolution institute
"jeff schloss" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"jeff schloss" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And going playful about sex love is dancing very rigidly laughing with channelled friends and playing some species with kits it only happens pragmatism when you're capable of reproducing mature love one of of the longstanding things about humans with committed our huge partners brains and are huge social fill out systems here is that selflove we go about herself the compassion process of and most affiliation radical of all and attachment a gop a and bonding selfless and sex compassionate in really complex love for social everyone ways and which i we think use we would all like to see sexuality more of in the world for purposes so let of me affiliation introduce paulsen and use together affiliation with our next for the guest purposes jeff of made schloss david sloan wilson okay picture this signor at the beach the current is strong in fact you know the riptide could suck you read out to sea and then you see a kid out there are screaming and there is no one else around you are the only one who could possibly saving but you don't even know if you could so what do you do well we know that some people will take extraordinary risks to help total strangers the question is why and for scientists this poses a real challenge for any theory of altruism dean there is no evolutionary reason why i should swim out to try to rescue that kid at least i don't think there is so can science explain why we want to help other people and to get back to our theme for this show are these acts of hashim also experiences of love well lucky for us we have to distinguish guests here to help us sort out these thorny questions both our evolutionary biologists jeff schloss is a senior scholar at the bile logos foundation and david sloan wilson is president of the evolution institute welcome both of you sure.

gop hashim jeff schloss senior scholar bile logos foundation david sloan wilson president paulsen
"jeff schloss" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"jeff schloss" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In spain to obtain have this experience but not necessarily the of trigger yes signs gich certain lane what was happening in my brain during the experience who what part of the brain is it that actually precedes not just agents experiences personality lic caused these events in the free meal maybe was something i ate laura some developmental cascade that that culminated in that moment i'm hoping to the possibility that maybe the trigger wasn't may be a there's a divine nina i'm going to give this experience the jeff if that's the case i don't think science explain it and in last lesson is okay so let's say we we do come up with the explanation was a drug the well we still had the could science say about the time it cost about whether or not there is an pat an intelligent loving being who so constructed the machine sightscanning manning about that one way or another in science can come up with discovery isn't descriptions of the world that seem to comport or not comport with the idea of a loving parl intelligent gum creator by science can adjudicate whether such a creator actually south yes that's jeff schloss he's a professor of biology at westmont college in california and he and steve talk more about evolution and religious belief in this week's podcast extra also if you'd like to read essays evolution and morale by jeff schloss and some others you'll find them on the website of humans and nature dot org they were our partners for this episode so you wouldn't think he could find that many scientists whose careers were inspired by mystical experiences but.

spain jeff schloss westmont college california laura steve