6 Burst results for "Jeff Pardo"

"jeff pardo" Discussed on MedTech Talk Podcast

MedTech Talk Podcast

05:24 min | 5 months ago

"jeff pardo" Discussed on MedTech Talk Podcast

"Welcome to the med tech talk podcast. This is your host Jeff Pardo, and today I'm delighted to have Stacy Pugh, CEO of endogenic on this month's episode. Stacy's had a fascinating and highly impactful career starting in medicine as a nurse and transitioning to industry where she's had vital roles in the evolution of stroke therapy while at Medtronic, and then on the forefront of digital medicine while at butterfly. Now she leads endogenic, which has the chance to transform type two diabetes treatment, one of the most insidious diseases we face with the potentially game changing approach. They see it's a pleasure to have you on the podcast. Well, thank you. I hope I can live up to that intro, John. Thank you. Well, great. So yeah, so maybe let's go back in time and as I mentioned at the top of your training in early experience was as a nurse and I'm curious, maybe you could just tell us about sort of how you grew up with your interest in medicine. How did you get interested in nursing and we'll go from there? Yeah, believe it or not, I actually thought I wanted to be a pediatric dentist. Jeff so, you know, was started undergraduate school kind of with that in mind. I had a sister who had become a nurse and actually thought, you know, if I pick up a nursing degree, I'm going to be able to better support myself through school. I actually worked full-time and paid my way through college. And so it was very practical decision. I will tell you when I got started, Jeff. Really found out once I got into training that the components of ICU nursing and the criticality of those patients was very exciting. And so ended up staying in ICU nursing and did some time at the bedside became a critical care educator at the hospital, did a little bit of flight and trauma nursing and really loved all of the time. That I had at the bedside. It was a number of years, but it was formative for me. I thought I might want to go to medical school wasn't really sure. And I was lucky enough to have the chairman of the department of surgery. He asked me to help him for free. Did some research work on a clinical trial in ARDS. And that's really where this whole other world of innovation and changing medicine not one patient at a time really opened up for me. And I was so blessed to have agreed to have done that. Allowed me to move over. And start a research program kind of bench to that side there in the department of surgery. And we were successful at that. The institution I was at Texas tech at the time asked us to think about doing that in an institutional level. So he and I started division of clinical research there. And enjoyed all of that time as well. Really got a pretty broad exposure to what research could look like. And that led me to fall into research on the industry side. With my initial position really being takes the eye at that point in time. Yeah. Yeah, and I want to talk about that transition, but one thing I think it's interesting is you decide to decide to keep up your license as a nurse. Is that right? It is. I just always felt like it was something that was important to me. And maybe it's paranoia, Jeff, that I think at some point in time I'll have to go back to the bedside one never goes. I can't imagine anybody would hire me anymore. But it was just something that I felt like it was kind of part of who I was and I certainly was so close to medicine that I didn't feel like I needed to give up. So yeah, I'm still licensed and registered. I just wouldn't let me take care of you today. How about that? Well, I mean, I can imagine that it gives you it just gives you a different perspective, having that real clinical and patient centered perspective. I imagine that that must really influence you as you whatever you've done on the industry side to have the patient really is the focal point must have an impact, right? Yeah, you know, I think it was a unique differentiator for me as I moved into really being more of a clinical trialist and thinking about trial design and trial implementation because I was early focused quite a bit in the critical care area, but I could always see where things were going to fall apart in the application of great ideas. I think and that was probably from my time in the trenches and healthcare. So I think it was helpful for me then, you know, now again, I think it just draws to the center of probably everyone who goes into medicine. You want to help patients. And I feel like I've been so blessed to find my way to a place where I can be an exponential contributor that just in a way that I never would have been able to at the bedside. Yeah, yeah. So here you are as a nurse and I feel like sometimes people on the medical side kind of see the industry is more of the dark side of things. I don't know if that's fair enough. But as you started getting more and more involved in some of the studies and the research and with maybe industry partners, what made you decide to take the leap to? You know, I once I saw what sat behind all of this.

"jeff pardo" Discussed on MedTech Talk Podcast

MedTech Talk Podcast

06:57 min | 6 months ago

"jeff pardo" Discussed on MedTech Talk Podcast

"Med tech talk podcast. This is your host Jeff Pardo, and today I'm thrilled to have Derek Carrera, CEO of bright Euro, of this month's episode. Derek is living an extraordinary life and today he's going to share some of his experiences as a marine raider and a series of events that took him from the battlefield and into med tech, where he's devoted himself to solving some key problems in the field of urology. In addition, we're going to dive into topics around new technology adoption and leadership. Derek, thanks so much for being on the podcast. Thanks for having me. It's a pleasure to be here. Well, great. So, you know, I always love to start with just getting sort of more of the backstory on our guests and hearing a little bit about how you grew up and what your interests were and particularly if there were any inklings of sort of, you know, the journey that would follow, either in military, but also as you thought about science and healthcare. Can you share a little bit about your background? Yes, I grew up in a military family, so I was always exposed to that line of work and the profession. My father was a career air force officer, he was a pilot. And my grandfather is both served for their careers in the air force as well. And so that was kind of our family business. And so it was always exposed to that and it was at the forefront of a lot of things that we did as a family while I was growing up. Passion of mine though was building things and tinkering and so I remember one of my earlier memories was taken apart our VCR for some of the younger listeners they may not remember what that is, but it's in a video cassette recorder. It's how you used to watch movies. And so I was like 7 years old, 6 or 7 years old and taking it all apart and then couldn't put it back together yet so I'd always had this desire to understand technology and develop technology and solve problems and innovate from a very young age. And so as I was entering high school or I looked and set a goal of trying to attend one of the service academies and to serve as a military officer on graduation and it was fortunate to be accepted to the naval academy and that began my career as a military officer and while I was there, continue to pursue engineering and my passion just for building things. And so I studied studied systems engineering there in robotics while I was there as a student and at the name academy. Interesting. And what did your family think? Did they want you to go in the air force? Or were they okay with you? Joining the naval academy. They gave me a hard time a little bit here and there. But they were really just happy and proud that I had earned the opportunity to be accepted to the institution. And proud just that I was making that decision to go forward and serve the country and that capacity. So they gave me a hard time a little bit about it, but I also was able to give them a hard time, too, because everybody likes to make fun of the air force for a lot of good different reasons. So it's good. So there wasn't too bad now. And so from there, talk about what happened, you continued into the military. After I graduated, I was commissioned as a marine officer and then I specialized my specialty within the Marine Corps was infantry. And so I spent four years leading teams of marines and sailors through two deployments. My first deployment was to Iraq, I spent 7 months in Iraq in 2008 and then my second deployment was on called unit called the marine expeditionary unit, which is where marines embark aboard naval vessels and ships and travel around to different countries to support different operations. And so that was a non combat deployment. We got to go lead marines and sailors across the room. A variety of countries in the Middle East and Europe and also Haiti at that time in 2010. And in between those two deployments, I sought out the next challenge for me, which was to become part of the special operations community within the Marine Corps, which is called the marine raiders, which are kind of like the marine version of navy seals. And so I tried out and went through the selection process and selected and then and then after I got back from my second deployment went through the training process to become a marine raider and then served in that capacity where I was leaving smaller teams, but very highly trained and highly experienced special operators and so I'd gone from my first platoon right after my first supply was about 40 ranges of sailors and then my second deployment I wasn't the commander but I was the second in charge of a company about 200 millions and sailors. And then once I joined the marine raider community had a small team of about 20 highly trained special operators that I was leaving. Yeah. And then from there, maybe you can describe kind of what happened. Your life took a pretty dramatic turn. Definitely. During my time in the marine raider community, the deployment that I went on in 2012, that was my third deployment, but my first deployment as a special operations officer and a marine raider. And we were deployed to the Helmand province of Afghanistan in 2012 and tasked with conducting village stability operations, which is basically an operation where our small team would embed in a local village and live, work, and operate their with the goal of trying to help train the Afghan treating the Afghan police force established security in the region with the hope that the one day we could leave and they would be able to sustain that security for themselves and build a thriving ecosystem there. And so where we were was pretty pretty chaotic and dynamic environment and so we were engaged by the enemy pretty frequently and we're fighting to establish that security that was needed to be able to have any sort of lasting peace. And as part of that, I'd let a small team with a small unit with a small group of marines about Ted marines and sailors with ten of our Afghan partners on a patrol in June 14th, 2012 and shortly after the sun rose once we were in our compound that we were occupying was engaged by the enemy during during that firefly

Taking the Urgency out of Urinary Incontinence

MedTech Talk Podcast

06:51 min | 3 years ago

Taking the Urgency out of Urinary Incontinence

"Welcome to the med tech talk. Podcast this is your host. Jeff pardo and this month's episode. I'm delighted to have dr. Karen noblet chief medical officer addict. Sonics joining me. Exxon x one of the most exciting emerging technologies in the med tech space. And it's really changing the way we think about treating a variety of urological condition. Starting with overactive bladder. Dr noblet has had an accomplished career in academic medicine before making the jump to industry where she's helping lead. Exxon clinical efforts dr noblet. Thanks so much for joining us. Thanks jeff it really is an honor and a pleasure to be here with. You will terrific. Well i wanna dive right into this and really start with the condition that exxon is treating overactive bladder. And you know the name of course is seems a bit. You know revealing itself as to what's happening with someone. That has the condition. But i think it will be really helpful is to just start off by kind of giving us the context of what the condition is. What's happening with these patients both in terms of the physiology the symptoms and also importantly i think the psychosocial impact of of the condition had jeff. I'm happy to do that. And i think it's the term overactive bladder as a very interesting term in Because it was actually a term that was coined by the pharmaceutical industry on. That happened back in the day when we first started seeing direct to consumer marketing with the anti masonic medications to treat overactive bladder and so we saw these commercials way. Back when saying is your. Is your bladder overactive. And i think what that term represents is a just an expansion in the way that we look at these conditions so overacted bladder is an umbrella term that includes multiple symptoms and those include urinary frequency. So going the bathroom too often and many times people don't understand what's normal and what's not normal so it's considered to go up to seven times a day. Be normal but eight times or more is really considered urinary frequency also under that umbrella term is something we call knock sharia or getting up at night and if you get more than once night nets. That's considered abnormal Also under that umbrella term is urgency incontinence. And that's probably what people think about most when we hear the term overact bladder. And that's when you have the urge to go in for most of us in a normal situation we can hold our bladder. We can wait tour. The right socially acceptable location but those that have urgency incontinence get the urged and in their bladder has an unwanted contraction in that leads to leaking and urgency. That is kind of the hallmark of overactive. Bladder where it's normal for us to have urged to go to the bathroom but urgency is really described as a condition where you have a strong urge to go difficult to defer in so you might have to interrupt an important phone on important meeting because you have to rush to get to the bathroom so that umbrella term was great because not only did we identify those. It had incontinence is having a problem but also those were going to the bathroom frequently. That was interrupting their sleep but they were Again having an impact on in many domains in quality of life because of that condition interesting and just to give kind of the full context. How do you distinguish that from stress. Urinary incontinence that's a really good question and stressing continents is typically type of incontinence that occurs wing The of strenuous activities such as coughing sneezing laughing exercise anything where there's an increase in the intra abdominal pressure. That pressure is transmitted to the bladder. And if you have loss of support much more of an anatomical deficiency then that will lead to incontinence episodes so associated with that activity whereas with urgency incontinence the patient all of a sudden gets this urge. they're not able to control the urge. The bladder has a contraction and they leak and so. It's i think a good distinction between that is the stress incontinence. If a patient knows she's going to cough and has stress incontinence. She can prepare for that. She can contract republic floor and oftentimes with urgency incontinence. It may happen suddenly. It's hard to predict and this can actually been occur in situations. That may be very embarrassing for the patient because they didn't have a chance to plan for it. Exactly and in the case of i think both conditions they it seems to affect women more than men but maybe educate me on that for away is this Predominantly a condition that affects women are are men equally effected. Yeah it's a great question. Jeff what we see when we look at prevalence studies is that We start seeing an increase in this condition. Probably in the in the early forties. And it's true that both men and women have the condition but in the younger years. There's a much higher prevalence. In women and we see the prevalence increase in each decade of life. For both women and men but women have a higher prevalence until probably about the the in their sixties. And we start seeing men increasing in prevalence about the seventy as and beyond The prevalence of overactive bladder in men is about equivalent to that in women. But one of the differentiating factors is that we see Men oftentimes have what we would consider rectal bladder dry. So they have a lot of urgency frequency and not as much of the continent's whereas women tend to be have more overacted bladder wet where they have the urgency incontinence episode. And when you look at the you know the the bother scale what is most. What's the most bothersome symptom in overactive bladder. It tends to be urgency incontinence episode. Because again it may be very unpredictable and it may happen at a very inopportune time that can lead to very embarrassing event for that patient.

Exxon Jeff Pardo Karen Noblet Dr Noblet Jeff Sonics Coughing Sneezing Abdominal Pressure Cough
Medtech's Accelerating Changes, Leadership Development and Having Fun

MedTech Talk Podcast

05:42 min | 3 years ago

Medtech's Accelerating Changes, Leadership Development and Having Fun

"To the Matt, tectonic podcast. This is your host Jeff Pardo, and in today's podcast I'm thrilled to have Katie Simon. Vice President Edwards Life Sciences and general manager of Global Critical Care Business. Katie has had a fascinating career both at Edwards, but also at medtronic where she was president their diabetes business. In addition to that she served on the board of numerous start up companies that are each having a huge impact on their various specialties companies like Inari. Inspire tourney a welcome Katie. Thank gap. It's great to be here. Thanks so much for joining us in. We have a lot of things to cover today, so I'm really excited to have the opportunity at beyond the podcast of let's start with Edwards in critical care and i. a lot of people don't realize that critical care is a seven hundred million dollar business within Edwards. Could you give our listeners an overview of critical care and really what the core of the Edwards offering is? The core initial started Edward. critical care started with the Swan Ganz Catheter, that was actually invented out of Cedar. Sinai and many people know the kind of the story. That invention was just that It was sitting on the beach and said Hey. How do I get a good reading of a patient's pulmonary artery pressure, and it's really hard to do unless you're inside the heart, and it's really hard to get to that pulmonary artery position and figured out that if you took a you know, think about how sailboats work. If you blow up a balloon and let it flow really through the body like a sailboat. Sailboat it would land in the pulmonary position, and that was invented almost fifty years ago. by a Jeremy Swan Ganz out of Cedar. Sinai. That was the beginning of our business. And since then we've really expanded and focused on advanced Chemo, dynamic monitoring, really in patients in the ICU or in high risk surgeries whether cardiac surgeries or high risk, non cardiac surgeries that may be four patients that are very thick and that have surgery greater than three hours, so are being screw from the beginning with the Swan. Ganz Catheters, and now we do you know all kinds of pressure? Monitoring Technologies really focused on making sure patients. Are Stable. That's great actually didn't know the the history of the slum Ganz Catheters so that's fascinating. One one of the things that must be having a huge impact on your business is the current crisis were facing in vid. How has that Changed Your Business in in? How are you seeing? Critical care evolve through this crisis. It's an interesting I. Think for us. We always assumed so much of our business was in the ICU and out with the with Kobe hitting. We've seen it hit in various degrees, so for example in the UK They realized that they had a significant shortage of ICU. And so they came through and ordered like one point, two million DP or pressure sensors from us to stock up so that they could build out there I see us other countries like Germany or the US had adequate ice, you beds in different parts of the country of the US. We've seen some regional spike, but overall I think we've found in the US. We had enough ice. You better than in Germany. They have enough, but then kind of across the rest of Europe. They found significant shortages so. So, we've seen some spikes in demand, related to building I, you capacity, and then we've seen just various spikes in demand like regionally for example in New York and New Jersey. Of course we've seen some higher demand there, but on the flip side, probably fifty percent of our revenues come from high risk surgery, and so with the cancellation of surgeries, really across the US and the world we've seen the kind of downward demand or downward revenues for about half the business for the high risk of our procedures. Interesting. I didn't realize it cut both. Ways. I think the the the building of stockpiles are expanding capacity is interesting dilemma that I think a lot of companies are are facing because on the one hand, it's great from the near term business side on the other hand you wonder. What will purchasing look like in the future with these SORTA stockpiles? How do you deal with that are a that? Is that something that? You see is. Concerned going forward. Yeah absolutely like so. It's been interesting journey for lot of our products manufactured of the Dominican Republic and in the Dr. Reduction of human you know of of human capital in terms of the workers, because many of the workers that were over age sixty were no longer able to come to the work that reduced our capacity by about eighty percent, and meanwhile then we had this bike demand. So now. We're sort of getting back to a steady state where you know, people are able to come back to work, but it's been a really interesting short-term. And there's also the concern as you said like. We've had this surge in demand, so we've had to work double. You know three shifts, and through the weekend to meet kind of these spikes in demand building capacity, but we all recognize that that's not going to be sustainable, and it's going to go back to a normal state afterwards so mostly. We're just hiring. And trying to use extra shifts as a way to kind of manage it so that we don't all become over capacity by ourselves right permanently.

Edwards United States Katie Simon General Manager Of Global Crit Ganz Catheters Swan Ganz Catheter Jeremy Swan Ganz Pulmonary Artery Edwards Life Sciences Jeff Pardo Vice President Germany Medtronic President Trump Chemo Europe New York Dominican Republic UK New Jersey
Ethical Leadership, Corporate Responsibility, and the Transformative Power of Yoga

MedTech Talk Podcast

06:24 min | 3 years ago

Ethical Leadership, Corporate Responsibility, and the Transformative Power of Yoga

"Welcome to the MIDTECH talk podcast. This is your host Jeff Pardo.

Jeff Pardo Midtech
Medtech Talk Welcomes its New Host

MedTech Talk Podcast

08:42 min | 3 years ago

Medtech Talk Welcomes its New Host

"I'd like to take this opportunity to introduce the new med tech talk host as well as give him an opportunity to share more about his story. I'd like to welcome Jeff Pardo partner at Gilda healthcare. Hi Jeff. Welcome to the MED tech. Talk podcast thanks worry. I'm not sure. I'm totally deserving of that introduction does very nice and I'm really excited to be hosting the show Awesome Jeff. Can you share a little bit about yourself your background and just also how you got into this industry absolutely? You know it's interesting I. It was not a straight LINE GETTING INTO MED tech at Brown University. Where I went I was a history. Major actually. Didn't take a single science class. I took some economics classes but they were a really boring and I really didn't have any interest in it and But I also recognize. That really didn't want to be a history professor and I didn't know exactly where history would take me so I started exploring after graduation. How to get into business in my first job was actually doing oil and gas consulting of all things and other areas. That hadn't really no idea was doing but I actually was born. In Latin America was put on teams that ended up working in Latin American oil and gas and had a terrific experience and that was my entry into business but then my initiation into midtech really began with sympathies and that turned out to be pivotal to my career development. Why is that well? It's funny Cynthia's was at the time. People probably know now that Cynthia was bought by Johnson and Johnson huge acquisition. Like twenty billion dollars. But at the time Cynthia's while it was reasonably large it was still run like a smaller company founder That owned a majority of the company was really able to shape the culture in the way that he wanted to shape it and part of that was in really tight relationships with clinicians In particular he really mandated that everybody spend a lot of time in the operating room working side by side with clinicians. That's actually not so easy anymore to do in the current You kind of regulatory environment. But at the time we were in the operating room all the time and and it may be realized that I wanted to contribute to innovation on a larger platform in effect companies. In many different medical specialties. So is that how you got into? Venture capitalists yeah exactly so I went to Ward and after Wharton I had a chance to work with cardinal partners. A general healthcare venture firm in Princeton New Jersey and then ultimately went to spray venture partners back in my hometown of Boston and Really was lucky in both cases to learn from some amazing mentors and entrepreneurs in their own right brandon hall. John Clark Dan Cole. Kevin Connors all. These people had a tremendous impact on me and it was really an apprenticeship for a business that you can't teach in a classroom. How South at spray was some of the most. I think important experiences for me. In terms of how to get company STAR WE START ABOUT HALF. The companies in our portfolio with the entrepreneurs filed patents in many cases for these companies but one of the more interesting experiences with solutions which we had invested in the CEO. Step down unexpectedly in two thousand seven and actually. I remember Juliet a backer. Who's now longitude? But at the time was with the peak. What approach me and said she was on the board and she said. Do you want to run this company and I was just you know pretty young guy but I said yes and that's an important lesson for me as I got through microbes. Even when you're not sure sometimes just say yes. That thing's usually important learning experiences. Come out of it and that was an amazing experience because we took a product that was still in a prototype stage yet in the clinic in the early clinical trials. We will find it into a very slick procedure. And we brought it into a full-scale pivotal trial and the device itself was working really well But we also endured a lot of funding challenges. Two Thousand Eight to two thousand eleven is listeners to this podcast probably remember was a very difficult time in medical devices in in particular for spying. Pma's and unfortunately we weren't able to complete the project ended up selling Globus in two thousand eleven and it was not a financial success but so many lessons came out of it for me. I'm sure so. What did you do after that I went? I went back to spray for about six months but during that time also was introduced to the folks from Gilda healthcare and I never met anybody from Gilda but got to know them and really appreciated their strategy of jumping into us. Med Tech at a time that a lot of investors had rotated out of the segment. Why is that well in two thousand eight? There was a financial crisis so that was a time. When you saw pullback from a lot of things but also at the time there was a lot of issues with a regulatory frameworks in Med tech. It was pretty onerous or difficult relationship with FDA issues were reimbursement. Were starting to crop up and a lot of Investors were simply hadn't really had the depth of background in Med tech and didn't know how to navigate some of those challenges so they ended up rotating out and guilt a really brought a fresh perspective in they saw the great products had been developed and the ones that were surviving really were worth investing in and so the last nineteen years For me personally has been an amazing journey through all of that you know. Through the ups and downs of medical devices and through seeing now public market emerged for venture back a device companies which really enables some of these companies to stand on their own two feet rather than than sal out to a bigger company in there's also whirlwind of challenges and opportunities the regulatory and reimbursement landscape shifts. Yeah then you're kidding when you said it's not US straight line. That is quite. The journey enjoyed every moment of it. I mean not that there haven't been really difficult times with various companies but really enjoyed every moment. It's incredibly challenging business. But the really what makes the difference or the people in our business and how dynamic people throughout this business are not only the entrepreneurs and investors but the clinicians also that are really on the frontlines implementing what the engineers are companies Do so it's really cool to be around. Inspiring people on a daily basis and that is a great perspective to bring to the MED tech. Talk podcast yeah when I was approached to do this You know it's exciting to think about what you might like to bring out in a podcast like this and for me really is kind of what I been referencing in terms of individuals their stories and my own story knowing that it wasn't a straight line to get here the chance to interview people and hear about their stories the experiences that shaped them as they were growing up as they were getting into med tech And really understand you know what makes them tick the things that they've learned that have made them successful and the really tough experiences. One thing I'd like to do is highlight failures in our business and the ability to come back from failure the ability to turn around situations. That's something that's not celebrated enough in our business. I don't think people sometimes hide from the more difficult experiences or doesn't go on their resume necessarily and I'd like to start to you. Know I have a small role in changing nat in bringing a spotlight to more difficult things because we learn so much from those experiences. So you'll hear me some of the guests that will bring on. The show is really understand. Kind of what? We're situations that they failed in and what came out of that in the hopes that you know people listening to To the show will really be able to grab onto something and maybe it helps them in in the situation that they're in and then we'll also tackle some of the big challenges in the business whether it's reimbursement regulatory commercialization what it means to take a company public but it will really focus on some of the guests that we have lined up

Cynthia Gilda Healthcare Jeff Pardo Brown University Kevin Connors Latin America Johnson United States Partner John Clark Dan Cole Boston Professor Gilda PMA Company Founder CEO Juliet Brandon Hall