20 Burst results for "Jeff Ernst"

"jeff ernst" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:28 min | 5 months ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Party from power for the first time in 12 years The results come as a relief to many hondurans who feared a contested election in 2017 the racchi of vote fixing and corruption followed by protests that left 23 people dead Journalist Jeff Ernst is in Tegucigalpa Honduras covering the story Jeff welcome Thanks for having me The national party leader conceded the election to Castro That's something that many hondurans didn't even think was possible What's the mood there today The mood is one really of relief And the lead up to elections businesses were brought up their windows people were stocking up on essentials and there was a lot of fear and anxiety about a repeat of the 2017 election that due to the extremely close results led to a post electoral crisis in which there was widespread destruction and at least 23 people resulted dead So today Honduras is in peace Everyone's relieved and there's also a sense of hope that after 12 years of one party rule in which the current president won Orlando Hernandez and his party have been implicated and really a never ending saga of drug trafficking and corruption allegations is hope that Honduras can turn the page and a brighter future can come The incoming president does have quite a job ahead of her though she's in a country that's been devastated by natural disasters unemployment street gains street gangs corruption migration is their optimism that she can fix all of that There is optimism that she can put the country back on the right track strengthen institutions bring back return respect for the separation of powers and do all these things that really are at the root of the problems that are hurting the economy that are causing people to flee but at the same time there's a recognition that the challenges are so great that change won't be quick it will take time and even during the next four years of her term we won't be able to see a completely new country On the issue of migration how do you expect her to navigate that with President Biden here in the U.S. You know I think both sides recognize that they need each other The U.S. is Honduras's number one trading partner The migration from Honduras becomes a domestic politician political issue in the U.S. I think that the Castro will look to cooperate with the U.S. but at the same time ensure that Honduras is sovereignty is respected How that will play out exactly it's hard to say All right that's reporter Jeff Ernst reporting from Honduras on the election of CO Maura Castro and you are hearing a leaf blower outside my window sorry.

Honduras Jeff Ernst Tegucigalpa national party Castro Orlando Hernandez Jeff President Biden U.S. Maura Castro
"jeff ernst" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"You now if you haven't heard arba money. This first story comes from science. Hi my name. Is chris davenport. And i write about space for the washington post. I'm also the author of a book. The space barons elon musk. Jeff bezos and the quest to colonize the cosmos. I've recently broke the story for the post about space tourism and about how the very wealthy can now opt to buy tickets to. Yeah which is fast becoming the new adventure vacation. I mean why. Would you charter a luxury yacht or go on an african safari or go to the caribbean when you can do somersaults in zero gravity and see the earth from a great distance but hey this is not cheap. I mean richard branson's virgin galactic in the past was charging about two hundred and fifty thousand dollars for tickets and its space plane called spaceship to which flies straight up to the edge of space roaring. That's engines going about three times the speed of sound before falling back down but it hasn't sold tickets for a while now and when they reopen sales later this year they're expected to charge about five hundred thousand dollars. Jeff basil's is blue. Origin is not set. What's gonna charge for similar flights again. These are sub orbital going straight up and then coming straight down. We're talking about being a mission that can last about ten minutes where you're in space for total of about four minutes or so but yet it's holding an auction for a seat on. Its very first human spaceflight mission. A few thousand people have already bid driving the price into the millions. And oh by the way if you win your crewmate is going to be. Jeff bezos himself and his brother mark who is also going to be going along and then of course there's elon musk and spacex. I mean they fly a much more powerful rocket the falcon nine. That goes all the way to orbit even to the space station. They've got a few missions on the books. Now the price for going say to the international space station and taking a week long vacation from earth up on that orbiting laboratory fifty five million dollars the training for all these missions though the company say is relatively light on has said that. Hey if you can survive and intense roller coaster you can go to space on. His dragon spacecraft. No problem and you know blue origin virgin galactic upset. You're going to have to be able to deal with some heavy g forces several times your own body weight but ultimately most people are going to be able to do that. That's the point. They want to send a lot more people to space. They say anyone can do it. Of course if you can afford it. What is there to do in space. Why charter a yet. I know what there is to do on a yacht. Why go on a safari. I understand what there is to do on a safari. Now we go to space now. What where's my hotel. What's there for us to do on the resort. You guys want to go to the beach tomorrow. Options up just in space. If you can take a trip on a roller coaster you can take a trip to space. But it's a roller coaster. At least what activities do you have for me in space. This is literally spinning five. Hundred thousand dollars to say that you've been this space. That's guess what. I've been space. I just did it for free space. Go have to give some amenities space going to have to get some activities. Majett you go you and your wife and you like yeah adverse coming up trying to go to space. What are we going to do in space backflips. What about after that. He was do. He's gonna do backflips gorgeous. Eight years old. Like every time. I see these people like i wanted to. I just want to take space. They really want a pet dinosaur. I've got the photos. They'll say goto shop from. Let's go to the spin. A million dollars in kota to space must be high. Did you catch that like amazon. Space programs run kind of like their business. And tesla space program is kind of run like their business. Yes this is definitely to me definitely feels like a high idea. Do let's go to space. That's it being high in space. I can see why might wanna try. our at. This next story comes from business. This is jeff ernst journalist based in central america and reporting for vice news. The story begins at the annual. Bitcoin conference held this year in miami with about twelve thousand attendees by whether the video appearance the president of the salvador naib kaley announced that his country was going to become the first in the world to make bitcoin legal tender or in other words make bitcoin for any all of your daily transactions whether it's going to the grocery store buy dinner in a restaurant whatever for cryptocurrency backers is a huge deal until now bitcoin is mostly been used as a form of investment like stock not as currency. Now president will as an interesting guy. The thirty nine year old is widely popular in this country. We're talking approval. Ratings hovered between eighty ninety percent. He's a former marketer with a flair for the dramatic so this kind of announcement is right up his alley but many soda question. How this would actually work. And what kind of unintended consequences. There might be one of the things that makes. It worries. The relative anonymity by cryptocurrencies. We know that they've been used by. Criminals devoid the transactions being traced panel salvador's known as a hotbed of criminal activity in particular by gangs and drug traffickers. The fear is that make. Bitcoin legal tender could attract all kinds of unscrupulous people who want to lend money. It could lead to other problems too particularly for small businesses. Don't have the resources or the know how to use bitcoin to their advantage. Whether pasco fears a couple of surfing villages on the pacific coast have been experimenting with using crypto currency for daily transactions. A number of vendors. Losing money do the currency volatility for example Bitcoin dropped thirty six percent over the month of may imagine being a poor person with one hundred.

Jeff bezos miami richard branson fifty five million dollars amazon Hundred thousand dollars chris davenport thirty six percent jeff ernst one hundred tomorrow Majett eighty ninety percent first earth central america mark this year first story millions
"jeff ernst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:00 min | 1 year ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"About the military. Instead, it's an article called the Secret I R s Files trove of never before seen records reveal how the wealthiest avoid income taxes. Now, maybe you've heard a little about this already. Three Po Propublica. Reporters analyzed over 15 years of tax returns from the richest Americans like Warren Buffett, Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, Elon Musk. And many more. But in addition to just income and taxes, these records showed investments, audit and debts. What did they find out while they obtained records showed that American business moguls who have managed to exponentially grow their wealth throughout the years? Pay little and and even and even in some cases, zero income taxes Now that may sound like something you already knew, or at least suspected. But one interesting thing about the report is it alleges that the ultrawealthy are able to avoid paying taxes most years legally and without even any need for offshore accounts or secret holdings. So what does this say about our tax code? And the unequal treatment built into it, or should we all really just be taking notes so we can do this ourselves? Just kidding. And what does it tell you about the rest of us? Are we paying a high percentage of our income? In taxes higher percentage than some of the world's richest people. And is that fair? Are we, the 99.9% subsidizing the means for these ultra wealthy Americans? To live extravagant lives. Does our government need to do a serious re examination of our tax code itself? Joining us now? Jesse Eisinger senior reporter and editor at Propublica. Hi, Jessie. Welcome back to W N Y C. Thank you for doing this with us. Hey, Brian. Happy to be back, and listeners will open up the phones right away. Did you catch the PROPUBLICA report already? What were your thoughts and reactions? Maybe we have some CPS or tax lawyers listening should the Biden administration Re address the current U. S tax code. What would you suggest they change to address inequality within the system at this level? 646435 70 to 80. Maybe you've been thinking about this just recently. Um, with the late tax filing deadline this year of May 15th so just a few weeks in the rear view mirror, 646435 70 to 80 with stories or questions. So, Jesse, you want, um Well, you and your co authors compare how much The ultra wealthy pay in taxes, uh, comparing that to their gain in wealth. So why do you use that measure instead of just simply looking at income and tax rates? Right. It's a good question. So the conventional way to do this would be to measure taxes compared to income. And in fact, we do do this in a companion team. Uh, and we show that billionaires have a Much lower, effective tax rate in the conventional way than wealthy people or even someone a single person making $45,000 a year. That itself is a blockbuster finding and very interesting, But we thought that it was much more interesting that in fact, the data demonstrate that the ultrawealthy are outside of the tax system. Almost entirely that we have a system where People make money and their gig get salaries and the taxes get extracted from their salaries and the wealthy. Don't Their income is essentially optional. It's voluntary. They decide when to take it and how much to take, and then they reduce the taxes on that small amount of income. But they're really outside of the system. And so we thought that the better measure was taxes compared to their wealth growth. Their income is optional. You said they decide what to take of the money that they're actually taking or not for tax purposes and the strategy. That some of these ultra wealthy folks used is framed in your piece as by borrow And die. Can you break down each one of those? Yeah, sure. Happy to. It's weird. It's hard to get your mind around it If your normal human being as I say in the tax system has to work to live as I do, as you do is most listeners do. So by borrow Die is the way that some super wealthy approach their wealth and their how they live. And what it is. Is that you buy or build or inherit your assets. So you're either Elon Musk or Jeff Bezoza, or you're somebody like I don't know. Jamie Diamond, who hasn't built, um J. P. Morgan, but inherits the position and comes in or you literally inherit like the Waltons of the Mars family. And you've got a great fortune, Then what you do instead of selling your stock or selling your assets and Getting money from that sale. You can borrow against the assets. And why would you borrow against the assets? Well, if you sell, you have to pay some capital gains tax. Or if you've got the equivalent amount and salary, you'd have to pay a top marginal rate of 37% today. Instead, you're borrowing it's single digit rates. Um, so it's a much better deal for you. Plus, you get to hold on to your company this whole time. Hold on to control and you can keep rolling and rolling and rolling over the debt for a very long time. You differ, uh, any sale and you increase the, um Your wealth and it compounds, especially if the company is growing like Amazon or Tesla. And then by the end of your life, there are a bunch of advantages that you can take. To avoid or reduce state taxes, state taxes, the last kind of licks that the U. S government has on you, and you're supposed to be taxed at 40%. But in fact Tax avoidance strategies for the estate tax after death, and even right before death are myriad and available for the ultra wealthy, and so they're they're really not touched in substantial ways by the estate tax. So you can get through having an enormous fortune that basically never his tax, According to the article, No. One among the 25 wealthiest avoided as much tax as Warren Buffett, the grandfather Lee sent to billionaire now that's a word many people have never heard before. What's a sent a billionaire? Yeah, It's a word that we haven't had much in society because we haven't had these kind of fortunes before. But that somebody who's worth over $100 million Excuse me. 100 Billion with a B dollars, Um I actually was a, uh someone corrected my grammar there that I should have said Heck still billionaire that we used the Greek for, um uh or, uh, for turned 100 in that situation, But I like the sound of sent the billionaire. But the point with Buffett is that No one takes as little income relative to his wealth and his wealth growth as Warren Buffett and so he takes very, very little income, and then it's taxed relatively low rates on that very small income. Well, you know, it's enormous income for you and me, but it's relatively small force. A person of his means and wealth. And so he has talked rather famously about having a low tax rate compared to the average person compared to his secretary. Um, and in fact, when he talks about that he's talking about his income tax rates. And the income tax rates, both capital gains rates and salary rates. You know, the top marginal rate are basically irrelevant for him. He's talking about something that even if those rates were to go up, it would be essentially a rounding error for him. And so what we wanted to bring home is that discussion of tax rates. In the current tax structure are almost irrelevant for the ultra ultra wealthy. Uh huh. And in the case of Warren Buffett when you mentioned him and his secretary, it probably reminds a lot of people that wait isn't Warren Buffett considered a progressive on these issues because he's out there with things like the Buffett rule. And saying it's not fair that I would pay a lower income tax rate than my secretary. Yes, It's a very complicated picture with Buffett. It's to his credit that he's raised these questions and complaints about our text system. Um and One of the things that he points out is that taxes on capital like when you sell a stock, you get a capital gain and that's tax and that has favorable tax status compared to Salaries. So those of us who don't have capital games are in the salary structure. We're paying higher rates than the people who sell. Um but what I what we wanted to point out in my colleagues Paul Kiel and Jeff Ernst hasn't worked on this story with me and Extraordinary reporters. And what we wanted to point out is somebody like Warren Buffet, you know, he talks about his rate on taxable income and the taxable income that he has are minuscule compared to his overall wealth. So when you talk about is overall wealth, what he's really doing is he's paying now compare this to an average person. Typical person making six years $70,000. They're paying $14. Of that to the government in federal income taxes. But when you talk about Warren Buffett Compared to his wealth growth. It's a different comparison. But it's effectively what his income is his wealth growth. Um, for the ultra wealthy wealth growth is like income. He's paying 10 cents. For every $100.14 dollars to $100 and Buffett has 10 cents for $100. We have a C P a calling in. So let's take his call first. David, you're on w N Y. C with Jesse Eisinger from Propublica. Hi, David. Hey, Jessie. Hey, everyone up. I just want to provide one snippet of information..

Mark Zuckerberg Bill Gates Jeff Bezoza Elon Musk Warren Buffett Amazon Jesse Eisinger Paul Kiel Jeff Ernst Jamie Diamond $14 Jessie Tesla Brian David 40% 37% Warren Buffet 10 cents Jesse
"jeff ernst" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"You know of these 25 top earners that you guys were able to look at their worth Rosa Collective $401 billion. This was from 2014 of 2018. They paid a total of $13.6 billion a lot of money, But when you put it all together, it's really only 3.4% of that amount of the amount that their wealth grew so very little in comparison there. Wanted to work in some of the discussion around taxes when it comes to politics and all that, because we've been hearing that from the Biden administration wanting to raise taxes on wealthier Americans, also on corporations that are making billions of dollars. You know, we've been hearing a lot about that. How does that work into this conversation? Mhm. Well, for, you know, decades, conversation about taxes has been kind of dominated by marginal tax rates, right? Um, But those rates are only going to capture what happens when people do take income. And so, uh, you know some some folks who are in the, uh, the top of the wealth distribution is rarely, uh What wealthy billionaires. Um you know they'll be affected to some degree by that, but it's not going to change much of the picture when we talk about how much they're paying in taxes versus their wealth. Growth. Um Economists do think that many economists think that, uh, the corporate taxes are ultimately paid by by individual people. And if you distribute that most of that falls onto the Shareholders. So insofar as there's moves on the corporate tax rate that would be more likely to be sort of raising revenue, at least indirectly off of this group. You made mention in the article as well about taxes being paid after somebody passes away and how even then, a lot of people's estates are able to skirt paying a lot of the taxes and and passing on. That well to the errors and all of that stuff. Obviously, there's all sorts of loopholes all over the place. But that just kind of figures into all of this, even in death, people escape paying a lot of these taxes. Yeah, There's an entire industry around wealth management. And a lot of that is geared towards, um, figure out how to minimize the tax burden, right? Um, And so there are complicated trust that you can set up if you are interested in trying to move a portion of your state without having it. Um End up being taxed at the estate tax level when you when you pass on, Um and a lot of these, you know, sort of trusts are only accessible to people who are you know in the top top stratum, which is also who's affected by the estate tax course. Jeff Ernst housing Senior data reporter at Propublica. Thank you very much for joining us. No, thank.

2014 Jeff Ernst $13.6 billion $401 billion 25 top earners 3.4% 2018 billions of dollars Propublica Rosa Biden Americans
"jeff ernst" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Broke this week. And it's something that we always knew that was happening. Ultra rich Americans paying little to no taxes, even as their wealth was increasing. Propublica obtained IRS dad on the top 25 richest Americans. How they maneuver the tax system by claiming very little taxable income, borrowing money or reporting investment losses, all to offset paying taxes for more on how billionaires like Jeff Bezoza, Elon Musk, Warren Buffett and others sometimes get away with paying zero in taxes. Speak to Jeff Ernst 1000 senior data reporter at Propublica. Our first story is about a very basic concept in some ways, which is that you and I, when we work to live, we're in wages or salary taxes are taken automatically out of our paychecks every month. The ultrawealthy are not in the tax system in the same way, so the bulk of their wealth as it grows its not tax until they choose to do something like, say, sell stock so they can accrue vast wealth, which is really like the equivalent of income brought. Um and not pay taxes on it. And so you mentioned in some years, billionaires have managed to pay nothing in federal income tax chip Bezoza paid no income taxes twice in 2000 and 7 ¥22,011 Musk paid nothing in 2018. And in recent years, and our investors George Soros and Carl Icahn and Michael Bloomberg have all paid nothing in income taxes. Um, in some years, And so there's been a main finding we were able to produce is that if you kind of take the entire day Group of the top 25 richest people in America and look at their wealth growth over the past over a five year period and look at how much they paid in taxes. You get that they grew their wealth by $400 billion over the five years from 2014 to 2018 and paid only a fraction of it 3.4% in federal taxes during that time. Then, for comparison, you know the average sort of typical American who takes some a wage pays about 14% on their income taxes in those years, the disparity and all that is huge. And, you know, obviously, the big question comes. How do they get to do that? One of the couple of things that I see is a common theme, obviously, and you mentioned it right? The income you have to report income to be able to be taxed on it. So a lot of times what these do is, um, you know, you report losses on investments or you borrow a lot of money. You don't have to pay income taxes on that stuff because it's not technically income. That's right. I mean, good example. Um, In terms of, um you not taking income would be someone like Warren Buffet. You know, Berkshire Hathaway's famously doesn't pay dividends. And so the stock price grows. Dividends aren't paid out. So we're in, but it's not registering, you know, income for tax purposes on it. Um, And so he has a very low rate when you consider how much he paid in taxes, compared to how much as well thrown in recent years, which is tens of billions of dollars Going back to the other notion of, you know, borrowing large sums of money. We see a lot of these big companies, CEOs and everything. A lot of times they're saying, Hey, Well, I'm only going to take a $1 in my salary for this year and to a lot of people he was hearing that saying, Oh, well, they're you know, they're not cashing in all sorts of amounts of money, but you know, it just doesn't really work out that way. They're not taking that incomes and they're not paying the taxes on that stuff, but they keep growing their wealth in other ways. That's exactly right. And you know, like with other assets you can borrow against wealth. Right? So in some sense, you know, folks who are the the highest well, stratum. They can borrow against things like shares the stock, which several of the folks in the top 25 did in the past decade or two, so many you sometimes see that come out actually, and disclosures from the SEC. So from that we know that Elon Musk, for example, borrowed tens of billions of dollars, um, are pledged tend to do $10 of Tesla stock in order to borrow money. So even though it may not look like income, there's still a way there's still a way to access that value. And your findings and all of us, you guys were able tax. It's a lot of IRS information kind of raw information. And you were comparing that to other data that we have data from Forbes about how a lot of these people grew their wealth, and you came up with a new number, something that you guys were calling a true tax rate. Basically, they're increasing their wealth so much, but they only paid this amount in taxes. And when you look at that number, I mean, that really kind of paints a picture of how much they're actually paying. Compared to all the money that they're making. Walk us through some of that. Yeah, so we did. We did two stories came out today. One was looking at this sort of traditional, uh, rates that that you that the IRS might publish, you know, income taxes divided by income basically to get at your tax rate. Um, Interestingly, the ultra wealthy pay a relatively low rates as far as that's concerned as well because most of their Income is in the form of theirs in forms of income that are taxed a lower rate like capital games. But it's not capturing the whole picture because you really have to take a look at how much they're able to really bring in and add to their buying power to their influence in society. Things like that that are influenced by your wealth. And when you take that picture when you look at the sort of unrealized gains as well as as traditional income You see that? It's a really small fraction for for them as a group in terms of what they pay in federal income taxes, and for some individuals, it's incredibly small. Walk us through some of those names because you mentioned Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett. Elon Musk. Give us a few numbers if you can with how much they're really paint when you work it out this way. Yeah. So you go back to 2000 and six and you look at how much Jeff Bezoza, for instance, Um, how much as well as has gone up. They went up something on the order of, uh, $130 billion, and in that time he paid Uh, you know, one. I think 1.4 billion in taxes, and it sounds like a lot. But when you sort of divide that by 130 billion, it's only about 1% these paying on his on his wealth growth, um, so it can be a strikingly low figure. It's actually even lower if you look at Warren Buffett, who has very who takes very low income. Yeah. And Warren Buffett been one of those proponents for higher taxes on the wealthy. I think you have great number in here..

Jeff Bezoza George Soros Carl Icahn Michael Bloomberg Warren Buffett Jeff Bezos Elon Musk $10 Warren Buffet 2018 3.4% 1.4 billion $400 billion 130 billion Tesla $1 Musk Bezoza $130 billion 2000
"jeff ernst" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Interestingly, the ultra wealthy pay a relatively low rate as far as that's concerned as well because most of their Income is in the farm is in forms of income tax to lower rate like capital games. But it's not capturing the whole picture because you really have to take a look at how much they're able to really bring in and add to their buying power to their you know, influence in society, things like that that are influenced by your wealth. And when you take that picture when you look at the sort of unrealized gains as well as traditional income You see that? It's a really small fraction for for them as a group in terms of what they pay in federal income taxes, and for some individuals, it's incredibly small. Walk us through some of those names because you mentioned Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett. Elon Musk. Give us a few numbers if you can with how much they're really paint when you work it out this way. Yeah. So you go back to 2000 and six and you look at how much Jeff Brazos, for instance, Um, how much as well as has gone out there. They went up something on the order of, uh, $130 billion, and in that time he paid Uh, you know, one. I think 1.4 billion in taxes, and it sounds like a lot. But when you sort of divide that by 130 billion, it's only about 1% these paying on his on his wealth growth, um, so it can be a strikingly low figure. It's actually even lower if you look at a Warren Buffett, who has very Who takes very low income. And Warren Buffett been one of those proponents for higher taxes on the wealthy. I think you have great number in here, you know of these 25 top earners that you guys were able to look at their worth Rosa Collective $401 billion. This was from 2014 of 2018. They paid a total of $13.6 billion a lot of money, But when you put it all together, it's really only 3.4% of that amount of the amount that their wealth grew so very little in comparison there. Wanted to work in some of the discussion around taxes when it comes to politics and all that, because we've been hearing that from the Biden administration wanting to raise taxes on wealthier Americans, also on corporations that are making billions of dollars. You know, we've been hearing a lot about that. How does that work into this conversation? Mhm. Well, for you know, decades, the conversation about taxes has been kind of dominated by marginal tax rates, right? Um, But those rates are only going to capture what happens when people do take income. And so, uh, you know some some folks who were in a, uh The top of the wealth distribution is rarely, uh, what wealthy billionaires, Um, you know they'll be affected to some degree by that, but it's not going to change much of the picture when we talk about how much they're paying in taxes versus their wealth growth. Um Some economists. Do you think that many economists think that, Uh, the corporate taxes are ultimately paid by by individual people. And if you distribute that most of that falls onto the Shareholders. So insofar as there's moves on the corporate tax rate that would be more likely to be sort of raising revenue, at least indirectly off of this group. You made mention in the article as well about taxes being paid after somebody passes away and how even then A lot of people's estates are able to skirt Paying a lot of the taxes and passing on that well to their errors and all of that stuff. Obviously, there's all sorts of loopholes all over the place. But that just kind of figures into all of this, even in death, people escape paying a lot of these taxes. Yeah, There's the entire industry around wealth management, And a lot of that is geared towards, um, figure out how to minimize tax burden, right? Um, And so there are complicated trust that you can set up. Um, if you are interested in trying to move a portion of your estate without Having it, um, end up being, you know, tax that the estate tax level when you when you pass on, um, and a lot of these, um, you know, sort of trust are only accessible to people who are you know, in the top top stratum, which is also affected by the estate tax course. Jeff Ernst 1000, senior Data reporter at Propublica. Thank you very much for joining us. No, thank you for having me you're listening to the Daily dive weekend edition on K F. I am 6 40. When we come back, we'll tell you how the pandemic has accelerated the rise of virtual food brands and how chicken wings figure into that equation. Neil Saavedra here about three years ago, my wife and I called American Vision windows. They installed gorgeous French doors for us change the flow of our home added architectural appeal. The next project. They're doing our kitchen windows. We can't wait. Their work is meticulous. It's outstanding. I recommended them to my brother Craig, and now he and his family have a lovely window in case patio, added 150, Sunny square feet to their home..

Neil Saavedra Jeff Brazos Craig 2014 $13.6 billion Elon Musk Warren Buffett Jeff Bezos 1.4 billion $130 billion 130 billion $401 billion 2018 3.4% Propublica 25 top earners 150 2000 billions of dollars six
"jeff ernst" Discussed on The Daily Dive

The Daily Dive

07:20 min | 1 year ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on The Daily Dive

"And it's ready when you wake up on the weekend edition. I'll be bringing some of the best stories from the week. Big story that broke this week. And it's something that we always knew. That was happening. Ultra rich americans paying little to no taxes. Even as their wealth was increasing. Propublica obtained i arrest out on the top twenty five richest americans and how they maneuver the tax system by claiming very little taxable income borrowing money or reporting investment losses all to offset paying taxes for more on. How billionaires like jeff bezos elon. Musk warren buffett and others sometimes get away with paying zero in taxes will speak to jeff ernst housing senior data reporter at propublica. First story is about a very basic concept in some ways Which is that you and i work to live. We earn wages or salary. Taxes are taken automatically out of our paychecks every month. The ultra wealthy are not in tax system in the same way so the bulk of their wealth as it grows. Its not taxed until they choose to do something like say sell stock so they can accrue vast wealth which is really like the equivalent of income for us And i pay taxes on it and so you mentioned in some years billionaires have managed to pay nothing in federal income tax. Jeff bezos pay no income taxes twice in two thousand seven hundred eleven yuan mouth paid nothing and twenty eighteen and in recent years they enter investors. George soros and carl icahn And michael bloomberg Have all paid nothing in income taxes. in in some years and so there's been a main finding We were able to produce Is that if you take the entire group of the top. Twenty five richest people in america and look at their wealth growth over the past five year period And look at how much they taxes you get that. They grew their wealth. Four hundred billion dollars over the five years from two thousand fourteen two thousand eighteen and paid only a fraction of it Three point four percent in federal taxes during that time and for comparison you know the average sort of typical american new. Who takes them. A wage pays about fourteen percents On their income taxes and those years. Yeah the disparity and all that is huge and you know. Obviously the big question comes. How do they get to do that. One of the couple of things that i see is a common theme. Obviously and you mentioned it right the income you have to report income to be able to be taxed on it so a lot of times what these do is you know you report losses on investments or you borrow a lot of money. You don't have to pay income taxes on that stuff because it's not technically income. That's right. I mean good example In terms of Not taking income would be someone like warren buffett. Berkshire place doesn't pay dividends and so The stock price grows dividend. Aren't paid out so warren buffet's not registering you know income for tax purposes on it And so he has a very low rate when you consider how much he's paid in taxes compared to how much as well s- grown in recent years With you know tens of billions of dollars going back to the other notion of Borrowing large sums of money. We see a lot of these. Big companies Ceo's in everything a lot of times. They're saying hey. Well i'm only gonna take one dollar in my salary for this year and to a lot of people hearing that saying. Oh well they're they're not Cashing in all sorts of amounts of money. But it just doesn't really work out that way. They're not taking that incomes on. They're not paying the taxes on that stuff but they keep growing their wealth in other ways. That's exactly right and you know like with other assets you can borrow against Wealth right so in some sense you know folks who are In the highest wealth threatened they can borrow against things like shares of stock Which several of the folks in the top twenty five did In the past decade or two so You sometimes see that come out. Actually disclosures from the sec. And so from that. We know that You know for example borrow tens of billions of dollars pledged tens of billions of of tesla's stock In order to borrow money so even though it may not look like income. There's still a way there's still a way to access that value in your findings and all of you guys were able to access a lot of. Irs information kind of raw information. And you're comparing that to other data that we have data from forbes about how a lot of these people grew their wealth and you came up with a new number something that you guys were calling true tax rate basically. They're increasing their wealth so much but they only pay this amount in taxes. And when you look at that number. I mean that really kind of paints a picture of how much they're actually paying compared to all the money that they're making walk us through some of that. Yeah so we did we did. Two stories Came out today. One was looking at the sort of traditional rates That that you the irs might publish you know Income taxes divided by income. Basically to get your tax rate Interestingly the ultra wealthy pay a relatively low rates as far as that's concerned as well because most of their income is in the form is in forms of income that are taxed a lower rate like capital gains. But it's not capturing the whole picture because you really have to take a look at how much they're able to you know really bring in add to their buying power to influence inside and things like that that are influenced by your wealth. Mainly you take that picture when you look at the sort of realized gained as well as as traditional income you see. It's a really small fraction for for them as a group in terms of what they pay in federal income taxes and for some individuals. It's incredibly small. Walk us through some of those names. Because you mentioned jeff bezos. Warren buffett elon. Musk give us a few numbers. If you can with how much they're really paying when you work it out this way. Yeah so you go back to two thousand and six and you look at how much. Jeff bezos for instance How much is wealth. It's gone up. Went up something on the order of You know one hundred thirty billion dollars And in that time he paid You know one. I think one point four billion in taxes and it sounds like a lot but when you sort of divide that by one hundred and thirty billion. It's only about one percent These paying on his on his wealth growth so it's can be a strikingly low figure. It's actually even lower if you look at warren buffett Who has a very who takes very low income. Warren buffett been one of those proponents for higher taxes on the wealthy. I i think you had number in here of these. Twenty-five top earners guys. We're able to look at their worth rose. A collective or hundred and one billion dollars. This was from two thousand fourteen at twenty eighteen. They paid a total of thirteen point. Six billion dollars a lot of money but when you put it all together it's really only three point. Four percent of of that amount of the amount that their wealth grew so very little in comparison. There i wanted to work in some of the discussion around taxes when it comes to politics and all that because we'd been hearing that from the biden administration wanting to raise taxes on wealthier americans also on corporations that are making billions of dollars. You know we've been hearing a lot about that. How does.

George soros Jeff bezos michael bloomberg Six billion dollars Four percent two thousand one hundred and thirty billion jeff ernst carl icahn jeff bezos america four billion Musk one hundred thirty billion dol today Four hundred billion dollars twice one dollar Two stories billions of dollars
"jeff ernst" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

09:12 min | 1 year ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on KTOK

"And it's something that we always knew that was happening. Ultra rich Americans paying little to no taxes, even as their wealth was increasing. Propublica obtained IRS dad on the top 25 richest Americans. And how they maneuver the tax system by claiming very little taxable income, borrowing money or reporting investment losses, all to offset paying taxes for more on how billionaires like Jeff Bezoza, Elon Musk, Warren Buffett and others sometimes get away with paying zero in taxes. We'll speak to Jeff Ernst 1000 senior data reporter at Propublica. Our first story is about a very basic concept in some ways, which is that you and I, When we work to live, we're in wages or salary. Taxes are taken automatically out of our paychecks every month. The ultrawealthy are not in the tax system in the same way, so the bulk of their wealth as it grows its not tax until they choose to do something like, say self stock so they can accrue vast wealth which is really like the equivalent of income for us, um and not pay taxes on it. So you mentioned in some years, Billionaires have managed to pay nothing in federal income tax. Jeff Bezos paid no income taxes twice in 7 ¥24,011 Mosque paid nothing in 2018. And in recent years, and our investors George Sorros and Carl Icahn and Michael Bloomberg have all paid nothing in income taxes in some years, And so there's been a main finding were able to produce is that if you kind of take the entire group of the top 25 richest people in America And look at their wealth growth over the over a five year period. Um, and look at how much they paid in taxes. You get that they grew their wealth by $400 billion over the five years from 2014 to 2018 and paid only a fraction of it 3.4% in federal taxes during that time. And for comparison, you know the average sort of typical American who who takes summer wage pays about 14% on their income taxes in those years? Yeah, the disparity and all that is huge. And, you know, obviously, the big question comes. How do they get to do that? One of the couple of things that I see is a common theme, obviously, and you mentioned it right the income you have to report income to be able to be taxed on it. So a lot of times what these do is, you know, you report losses on investments or you borrow a lot of money. You don't have to pay income taxes on that stuff because it's not technically income. That's right. I mean, good example. Um, In terms of, um you're not taking income would be someone like Warren Buffett. Berkshire Hathaway sort of famously doesn't pay dividends. And so the stock price grows. Dividends aren't paid out. So Warren Buffett's not registering, you know, income for tax purposes on it. Um, And so he has a very low rate when you consider how much he paid in taxes, compared to how much as well so grown in recent years, which is tens of billions of dollars Going back to the other notion of, you know, borrowing large sums of money. We see a lot of these big companies, CEOs and everything. A lot of times they're saying, Hey, Well, I'm only going to take a $1 in my salary for this year and to a lot of people he was hearing that saying, Oh, well, they're you know, they're not cashing in all sorts of amounts of money, but you know, it just doesn't really work out that way. They're not taking that incomes on their not paying the taxes on that stuff, but they keep growing their wealth in other ways. That's exactly right. And you know, like with other assets you can borrow against wealth. Right? So in some sense, you know, folks who are, uh, the highest well threatened, they can borrow against things like shares of stock, which several of the folks in the top 25 did in the past decade or two. So And you sometimes see that come out actually, and disclosures from the SEC. So from that we know that Elon Musk, for example, borrowed tens of billions of dollars, Um, are pledged tens of billion dollars of of Tesla stock in order to borrow money. So even though it may not look like income, there's still a way there's still a way to access that value. And your findings and all of us, you guys were able tax. It's a lot of IRS information kind of raw information. And you were comparing that to other data that we have data from Forbes about how a lot of these people grew their wealth, and you came up with a new number, something that you guys were calling a true tax rate. Basically, they're increasing their wealth so much, but they only paid this amount in taxes. And when you look at that number I mean, that really kind of paints a picture of how much they're actually paying compared to all the money that they're making. Walk us through some of that. Yeah, so we did. We did two stories came out today. One was looking at the sort of traditional, uh, rates that that you that the IRS might publish, you know, income taxes divided by income, basically to get a year tax rate. Um, Interestingly, the ultra wealthy pay a relatively low rates as far as that's concerned as well because most of their Income is in the farm is in forms of income that are taxed a lower rate like capital gains. But it's not capturing the whole picture because you really have to take a look at how much they're able to really bring in and add to their buying power to their influence in society. Things like that that are influenced by your wealth. And when you take that picture when you look at the sort of unrealized gains as well as as traditional income You see that? It's a really small fraction for for them as a group in terms of what they pay in federal income taxes, and for some individuals, it's incredibly small. Walk us through some of those names because you mentioned Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett. Elon Musk. Give us a few numbers if you can with how much they're really paying when you work it out this way. Yeah. So you go back to 2000 and six and you look at how much Jeff Bezos, for instance, Um, how much as well has gone up. They went up something on the order of, uh, you know, $130 billion And in that time he paid, uh, you know one. I think 1.4 billion in taxes, and it sounds like a lot. But when you sort of divide that by 130 billion, it's only about 1%. He's paying on his on his wealth growth, um, so it can be a strikingly low figure. It's actually even lower if you look at at Warren Buffett, who has very who takes very low income. And Warren Buffett been one of those proponents for higher taxes on the wealthy. I think you have great number in here, you know of these 25 top earners that you guys were able to look at their worth Rosa Collective $401 billion. This was from 2014 to 2018. They paid a total of $13.6 billion a lot of money, But when you put it all together, it's really only 3.4% of that amount of the amount that their wealth grew so very little in comparison there. Wanted to work in some of the discussion around taxes when it comes to politics and all that, because we've been hearing that from the Biden administration wanting to raise taxes on wealthier Americans, also on corporations that are making billions of dollars. You know, we've been hearing a lot about that. How does that work into this conversation? Mhm. Well, for, you know, decades, conversation about taxes has been kind of dominated by marginal tax rates. Right? Um, but those rates are only going to capture what happens when people do take income. Um And so, uh, you know some some folks who are in the, uh The top of the wealth distribution is really, uh what wealthy billionaires, Um you know they'll be affected to some degree by that, but it's not going to change much of the picture when we talk about how much the thing in taxes versus their wealth growth. Um Economists. Do you think that many economists think that, Uh, the corporate taxes are ultimately paid by by individual people. And if you distribute that most of that falls onto the Shareholders. So insofar as there's moves on the corporate tax rate that would be more likely to be sort of raising revenue, at least indirectly off of this group. You made mention in the article as well about taxes being paid after somebody passes away and how even then A lot of people's estates are able to skirt Paying a lot of the taxes and passing on that well to their errors and all of that stuff. Obviously, there's all sorts of loopholes all over the place. But that just kind of figures into all of this, even in death, people escape paying a lot of these taxes. Yeah, There's an entire industry around wealth management. And a lot of that is geared towards, um figure out how to minimize tax burden, right? Um, And so there are Complicated trust that you can set up. Um, if you are interested in trying to move a portion of your estate without having it, Um uh, end up being, you know, tax that the estate tax level when you when you pass on And a lot of these, you know, sort of trust are only accessible to people who are, you know, in the top top stratum, which is also who is affected by the estate tax course..

Jeff Bezoza Jeff Bezos Warren Buffett Carl Icahn George Sorros Michael Bloomberg Elon Musk 3.4% Warren $130 billion 1.4 billion 2018 $1 $13.6 billion $400 billion 130 billion Jeff Ernst Tesla America 25 top earners
"jeff ernst" Discussed on The Daily Dive

The Daily Dive

07:05 min | 1 year ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on The Daily Dive

"And people aren't just trying them. Once received repeat customers laura riley business food reporter at washington. Post joins us for how plant based proteins are taking a bite out of big meet news without the north. That's die. Recent study shows that fifty five in the nation's biggest corporations paid zero federal tax last year. Those fifty five corporations made an excess of forty billion dollars in profit joining us now is jeff ernst housing senior data reporter at propublica. Thanks jeff thanks for having me wanting to talk about taxes there at propublica you guys were able to obtain a large amount of. Irs information shows how billionaires like. Jeff bezos elon musk. Warren buffett of others really pay very little in income taxes compared to their massive wealth. Sometimes they paid nothing. There's a number of cases a number of times where these individuals paid nothing in federal income taxes and You know we have this kind of notion in america that everybody pays their fair share in taxes and all the staff that has obtained really kind of throws that out the window. There's a number of mechanisms and loopholes that these people can use to avoid paying a lot of those taxes. So jeff walk us through some of this and some of the information that you guys were able to obtain. Yeah so our first story is about a very basic concept in some ways Which is that You and i we worked to live. We earn wages or salary. Taxes are taken automatically out of our paychecks every month. The ultra wealthy are not in the taxes them in the same way so the bulk of their wealth as it grows. Its not taxed until they choose to do something like say sell stock so they can accrue vast wealth which is really like the equivalent of income for us And not pay taxes on it and so you mentioned in some years billionaires have managed to pay nothing in federal income tax. Jeff bezos paid no income taxes twice in two thousand seven hundred eleven yuan mouth paid nothing in two thousand eighteen and in recent years they investors george soros and carl icahn And michael bloomberg Have all paid nothing income taxes in some years and so there's been a main finding We were able to produce Is that if you take the entire group of the top twenty five richest people in america and look at their wealth growth over a five year period and look at how much they paid in taxes. You get that. They grew their wealth. I four hundred billion dollars over the five years from two thousand fourteen to two thousand eighteen and paid only a fraction of it. Three point four percent in federal taxes during that time and for comparison the average typical american who takes a wage pays about fourteen percent on their income taxes. And those years. Yeah the disparity and all that is huge and obviously the big question comes. How do they get to do that. One of the couple of things that i see is a common theme. Obviously and you mentioned it right the income you have to report income to be able to be taxed on it so a lot of times what these do is you know you report losses on investments or you borrow a lot of money. You don't have to pay income taxes on that stuff because it's not technically income. That's right. I mean good example in terms of not taking income would be someone like warren buffett berkshire. Hathaway famously doesn't pay dividends and so The stock price grows Dividends paid out. So we're in but it's not registering you know income for tax purposes on it And so he has a very low rate when you consider how much he's paid in taxes compared to how much as well s- grown in recent years You know tens of billions of dollars going back to the notion of You know borrowing large sums of money. We see a lot of these. Big companies Ceo's and everything a lot of times they're saying. Hey well. I'm only gonna take one dollar in my salary for this year and to a lot of people you're hearing that saying while they're they're not Cashing in all sorts of amounts of money. But you know it just doesn't really work out that way. They're not taking that incomes. They're not paying the taxes on that stuff but they keep growing their wealth in other ways. That's exactly right. And you know like with other assets you can borrow against Wealth right so in some sense you know folks who are In the highest well threaten they can borrow against things like shares of stock Which several of the folks in the top twenty five did In the past decade or two so Many sometimes see that. Come out actually disclosures from the sec and so from that we know that You know in most for example borrowed tens of billions of dollars. pledged a tens of billions of of tesla's stock In order to borrow money so even though it may not look like income. There's still a way to access that value your findings and all you guys were able to access a lot of. Irs information kind of raw information. And you're comparing that to other data that we have a data from forbes about how a lot of these people grew their wealth and you came up with a new number something that you guys were calling true tax rate basically. They're increasing their wealth so much but they only pay this amount in taxes. And when you look at that number. I mean that really kind of paints a picture of how much they're actually paying compared to all the money that they're making walk us through some of that so we did. We did two stories Came out today. one Was looking at this sort of traditional rates that the irs might publish Income taxes divided by income basically to get a year tax rate. Interestingly the ultra wealthy pay a relatively low rates As far as that's concerned as well because most of their incomes in the form in of income that are taxed the lower rate like capital gains. But it's not capturing the whole picture because you really have to take a look at how much they're able to you know really bring in and add to their buying power to their influence inside anything like that that are influenced by your wealth. Mainly you take that picture when you look at. The sort of unrealized gain does well as as a traditional income you see. It's a really small fraction for for them as a group in terms of what they pay federal income taxes and for some individuals. It's incredibly small. Walk us through some of those names. Because you've mentioned jeff bezos. warren buffett. Elon musk give us a few numbers. If you can with how much they're really paying when you work it out this way. Yeah so you go back to two thousand and six and you look at how much Jeff bezos for instance How much is well has gone up. They went up. Something on the order of You know hundred and thirty billion dollars In that time he paid You know one. I think one point four billion in taxes and it sounds like a lot but when you divide that by one hundred and thirty billion it's only about one percent These paying on his on his wealth growth so it can be a strikingly low figure. It's actually even lower if you look at warren buffett A very.

michael bloomberg two thousand george soros jeff jeff bezos carl icahn laura riley four hundred billion dollars Jeff bezos america four percent one hundred and thirty billion twice four billion Warren one dollar jeff ernst Elon musk last year today
"jeff ernst" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"And what would be the ways that they that the government could be able to move into this whole area of wealth versus income in terms of because obviously a lot of these ultra wealthy people like michael bloomberg and soros and and buffet end up giving a lot of their wealth foundations as as a means for actually to avoid paying even even wealth tax on toward the end of their lives. Yeah it's one of the Aspects of the system that you know if if nothing else if you donate Your money to charity. There's not going to be a moment when those Gains are taxed so if you give stock to charity for instance you don't pay. It's not like you have to sell it and then take a pay taxes on it and then give it to the charity you to give to the charity and taxes are never paid on it And while the foundations they may do quite a bit of good in the world It does sort of allow those who have a great deal of wealth to somewhat pick and choose what they contribute to well Normal everyday americans are paying into the general the general fund. If you will of expenditures at the government makes i wanted to turn to orienting congress Abigail disney the granddaughter of roy disney the co founder of the walt disney company recently testified on capitol hill in support of a wealth tax. She was questioned by senator elizabeth warren. If you don't mind my asking how much wealth do you have. And how much did it grow last year for belch. Hundred and twenty million dollars maybe more depending on how the stock market is on any given day it grows in about four eight percent annually. Okay thank you. And let's just say you said forty eight percent. Let's just say an average growth of about six percent that would mean that your wealth grew by about seven million dollars last year. That is almost sixty times. The total wealth of the typical american family. So let's just for minute talk about that increase. Do you know how much taxes you will pay on your seven million dollar increase in wealth. This year dr disney on. Not that much. The comes not from wages but from things like dividends and capital gains interest and so forth so all of that qualifies for lower tax rate than income. And what about your total one hundred twenty million dollar fortune. How much you think you'll pay taxes on that this year. There's no wealth tax. So that's abigail disney. The granddaughter of the co founder of walt disney company and that she was being questioned by elizabeth warren. The senator responded to the propublica investigation by tweeting. Our tax system was rigged for billionaires. Don't make their fortunes through income like working families do. The evidence is abundantly clear. It's time for a wealth tax. In america to make the ultra rich rich finally pay their fair. Share on jeff ernst house. And can you explain what a wealth tax would look like and also how you calculated the true tax The true tax as you called it on on these billionaires of these billionaires so article was focused sort of putting out information that we think is important to inform the public debate There are a number of proposals that people have made for how well taxes would work Although it wasn't sort of the focus of of our article And the The way that we did our analysis and it was something that couldn't obviously be done without. Having the tax information of of these individuals Was to compare how much their wealth went up over a five year period according to forbes with how much they're paying in taxes and that's really the key concepts for these folks because they're not bringing in a lot of money in in wages and traditional income They're bringing in money through things like capital gains growth in stock value. And that really illustrates what matters most for them. Which is how how much. Their wealth grows each year and jeff. I wanted to ask you given that this individual tax information. The information of tax payers is generally considered a secret information not available to the public and that you obtain some of these records now criticism in some parts especially among some republicans that this was an somehow an illegal dump of information to you. How do you respond to the biden administration concentrating now and trying to find out how this leak occurred a rather than try to deal with. What it reveals. Obviously we think it's important to inform public debate about taxation and spending in this country To know what the the wealthiest americans Pay and were being very selective and and what we are disclosing in our stories So we think this is a vitally important information to to inform the public spokesperson. It's disclosure of confidential government. Information by person with access is illegal. And we'd take this very seriously. The irs commissioner said today that they are taking all appropriate measures including referring the matter to investigators so again that is white house. Spokesperson jen psaki. I think it's interesting. This comes right. After the biden administration and the department of justice from us they would not be investigating journalists. So maybe jeff your email and other records will be safe if in fact this leak investigation goes on. But it's an interesting contrast between senator. Senator warren calling for a wealth tax and biden administration calling for a leak investigation absolutely. And we're of course hoping that The the administration sticks to some of the rhetoric that we've heard in a previous day's in recent previous day's regarding that and finally you have one of the a number of articles here. It's a whole compilation of articles. You may be paying a higher tax rate than billionaire a explain. Yeah so we. We released two articles one Focus on what we've discussed so far. Which is this This tax rate on wealth growth. The other we we focus on the sort of very traditional measure that the irs often uses. Which is you know Taxes paid divided by income as as the irs recognizes it. And it's a lot of people think of when they think of their tax rate And the interesting thing is that even on that measure The ultra-wealthy pay less than a large swath of of americans. Because they're the income that they do take tends to be the preferential rates capital gains which is at a lower rate than wages. So even on that sort of traditional measure the group of Of the wealthiest americans pays relatively little. And what do you plan to do with all this information. You haven't released a lot of details What are you doing over these months Yeah we're going to continue to write stories The related to the information in here And you can expect a number of additional stories over.

america michael bloomberg forty eight percent elizabeth warren congress today jen psaki abigail disney This year soros last year two articles about six percent this year Senator each year roy about seven million dollars about four eight percent one
"jeff ernst" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"And what would be the ways that they that the government could be able to move into this whole area of wealth versus income in terms of because obviously a lot of these ultra wealthy people like michael bloomberg and soros and and buffet end up giving a lot of their wealth foundations as as a means for them actually to avoid paying even even wealth tax on toward the end of their lives. Yeah it's one of the Aspects of the system that you know if if nothing else if you donate Your money to charity. There's not going to be a moment when those Gains are taxed so if you give stock to charity for instance you don't pay. It's not like you have to sell it and then take a pay taxes on it and then give it to the charity you to give to the charity and taxes are never paid on it And while the foundations they may do quite a bit of good in the world It does sort of allow those who have a great deal of wealth to somewhat pick and choose what they contribute to well Normal everyday americans are paying into the general the general fund. If you will of expenditures at the government makes i wanted to turn to orienting congress Abigail disney the granddaughter of roy disney the co founder of the walt disney company recently testified on capitol hill in support of a wealth tax questioned by senator elizabeth warren. If you don't mind my asking how much wealth do you have. And how much did it grow last year for belch. Hundred and twenty million dollars maybe more depending on how the stock market is on any given day it grows in about four eight percent annually. Okay thank you. And let's just say you said forty eight percent. Let's just say an average growth of about six percent that would mean that your wealth grew by about seven million dollars last year. That is almost sixty times. The total wealth of the typical american family. So let's just for minute talk about that increase. Do you know how much taxes you will pay on your seven million dollar increase in wealth. This year dr disney on. Not that much. The comes not from wages but from things like dividends and capital gains interest and so forth so all of that qualifies for lower tax rate than income. And what about your total one hundred twenty million dollar fortune. How much you think you'll pay taxes on that this year. There's no wealth tax. So that's abigail disney. The granddaughter of the co founder of walt disney company and that she was being questioned by elizabeth warren. The senator responded to the propublica investigation by tweeting. Our tax system was rigged for billionaires. Don't make their fortunes through income like working families do. The evidence is abundantly clear. It's time for a wealth tax. In america to make the ultra rich rich finally pay their fair. Share on jeff ernst house. And can you explain what a wealth tax would look like and also how you calculated the true tax The true tax as you called it on on these billionaires of these billionaires so article was focused sort of putting out information that we think is important to inform the public debate There are a number of proposals that people have made for how well taxes would work Although it wasn't sort of the focus of of our article And the The way that we did our analysis and it was something that couldn't obviously be done without. Having the tax information of of these individuals Was to compare how much their wealth went up over a five year period according to forbes with how much they're paying in taxes and that's really the key concepts for these folks because they're not bringing in a lot of money in in wages and traditional income They're bringing in money through things like capital gains growth in stock value. And that really illustrates what matters most for them. Which is how how much. Their wealth grows each year and jeff. I wanted to ask you given that this individual tax information. The information of tax payers is generally considered a secret information not available to the public and that you obtain some of these records now criticism in some parts especially among some republicans that this was an somehow an illegal dump of information to you. How do you respond to the biden administration concentrating now and trying to find out how this leak occurred a rather than try to deal with. What it reveals. Well obviously we think it's important to inform public debate about Taxation and spending in this country To know what the the wealthiest americans Pay and were being very selective and and what we are disclosing in our stories So we think this is a vitally important information to to inform the public spokesperson. It's disclosure of confidential government. Information by person with access is illegal. And we'd take this very seriously. The irs commissioner said today that they are taking all appropriate measures including referring the matter to investigators so again that is white house. Spokesperson jen psaki. I think it's interesting. This comes right. After the biden administration and the department of justice from us they would not be investigating journalists. So maybe jeff your email and other records will be safe if in fact this leak investigation goes on. But it's an interesting contrast between senator. Senator warren calling for a wealth tax and biden administration calling for a leak investigation absolutely. And we're of course hoping that The the administration sticks to some of the rhetoric that we've heard in a previous day's in recent previous day's regarding that and finally you have one of the a number of articles here. It's a whole compilation of articles. You may be paying a higher tax rate than billionaire a explain. Yeah so We we really two articles one Focus on what we've discussed so far. Which is this This tax rate on wealth growth. The other we we focus on the sort of very traditional measure that the irs often uses. Which is you know Taxes paid divided by as as the irs recognizes it. And it's a lot of people think of when they think of their tax rate And the interesting thing is that even on that measure The ultra-wealthy pay less than a large swath of of americans. Because they're the income that they do take tends to be the preferential rates capital gains which is at a lower rate than wages. So even on that sort of traditional measure the group of Of the wealthiest americans pays relatively little. And what do you plan to do with all this information. You haven't released a lot of details What are you doing over these months Yeah we're going to continue to write stories The related to the information in here And you can expect a number of additional stories over.

america michael bloomberg elizabeth warren congress abigail disney today jen psaki last year forty eight percent This year soros this year about seven million dollars about six percent Abigail disney two articles Senator each year seven million dollar one
"jeff ernst" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Have pummeled central america on november third hurricane bertha. I struck nicaragua and then made its way through honduras in guatemala. According to the red cross more than two million people in the region were affected by floods and landslides caused by the hurricane and then this week another hurricane hurricane iota made landfall in central america delivering yet another blow to the region. The two storms back to back aren't only devastating to communities in central america but are also complicating efforts to mitigate covid nineteen joining us. Now to talk about what's happening on the ground is jeff ernst a freelance journalists base in honduras. Jeff thanks for being with us after having me. So what are conditions on the ground in honduras right now right now. Much of honduras is is underwater Particularly in the northwest soula valley region which is home to about two million people and putting the second largest in honduras and pedro soula as really the motor of of the country. So the fact that so much of this area in particular is underwater is really indicative of how damaging is given that roughly forty percent of the gdp or more is produced in this region but really After i iota we have much of a widespread damage Across the whole country was a much larger storm so just particularly crest the north coast and the west. They're still a rising waters. Some parts We've last a lot of bridges and roads and other infrastructure and as many people are currently displaced by the flooding. The storm's first struck nicaragua before going through honduras and guatemala. What were the effects in those two countries with evita it. It was damaging but it went through a pretty lowly populated area of nicaragua but iota so much larger that it really hit harder in nicaragua. And even the wins were harder to so nicaragua. We're seeing pretty widespread damage flooding even in the capital of managua and south of it so nicaragua's pretty devastated this point. You you've been reporting on This region in honduras for awhile have. How have the government's responded to effort on the ground. The the government's response has been heavily criticised ahead of eight to actually scheduled the special holiday for that week. In order to try to promote domestic tourism and and stimulate the economy which has been really hit hard by the covid nineteen pandemic and there was a clear reticence by the government to cancel that vacation and so they did not emit alerts or or evacuation orders which led to tens of thousands of people completely caught off guard been and then ended up getting trapped on the roads some for as many as five days and of course that led to more deaths which we really don't know how much yet because the water was never even able to fully recede from eight to before we got hit by iota So there's really some clear negligence by the government here and then with in terms of responding. They're they're completely overwhelmed By it and a complete clearly unprepared and missouri question of how they're spending the resources government just a year ago or just from israel this for war that really has has seen of her for country like and yet they're emergency response. Units doesn't have the votes necessary to be able to deal with the strong currents that we're seen from the flooding in order to rescue people in until the water gets down. Do people are very upset. Definitely more than ever with the government and and this could definitely to even more political instability than we've seen down here in the past and that political instability could also spur more Migration out of the region is that right coming towards A whether that's the united states are moving towards mexico or other places as people try to survive absolutely. There's already people organizing on social media caravans That looks like they're planning for january most of them Whether or not that materializes There's just no doubt. We're going to see an uptick in migration over the next year particularly as covy nineteen travel restrictions are eased You know. I talked to so many people already particularly the young people Who just see no opportunity They have no work and now they've lost everything so they really have nothing to lose And they see migrating as the quickest way to be able to help to their families to rebuild and recoup everything. They've lost the united states government. has limited at least under the trump administration migration from many of these countries at the same time it's ass many central american countries to help it with its asylum policies Has the us. Government sent any aid to these countries as they struggle to deal with the blows from these hurricanes the lack of leadership from the us Following these crisis is really shocking. There's been no word from the state department or from the white house other than us aid which is down here. Most recently after i iota they designated seventeen million dollars through the region half of which is going to honduras and then also the. Us military base. Don't here has been a source of of rescue missions which has definitely been very helpful but seventeen million dollars when we're talking about billions and billions dollars damage and really in nine hundred ninety eight when hurricane mitch hit which was the worst natural disaster in central america to date it was. Us leadership that mobilized support from the global community and that is completely lacking at this point. president-elect biden has expressed is concerned and support for the region. So there's hope that when he takes office he will take that traditional leadership role of the. Us to help one of its neighbors. I'll be watching to see how this pans out. Jeff ernst a freelance reporter based.

honduras nicaragua america united states hurricane hurricane jeff ernst hurricane bertha guatemala managua hurricane mitch missouri soula valley president-elect biden pedro soula reporter white house israel mexico
"jeff ernst" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on The Takeaway

"A set of devastating hurricanes have pummeled central america on november third hurricane bertha. I struck nicaragua and then made its way through honduras in guatemala. According to the red cross more than two million people in the region were affected by floods and landslides caused by the hurricane and then this week another hurricane hurricane iota made landfall in central america delivering yet another blow to the region. The two storms back to back aren't only devastating to communities in central america but are also complicating efforts to mitigate covid nineteen joining us. Now to talk about what's happening on the ground is jeff ernst a freelance journalists base in honduras. Jeff thanks for being with us after having me. So what are conditions on the ground in honduras right now right now. Much of honduras is is underwater <hes>. Particularly in the northwest soula valley region which is home to about two million people and putting the second largest in honduras and pedro soula as really the motor of of the country. So the fact that so much of this area in particular is underwater is really indicative of how damaging is given that roughly forty percent of the gdp or more is produced in this region but really <hes>. After i iota we have much of a widespread damage <unk>. Across the whole country was a much larger storm so just particularly crest the north coast and the west. They're still a rising waters. Some parts <hes>. We've last a lot of bridges and roads and other infrastructure and as many people are currently displaced by the flooding. The storm's first struck nicaragua before going through honduras and guatemala. What were the effects in those two countries with evita it. It was damaging but it went through a pretty lowly populated area of nicaragua but iota so much larger that it really hit harder in nicaragua. And even the wins were harder to so nicaragua. We're seeing pretty widespread damage flooding even in the capital of managua and south of it so nicaragua's pretty devastated this point. You you've been reporting on <hes>. This region in honduras for awhile have. How have the government's responded to effort on the ground. The the government's response has been heavily criticised ahead of eight to actually scheduled the special holiday for that week. In order to try to <hes> promote domestic tourism and and stimulate the economy which has been really hit hard by the covid nineteen pandemic and there was a clear reticence by the government to cancel that vacation and so they did not emit alerts or or evacuation orders which led to tens of thousands of people completely caught off guard been and then ended up getting trapped on the roads some for as many as five days and of course that led to more deaths which we really don't know how much yet because the water was never even able to fully recede from eight to before we got hit by iota <hes>. So there's really some clear negligence by the government here and then with in terms of responding. They're they're completely overwhelmed <hes>. By it and a complete clearly unprepared and missouri question of how they're spending the resources government just a year ago or just from israel this for war that really has has seen of her for country like and yet they're emergency response. Units doesn't have the votes necessary to be able to deal with the strong currents that we're seen from the flooding in order to rescue people in until the water gets down. Do people are very upset. Definitely more than ever with the government and and this could definitely to even more political instability than we've seen down here in the past and that political instability could also spur more <hes>. Migration out of the region is that right coming towards <hes>. A whether that's the united states are moving towards <hes>. mexico or other places as people try to survive absolutely. There's already people organizing on social media caravans <hes>. That looks like they're planning for january most of them <hes>. Whether or not that materializes <hes>. There's just no doubt. We're going to see an uptick in migration over the next year particularly as covy nineteen travel restrictions are eased <hes>. You know. I talked to so many people already particularly the young people <hes>. Who just see no opportunity <hes>. They have no work and now they've lost everything so they really have nothing to lose <hes>. And they see migrating as the quickest way to be able to help to their families to rebuild and recoup everything. They've lost the united states government. <hes> has limited at least under the trump administration migration from many of these countries at the same time it's ass many central american countries to help it with its asylum <hes> policies <hes>. Has the us. Government sent any aid to these countries as they struggle to deal with the blows from these hurricanes the lack of leadership from the us <hes>. Following these crisis is really shocking. There's been no word from the state department or from the white house other than us aid which is down here. Most recently after i iota they designated seventeen million dollars through the region half of which is going to honduras and then also the. Us military base. Don't here has been a source of of rescue missions which has definitely been very helpful but seventeen million dollars when we're talking about billions and billions dollars damage and really in nine hundred ninety eight when hurricane mitch hit which was the worst natural disaster in central america to date it was. Us leadership that mobilized support from the global community and that is completely lacking at this point. <hes> president-elect biden has expressed is concerned and support for the region. So there's hope that when he takes office <hes>. he will take that traditional leadership role of the. Us to help one of its neighbors. I'll be watching to see how this pans out.

honduras nicaragua america united states hurricane hurricane jeff ernst hurricane bertha guatemala managua hurricane mitch missouri soula valley president-elect biden pedro soula reporter white house israel mexico
Iota still a threat after killing dozens in Central America

The Takeaway

07:16 min | 1 year ago

Iota still a threat after killing dozens in Central America

"A set of devastating hurricanes have pummeled central america on november third hurricane bertha. I struck nicaragua and then made its way through honduras in guatemala. According to the red cross more than two million people in the region were affected by floods and landslides caused by the hurricane and then this week another hurricane hurricane iota made landfall in central america delivering yet another blow to the region. The two storms back to back aren't only devastating to communities in central america but are also complicating efforts to mitigate covid nineteen joining us. Now to talk about what's happening on the ground is jeff ernst a freelance journalists base in honduras. Jeff thanks for being with us after having me. So what are conditions on the ground in honduras right now right now. Much of honduras is is underwater Particularly in the northwest soula valley region which is home to about two million people and putting the second largest in honduras and pedro soula as really the motor of of the country. So the fact that so much of this area in particular is underwater is really indicative of how damaging is given that roughly forty percent of the gdp or more is produced in this region but really After i iota we have much of a widespread damage Across the whole country was a much larger storm so just particularly crest the north coast and the west. They're still a rising waters. Some parts We've last a lot of bridges and roads and other infrastructure and as many people are currently displaced by the flooding. The storm's first struck nicaragua before going through honduras and guatemala. What were the effects in those two countries with evita it. It was damaging but it went through a pretty lowly populated area of nicaragua but iota so much larger that it really hit harder in nicaragua. And even the wins were harder to so nicaragua. We're seeing pretty widespread damage flooding even in the capital of managua and south of it so nicaragua's pretty devastated this point. You you've been reporting on This region in honduras for awhile have. How have the government's responded to effort on the ground. The the government's response has been heavily criticised ahead of eight to actually scheduled the special holiday for that week. In order to try to promote domestic tourism and and stimulate the economy which has been really hit hard by the covid nineteen pandemic and there was a clear reticence by the government to cancel that vacation and so they did not emit alerts or or evacuation orders which led to tens of thousands of people completely caught off guard been and then ended up getting trapped on the roads some for as many as five days and of course that led to more deaths which we really don't know how much yet because the water was never even able to fully recede from eight to before we got hit by iota So there's really some clear negligence by the government here and then with in terms of responding. They're they're completely overwhelmed By it and a complete clearly unprepared and missouri question of how they're spending the resources government just a year ago or just from israel this for war that really has has seen of her for country like and yet they're emergency response. Units doesn't have the votes necessary to be able to deal with the strong currents that we're seen from the flooding in order to rescue people in until the water gets down. Do people are very upset. Definitely more than ever with the government and and this could definitely to even more political instability than we've seen down here in the past and that political instability could also spur more Migration out of the region is that right coming towards A whether that's the united states are moving towards mexico or other places as people try to survive absolutely. There's already people organizing on social media caravans That looks like they're planning for january most of them Whether or not that materializes There's just no doubt. We're going to see an uptick in migration over the next year particularly as covy nineteen travel restrictions are eased You know. I talked to so many people already particularly the young people Who just see no opportunity They have no work and now they've lost everything so they really have nothing to lose And they see migrating as the quickest way to be able to help to their families to rebuild and recoup everything. They've lost the united states government. has limited at least under the trump administration migration from many of these countries at the same time it's ass many central american countries to help it with its asylum policies Has the us. Government sent any aid to these countries as they struggle to deal with the blows from these hurricanes the lack of leadership from the us Following these crisis is really shocking. There's been no word from the state department or from the white house other than us aid which is down here. Most recently after i iota they designated seventeen million dollars through the region half of which is going to honduras and then also the. Us military base. Don't here has been a source of of rescue missions which has definitely been very helpful but seventeen million dollars when we're talking about billions and billions dollars damage and really in nine hundred ninety eight when hurricane mitch hit which was the worst natural disaster in central america to date it was. Us leadership that mobilized support from the global community and that is completely lacking at this point. president-elect biden has expressed is concerned and support for the region. So there's hope that when he takes office he will take that traditional leadership role of the. Us to help one of its neighbors. I'll be watching to see how this pans out.

Honduras Nicaragua Hurricane Bertha Hurricane Hurricane Jeff Ernst Northwest Soula Valley Pedro Soula United States Guatemala Red Cross Evita Managua Hurricane Jeff Trump Administration Missouri Israel
"jeff ernst" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on The Takeaway

"A set of devastating hurricanes have pummeled central america on november third hurricane bertha. I struck nicaragua and then made its way through honduras in guatemala. According to the red cross more than two million people in the region were affected by floods and landslides caused by the hurricane and then this week another hurricane hurricane iota made landfall in central america delivering yet another blow to the region. The two storms back to back aren't only devastating to communities in central america but are also complicating efforts to mitigate covid nineteen joining us. Now to talk about what's happening on the ground is jeff ernst a freelance journalists base in honduras. Jeff thanks for being with us after having me. So what are conditions on the ground in honduras right now right now. Much of honduras is is underwater <hes>. Particularly in the northwest soula valley region which is home to about two million people and putting the second largest in honduras and pedro soula as really the motor of of the country. So the fact that so much of this area in particular is underwater is really indicative of how damaging is given that roughly forty percent of the gdp or more is produced in this region but really <hes>. After i iota we have much of a widespread damage <unk>. Across the whole country was a much larger storm so just particularly crest the north coast and the west. They're still a rising waters. Some parts <hes>. We've last a lot of bridges and roads and other infrastructure and as many people are currently displaced by the flooding. The storm's first struck nicaragua before going through honduras and guatemala. What were the effects in those two countries with evita it. It was damaging but it went through a pretty lowly populated area of nicaragua but iota so much larger that it really hit harder in nicaragua. And even the wins were harder to so nicaragua. We're seeing pretty widespread damage flooding even in the capital of managua and south of it so nicaragua's pretty devastated this point. You you've been reporting on <hes>. This region in honduras for awhile have. How have the government's responded to effort on the ground. The the government's response has been heavily criticised ahead of eight to actually scheduled the special holiday for that week. In order to try to <hes> promote domestic tourism and and stimulate the economy which has been really hit hard by the covid nineteen pandemic and there was a clear reticence by the government to cancel that vacation and so they did not emit alerts or or evacuation orders which led to tens of thousands of people completely caught off guard been and then ended up getting trapped on the roads some for as many as five days and of course that led to more deaths which we really don't know how much yet because the water was never even able to fully recede from eight to before we got hit by iota <hes>. So there's really some clear negligence by the government here and then with in terms of responding. They're they're completely overwhelmed <hes>. By it and a complete clearly unprepared and missouri question of how they're spending the resources government just a year ago or just from israel this for war that really has has seen of her for country like and yet they're emergency response. Units doesn't have the votes necessary to be able to deal with the strong currents that we're seen from the flooding in order to rescue people in until the water gets down. Do people are very upset. Definitely more than ever with the government and and this could definitely to even more political instability than we've seen down here in the past and that political instability could also spur more <hes>. Migration out of the region is that right coming towards <hes>. A whether that's the united states are moving towards <hes>. mexico or other places as people try to survive absolutely. There's already people organizing on social media caravans <hes>. That looks like they're planning for january most of them <hes>. Whether or not that materializes <hes>. There's just no doubt. We're going to see an uptick in migration over the next year particularly as covy nineteen travel restrictions are eased <hes>. You know. I talked to so many people already particularly the young people <hes>. Who just see no opportunity <hes>. They have no work and now they've lost everything so they really have nothing to lose <hes>. And they see migrating as the quickest way to be

honduras nicaragua america united states hurricane hurricane jeff ernst hurricane bertha guatemala managua hurricane mitch missouri soula valley president-elect biden pedro soula reporter white house israel mexico
Hurricane Iota batters Central America

The Takeaway

05:30 min | 1 year ago

Hurricane Iota batters Central America

"A set of devastating hurricanes have pummeled central america on november third hurricane bertha. I struck nicaragua and then made its way through honduras in guatemala. According to the red cross more than two million people in the region were affected by floods and landslides caused by the hurricane and then this week another hurricane hurricane iota made landfall in central america delivering yet another blow to the region. The two storms back to back aren't only devastating to communities in central america but are also complicating efforts to mitigate covid nineteen joining us. Now to talk about what's happening on the ground is jeff ernst a freelance journalists base in honduras. Jeff thanks for being with us after having me. So what are conditions on the ground in honduras right now right now. Much of honduras is is underwater Particularly in the northwest soula valley region which is home to about two million people and putting the second largest in honduras and pedro soula as really the motor of of the country. So the fact that so much of this area in particular is underwater is really indicative of how damaging is given that roughly forty percent of the gdp or more is produced in this region but really After i iota we have much of a widespread damage Across the whole country was a much larger storm so just particularly crest the north coast and the west. They're still a rising waters. Some parts We've last a lot of bridges and roads and other infrastructure and as many people are currently displaced by the flooding. The storm's first struck nicaragua before going through honduras and guatemala. What were the effects in those two countries with evita it. It was damaging but it went through a pretty lowly populated area of nicaragua but iota so much larger that it really hit harder in nicaragua. And even the wins were harder to so nicaragua. We're seeing pretty widespread damage flooding even in the capital of managua and south of it so nicaragua's pretty devastated this point. You you've been reporting on This region in honduras for awhile have. How have the government's responded to effort on the ground. The the government's response has been heavily criticised ahead of eight to actually scheduled the special holiday for that week. In order to try to promote domestic tourism and and stimulate the economy which has been really hit hard by the covid nineteen pandemic and there was a clear reticence by the government to cancel that vacation and so they did not emit alerts or or evacuation orders which led to tens of thousands of people completely caught off guard been and then ended up getting trapped on the roads some for as many as five days and of course that led to more deaths which we really don't know how much yet because the water was never even able to fully recede from eight to before we got hit by iota So there's really some clear negligence by the government here and then with in terms of responding. They're they're completely overwhelmed By it and a complete clearly unprepared and missouri question of how they're spending the resources government just a year ago or just from israel this for war that really has has seen of her for country like and yet they're emergency response. Units doesn't have the votes necessary to be able to deal with the strong currents that we're seen from the flooding in order to rescue people in until the water gets down. Do people are very upset. Definitely more than ever with the government and and this could definitely to even more political instability than we've seen down here in the past and that political instability could also spur more Migration out of the region is that right coming towards A whether that's the united states are moving towards mexico or other places as people try to survive absolutely. There's already people organizing on social media caravans That looks like they're planning for january most of them Whether or not that materializes There's just no doubt. We're going to see an uptick in migration over the next year particularly as covy nineteen travel restrictions are eased You know. I talked to so many people already particularly the young people Who just see no opportunity They have no work and now they've lost everything so they really have nothing to lose And they see migrating as the quickest way to be

Honduras Nicaragua Hurricane Bertha Hurricane Hurricane Jeff Ernst America Northwest Soula Valley Pedro Soula Guatemala Red Cross Hurricane Evita Managua Jeff Missouri Israel Mexico
Hurricane Iota Drives Thousands From Their Homes in Nicaragua

BBC World Service

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Hurricane Iota Drives Thousands From Their Homes in Nicaragua

"Category four Storm which for several hours reached an intensity of five has come ashore on the Caribbean coast of Nicaragua, with maximum sustained winds of 250 kilometers an hour. Speaking to the BBC World Service from the coastal city of San Pedro, sooner in Honduras, the journalist Jeff Ernst, said locals were on the move. People are pretty frantically. Just trying to get to higher ground or get to anywhere that they think is is safer, particularly people who are in areas affected by the last hurricane, which is hurricane data which hit just two weeks ago. Because white spread flooding The region is still struggling to recover from that storm.

Jeff Ernst Nicaragua Caribbean San Pedro Honduras BBC Hurricane
"jeff ernst" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"All right, everybody. I just want to thank my guests like to talk to you for a long time. I don't know. Have we met? Jeff Ernst. Dennis. I've had the great pleasure of doing so twice. Most recently do is march of 2019. Well, now that you are a media sensation, I look, I look forward for many reasons. I look forward to seeing you again, including meeting people period. So I just anyway from the bottom of my heart. Thank you. For the endorsement of Prager. You It means the world to us. Well, Dennis, if I if I had a second I guess I just like to say a couple of other things about Prager you if you don't mind, sure. And Gin and really What it boils down to is. We need to remember who America I myself where the American dream didn't know what I do now, thanks to you, thanks, Others. But the vast majority of people don't know that's right problem. How do we solve that problem? We have to make them aware, and Prager used does that It's the best platform. It's impactful. It's persuasive. Change his mind. And it's timeless. The videos and mentioned the Middle East. It's as true today as it was eight years ago, when you first made it the American Trinity. Same thing. And it needs to be timeless because we're in a long fight to get our country back. We need to win elections tactically, but we need to change minds forever. And every one of the videos every part of the platform of pregnant you. Is timeless in its message. The end can be viewed by all and we'll really it's it's more than a donation. It is truly an investment in oneself. In their family in their country. And as my father used to, say, Dennis Conrad, his soul Don't give till it hurts. Give until it feels good. I'm telling you that heart you wanted such a better job than I do. Uh, Jeff, God bless you. It's all I could say I'm very touched. It's only till Monday, August and then we stop. We don't violate our our commitment. Largest. We fundraise and then we move on. People did forget what America stands for. That's exactly the issue. I do this When I was a kid. The courageous generation did not pass on the values. That made them a great generation, which we could take. Well, Nick.

Prager Dennis Conrad Jeff Ernst America Middle East American Trinity Nick
"jeff ernst" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

11:29 min | 2 years ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Number of people that are actually reaching an entering the United States. Jeff what about the US in Honduras. What does that relationship look like now? The Honduran government is dependent upon. US approval especially now with all these allegations nations of drug trafficking and corruption during Dr Hundred President so hundreds of signed a safe third country agreement. where it it will start receiving migrants? Who Been deported from the US Mexico border and supposedly often asylum in in hunters or giving them supposedly safe place to stay while they wait for their asylum claim in the US? Marine Mexico's new President Lopez opened. The door has only been in office for a year. What does all this meant for his stature in Mexico Lopez at other continues to enjoy really high high levels of support? He is still very popular in in Mexico and I think his government has framed this in two ways one we are being successful and maintaining containing a good relationship with the trump administration which has as a priority and second that they are not distancing themselves from the administration's original approach. which was we want to treat migrants? Humanely offer them opportunities in Mexico. Sitting the Mexican population usually doesn't view this as a top issue. They're more concerned about the economy and security in Mexico and are willing to take loops our Lord at his word that this is important for his government and for the relationship ship with United States. Marine Meyer is the director from Mexico and migrant rights for the Washington Office on Latin America and Jeff Ernst a freelance journalist based in Honduras US Marine. Jeff thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me all over the world today. Almost seventy million people have been forcibly displaced from their homes in every year. Thousands of these people try to seek refuge in Japan. I've never been refugee before now so I really don't know how it was. Rose a refugee from Cameroon is one of these. Women just won't be the world's world for rose trying to make a home in Japan meant leaving her whole life behind just so she could be safe but of the ten thousand people who apply for refugee status in Japan every year. Only forty get approved for like a week. I did not sleep. I was like I got myself into. Maybe it was better need to be there and wait for death when it comes or whatever I want to team. Rosa's story is one one of many where asylum-seekers flee prosecution only to end up in a country where they're not welcome just to note that we're not using roses real name here to protect her identity. Matt Katz is a reporter at WNYC and went to Japan to report on this story. Thank you for joining us matt before we begin. Let me just mention to our listeners that I did listen to some of the early drafts of reporting as part of a listening session here. WNYC and made some suggestions on other parts of this series to me Matt Japan is really fascinating example of a country that has severely restricted immigration and based on. How some people responded to your series? It has a lot of symbolic the value. Not just two people in Japan but to people here in the West correct. Yes I realize that. There is a fascination even a fetish for the perception that Japan is has mono-ethnic so white supremacists really love this idea of Japan as this society that has successfully been able to restrict immigration to stay a quote unquote Japanese and still be part of the global community. So when I reported on the fact that there's such restrictions to immigration into the white supremacists supremacists responded and said leave Japan alone. Don't bring these globalist ideas into what is an otherwise perfect society. So let's talk a one of the people who is displaced and saw refuge here in Japan. Rose she's interesting case because very. Few people are aware of the conflict in Cameroon. It's one of these many any flash points throughout the world that are creating refugees. Cameroon is going through. What's basically a civil war right now? Between French speakers and English speakers is it is literally a conflict over language The government is controlled by the francophones and rose comes from the Anglophone region and the English speakers of Long said that the French speaking government have not given them fair rights so roses family was involved in a separatist movement in Cameroon to break away from in this french-speaking control the government and she lost touch with movement because she actually was sexually assaulted by soldiers who were looking for her father father when she was a teenager so she didn't want anything to do with politics. She moved away from her home village and she became a teacher. She came back home on a visit in two thousand sixteen eighteen and she joined a teacher protests. She says she just thought it was a protest to push for more resources for English speaking schools but teachers teachers and lawyers have been at the tip of the spear of this separatist movement in Cameroon. And they're seen as an anti the Cameroonian government so this protest. The government came down quite hard on it. She starts to explain a little bit about that in a interview. I did with her. The military will come with the van. And they're like you get in you get in when you get in a let me have your phone. You give your phone so there were times. They'll take offs are not everybody would come back like a half to WHO colleagues to today. We've not heard from more than a year. An income ruin. You could be awaiting trial for three or four years and nobody's talking about you. Nobody's getting back to you so that was when I noticed that maybe one day will be my not to come and she needed to leave. That's what she decided so she used all for money honey. She borrowed a bunch of money and she hired a broker. This is what people throughout the world do. When they need to leave their country they hire somebody in the black market to figure out a way out of where they're at and The broker came back to her with an unusual offer so he just called me and asked me what. If I told you I go to visa for you Japan. I said I'll be happy. He said Yeah. I got a visa. That was on a Wednesday morning and he told me to leave on Thursday morning so so she has literally hours to pick up and move to another continent right and she really embodies the story of refugees today they leave in a hurry and there are conflicts all throughout the globe. People are just flying into Tokyo and declaring asylum. They're asking to stay and they're doing it by by the thousands so Japan cannot stay. This isolated island that it had been for centuries. She finds guide the airport who speaks English and he takes around her budget. Vote tells until she finds one that you could afford you at one hundred dollars in her pocket and then she calls this woman who's an acquaintance of an acquaintance who is from Cameroon and she. It goes to her place in Japan and She spends a couple of nights there. This woman tells her about a nonprofit called Japan Association for Refugees. She goes to this office. She says where she's from and what she needs and she'd like to figure out how to declare asylum and get a job and stay in Japan and They they tell her. There's there's no way she's GonNa Win Asylum and Japan. How is this possible? Why once they believe that people are truly in danger? I believe that people are owning for the end lines but the people from the Japan Association for Refugee Sam. Sorry but Japan doesn't take hardly any refugees. They took just forty two people last year and many of them when they declare asylum at the airport. Just like what happens in the US if you landed landed JFK or lax and you declare silom. You often get detained. And you're held in detention hearings and what's interesting is People who follow the asylum process in America will hear parallels. It's a similar sort of thing that's going on in this country now. It is increasingly difficult to find safety the in the US if you're claiming that you face persecution at home and that same phenomenon is happening all over the world in Japan in the US and in Europe all of these countries signed agreements after World War. Two with the UN saying that anybody who is facing persecution can find safety in these countries but in reality. That's just not the way it's working anymore and so rose is in this predicament. She enters into his landscape. And she's trying to navigate it. What happens to her so she was able to get subsidized housing through this nonprofit and she takes Japanese lessons and she submits her application for asylum? mm-hmm she lives a very meager lifestyle. There she has rice and nothing else most days of the week and she tries to adjust to life in Japan because the think about asylum seekers is it takes months and even years in the US or in Japan or elsewhere for your case to be reviewed. Even if you. I know that you'RE GONNA end up getting deported at the end of it and so basically this might be seen by some people who are critics of Japanese system as a way simply of of keeping you out diversity when you interact with people from Japan. How do they see people like rose? There's very little in the way of you've overt discrimination. You don't hear people saying disparaging things about immigrants. There's also very little civic conversation about Immigration Shen compared to what we're here in this country in terms of dominating Television and news and public conversation. I it's it. Quieter restriction restrictive approach There's a understanding that Japan needs to attract foreigners but there is concern that too many foreigners can echo the scenes people have seen on TV Of Syrians entering Europe up of people in the Mediterranean Sea in boats amassed on boats trying to get into Greece Or the caravans coming from the southern border of the US. US and Japanese are aware of those images and there are concerned that Japan could be overrun with these immigrants and asylum seekers and and then the most pragmatic of the Japanese. Tell me that they need the farmers and that their country can't survive without bringing in these immigrants but in the meantime The stance of the Japanese government is more of a outsourcing approach. So they are. H Man is quite generous donor to the UN when refugee agency but that money is really to house and feed refugees in camps abroad rather than spending money to resettle them in Japan. So what is life Japan. Hold for. Rose she's looking for work. She's allowed to work while she's applying for asylum And then she's looking.

Japan United States Cameroon Mexico Japan Association for Refugees Matt Japan Japan Association Jeff Ernst Honduran government Japanese government Marine Mexico Honduras WNYC Europe President Lopez UN Dr Hundred President matt
"jeff ernst" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:57 min | 2 years ago

"jeff ernst" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thorton Avenue that's over on the right hand shoulder to trouble on the shore free weights westbound eighty before Abby and way car went off the roadway it's into the trees there truly devilish working to redeem brought to you by shin eun performing arts I'm Judy Woodruff on the next news our one on one with my palm pale I sit down with the US secretary of state that's Wednesday on the PBS newshour the PBS newshour comes on this afternoon at three I Marco Werman you're with the world women in Iran have a request and it's not a big one I just want to and we just want to what's a football game not more not any political press pretest not any of them so some free does just a football game and buy football she means soccer of course that was a woman I spoke with from Tehran she's thirty five years old and tomorrow for the first time in our life she plans to walk into a stadium and watch a men's soccer game I think it's safe and and very very huge excitement she didn't want us to use her name on the air she says she's worried she could get in trouble with the Iranian government for speaking with us and that's why despite what she says this does seem political women in Iran have been banned from attending men's games for almost forty years women's rights activists have been pushing the government to lift the ban for a long time that pressure ramped up last month after the death of Sahar hodie ari is also known as the blue girl she was arrested for sneaking into a stadium in protest she set herself on fire her death had an impact on many Iranians I think many of the people many of the women who and go to the stadium tomorrow and is because of my many often means and because of sat higher and on behalf of St high we go there another woman in Tehran told is pretty much the same thing she's a twenty four year old soccer fan she also didn't want us to use her name she says what happened to the blue girl was important how about a short term the other social media alarm she says it was the news of the death of the blue girl that got the attention of FIFA the international governing body for soccer FIFA threaten to punish Iran if they did not let women inside soccer stadiums many see it as a positive step but it does not go far enough around thirty five hundred tickets out of a possible one hundred thousand were set aside for women the twenty four year old fan Tehran says the tickets went so quickly she couldn't get one I mean what I'm missing the speaking minions are the same but you'll be going to the stadium tomorrow to take photos and videos with other women who couldn't get in there's one other thing about tomorrow that bothers the first fan we spoke with unfortunately they want to put US indicate she got a ticket but you'll have to sit in a section that will be surrounded by a fence to keep the women separate from male fans despite the downside she still excited and she's the proud owner of a new horn in the colors of the Iran flag of course I had to ask her about that is like one of those horns they had at the South Africa World Cup the call of moves Ella yeah yeah something like that what's the word for Vuze Ella in Farsi we we called it say to say yes all right well make a lot of noise yeah in a way she already is there's a political drama playing out for Honduras but it's happening in a courtroom in New York under a politician Juan Antonio Tony Hernandez is standing trial is accused of smuggling tons of cocaine into the United States under the protection of his brother one Orlando Hernandez one Orlando also happens to be the president of Honduras this is not the first time Honduran officials have been implicated in drug trafficking but this particular trial is something different according to many Hondurans there has been a lot of politicians involved it with drug dealers and with us and nothing has been done I'm waiting for the verdict but of course there has to be deep profound reforms in and with us and hopefully this case is the turning point this case is the critical juncture where politicians and the economic elites change their way of concentrating their power and wealth in the country right now that's Lester Ramirez from the NGO Transparency International speaking from the capital Tegucigalpa journalist Jeff Ernst is also base there but we reached him in New York where he's been inside the courtroom every day covering the trial hunter answer following this like it's the World Cup for many it's simply confirmation of what they have long believed that the narco traffickers have infiltrated the state all the way to the highest levels others are more wait and see attitude but everybody regardless of their ideology is sitting on pins and needles waiting to see what happens in court each day given the reports about the violence many Hondurans are fleeing from what are the charges me for their daily lives hunter and have a justice system that doesn't work several of these narco traffickers are now confessed Necro Jeffers testifying in trial and were allegedly associates of Tony Fernandes no investigation was ever opened against them in Honduras particularly notable in the case of Alexander a don't whose testimony heard this week it was an open secret there are news reports as far back as twenty eleven of him being involved in our contract and he was mayor of a small town along the border with Guatemala everybody knew what he was up to yet nothing ever happened to him and Honduras and now we're seeing a court why and Honduras are waiting on pins and needles with this a trial because they think something will change in Honduras they hope something would change Honduras has a unique relationship with the US they kind of look for the U. S. to give interaction many don't understand that the US would never indicted sitting president so many think that if if twenty Anand is is convicted then wonder Landau would be Maximo take him out to and that's just not gonna happen but more than anything it's confirmation of the government's own complicity in this drug trafficking trade that help make the country one of world's most violent right well I mean this is all happening as the Honduran government is facing immense pressure from the White House to hold migration the United States and just last week from pose for photos in New York with the Honduran president they celebrated a deal that would require hunters to take in more asylum seekers you living there in under something what do you think Jeff is it a safe third country for asylum seekers the hunter government doesn't have the capacity to care for its own citizens much less any sort of asylum seekers and the idea of hi dear is being a safe country for migraines which is a particular von a world population is pretty laughable and how safe is Honduras for journalists like yourself I mean this trial in New York is brought back the legacy of cartel lord el Chapo Guzman was not wise to cross him I there is a competitor trafficking as a government official or journalist local journalists certainly face a lot of danger behind there is one of the most dangerous countries and the world for journalists so let him just simply avoid these subjects they don't write about drug trafficking don't write about corruption and that's helps fermented the impunity that really rains in Honduras really I met an American and I enjoy certain privileges and more protection just of that but for the local journalists there's definitely a culture of fear they leads to self censorship often because they don't want to expose themselves to death threats or potential danger to them of the families it's a very serious and one of the most difficult places at least in this hemisphere to do journalism Porter Jeff earns his usually based in Honduras but has been speaking with us from New York where he's covering the drug trafficking trial of one Antonio Hernandez the brother of the president of Honduras Jeff thank you thanks for having me news headlines are about a minute away you're with the world a report on the.