23 Burst results for "Jeff Brumfield"

Magnets, The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

Short Wave

04:45 min | 5 months ago

Magnets, The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

"Okay jeff brumfield. Where does our journey into the world of magnetism begin. It begins with a call to carlos. And a guy named tim murphy. They both work at the national high magnetic field laboratory in tallahassee florida. Normally you know. I do research and i learn about things but this time i just i just brought some bar magnets thought i would let you. That's all we do here so they just you know they're bigger and they give us money for it so expensive too. Yeah and they're painted. We paint them. They're so ready for this interview. They were born ready for this interview. These folks work with magnets all day long. Carlos heads the k. Twelve education programs for the lab. Tim is a physicist there. And like carlos was saying earlier they really feel like magnets need respect. I guarantee you that whatever direction you're looking right now unless you're in the wilderness. Right now there's probably a magnet in your line of sight and you just don't know it well and if you're you're in the wilderness you're standing on the biggest magnet that we have which is the earth the earth is a giant magnet with a pole and the south pole and where that magnetism comes from kind of complicated so for today. We're just going to stick to smaller baghdad's like the ones we use in our daily lives. Jeff i'll be honest. I don't really know what makes a magnetic field magnetic field. So how would you describe that which is kind of fascinating. Because you've turned yourself. Into the shortwave fisk there's gaps in my knowledge the only god what is a magnetic field exactly well so magnetic fields like i just said you know based on the field. Actually they're often said to north and the south pole and right opposite poles attract and light poles repel. So magnets can pull each other together. Push each other part in actually magnetism itself is half of fundamental force a called electromagnetism which also includes electric fields. But what i think is really fascinating is aside from gravity. Magnets are really the only fundamental force that we can just experience an encounter on a regular basis right and we can kind of see this magnetism action when we're playing around with magnets and they stick to certain metals right. Yeah yeah i mean the whole metal magnet thing is kinda complicated carlos. Tell you that everybody comes up. I see on. Tv shows all the time even the education tv shows. They say magnets metal. And i'm like no you got it wrong again. There's only three medals of her naturally magnetic iron nickel and cobalt. And what carlos means there is that there are only three medals that be permanent magnets that hold their magnetism forever and never other metals can stick to magnets but then there are a lot of medals. They can't so we just moved to. A new house has a stainless steel fridge. And guess what like all our fridge. Magnets don't work on this fridge anymore. so what makes them materials magnetic and others not so much well it actually all has to do with electrons. Oh our friends the electrons. Of course these are. The negatively charged particles in adams and when they flow they create electricity. That's right and whenever electrons move in in particular when they spin around something they generate a magnetic field as well as an electric field so magnetic fields have to do with spinning electrons exactly so the electrons are spinning around the atom and that makes like a little magnetic field but then in a permanent magnet. What happens is all. The atoms are facing the same direction. Imagine all these atoms lined up in a row and they kinda wanna do what their next neighbor is doing. So if their neighbor is pointed up right there magnetic moment is up than the one next to him says. Hey up is the the direction so they go up as well. So now you end up with a macroscopic magnetic field because all of these atoms are kind of lined up with their magnetic moments so all of these atoms facing the same direction is what creates one. Big magnet exactly. That's how permanent magnets work like the magnet. Cystic to your fridge. All the atoms in that baghdad are lined up in the same way and they make this big magnetic field that polls the magnet against your fridge and keeps it there. But then there's another kind of magnet and tim the guy you just heard there he actually works with this one. It's called an electromagnet for electro magnets. We actually don't care about the spin of the electron what we care about is the

Carlos Jeff Brumfield National High Magnetic Field L Tim Murphy Tallahassee Baghdad TIM Florida Jeff Adams
Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

Short Wave

10:06 min | 7 months ago

Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

"Jeff. i have a lot of questions about antimatter. But can you just start with regular mater. What is that. Yeah so a refresher for who don't remember regular matters abroad category for everything. So you're matter i'm matter. The studios matter the microphones. Yeah i get it matter and we matter. It's a nice thought. Yeah and as matter were all made of atoms. So you're bunch of adamson the shape of an emily corn. And i'm tabatha the shape of a jeff brumfield now for antimatter. I'm actually going to let another jeffrey. Who knows a lot more. Physics denied to answer this one. His name is jeffrey hengst. And he's a researcher at our house university in denmark. And to i. I think of it as kind of an evil twin of the stuff that makes up our everyday world intriguing. Go on it is it is. It's just this kind of opposite matter. It's like this muir to everything that's around us so antimatter. It's here right now yet. I mean it's a little more complicated than that but anti matters real stuff and it exists in our universe and actually before anyone ever even detected it. They predicted it because math. The equations of physics demanded in fact it was discovered that way by coming up with an equation that predicted his existence. Nobody was really looking for it. And i am not going to attempt to describe the fundamental equations of physics on this podcast. Because i don't really understand them But hank says the closest analogy. He's got for us mortals to think about. Is this math problem. What's the square root of four two very but there's a second solution negative to allocate right because negative negative to is four so the way you just went straight to two. That's exactly kind of what happened in physics like there were these equations and there was a positive set of solutions for particles and negative said and everyone was like the negative set. What does that even mean. That's nonsense but it turned out there. Worthies negative particles. They did exist in. They're called antimatter. Oh okay so there's this theoretical idea of antimatter kicking around for awhile. Which kind of explains what it is. But what is it exactly. Here's the thing it really is like opposite matter. Protons remember protons. Yeah their positively charged subatomic particles. They are anti. Protons are negatively charged electrons their negatively charged and their anti particles are positively charged. This is kind of amazing. It is kind of amazing. And here's the best part. It actually lives up to the sci-fi analogy so just go with your sifi brain and i get it emily. You're more of like colin firth. Pride and prejudice bbc. You know no shame in it. There isn't there isn't i've seen it probably more times than you have in my life. But what do you think happens when matter and antimatter Get together when they actually meet okay. If anti matters the evil twin the fight they do will. They do like in a jane austen novel. They do. Well you're not too far off. I'm going to let the actual experts explain it to you. And i have a tendency to cancel each other out a minute. Where's this under. Certain conditions when to identify articles of matter. Antimatter meet these. Are your experts. Jeff captain kirk and is that leonard nimoy as relationship. Yes total complete absolute annihilation. Spock it is. That's right and you're right. That's star trek season. One episode twenty-seven original track the best track. But here's the thing eveline. It's actually a hundred percent accurate or pretty close so the universe won't end if antimatter and matter meat. But the two particles do disappear in a flash of light. The anti-matter can't exist in the presence of matter. The science fiction stuff comes in these things really do annihilate each other if you get together okay. So i've covered a lot of physics over the years and this is pretty much the only case where the sci-fi and the reality match although i will say annihilation is actually a lot less sexy in real life it's really Just annoying to have to deal with something that you have to make that the universe is trying to destroy and every every every turning point be an antimatter physicist it it is. I mean he's literally been doing this since the ninety s and like he does get a little frustrated. All right you said earlier that antimatter. It's here in this universe but this universe is full of matter and i don't see any antimatter lurking around. So where is it if it's existing theory but it's hard to find in reality. I don't get this you know who else doesn't get it. Every physicist on earth this is one of the fundamental questions the equation say there should be as much antimatter matter but in practice. Antimatter is actually super hard. To find and hank says nobody knows why there aren't any good ideas about this. I mean physicists. Do see little bits of antimatter here. and there. In fact anti electrons for i discovered in cosmic rays coming from deep space way back in the nineteen thirties. And actually i've got another natural source of antimatter right here in the studio emily in this room. Yes ready yes this banana. What are you talking about this real episode. This is an episode about nothing and tomfoolery. Hold the banana to make sure it's real. I'll explain yes okay so obviously. The banana is not anti matter. But here's the thing about bananas. Bananas are full of potassium. Which is really good for you. But there's also a radioactive isotope potassium into banana called potassium forty. This is a naturally occurring. isotope So some porsche. The potassium in the banana is potassium. Forty now here's the thing. Potassium forty when it decays releases an electron but very very very very rarely it releases an anti electron. So if we just hold this banana and wait for for. How long are we waiting. Okay we'd have to seventy five minutes. We're at ten minute podcast. Geoff just sit here for seventy five minute. What i'm hearing is seven part series on antimatter. Emily kwan and a meditation silence. That's right no so. On average this entire banana will spit out. One anti-electron every seventy five minutes. I think this really makes the point. Well right like antimatter exists. It's not some parallel universe but one tiny anti trump for trillions of banana adams is like even. That's a pretty rare thing to have. Happened and jeffrey wants a lot more than that. That's why he's at this giant particle accelerator cernan switzerland. Okay so tell me what. He's up to their well. Hanks wants lots of anti electrons. And in this is key anti protons. Hey so it turns out the anti electrons are kind of easy. You can find other radioactive sources Besides bananas that can make a lot more of them and then the elevator makes anti protons. And here's the thing so you have to very carefully hang us to bring the anti protons in the anti electrons together we call it s- merge it's a smooz merge merge but even after that merge they still end up with a lot of antimatter just disappearing. Thirty million anti protons. That's converted two hundred thousand or so trapped. Anti protons of those will get twenty or thirty that actually make anti hyphen that we can use well. Willow anti-hydrogen is that what i just heard. Jeff what is that. Anti-hydrogen is just one anti electron orbiting one anti protons and it's the antimatter. Equivalent of the lightest element on earth. So that's regular hydrogen willing to go to all this trouble just to get a few atoms of anti-hydrogen but why go through all the trouble you know of making andy hydrogen okay. So here's the thing. He's hoping to get some clues from anti-hydrogen about matter antimatter and the thinking goes like this. Hydrogen is the lightest element in the universe and hydrogen is probably the thing we know best. We've been studying it forever. We really understand it. So by looking very very carefully at anti-hydrogen. He's hoping that they can learn more about what's going on with antimatter. And that's basically what he's doing he's using lasers all kinds of stuff to probe this anti-hydrogen to see how it behaves. Well has shed any light on where the rest of the antimatter is. Not yet not yet. And so far. Anti-hydrogen is behaving exactly as predicted by all those fundamental physics equations. And so far with the places that we've looked and to the precision with which we've looked they're the same and that's kind of a problem because they also say there should be much matters antimatter unless they can find some sort of deviation it may not be possible to figure out you know where the antimatter went. So we don't have any clues but that's okay because he's just

Jeff Brumfield Jeffrey Hengst House University Jeff Captain Kirk Tabatha Hank Adamson Jeffrey Colin Firth Denmark Eveline Leonard Nimoy Jeff Jane Austen Emily Kwan Spock Emily Banana Adams BBC
Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

Short Wave

07:44 min | 1 year ago

Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

"Antimatter. I'm so excited to talk to you about antimatter and emily. I know exactly what you're thinking. Anti-matter pods are rigged to blow up the moment we star Trek Right. I mean antivirus. A huge part of Star Trek. All right I know. The Vulcan Salute. Live long and prosper. That's about the extent of my knowledge of Star Trek. But I get your point. Antimatter does kind of sound like science fiction. But it's Real. That's the cool thing. Yes antimatter particles. Are these strange mirror particles to the stuff we see all around us and scientists have made it using a giant particle accelerator in Europe. They're studying it because they hope it can answer some fundamental questions about the universe. Okay not entirely sure I get it but by the end of the episode I assume we all will so today on the show anti-battery what it is how it works and why one scientist has spent decades trying to trap it. Jeff. I have a lot of questions about antimatter. But can you just start with regular matter? What is that? Yeah so a Refresher Viseu. Don't remember regular matter. It's a broad category for everything. So you're madder I matter the studios matter the I I get it matter matter matter. It's a nice thought. Yeah and as matter. We're all made of atoms. So you're a bunch of Adamson the shape of an emily corn on the shape of a Jeff Brumfield now for antimatter. I'm actually going to let another Jeffrey. Who knows a lot more physics? Naidoo answer this one. His name is Jeffrey Angst. And he's a researcher at our House University in Denmark and to Madeira. I think it is kind of an evil twin of the stuff that makes up our everyday world intriguing. Go on it is it is. It's just this kind of opposite matter. It's like this mirror to everything that's around us so antimatter. It's here right now. Yeah I mean it's a little more complicated than that but anti matters real stuff and it exists in our universe and actually before anyone ever even detected it. They predicted it because math. The equations of physics demanded in fact was discovered that way. You know by coming up with a an equation that predicted existence. But nobody was really looking forward and I am not going to attempt to describe the fundamental equations physics on this podcast because I don't really understand them But Hank says the closest analogy. He's got for US mortals to think about. Is this math problem. What's the square root of four two very good? But there's a second solution negative to Aoki because negative negative to four so the way you just went straight to. That's exactly kind of what happened in physics like there were these equations and there was a positive set of solutions for particles and negative side and everyone was like the negative set. What does that even mean? That's nonsense but it turned out there. Were these negative particles. They did exist and they're called antimatter. Oh okay so there's this theoretical idea of antimatter kicking around for awhile. Which kind of explains what it is. But what is it exactly? Here's the thing. It really is opposite matters. So protons do you remember protons. Yeah their positively charged subatomic particles. They are anti. Protons are negatively charged electrons their charged and their anti particles are positively charged. Hey this is kind of amazing. It is kind of amazing. And here's the best part actually lives up to the SCIFI analogy. So just go with your vestigial Sifi brain and I get it emily. You're more of like Colin Firth. Pride and prejudice. Bbc D. You know no shame in it. There isn't there isn't I've seen it probably more times than you have in my life but what do you think happens when matter? Antimatter get when they actually meet okay. If antimatter is the evil twin they fight they dual. They do lake in Jane austen novel. They do well. You're not too far off. I'm going to let the actual experts explain it to you. My her Antimatter tendency to. Cancel each other out. Where's this under certain conditions when to identify articles of matter? Antimatter meet these experts. Jeff Captain Kirk and is that Leonard Nimoy as relationship. Yes total complete absolute annihilation as stock. It is that's right and you're right that Star Trek season one episode twenty seven original track the best track. But here's the thing heavily. It's actually a hundred percent accurate or close. The Universe won't end if antimatter and matter meat. But the two particles disappear in a flash of light. The anti-matter can't exist in the presence of matter. That's where the science fiction stuff comes in. These things really do annihilate each other if you get them together okay. So I've covered a lot of physics over the years and this is pretty much the only case where the sci-fi and the reality match although I will say annihilation is actually a lot less sexy in real life. It's really just annoying to have to deal with something that you have to make and that the universe is trying to destroy and every every every turning point that's hard to be an antimatter physicist I it is. I mean he's literally been doing this since the ninety s and like he does get a little frustrated. All right you said earlier that antimatter. It's here in this universe but this universe is full of matter. I don't see any antimatter lurking around. So where is it if it's exists in theory but it's hard to find in reality. I don't get this you know who else doesn't get it. Every physicist on earth like this is one of the fundamental questions the equation say there should be as much anti matters. There's matter but in practice. Antimatter is actually super hard to find and Hank says nobody knows why there aren't any good ideas about this. I mean physicist. Ducey little. Bits of antimatter here and there. In fact anti electrons I discovered in cosmic rays coming from deep space way back in the nineteen thirties. And actually I've got another natural source of antimatter. Right here in the studio emily in this room. Yes ready yes. Data this banana. What are you talking about? Is this a real episode? This is an episode. About nothing and Tomfoolery. Mom Can I hold the banana to make sure it's real Alex Lane? Yes okay so obviously. The banana is not anti. It's it's matter but here's the thing about bananas. Bananas are full of Potassium. Which is really good for you. But there's also a radioactive isotope of potassium into banana. Call Potassium forty. This is a naturally occurring isotope So some Porsche. The potassium in the banana is potassium. Forty now here's the thing. Potassium forty when it decays eight usually releases an electron but very very very very rarely it releases and anti-electron so if we just hold this banana

Physicist Hank Jeffrey Angst Europe Colin Firth Jeff Jane Austen Jeff Brumfield Naidoo Scientist Aoki Adamson Alex Lane Jeff Captain Kirk United States Porsche Madeira Researcher BBC
U.S. Has Reportedly Deployed New, Small Nukes On Submarine

NPR News Now

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. Has Reportedly Deployed New, Small Nukes On Submarine

"US as reportedly deployed a new small nuclear weapon on a submarine as NPR's Jeff Bromfield explains that his arm control experts concerned. The new nuclear weapon has just a fraction of the explosive power of those currently carried on submarines its main job is to deter Russia which the trump administration believes has small nukes of tone. We're somewhat back in the sort of Cold War Tit for tat here. Hans Christianson is with the Federation of American scientists a watchdog group that reported on the nuke nuke he worries that these smaller weapons might see more usable by both sides in a conflict that could lead to escalating. Yeah once you start popping nukes folks. The bets are off and the possibility of full-scale nuclear war becomes more likely the Pentagon declined to comment on the report Jeff Brumfield. NPR News as

Jeff Bromfield Hans Christianson Jeff Brumfield NPR Npr News Russia Pentagon Federation Of American
"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KCRW

"Has backed up from Lincoln hello thanks locals at fault tonight lows in the fifties and sixties I should be on the hot side tomorrow sunny skies and your ninety fermeture LA and in the Orange County at four twenty from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm ari Shapiro and I'm Audie Cornish China India smaller nations like Israel on a cruise and Korea or all pursuing lunar ambitions this month marks the fiftieth anniversary of the first moon landing so NPR's Jeff Brumfield decided to find out why so many countries have their sights on the moon I'm December fourteenth nineteen seventy two humans left the moon zero one that was the last Apollo mission Apollo seventeen taking off from the lunar surface Emily walked a wall is with the planetary society which promotes space exploration she says after that the world kind of lost interest in the moon there was a dry patch between the time that up the Apollo and and Soviet lunar missions ended there were only a couple of missions the moon never went anywhere though it was always up there then now fickle humans have gotten interested again it just seems like things kind of go in almost like unfashionable waves satellites from several countries began showing up in the early two thousands and then in twenty thirteen he yeah ignition now starts and we have a the.

Orange County ari Shapiro Israel NPR Jeff Brumfield Apollo Emily Audie Cornish China India Korea
"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Humane treatment? We've sort of pioneered efforts to figure out, what anesthesia's are, are useful for SEPLA pods. They also work to make sure living conditions are stress-free. He says, all this is important because octopus and squid may lack backbones, but they're not at all primitive. This is exactly why. Scientists want to study them. Nell greenfieldboyce, NPR news. In late may the commercial spaceflight company, SpaceX launched rocket to what? Ignition. About an hour later that rocket released sixty satellites. They really are just slowly fanning out like a deck of cards in the space, the satellite to the first part of a massive constellation that will bring the internet to every corner of the planet and is NPR's. Jeff Brumfield reports it may forever change our view of the heavens, Victoria, gurgles does public education at the Lowell observatory in flagstaff, Arizona and a couple of nights after SpaceX launched although satellites, she saw them a bunch of little dots moving into line across the sky, and they actually crossed right in front of where the telescope was pointed. The telescope was small one gurgle uses it to show celestial objects to the observatory skits that night she was trying to photograph some faint galaxies. The bright satellites created over two dozen streaks across the image. First immediate reaction was visually kind of cool. But my second reaction was men. You can't single galaxy. The picture was basically ruined now. Gurgle wasn't the only one to notice this in the days after the launch images and videos began to pop up on social media. Jesse christianson is an astronomer at Caltech all of those videos and pictures delighted the public, but it horrified the astronomy community, because it was like wait. That's bad bad. Because professional astronomers are trying to take lots of pictures of really faint things far out in space and believe it or not, none of them thought these satellites for going to be a problem, nobody really realized until after launch that they were going to be so bright. But the satellites are bright. And here's the thing SpaceX is just getting started. The company plans on launching total of nearly twelve thousand satellites to provide global internet, other companies, including Amazon are planning similar constellations. Space is about to get much more. Crowded and Christian and says, there's not a lot of strana mors can do about it. Space is still a little bit of the wild west. Right. We're still working out who owns it, and who gets to make the rules in a statement, SpaceX says it expects the satellites to grow dimmers they've reached their final orbits. And it's looking into other ways to minimize the glare problem that will help Christians and says, but she also thinks the night skies about to undergo very big change. I think with twelve thousand low earth, orbit bright satellites now, it'll be like hard to find the things that say still you're not gonna see the same sky anymore. It'll be really interesting. It'll you know, it'll be a cultural shift on the right side. We'll have good internet. We will. And, you know, honestly, this ten thousand astronomers in the world we shouldn't stack up against the total summit, humanity. Right there. Seven billion people in the world. And the internet is an incredible gift. It can be used much good. If SpaceX exceeds that good will soon include Kathy. Anywhere on earth. Jeff Brumfield NPR news. This is NPR news. Stay with us for marketplace. And latest in traffic.

SpaceX NPR Nell greenfieldboyce Jeff Brumfield Lowell observatory Jesse christianson Caltech Arizona flagstaff Amazon Kathy gurgles
The U.S. And Russia Are Stocking Up On Missiles And Nukes For A Different Kind Of War

NPR's World Story of the Day

03:55 min | 2 years ago

The U.S. And Russia Are Stocking Up On Missiles And Nukes For A Different Kind Of War

"The US has begun production of a new nuclear weapon supporters of the weapons they it's needed to counter Russia, but critics worry it's taking America back to a time when nuclear weapons were more likely to be used NPR's, Jeff Brumfield has more. It wasn't that long ago with the military had plans to use nuclear weapons all over the place July nineteen sixty two these troops were the first hour army's history to engage in tactical exercise supported by live nuclear firepower. That's our KYW footage from the Nevada. Desert. Hundreds of troops rehearsed to the tech. But before they went in they fired a tiny nuclear weapon at a simulated enemy position it detonated perfectly releasing its lethal radiation back, then that was how some thought nuclear war would look nukes small enough to knock out just a couple of city blocks used together with conventional weapons like tanks and troops. Of course, that's not what happened radiation and other factors may nuclear weapons of bad fit for the battlefield, and as the US's conventional strength through battlefield nuclear weapons became less important and the end of the Cold War, the United States said well that was kind of stupid. Why did we have all the? Stuff. Let's get rid of it. Matthew crane is at the Atlantic Council. He also worked on nuclear strategy in the Pentagon, the US dismantled nearly all of its battlefield nuclear weapons. But Russia took a different path. It has kept thousands of battlefield nukes in storage. So today Russia has nuclear landmines nuclear torpedoes, nuclear depth charges nuclear artillery, nuclear short range missiles, and the Trump administration believes Russia would be tempted to use some of these weapons in conflict. If that happened chronic says, the US wouldn't be able to responding kind though only nukes it has left are big weapons designed to fight an apocalyptic nuclear war. So the administration has begun converting an existing larger warhead into a new smaller low-yield weapon. More like the old battlefield nukes. What the low yield nuclear weapons do say, no actually we have a range of options. If you use a low you'll nuke. Earlier weapon we can respond with one two or three of our own. I mean, well, it's insane. That's Jeffrey Lewis a scholar at the Middlebury institute of international studies, who's not a fan of battlefield nukes. The Trump administration's new warheads sits on the same missile that now carries a much more powerful nuclear weapon. So if the US did use it for some reason, all the Russians are going to see is that a missile that only carries nuclear warheads is heading toward Russia and Russian policy as Flannery. Putin has said many times is not to wait for it to land. In other words, Russia could unleash an attack on the US just to be safe or go ole occur is with the International Crisis Group. She says just the existence of smaller US weapons could cost the Russians to take battlefield nukes out of storage. They think wow, we need to deter that. No way are conventional weapons deter that. We have to emphasize the nuclear capability, she says that could end. Up countering the vastly superior conventional forces of the US, they're throwing away advantage. The Trump administration says several of these new smaller weapons will be ready to enter service later this year, but the administration's long-term plans for more battlefield nukes. Face a bigger obstacle. Newly elected Democrats have vowed to block them. Jeff Brumfield NPR news, Washington. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast.

Russia United States Trump Administration Jeff Brumfield NPR Comcast Putin Nevada Matthew Crane Jeffrey Lewis America Atlantic Council Middlebury Institute Of Intern International Crisis Group Pentagon Flannery Washington
"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Things considered from NPR news. The US has begun production of a new nuclear weapon supporters of the weapons say it's needed to counter Russia. The critics worry it's taking America back to a time when nuclear weapons were more likely to be used NPR's, Jeff Brumfield has more. It wasn't that long ago when the military had plans to use nuclear weapons all over the place, July nineteen sixty two these troops were the first in our armies history to engage in a tactical exercise supported by live nuclear firepower, that's archival footage from desert hundreds of troops rehearsed. But before they went in they fired a tiny nuclear weapon at a simulated, and we position it detonated perfectly releasing its lethal radiation back then that was how some thought nuclear war with look nukes small enough to knock out just a couple of city blocks used together with conventional weapons like tanks and troops. Of course. That's not what happened radiation and other factors made nuclear weapons of bad fit for the battlefield, and as the US's conventional strength through battlefield nuclear weapons became less important, and at the end of the Cold War, the United States said well now that was kind of stupid. Why did we have? All this stuff. Let's get rid of it. Matthew chronic is at the Atlantic Council. He also worked on nuclear strategy in the Pentagon, the US dismantled nearly all of its battlefield nuclear weapons. But Russia took a different path. It has kept thousands of battlefield nukes in storage. So today Russia has nuclear landmines nuclear torpedoes, nuclear depth charges nuclear artillery, nuclear short-range missiles, and the Trump administration believes Russia would be tempted to use some of these weapons in a conflict. If that happened chronic says, the US wouldn't be able to respond in kind though only nukes it has left are big weapons designed to fight an apocalyptic nuclear war. So the administration has begun converting an existing larger warhead into a new smaller low-yield weapon. More like the old battlefield nukes. What the low yield nuclear weapons do say, no actually we have a range of options. If you use of Oyo. Nuclear weapon, we can respond with one two or three of our own. I mean, well, it's insane. That's Jeffrey Lewis scholar at the Middlebury institute of international studies, who's not a fan of battlefield nukes. The Trump administration's new warhead sits on the same missile that now carries a much more powerful nuclear weapon. So if the US did use it for some reason, all the Russians are going to see is that a missile that only carries nuclear warheads is heading toward Russia and Russian policy as Flannery. Putin said many times is not to wait for it to land. In other words, Russia could unleash an attack on the US just to be safe or got all occur is with the International Crisis Group. She says just the existence of smaller US weapons could cost the Russians to take battlefield nukes out of storage. They think well we need to deter that. No way are conventional weapons that we have to emphasize the nuclear capability, she says that could. End up countering the vastly superior conventional forces of the US, they're throwing away advantage. The Trump administration says several of these new smaller weapons will be ready to enter service later this year, but the administration's long-term plans for more battlefield nukes. Face a bigger obstacle. Newly elected Democrats have vowed to block them. Jeff Brumfield NPR news, Washington. You're listening to all things.

Russia Trump administration United States Jeff Brumfield NPR Putin America Jeffrey Lewis Atlantic Council Middlebury institute of intern Matthew International Crisis Group Washington Pentagon Flannery
"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:45 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We know that are most vulnerable point of entry. The statistic. I didn't know if you're gonna use it. But I studied up on this, do, you know, where those four thousand people come where they're captured the airports, not always certainly says there hasn't been any terrorist that they found. Land. And it's spicy NBC then reported that the actual number of suspected terrorists detained at the border with six not thousands. According to data that customs and border protection gave congress for the first half of fiscal year two thousand eighteen presidential adviser Kellyanne Conway, then said the press secretary had made a misstatement. Well, our next guest has first-hand knowledge of the terrorist threat. And whether it is centered at the border, airports or someplace else altogether. Nick, Rasmussen ran the government's national counterterrorism center for three years through two thousand seventeen welcome. Thanks for having me. Are you briefed top government officials up to and including the president on the state of the terrorist threat did the southern border factor into those briefings. Did open only episode and not an really prominent way. It was a logical question for people to be asking are given the concerns about vulnerability of at the southern border. The were often members of congress or other senior officials who would ask, hey, how are terrorists thinking about the southern border? Are they trying to infiltrate operatives are people traveling across the southern border who are of terrorism concern, we would say in the intelligence community is to the best of our knowledge. The answer is is largely. No, they're not. It is certainly a concern is certainly a potential vulnerability. But it was a vulnerability that was not translating into actual numbers of terrorists crossing into the country. And certainly not the kind of volume that you've been hearing administration officials refer to when detail I found interesting in that document that customs and border protection provided a congress is that last year. More suspected terrorists were apprehended on the northern border with Canada than the southern border with Mexico. And again, it just goes to the to the the problem that we've seen in terms of marshalling facts in support of arguments here because again, the the the facts would suggest that we don't face a crisis at the southern border in terms of terrorists trying to cross into the United States. We have an effective watch listing system can always improve. But it's not as if we are somehow at the mercy of terrorist organizations. There are large numbers of terrorists at the southern border crossing into the United States are waiting to do. So just simply isn't the case. So when you look at where the threat actually is today, what is the weakest point? And where would you funnel money to address that? Well, as as my colleagues in government in the intelligence community have set in public testimony that the most serious threat we face from terrorism perspective here in the United States right now comes from homegrown violent extremists. And those homegrown violent extremists tend to be individuals who've been here for a long time in the United States. They may even have been born year, they have become radicalized or potentially a. Attracted to terrorist. Ideologies over time, but it's not something that attached to their particular immigration status, or when they arrived or something like that that homegrown piece of it is really the piece we should be funneling resources at working with communities to try to find ways to reach vulnerable individuals before they become radicalized before they become a potential terrorist in the community somewhere here in the United States. That's not a border security problem that's more of a community policing and community resilience problem. It's an interesting conclusion that Al Qaeda ISIS and other similar groups have found it is easier to radicalize people who are already in the country than it is to get people into the country says something about the strength of the border and airports already in the present day. And again, you know, I'm not here to tell you that our border security is perfect from terrorism or counter terrorism perspective, and there's always ways we can improve and get better. But the degree of of progress that we've made since nine eleven in making our borders. More secure is something that's not to be understated. And certainly shouldn't be shouldn't be thrown around in political debate in a way that somehow undermines the the the American public's confidence in our border security at least with respect to terrorism. It simply isn't the case that we are vulnerable at the southern border in the way that that some officials are describing that's Nick Rasmussen former head of the national counterterrorism center who worked in counterterrorism under three administrations. Thanks for joining us today. Thanks very much. All right. After several years of decline carbon dioxide emissions in the US are on the rise. That's according to a new report out today. NPR's Jeff Brumfield has more on what it could mean for the planet. Here's the upside of an economic downturn greenhouse gas emission to also go down factories are using less electricity. There are fewer trucks and planes shipping. Goodson people, and that's exactly what happened after the financial crisis of two thousand eight carbon dioxide emissions plummeted. They've been bouncing up and down since then. But last year the economy was on a roll output with up and now an estimate by the rhodium group, an independent research firm shows that CO two emissions were way up it appears based on preliminary data that emissions in the US grew by the highest rave since two thousand and ten when we were covering from the great recession Trevor Hauser's and author on the new estimate, he says carbon dioxide emissions are up roughly. Three point four percent over last year. The big drivers are increases intellect trysofi. Demand which burns natural gas and coal and big growth in trucking and aviation on Amazon packages all those holiday vacations that come with a booming economy. Now there were some areas where decisions by government and industry made a difference. A record number of coal fired power plants closed in two thousand eighteen and emissions. From passenger automobiles drops slightly due to better fuel economy standards. But it was not enough and Hauser wants more aggressive policies to drive down. CO two had seems unlikely for now policies to limit greenhouse gas emissions started under the Obama administration are now being halted and even reversed under President Trump. What we've seen as backsliding in federal policy, and we're starting to feel the effects of that now. So is Houser rooting for another recession to bring a mission down. Again. I I am not I am not short-term emissions decline. As a result of a recession as not something anyone cheering for what's needed. He says is a strong economy and the right incentives to invest in green technologies. Jeff Brumfield NPR.

United States congress Nick Rasmussen Trevor Hauser NBC Jeff Brumfield NPR Kellyanne Conway president Canada press secretary Al Qaeda ISIS NPR Mexico Jeff Brumfield Houser
"jeff brumfield" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"After several years of decline carbon dioxide emissions in the US are on the rise. That's according to a new report out today. NPR's Jeff Brumfield has more on what it could mean for the planet. Here's the upside of an economic downturn greenhouse gas emissions. Also, go down factories are using less electricity. There are fewer trucks and planes shipping. Goodson people, and that's exactly what happened after the financial crisis of two thousand eight carbon dioxide emissions plummeted. They've been bouncing up and down since then. But last year the economy was on a roll output was up and now an estimate by the rhodium group, an independent research firm shows that CO two emissions were way up it appears based on preliminary data that emissions in the US crew by the highest rate since two thousand and ten when we were covering from the great recession Trevor Hauser's and author on the new estimate, he says carbon dioxide emissions. Our approach. Roughly three point four percent over last year. The big drivers were increases in electric demand which burns natural gas and coal and big growth in trucking and aviation Amazon packages all those holiday vacations that come with a booming economy. Now there were some areas where decisions by government and industry made a difference. A record number of coal fired power plants closed in two thousand eighteen and emissions. From passenger automobiles dropped slightly due to better fuel economy standards. But it was not enough and Hauser wants more aggressive policies to drive down. CO two had seems unlikely for now policies to limit greenhouse gas emission started under the Obama administration are now being halted and even reversed under President Trump. What we've seen as backsliding in federal policy, and we're starting to feel the effects of that now. So is Houser rooting for another recession to bring a mission down. Again. I I am not I am not short term emissions decline. As a result of a recession is not something anyone's cheering for what's needed. He says is a strong economy and the right incentives to invest in green technologies. Jeff Brumfield NPR news..

Jeff Brumfield Trevor Hauser US NPR Houser Goodson rhodium group Amazon President Trump Obama administration four percent
"jeff brumfield" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"After several years of decline carbon dioxide emissions in the US are on the rise. That's according to a new report out today. NPR's Jeff Brumfield has more on what it could mean for the planet. Here's the upside of an economic downturn greenhouse gas emissions to also go down factories are using less electricity. There are fewer trucks and planes shipping goods and people, and that's exactly what happened after the financial crisis of two thousand eight carbon dioxide emissions plummeted. They've been bouncing up and down since then. But last year the economy was on a roll output was up and now an estimate by the rhodium group, an independent research firm shows that CO two emissions were way up it appears based on preliminary data that emissions in the US crew by the highest rates since two thousand and ten when we were covering from the great recession Trevor Hauser's and author on the new estimate, he says carbon dioxide emissions. Our approach. Flee three point four percent over last year. The big drivers who are increases in demand, which burns natural gas and coal and big growth in trucking and aviation the Amazon packages all those holiday vacations that come with a booming economy. Now there were some areas where decisions by government and industry made a difference. A record number of coal fired power plants closed in two thousand eighteen and emissions. From passenger automobiles dropped slightly due to better fuel economy standards. But it was not enough and Houser wants more aggressive policies to drive down. CO two had seems unlikely for now policies to limit greenhouse gas emission started under the Obama administration are now being halted and even reversed under President Trump. What we've seen as backsliding in federal policy, and we're starting to feel the effects of that now. So is Houser rooting for another recession to bring a mission statement again, I I am not I am not short-term emissions decline. As a result of a recession is not something anyone's cheering for what's needed. He says is a strong economy and the right incentives to invest in green technologies. Jeff Brumfield NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Plane.

Jeff Brumfield Houser US NPR Trevor Hauser rhodium group Amazon President Trump Obama administration four percent
"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KCRW

"And has threatened to attack the parts of Syria that they control Baltin did meet with his Turkish count. Parts. But shortly after the meeting president Edwin said, he would make no concessions for the US's Kurdish allies and even said that preparations for Turkish military offensive against them to a large extent complete wreath. Shylock NPR news Beirut us emissions of carbon dioxide rose sharply last year, according to a new report out today. NPR's Jeff Brumfield has more on what's behind the rise. The report by an independent consultancy called the rhodium group shows carbon dioxide emissions for up and estimated three point four percent in two thousand eighteen that's the first increase in three years. The rights comes despite the closing of a record number of coal fire power plants. The report says the strong economy led to the increase nationwide natural gas plants pumped out electricity to Hungary industrial customers in the transportation sector demand for diesel and jet fuel also rose the increase means that the US is farther for meeting its goals under the Paris. Climate agreement. President Trump has pledged to withdraw from that agreement next year. Jeff Brumfield NPR news on Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrials are up two hundred sixty points or more than one percent. The NASDAQ is up nearly fifty points. You're listening to NPR and from KCRW, I'm Cheri Glazer was state and local headlines. Gavin Newsom has taken the oath of office to become the fortieth governor of California. And after all the pomp and circumstance surrounding the inauguration yesterday, he got down to work as KCRW Darryl Sassaman reports Newsom announced several policy initiatives related to healthcare, affordability newsome's. First act is governor was to propose state funded health coverage for nearly one hundred and fifty thousand young people in the country illegally and a reinstatement of a mandate that everyone buy health insurance or face fines, that's known as the single payer model. Newsom also proposed giving subsidies to middle class families that earn too much to qualify. I for ObamaCare subsidies his plan would provide assistance for families of four making up to a hundred and fifty thousand dollars Newsom also sent a letter to President Donald Trump and congressional leaders seeking more authority over federal healthcare dollars policies in California. And he signed an order giving the state more bargaining power in negotiating prescription drug prices. Four. Do you.

Gavin Newsom President Donald Trump Jeff Brumfield NPR US California president Edwin Syria Cheri Glazer Baltin Beirut Hungary Darryl Sassaman
"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reasoning I believe President Trump has to stick to his guns. And fortunately, it is affecting a lot of workers. And hopefully, they'll be able to resolve this quickly passenger Jonathan Holly is from Atlanta. He says Trump is having a tantrum. This whole Trump shutting everything down. He's a crybaby. You know, what I'm saying is one way. This. Anybody else? This is a shame. President Trump will speak to the nation tonight about border security secretary of state, Mike Pompeo is in Jordan on the start of the Mideast trip. He'll address the confusion over how US troops may withdraw from Syria. Trump is said troops will leave within weeks, but national security adviser John Bolton says they won't until ISIS is defeated. Bolton. Also says Turkey needs to guarantee it won't jeopardize US backed Kurdish fighters who have opposed ISIS NPR's Ruth Sherlock says Bolton who was in Turkey has now been rebuffed by the Turkish president moments before do was set to meet with national security adviser John Bolton the meeting was cancelled the move was seen as a snub by the Turkish president. He's angered by Bolton's accession that the US must secure the interests of its local Kurdish allies in Syria before troop withdrawal tacky sees these kaddish authorities as being aligned with militants that it considers terrorists and has threatened to attack the parts of Syria that they control Bolton did meet. With his counterpart. But shortly after the meeting president Edwin said, he would make no concessions for the US's Kurdish allies and even said that preparations for techies military offensive against them to a large extent complete with Sherlock. NPR news Beirut new s emissions of carbon dioxide rose sharply last year, according to a new report out today. NPR's Jeff Brumfield has more on what's behind the rise. The report by an independent consultancy called the rhodium group shows carbon dioxide emissions for up an estimated three point four percent in two thousand eighteen that's the first increase in three years. The rights comes despite the closing of a record number of coal fire power plants. The report says that the strong economy led to the increase nationwide natural gas plants pumped out electricity to Hungary industrial customers in the transportation sector demand for diesel and jet fuel also rose the increase means that the US has farther for meeting its goals. Under the Paris climate agreement. President Trump has pledged to withdraw from that agreement next year. Jeff Brumfield NPR news on Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrials are up two hundred sixty points or more than one percent. The NASDAQ is up nearly fifty points. You're listening to NPR from K Q E D news, I'm Brian watt state and federal officials want to set up a dumpsite in Oroville for a million tonnes of non hazardous debris from the campfire. But some Oroville residents have raised environmental concerns about the proposed site which used to be a wood treatment plant where hazardous material had to be cleaned up. By the way, Eric Lambro is the acting director of the governor's office of emergency services, which is overseeing the cleanup. He says fficials are prepared to mitigate any safety issues that could arise at the site. One of the biggest badgers we'd be doing is bringing in a significant amount of material to cover the site. So that all of our equipment is operating in an elevated fashion. The soil. That's there. Now Lambro says there are at least eight other sites under consideration. And a final decision is expected before the end of the month. San Francisco mayor London breed says, she's hopeful governor Gavin Newsom will work with her on some of her city's biggest issues after newsome's inauguration ceremony. Yesterday breed outline where she thinks the new governor could help local governments.

President Trump John Bolton NPR US president Syria Jeff Brumfield Jonathan Holly Ruth Sherlock Eric Lambro Turkey fficials Oroville Atlanta Mike Pompeo Beirut Brian watt
Russia's 2016 Election Meddling More Comprehensive Than Realized

All Things Considered

04:08 min | 2 years ago

Russia's 2016 Election Meddling More Comprehensive Than Realized

"Focused on developing an audience and even recruiting asset so people to act in the real world to say stage rallies. Now, one of the report says that a main message that was pushed to African American voters was that it was best to sit out the election to boycott the election. The press turn out, right? And then one example of a fake persona. That was created by the IRA that got a lot of traction is an Instagram account set up with the username of that blacks to Graham, and it had more than three hundred thousand followers. It is worth pointing out that much of the focus up until now has been on Facebook and Twitter. But these researchers are saying that the Russians also use Instagram and other social media platforms. Right, right. One of the things that these reports made clear is that the Russians leveraged every major social media platform Instagram had largely stayed under the radar. That's no longer. The case. These reports say that Instagram was actually a huge part of Russia's efforts online. For example, one of the report says that fake Russian content on Facebook received seventy six point five million engagements on Instagram fake, Russian content earned more than two times as many engagements is that researchers say importantly, looking ahead that the Russians have shifted a lot of their activity to Instagram since the election, which is an important point the Russians are still using social media. Try to influence Americans. That's absolutely, right. And it's a really important point to make that Russians continue to use fake accounts on these platforms for nefarious purposes. So you mentioned that the Senate supplied the data. These researchers used is congress planning to do anything more to stop Russia or any other country from using social media to influence US voters. Well, there's certainly been chatter from lawmakers about possible legislation social media companies would prefer to deal with this without any sort of legislation regulation, of course, one of the reasons that we are talking about this. And this report is out is it puts the public's attention on material online, and with the hope that Americans will be more judicious about what they're engaging with online. That's NPR's. Ryan lucas. Thanks, ryan. Thank you. Thirty one years ago this month. Ronald Reagan turned to Mikhail Gorbachev and spoke these words dove, no provi trust. But verify the occasion was the White House signing of the intermediate range nuclear forces treaty. The I n f as it's known the treaty bans. Both the US and Russia from having land launched missiles that can fly from three hundred to thirty four hundred miles. Washington says Russia has been cheating on the treaty. And now the US is threatening to pull out that could spell the end of what has been considered one of the most successful, Cold War era, arms, control, treaties, more. We're going to take a few minutes here to lay out what is going on. And why it matters here in the studio to help with that our national security correspondent, David welna? Hi there, Mary Louise and our in house nuclear expert. Jeff Brumfield, welcome to you. Hi, David you start. What is the US beef here? What why does the US wanna pull out? Well, the US says that since the end of the last Bush admin. Station. Russia has been out of compliance with the treaty that Russia has been not only developing but also fielding cruise missiles that are in violation of the treaty and the Obama administration this publicly for the first time four years ago. So this isn't just the Trump administration. Leveling these complaints. This goes back, but President Trump in October said that the US was going to pull out of the treaty. And then earlier this month secretary of state, Mike Pompeo went to Brussels, and he said Russia would have sixty days to come back into compliance with the treaty or the US would begin the formal six-month notification process for pulling out of the treaty. Here's what Tom PEO said Russia admits it's violations and fully and verifiably comes back into compliance. We will of course, welcome. That course of action and just to keep the clock straight here. David Pompeo was talking you said earlier this month he gives Russia sixty days to come back into compliance. So that means the US is looking for something by what February by February for them to come back into compliance. And if they don't by early August, the US would no longer be a party to the treaty and just briefly what does Moscow say today acknowledged that they're cheating on the treaty Moscow. At first denied that they even had

Russia United States Instagram Facebook David Pompeo Ryan Lucas Mike Pompeo Senate Twitter NPR Graham Ronald Reagan White House David Welna Congress Tom Peo Jeff Brumfield President Trump Mikhail Gorbachev
"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KCRW

"The co not the Kahan pass but through the tone pass. This is the great right is open, both directions. Open even after some snow earlier today, and we also have opened now the PCH PCH, which is going through the Malibu area also opened up to those mudslides five twenty from NPR news. This is all things considered. I melt Mary Louise Kelley news today that North Korea has been expanding one of its missile basis. That's according to a new analysis of satellite, imagery, NPR's, Jeff Brumfield has more the US knew about this base. It's in a remote mountain valley in the very northern part of the country right near the Chinese border. So it's very hard to get to Jeffrey Lewis with the Middlebury institute of international studies, speaking on Skype. He was part of the team that looked at commercial satellite images. And when he and others looked carefully. They noticed something else about seven miles away. It was extremely well camouflaged. And we had not noticed it before a new base or maybe an extension and at this new facility. The North Koreans are digging big time creating a giant underground cavern in the side of a mountain. You can just see from the amount of dirt and rock that they've pulled out from the tunnel. How large it is. It's one of the larger North Korean underground facilities I've ever seen. This new underground facility. Probably has just one purpose. Lewis says to house North Korea's largest missiles like the intercontinental ballistic missiles it claims construct the US the digging has been taking place all year, even after President Trump's June summit with North Korean leader, Kim Jong UN Trump has touted the summit is a success here. He is talking about it at a rally back in October. No, more rockets. Right. I say all the time. No, more rockets. No more missiles, no more nuclear testing. So suicide north going back on its word. No says Eric brewer he worked in the Trump White House coordinating sanctions against the north. And he says Kim Jong UN promised not to test but said nothing about missile bases. There's no deception here. He's not breaking any of his commitments that he has made Trump now onto another summit brewer says there's been no lower level talks to discuss things like the basis he worries a summit will go badly without the preparation. I think we put ourselves in a dangerous position when we put President Trump and Kim Jong UN and the room together to try and agree to some of these details, so far the north has declined to meet at a lower level. Trump says he hopes the next summit can happen early next year. Jeff Brumfield NPR news Washington in Ethiopia, the young protesters who forced out the country's repressive government. This year were seen as heroes now. Many worry their ambitions. Could tear the country apart members of the large aroma ethnic group took to the streets to seek equality and after three years they helped bring down a prime minister as part of our coverage of the transition in east Africa NPR's ADA, Peralta met, the group's leaders and asked whether they risk inflaming dangerous ethnic tensions. Komo.

President Trump Jeffrey Lewis Kim Jong UN Trump North Korea Jeff Brumfield Trump White House Eric brewer NPR US Kahan Mary Louise Kelley mountain valley Middlebury institute of intern Ethiopia prime minister Washington
"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KCRW

"It's eight thirty live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. President Trump is taking aim at yet, another international treaty. This time it's the US arms control pact with Russia that eliminates an entire class of nuclear weapons. Trump says Russia's repeatedly violated the packs, so there's no point in even having a treaty. But as NPR's Jeff Brumfield tells us experts say there are more pros and cons of sticking with it most arms control experts want America to stay in because the US doesn't really need to build these kinds of weapons. And so even if Russia is cheating or maybe trying to cheat. It's better to have the treaty. So you can point to say, hey, guys knock it off than it is to get rid of the treaty entirely NPR's. Jeff Brumfield Trump has withdrawn the US from other critical agreements as well, including the Iran nuclear deal in the Paris climate accord, the US army confirms that the unidentified soldier injured in last week's Taliban attack in southern Afghanistan is a General Janet. For glass in Kabul has more on the gunman behind the assaulted. Also killed two top Afghan officials including candy hearts powerful chief of police Taleban infiltrated one of the most secure compounds in Canada heart. He got a job as the governor's bodyguard about six weeks ago using a fake identity. According to Afghantistan intelligence chief, he says, the attack was planned in neighboring Pakistan and of the shooter made a phone call to Pakistan moments before opening fire. That's Jennifer glass reporting. The Dow is down sixty three points. You're listening to NPR news and from KCRW, I'm Cheri Glazer with state and local headlines, the department of health and human services plans to gender as a fixed status. Oh..

Jeff Brumfield Trump US NPR Russia Jeff Brumfield Lakshmi Singh Pakistan Kabul Cheri Glazer Washington Jennifer glass intelligence chief Taliban Canada Iran KCRW department of health
"jeff brumfield" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Intelligence committee congressman thanks against your time thank you i appreciate it today the trump administration released a report on america's nuclear weaponry most of the assessment was of the pentagon's nukes and missiles but buried in the plan was also mention of a mysterious russian weapon called status six and pierce jeff brumfield reports that status six appears to be some kind of a doomsday device if it's real status six made its first public appearance two years ago edward geist this with the rand corporation putin was receiving a briefing from is generals when he was on a visit to soji who peter fees dominion about only clear to russia state television reported the visit the camera showed who didn't seated long table with his generals and then it cuts to a shot over one of the general shoulders he's looking at the drawing of a weapon now it seems like the camera just happened to catch the drawing but guy says this was no accident or general consensus of this was very intentional this is all very engineered by the russians the drawing appears to be a new nuclear weapon a weapon far more powerful than anything in the us or russian arsenals its name the oceanic multipurpose system status six status six it looks like a giant torpedo about a third the length of a big russian submarine specification on the slide this thing is faster than most or all of our torpedoes it's the post operated depth greater than our submarines can go its nuclear powered so it can travel thousands of miles underwater without surfacing if the slide is to be believed in we'll talk more about that in a second then status six would launch from beneath the russian submarine it would shoot under the ocean at a depth too deep to be intercepted and then incinerate a u s coastal city in terms of the sheer destructiveness of such a weapon it's i mean it's a little is difficult to imagine a normal terms because the radius of total or neartotal destruction as the size of a pretty lord metropolitan area actually pavel podvig who runs a blog called russian forces says the size of the bomb might also cause radioactive fallout on a.

congressman america pentagon putin us jeff brumfield edward geist rand corporation russia two years
"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A review the review of the nation's nuclear weapons that review is almost complete and it paints a picture of a more dangerous nuclear world it also recommend some pretty big changes to us policy and here's jeff brumfield covers nuclear weapons he's here now welcome thank you power for the courses this president stu they always come into office get elected take the oath or nuclear review well ed is not required but it has become increasingly common so president george w bush did a review of barack obama did the last one in 2010 it's called a nuclear posture review and so it's sort of a submission other npr the other npr beat of where we are with nuclear weapons what kind of weapons we have what our policies are the huffington post last week got a hold of a draft version of this latest npr from the trump administration and so it really provides the the most comprehensive look we've seen so far at sort of how the trump administration views nuclear weapons find so what does it say i mean we said that he there are some recommendations for some big changes mike went well uh one thing i've which i suppose isn't really big change the first priority assists or to upgrade and modernize existing nuclear weapons side and that was very much obama policy as well would these weapons are gang older and they need to be refurbish just so they don't break down frankly but there is something new here that's called a lot of people side to new things actually lowyield nuclear weapon that could be launched from a submarine we're talking about something in the range of a few kilotonnes the bomb that was trapped on her shimao was fifteen kilotonnes and then a c launched cruise missile that could be launch from a strip or summary and why would the us need these i mean what would they allow the us military to do that it can't do with the.

nuclear weapons jeff brumfield president barack obama huffington post npr mike us george w bush
"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Talks have been difficult in the past so so it does seem like a difficult moment there aren't a lot of options i'm just putting all of this together and a half the sage if you're you're scared me a little bit i mean if if they don't have to do necessarily any other testing to be nuclear power there declaring their nuclear power they've tested these business these big missiles they have test they have carried out nuclear test i mean how worried should americans be right now well i mean it's a dangerous time there's a lot of potential from miscommunication miscalculation but there is a way out by declaring a nuclear powered by declaring itself nuclear power north korea may be offering a window for talks they may be same we don't need to test anymore and so we may have an opportunity here to deescalate the situation npr editor jeff brumfield are talking to us after the new tests by north korea i'm geoff thanks thank you now we have a story about the power of science to heal for decades scientists have been dreaming about curing diseases with gene therapy those dreams have not become reality but there is growing excitement now npr health correspondent rob stein reports nattily wheatley was terrified that might be something wrong with her baby either with born healing move agnency and after he was born doctors told her her worst fears were true he had a terrible incurable genetic disease that was destroying his muscles basically timing he went making his first birthday taking harmon live amen send as much time i came as you can add and i'm going to me ours the i was devastated moved when christian chorkina was born he was also diagnosed with a rare genetic disease his wasn't fatal but was destroying his vision i wouldn't be able to walk around outside by my own it would be incredibly dark um blurry end sort of watching your world fade away but wheat leeson eli is still alive he's now three and seems to be thriving in lebanon kentucky he just started preschool in september he goes to preschool alone he eats in the cafeteria with with all the other kids he's doing extremely well extremely well it's been amazing truly amazing and christian gorgino who seventeen and lives in pawtucket new york can now see things he only dreamed about i was.

nuclear power north korea jeff brumfield christian chorkina lebanon pawtucket new york npr editor geoff rob stein nattily wheatley harmon kentucky
"jeff brumfield" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Power with uh uh in those tests but yes i mean it still could go that extra step so in response to us missile test trump said at a press conference we will take care of it we need situation that we will handle what does that mean what can the youth actually do right now yeah i mean that was a pretty muted response compared to what president trump is set in the past he's made some pretty bellicose statements other hawks have gone from being lindsey graham was talking about uh shortly after the test go into wharf nate need be that seems a little unrealistic to to a lot of independent experts mean basically what's happened to see us as kind kinda backed its way into a classic deterrence situations similar to what we have with russia and china the nauru has a pretty serious looking capability we don't know exactly what it can do uh by you know if if we try to hit them they could hit us potentially they could had our allies with a major nuclear weapon and so were were the sorta standoff we've seen with other powers um and you know talks been difficult in the past so so it does seem like a difficult moment there aren't a lot of options i'm just putting all of this together and i have to say jefford your skin me a little bit i mean if they don't have to do necessarily any other testing to be a nuclear power they are declaring their nuclear power they've tested these these these big missiles they have test they have carried out nuclear test i mean how worried should americans be right now well i mean it's a dangerous time there's a lot for miscommunication miscalculation but there is a way out by declaring a nuclear power by declaring itself nuclear power north korea may be offering a window for talks they made the same we don't need to test anymore and so we may have an opportunity here to deescalate the situation and pure science editor jeff brumfield talking to us after the nuclear tests korea thank you now we have a story about the power of science to heal for decades scientists and dreaming of curing diseases with gene therapy though dreams have not become reality but there is growing excitment now npr health correspondent rob stein reports natalie wheatley with terrified that might.

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"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 4 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To price their policies two ways with the subsidies and without and there's a big difference in some cases is the difference between a single digit percentage increase in premiums for next year and a twenty percent plus increase npr scott horsely president trump is expected to say today he will not recertify iran's compliance with ron's international nuclear accord the president's action would allow congress to decide whether to snap back new sanctions on iran and try to renegotiate the deal california fire officials say at least thirty one people have been killed in this week's incredibly destructive wildfires thousands of buildings have burned scientists who steady wildfires see these latest blazes is part of a pattern and pierre's jeff brumfield has more fire colleges jennifer baulch says it's been a hot dry summer korea but a western have broken record crowd drier how do i from that includes california oregon and montana the climate connection to wildfires his pretty obvious hot conditions dry out foliage creating fuel for the flames baulch should the university of colorado bolder says that over eight million acres have burned so far this year because nobody pushing one of the largest tyre year decade that's the big picture but climate isn't solely to blame for the fires in northern california strong winds are the main reason they are spreading with alarming speed jeff from feel npr news iraq's government is sending military forces to the border with each region of kurdistan kurdish forces are doing the same and fears gina raff reports from the kurdish city of arbil the move comes after the kurdistan region voted for independence last month kurdish statements warning of an impending attack by iraqi forces have many a year worried about war but the iraqi military says it has no intention of attacking and says troop movements in disputed territories are part of the ongoing fight against isis the kurdish government has deployed more fighters to the city of kirkuk and built defence of sand barriers near a main highway that leads to iraqi governmentcontrolled territory tori baghdad has retaliated for the kurdish vote for independence by banning international flights to the region and issuing arrest warrants for referendum officials jana raff npr news reveal on wall street the dow jones industrial average is up thirty six points the nasdaq is up sixteen this is npr from kqed news i'm brian and what we're providing updates throughout the day on the.

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"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of hawaii we appreciate your joining us from honolulu thanks very much thank you so much as concern grows over north korea's nuclear weapons president trump tweeted this morning about the us arsenal he wrote my first order as president was to renovate in modern is our nuclear arsenal is now far stronger and more powerful than ever before we wanted to fact check the president's even so we've s p r science editor jeff brumfield take a look look into the city adjust highlighted what have you learned so far well there's a lot of questions around some of the facts in that tweet this morning first of all present trump's first executive order had to do with repealing the affordable care act not nuclear weapons although his secretary of defense james mattis put out a statement today saying that when the trumps first orders to mattis had to do with nuclear weapons it rob megatons the us arsenal is smaller than it was at the height of the cold war although the us still has almost five thousand nuclear weapons which is plenty of most people's books in fact they're really hasn't been any perceptible changes to the nuclear arsenal since trump's inauguration but it is true that president trump has been concerned about the state of the nuclear arsenal going back to when he was a candidate during the presidential debates for instance areas with hillary clinton she talks tough against russia but our new earlier program has fallen way behind and they've gone wild with their nuclear program not convince my government shouldn't of allowed that didn't happen russia is new in terms of nuclear we are rolled with tired were exhausted in terms of nuclear now jeff you also said that the nuclear arsenal is smaller and less powerful help us understand the contacts for the president's concerns right it is true that russia is in the process of deploying new missiles and testing new systems to deliver nuclear weapons and that's cause for concern for sure it's also true the americas nuclear arsenal has shrunk since the cold war.

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"jeff brumfield" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"jeff brumfield" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"What would it mean to modernize as force well the nuclear forces broken into three parts there submarines there's bomber sin than their cease stig intercontinental ballistic missiles and all three of these are set to be upgraded in the coming decades and actually replaced this is going to be enormously expensive the congressional budget office estimates it would cost four hundred billion over just the next decade over thirty years that could go to well over trillion dollars in trump is going to have to make some hard choices about the program in fact in january he ordered the pentagon to conduct a review of the nuclear arsenal in the end it what do you see as the status of this arsenal i've been speaking to experts day and i think daryl kimbal of the arms control association of sums it up best the united state has the world's most deadly incremental all nuclear arsenal uh there's no there's no doubt about it are no us strategic mander with trade the us arsenal for another country arsenal now that's not an endorsement by the way i should say the arms control association is advocating for fewer nuclear weapons not more but the bottom line is that the reason there's all this old equipment out there is that it works in the us knows it works it's reliable earlier this month the us fired an unarmed ice gm from california across the pacific ocean four thousand two hundred miles away in the flu perfectly in it landed right on target so i mean i think despite all this talk over the past few days and weeks at the bottom line is the nuclear arsenal is very powerful and very reliable that's n pierre science editor jeff brumfield thank you so much thank you i do ludi lin.

intercontinental ballistic mis pentagon nuclear arsenal daryl kimbal us arms control association nuclear weapons gm california flu jeff brumfield n pierre science editor trillion dollars thirty years