35 Burst results for "Jeff Brady"

Congress passes $900 billion compromise COVID-19 relief package

Morning Edition

01:15 min | Last month

Congress passes $900 billion compromise COVID-19 relief package

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Winter Johnston Congress has passed the next coronavirus relief bill, ending a monthlong stalemate. Roughly $900 billion measure includes an extension of jobless benefits and another round of direct payments. It also includes the most significant federal legislation addressing climate change in over a decade. NPR's Jeff Brady reports. The bill contains a phase down of heat trapping greenhouse gas is used in brief Redrants hydrofluorocarbons or HFCs are used in refrigerators and air conditioners. But in the environment there are powerful contributor to climate change. Governments agreed to phase down there use over 15 years. This legislation accomplishes that in the U. S. Environmental groups and affected companies supported the legislation. Chain of it with the U. S. Chambers has developing new refrigerants creates thousands of jobs. The US has been a leader in this space, and this will allow us to maintain that leadership, reducing imports from international technologies and increasing exports of US develop technologies. The relief package also includes billions of dollars for renewable energy research and development. Jeff Brady. NPR News

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Climate Activists Want Biden To Bar Appointees With Fossil Fuel Ties

Environment: NPR

03:27 min | 2 months ago

Climate Activists Want Biden To Bar Appointees With Fossil Fuel Ties

"Joe biden has an ambitious climate plan and there are a lot of people with government experience. Who could help implement that plan. But some of them have ties to fossil fuel industries and that is a problem for climate change activists. Npr's jeopardy reports in philadelphia recently. A group of young climate activists marched to biden's campaign headquarters. The sunrise movement often pressures democrats. Back the green new deal but instead biden offered his own climate plan for a slower transition away from coal oil and gas. He has not committed to barring people with fossil fuel ties from his administration. Lauren martinez was sunrise. Thinks he should biden ran on the most progressive climate agenda in us history and one on it. So it's incumbent upon him to take that seriously and put forward people who are accountable to the people that elected him to office the head of the natural resources defense council and former epa administrator gina mccarthy says she understands why young activists want to ban on appointees connected to fossil fuels especially after trump. Put them in key posts including andrew wheeler a former coal industry lobbyist. I mean that's who has been running the environmental protection agency and has gotten us nowhere fast. It's backed us up. It hasn't supported a growing clean energy economy. But here's a problem with a fossil fuel will litmus test biden won't govern alone the us senate could remain under republican leadership that means passing legislation would require compromise and bradbury is ceo of the american exploration and production council. Americans voted for divided government. As part of that you know. I think they voted for moderation. And i think they voted for commonsense. Bradberry sees a future for fossil fuels even under biden's ambitious plan for net zero carbon emissions by twenty fifty worried about climate. Change say there are issues. Republicans and democrats likely can agree on heather. Reams was citizens for responsible. Energy solutions suggests activist focus on things like economic stimulus that boost clean energy. They should looking at the bigger policies and getting to what's possible with getting climate action done today rather than arguing about the position on one's resume among the names on the biden transition team a few have limited ties to fossil fuel but more are from environmental groups. Jody freeman served as councillor for energy and climate change on the obama white house now freeman is at harvard law school and says she sees a trend in the people selected so far i think the clear messages vitality one good people in place wrestling start who have experienced any days and not wasting any time. Freeman is a good example of those who could be excluded. If a biden administration rejects people connected to fossil fuel companies. She sits on the board of oil company conaco phillips but she also led obama's effort to double car fuel efficiency standards. She's also an expert on using presidential powers to address climate change. That's knowledge that likely will be necessary if both parties can't agree on new climate legislation when biden his sworn in next year. Jeff brady npr news.

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Trump and Biden debate their climate and environmental policies

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:42 min | 3 months ago

Trump and Biden debate their climate and environmental policies

"A lot at Thursday's debate. There was this telling exchange about climate change. Would you close the have a transition from their own industry? Yes. It is a big statement, President Trump again boosted the fossil fuel industries contributing to global warming. Joe Biden is campaigning on a plan for Net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. NPR's Jeff Brady has more on his $2 trillion proposal. Joe Biden's climate plan is ambitious for an economy is big and complex as the United States, but even those connected to fossil fuel industry say it may be doable. Scott Siegal with the energy focused law firm. Bracewell says the plan is pragmatic and includes both regulations and incentives for the growing list of companies focused on using cleaner energy in the future. One thing that makes Biden's approach somewhat comfortable is that you can sketch out that linear commitment to additional resource is to achieve these objectives, which I think most people in business, believe me. Are going to be the future anyway. The country has one example of meeting an ambitious climate goal. The Obama administration's clean power plan aimed to cut emissions from power plants, about a third by 2030. Even though court challenges stopped the plan from going into effect, the country is ahead of schedule. David Doniger is with NRDC Action Fund, The political arm of the natural resource is defense counsel. The power sector is already undergoing changes that have reduced their emissions by more than 30% 10 years ahead of the target that the Obama administration thought was aggressive. In 2015, a big part of that was the collapse of the coal industry. Coal fired power plants continue to go out of business, replaced with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Still, the bite and climate plan faces significant hurdles. It relies on technologies that haven't been developed or may not be commercially viable. That's why the plan includes $400 billion over a decade for research. With the economic hit from the Corona virus pandemic. Biden's campaign updated the plan this summer. It includes billions of dollars to hire people for things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations. Steph Feldman, with the bite and campaign says the plan also focuses on environmental justice. 40% of the benefit of those investments go to community, the color and low income communities that have been disproportionately harmed by pollution and the effects of climate change. This is especially important to the most vocal climate change activists. While Biden has distanced himself from the green new deal, it is popular, especially with the left wing of his party. Jenny Marino, Zimmer with 3 50 actions as this's thie strongest plan yet from a Democratic presidential nominee, the Biden campaign has committed to doing some really great things like ending leasing of fossil fuels on public lands. We'd like to see them go further and create a true phase out for the entire fossil fuel mystery over Of course of the next decade. Biden's plan has a longer timeline for a transition and includes a role for fossil fuels with offsets and carbon capture. Amy Myers Jaffe manages the climate policy Labatt Tufts University and says overall, this is a credible plan for addressing climate change. The Biden campaign has listed the right things. But the difference between listing things and implementing those things is a big difference. If Biden is elected, he'll likely need a Democratic Congress willing to pass laws and allocate money

Joe Biden Obama Administration Fossil Fuel Industries Amy Myers Jaffe Jeff Brady NPR Scott Siegal United States Bracewell Steph Feldman President Trump Nrdc Action Fund Labatt Tufts University David Doniger Congress
Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

Environment: NPR

03:44 min | 3 months ago

Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

"At Thursday's debate, there was this telling exchange about climate change. Would you close the? Transition from oil minister yes. I was trying to. It is a big statement president trump again boosted the fossil fuel industries contributing to global warming. Joe. Biden is campaigning on a plan for net zero greenhouse gas emissions by twenty fifty and peers. Jeff Brady has more on his two trillion dollar proposal Joe Biden's climate plan is ambitious for an economy as big and complex as the United States but even those connected to fossil fuel industry. Say it. May Be Doable Scott Siegel with the energy focused law firm Bracewell says plan is pragmatic and includes both regulations and incentives for the growing list of companies focused on using cleaner energy in the future one thing that makes Biden's approach somewhat comfortable is that you can sketch out that linear commitment to additional resources to achieve these objectives which I think most people in business believe are going to be. The future anyway, the country has one example of meeting an ambitious climate goal. The Obama Administration's clean power plan aimed to cut emissions from power plants about a third by twenty thirty even though court challenges stopped the plan from going into effect, the country is ahead of schedule David. Doniger. IS WITH NRDC Action Fund the political arm of the Natural Resources Defense Council, the power sector is already undergoing. Changes have reduced their emissions by more than thirty percent ten years ahead of the target that the Obama Administration thought was aggressive in two thousand fifteen. A big part of that was the collapse of the coal industry coal fired power plants continue to go out of business replaced with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Still, the Biden, climate plan faces significant hurdles it relies on technologies that haven't been. Developed or may not be commercially viable. That's why the plan includes four hundred billion dollars over a decade for research with the economic hit from the coronavirus pandemic Biden's campaign updated the plan this summer it includes billions of dollars to hire people for things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations. Steph Feldman with the Biden campaign says, the plan also focuses on environmental justice forty percent. Of the benefits of those investments, go to communities of color and low income communities that have been disproportionately harmed by pollution and the exit climate change. This is especially important to the most vocal climate change activists while Biden has distanced himself from the green new deal. It is popular especially with the left wing of his party Jenny Marino Zimmer with three fifty actions as this is the strongest plan. Yet from a Democratic presidential nominee, the Biden campaign has committed to doing some really great things like ending leasing of also feels on public lands. We'd like to see them go further and create a true phase out for the entire fossil fuel mystery over the course of the next decade. Biden's plan has a longer time line for a transition and includes a role for fossil fuels with offsets and. Carbon Capture Amy Myers Jaffe manages the climate policy lab at Tufts University and says, all this is a credible plan for addressing climate change. The Biden campaign has listed the right things but the difference between listing things and getting those things is a big difference. If Biden is elected, he'll likely need democratic congress willing to pass laws and allocate money to make his plan a reality. Jeff Brady NPR

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Climate Change Is A Top Campaign Issue  At Least For Democrats

Environment: NPR

06:54 min | 3 months ago

Climate Change Is A Top Campaign Issue At Least For Democrats

"This year climate change is a top campaign issue at least for Democrats. Yesterday, we looked at president trump's record. On the issue today, we'll explore toe Biden's plan, which is the most ambitious climate proposal. Any presidential candidate has ever laid out. We've got NPR's Nathan rods and NPR's Jeff Brady both of our climate team with us. Hi, guys good morning. So. Let's just the obviously our Joe Biden and Donald Trump do not exactly agree on climate? Change. Absolutely yeah I think that's a fair way to put it. President trump repeatedly rejects climate science and generally he depicts regulations to address climate. Change is bad for the economy and bad for jobs Joe Biden calls climate change existential threat to our health, our economy, our national security, the whole thing but he's also trying to frame it right now as an opportunity you know when? Donald. Trump thinks about climate change he thinks hoax. When I think about I think jobs. Good paying union opposite put. To work. Building a stronger more. Climate resilient nation I mean nate. That sounds great. But has he laid out a plan for how he would actually make that happen. Yes, and it is a lot Hewitt invest money for one climate. Change is part of his economic recovery plan for the pandemic. But he's also says he'll do executive actions right? Other Gate. He says he's GONNA re enter the Paris climate agreement and put the US back in the global climate conversation He's talking about conserving land for biodiversity stopping offshore drilling in the Arctic. Methane from existing oil and gas tell me when you want me to stop. But he's also putting money towards climate adaptation measures to make communities more resilient to sea level rise flooding hurricanes fires. You know the type of things we've experienced over the last few months and he's also promising massive investments in green energy and infrastructure. This is where the. Jobs part of what he's promising comes in. So that means more solar more wind high speed rail, electric car chargers all with the goal of zeroing out carbon pollution from our electrical sector by twenty, thirty five and making the country carbon neutral. So it's contributing anymore to climate change by twenty fifty. And I mean I know a lot of campaigns I mean the rhetoric is aspirational, right but even so I mean by twenty fifty shifting the entire US economy to be carbon neutral to sounds like a massive undertaking is he going to be able to accomplish that Jeff? You know most of the experts I've talked with thinking is possible. The plan includes a lot of executive actions. The Biden says, he would take right away some of the nature mentioned. It also this plan requires new laws passed by Congress to create policies for meeting that overall goal. Now, that's going to require a democratic majority in the Senate most likely I talked with Scott Siegel. He's a partner with the law firm Bracewell, which represents a lot of energy clients including fossil fuel companies, and you can imagine that they have a lot at stake care. He thinks guidance climate plan is realistic. He says, it includes both regulations and incentives for people. In Industries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and I think when a plan has both and doesn't rely only on the carrot or the stick, it's a sign of maturity in approaching these issues. Siegel likes that it leaves room for some fossil fuels with carbon offsets and capture, and he points out that the electric power sector is already on its way to meeting that interim 2035 call some of those companies in utilities are setting net zero carbon goals all on their own. Yeah, and that's an important point. I talked to Karl Frisch who worked at the US Department of Energy under three administrations including trump's she's now at the Rocky Mountain Institute you know and I asked her if she thinks it could all be done by Biden alone if he gets elected. No. So to get where we need to go on climate in the United States to reduce emissions and build a sustainable economy, it takes action by the executive branch action by Congress. And action by state leaders, city leaders, business leaders on the ground, and she says, you know a lot of these actions are already happening at the local level. So a Biden administration would be smart to try to build on that existing momentum. So something we hear president trump attack Joe Biden on a lot is fracking fracking for natural gas. The president alleging that Joe Biden wants to ban it. Let's just clear this up Jeff Does Joe Biden WanNa. Ban fracking. No, he doesn't want to ban fracking. He has repeatedly said that he would not ban all fracking just new fracking on federal land and when trump says that it's aimed at voters and energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania, which actually has very little federal land but that's still a point of contention for for Biden, with mini climate activists who say the country should stop all fracking and keep all fossil fuels in the ground to slow climate change. So. What about the politics of climate change you know I mean we know what the facts are that it is happening that humans have contributed to it as well. But what about the politics of climate change because we know for Republicans it's an incredibly divisive issue where do Democrats stand on Biden's proposals? Well, polling indicates a majority of registered voters in the US view climate change as a real threat to the country, and when you look at Republicans climate change is actually a lot less divisive you get. But in terms of Democrats a recent poll by Pew found that more than two-thirds of Joe Biden supporters sit climate change is very important to them. So Biden's. Plan is not as ambitious as what some Progressive Democrats want to see it is not the green new deal despite what the president repeatedly says, but it is more ambitious than what Joe Biden had initially proposed. So for example, his plan now includes an environmental justice component which would aim to address the fact that people of color are disproportionately affected by pollution climate change and have been for a long time. His plan says he'd do that by investing in disadvantaged communities pulling polluters accountable I talked to Michelle Roberts with the Environmental Justice Health Alliance about this, and she has a long history with Biden because she's actually from Delaware, his home state and she says historically. Always overly supportive when it came to dealing with polluters like dupont over communities like hers he was a Filibuster for the political economy that was running the great state of Delaware. Does that make sense BA- Roberts says she's met with Biden since and she thinks his views have a she supports him but it's going to be important. She says if he's elected to hold them accountable all the things that he's promising to do now. NPR's nate wrought and NPR's Jeff. Brady, thank you for your reporting. Thank you. Thank

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What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 3 months ago

What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

"News. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro. We're spending a few days this week digging into where the presidential candidates stand on some of the key issues in this election. Today, it's climate change. President Trump and Joe Biden have dramatically different views. Biden has an aggressive plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. President Trump is focused on boosting fossil fuels. We learn more. We're joined by Jeff Brady of NPR's climate team. Hi Jeff Diary start by summing up force. What President Trump has done on climate in his first term climate change is not a priority for him in the past. He's even called it a hoax. But Trump has softened his language a bit on this. At the first presidential debate Last month, the president was asked what he believes about climate change. I want crystal clean water and air. I want beautiful, clean air. We have now the lowest carbon. If you look at our numbers right now, we are doing phenomenally, but I haven't destroyed our businesses. Trump's still doesn't display much understanding about how humans are changing the climate. But as you heard there, he does brag about carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector going down. That's not because of anything Trump has done. It's because cleaner and cheaper renewable energy and natural gas air replacing coal for generating electricity. Trump has this energy dominance agenda. It's a combination of promoting domestic energy, mostly fossil fuels. And getting rid of regulations that might hinder the drilling and mining that produces those fuels. So he pulled out of the Paris climate agreement. He's rolled back dozens of environmental regulations, including President Obama's clean power plan, and also strict fuel efficiency standards for cars. On the campaign trail. President Trump often ties Joe Biden two proposals like the Green new Deal and banning fracking. Those issues might hurt biting and ki energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania but clear this up for us What our Biden's position On those topics and what are his actual climate proposals? Well, Biden says the green new deal is a good framework. But he has his own climate plan, and the only supports burnt banning new fracking on public land. And there's very little of that. In Pennsylvania on climate change bite an echo scientists that humans are changing the climate and emissions must be reduced quickly. His detailed climate plan has a big job creation focus. He calls for spending $2 trillion over four years for a wide range of environmental projects, Things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations across the country. There's so many things that we can do now to create thousands of thousands of jobs. We can get to net zero in terms of energy production by 2035, not only not costing people jobs, creating jobs. On top of that 2035 goal for the electricity sector that he mentioned at the first debate. Biden's plan aims for net zero carbon emissions across the entire US economy, including transportation by 2050. That seems like an enormous pivot. When you think of all the power plant's vehicles, airplanes in the U. S it zbig reach. Is it possible it would cost trillions of dollars and require big changes really fast. Under this plan, fossil fuels, though, would still be used, but there would be offsets and carbon capture projects to reach that. Net zero goal. Biden has a long list of what he calls day. One executive actions Some are about reversing trumps rollback. Something's like methane emissions and those car fuel efficiency standards. There's also directives for the federal government by zero emission vehicles and make buildings more efficient. He has an ambitious legislative agenda that includes an enforcement mechanism mechanism to meet that net zero by 2050 goal. And to do all this. Given the political polarization around climate change, his party probably will have to control both houses of Congress. Looks like Democrats will hold on to the house, but the Senate is still in question there. And if President Trump is re elected, what is his second term climate agenda look like AA lot of the environmental rollbacks from his first four years are being challenged in court now, so resolving those battles and cementing trumps deregulation agenda would be a big focus. He'd continue pushing for more exploration and drilling on public land and offshore. But very little focus on addressing climate change, which you know, scientists say the world needs to do that to minimize its worst effects in coming decades. That's NPR's Jeff Brady. Thanks, Jeff. Thank you. The film

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What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 3 months ago

What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

"All things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro. We're spending a few days this week digging into where the presidential candidates stand on some of the key issues in this election. Today, it's climate change. President Trump and Joe Biden have dramatically different views. Biden has an aggressive plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. President Trump is focused on boosting fossil fuels. We learn more. We're joined by Jeff Brady of NPR's climate team. Hi Jeff Diary start by summing up for us. What President Trump has done on climate in his first term climate change is not a priority for him in the past. He's even called it a hoax. But Trump has softened his language a bit on this. At the first presidential debate Last month, the president was asked what he believes about climate change. I want crystal clean water and air. I want beautiful, clean air. We have now the lowest carbon. If you look at our numbers right now, we are doing phenomenally, but I haven't destroyed our businesses. Trump's still doesn't display much understanding about how humans are changing the climate. But as you heard there, he does brag about carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector going down. That's not because of anything Trump has done. It's because cleaner and cheaper renewable energy and natural gas air replacing coal for generating electricity. Trump has this energy dominance agenda. It's a combination of promoting domestic energy, mostly fossil fuels. And getting rid of regulations that might hinder the drilling and mining that produces those fuels. So he pulled out of the Paris climate agreement. He's rolled back dozens of environmental regulations, including President Obama's clean power plan, and also strict fuel efficiency standards for cars. On the campaign trail. President Trump often ties Joe Biden two proposals like the Green new Deal and banning fracking. Those issues might hurt biting and ki energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania but clear this up for us What our Biden's position On those topics and what are his actual climate proposals? Well, Biden says the green new deal is a good framework. But he has his own climate plan, and the only supports parent banning new fracking on public land. And there's very little of that. In Pennsylvania on climate change bite an echo scientists that humans are changing the climate and emissions must be reduced quickly. His detailed climate plan has a big job creation focus. He calls for spending $2 trillion over four years for a wide range of environmental projects, Things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations across the country. There's so many things that we can do now to create thousands of thousands of jobs. We can get to net zero in terms of energy production by 2035, not only not costing people jobs, creating jobs. On top of that 2035 goal for the electricity sector that he mentioned at the first debate. Biden's plan aims for net zero carbon emissions across the entire US economy, including transportation by 2050. That seems like an enormous pivot. When you think of all the power plant's vehicles, airplanes in the U. S it zbig reach. Is it possible it would cost trillions of dollars and require big changes really fast. Under this plan, fossil fuels, though, would still be used, but there would be offsets and carbon capture projects to reach that. Net zero goal. Biden has a long list of what he calls day. One executive actions Some are about reversing trumps rollback. Something's like methane emissions and those car fuel efficiency standards. There's also directives for the federal government by zero emission vehicles and make buildings more efficient. He has an ambitious legislative agenda that includes an enforcement mechanism mechanism to meet that net zero by 2050 goal. And to do all this. Given the political polarization around climate change, his party probably will have to control both houses of Congress. Looks like Democrats will hold on to the house, but the Senate is still in question there. And if President Trump is re elected, what is his second term climate agenda look like AA lot of the environmental rollbacks from his first four years are being challenged in court now, so resolving those battles and cementing trumps deregulation agenda would be a big focus. He'd continue pushing for more exploration and drilling on public land and offshore. But very little focus on addressing climate change, which you know, scientists say the world needs to do that to minimize its worst effects in coming decades. That's NPR's Jeff Brady. Thanks, Jeff. Thank you. The film that

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How Nomination Of Amy Coney Barrett To Supreme Court Might Affect U.S. Climate Action

Environment: NPR

03:46 min | 3 months ago

How Nomination Of Amy Coney Barrett To Supreme Court Might Affect U.S. Climate Action

"Environmental Policies Almost always end up in court these days and several of president trump's most contested chart changes to environmental policy are likely headed to the Supreme Court if Conservative nominee amy, Coney Barrett confirmed, it could have a major impact on how the US treats climate change as NPR's Jeff Brady explains it's difficult to predict how Amy Coney Barrett will rule on specific cases. Environmental Law was not her focus as a professor and not something she dealt with a lot during her time on the Court of Appeals for the seventh circuit. Her judicial philosophy does offer clues discussed that when her nomination was announced, a judge must apply the law as written. Judges are not policymakers and they must be resolute and setting aside any policy views. They might hold Barrett's judicial philosophy show skepticism of government and favors. Deregulation over-regulation says, Harvard law professor and former Obama administration official Jody Freeman I think generally speaking it's GonNa be a corporate court good for business good for corporation. Freeman says Barrett is skeptical federal agencies stretching their authority under laws where Congress hasn't given them clear direction. But Freeman, says agencies need to have flexibility. Even when Congress passes new laws are always ambiguities they're always things congress doesn't fade there always is new science new understanding new risks, new problems, new data. And it's impossible to specify each and every small kind of decision that the agencies make and sometimes agencies have to use existing laws to address new problems like climate change. That's what the Obama Administration did after failing to convince Congress to pass legislation focused on the polarizing topic, the EPA turned to the decades-old Clean Air Act to regulate greenhouse gases a two thousand seven. Supreme. Court case Massachusetts versus the EPA determined carbon dioxide could be regulated under the act. It became an important environmental ruling and now some worry a more conservative Supreme Court could overturn or weaken it case Western. Reserve University Law Professor Jonathan Adler. Unlikely on the question of whether greenhouse gases are pollutant, but he says it's more likely on the constitutional issue of standing whether Massachusetts and the other states had the right to sue the federal government standing inclement cases can be a challenge and I think based on what we've seen on the seventh circuit. A Justice Barrett. Certainly won't make that challenge. Any easier Adler Conservative agrees that bear it a skeptical of agencies overreaching their authority but says that doesn't mean Barrett is hostile to addressing climate change just that Congress needs to pass more specific laws constant do a lot of that these days but but yes. I'm old fashioned in that I. think that's what we had members of Congress and that's what we elect senators to do this appeals to conservatives like Tom Pile with the American energy alliance he supported Barrett's nomination on his podcast was duke it out where it belongs in Congress you guys win congratulations expanded to include co two regulation. You got it but Reverend Lennox Yearwood with the hip hop caucus says, he wants a different kind of justice who will lead on fixing big problems like climate change is a lifetime position and so that's why you have to have people in those positions who have a world view. that. Is One that Debbie will go by the Constitution. But also understands the nuances of the world we live today year would is among those who say they want the Senate to wait on a confirmation vote until after the presidential election. Jeff Radi? NPR

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'Light Years Ahead' Of Their Elders, Young Republicans Push GOP On Climate Change

Environment: NPR

03:29 min | 4 months ago

'Light Years Ahead' Of Their Elders, Young Republicans Push GOP On Climate Change

"A recent NPR PBS Newshour poll showed that the top issue for Democratic voters. This election is climate change for Republicans it barely registers, but there is a divide within the GOP on the issue. Other surveys show that younger Republicans are more concerned than their elders by nearly two to one margin. NPR's Jeff Brady reports Benji backers started the American conservation coalition in two thousand seventeen while still in college he says his love of nature comes in part from his family there audubon members, Nature Conservancy members, but they were conservative and. I grew up not thinking that the environment should be political at all yet these days, environmental politics and dominate his life from now until election day backer is driving an electric car across the country talking about his groups climate agenda and posting videos along the way we are in the San National Park about to kick off the electric election road trip. Promoting his groups American climate contract. That's his conservative market focused response to the green new deal. Backer is critical of fellow conservatives who ignore climate change he's praised Swedish. Climate activist gratitude. And says, he wants to work with liberal climate activists to pass legislation. So how will he vote in November? If president trump wants to get my vote, he's going to have to prioritize climate change in the way that he has not done over the past four years. Backer says he's undecided so far he was disappointed climate change wasn't even discussed at the Republican National Convention. The trump campaign says in a statement to NPR that the president has proven, you can have energy independence and a clean healthy environment but the statement doesn't even mention climate change. Young Republicans are light years ahead of their elder counterparts on this issue here O'Brien HEADS YOUNG CONSERVATIVES FOR CARBON DIVIDENDS WHICH SUPPORTS A carbon tax to reduce greenhouse gas emissions grew up in Alaska and says, young people are motivated by mounting evidence that the climate is changing. They're seeing the impacts firsthand whether it's myself in Alaska with Algal blooms that are turning the ocean weird colors or with flooding in the Gulf coast hurricanes that are unprecedented at this point this is the climate generation and people are witnessing these things that we had been told growing up far off in real time that urgency is prompting young conservatives to join others in their generation and pushing for more action on climate change according to Bob English is a former Republican congressman from South Carolina I. Think it's a with their progressive friends. Plan on living on the earth longer than say their parents or grandparents English now directs the Conservative Climate Group Republic E. N. he says among young conservatives addressing climate change is becoming a moral issue more than a political one and that makes him optimistic. The country will eventually take more action. The demographics are definitely going to deliver a win for climate change. I am absolutely certain that we are going to win on climate policy the questions whether we win soon, enough to avoid the worst consequences scientists say the timeline is short. English says the country is more likely to succeed if both sides of the aisle are focused on climate change jeopardy NPR

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Trump's Postmaster General DeJoy will testifies before Congress

Morning Edition

03:26 min | 5 months ago

Trump's Postmaster General DeJoy will testifies before Congress

"Lewis to Joy testifies before Congress Today he is sure to be questioned about just how he is changing the U. S Postal Service. Joy has already promised to suspend his plans until after the election, but still faces concern about male delays and mail in ballots. That is especially the case in states where the vote may be close. Such as Pennsylvania, where NPR's Jeff Brady is based. Just about every summer. For more than two decades, Nancy Rothwell and her family have rented a vacation house at the Jersey Shore. This was the first year she ran into a problem with the mail. The realtor contacted me after about two weeks. And said, Hey, where is your money? And I said, What are you talking about? I mailed it in July. Sir, usually takes just a few days for mail to travel 80 miles from Roth Wells, Philadelphia suburb to the shore town. Fortunately, the check arrived, but just barely in time, three weeks from now. Tell him village to Ocean City, New Jersey is like ridiculous. The Postal Service declined to comment for this story. It referred NPR TOE. Postmaster General Lewis to Joy's announcement that cost cutting measures will be suspended until after the election to joy says the agency will be ableto handle whatever volume of election mail it receives. But postal service unions are not convinced. John Gibson is president of the National Postal Mail Handlers Union. Local 30 Wait, which covers Delaware. Pennsylvania and New Jersey. He says. Giant mail sorting machines that have already been removed aren't coming back. The trend facility took out 60 VCs machines, which sorts mail there not being returned. They're just not going to perceive with removing the other three. The loss of those machines now is a concern, says Gibson, because they also sort mail in ballots because of the pandemic. New Jersey is mailing ballots to everyone, and Gibson thinks not having these machines will slow down processing. Times. The steps that have been taken initially by the postmaster general have led to the slowing of the mail deliveries. No doubt about it. Ohio is another politically important state this election and at least one case, they're postal workers say equipment they thought would just be unplugged and covered with a tarp was instead dismantled and stored outside exposed to the elements. Ensuring it can't be used again. On top of these changes. Union official Gibson says the Corona virus pandemic also has slowed mail delivery. He says absenteeism among his members was up to 50% in spring, he says that's improving and has been cut in half. Still, even with change is suspended and workers coming back. Some voters like Yumi Kwan near Philadelphia are losing confidence that the Postal Service can ensure their votes will be counted and I going to get my mail in ballots on time. If I mail my ballots really get there on time. Voting is important to Quan. She's not a fan of President Trump, who won Pennsylvania four years ago by a narrow margin. With the Corona virus. She doesn't want to risk missing election day. Like if I get physically sick and I have to be hospitalized, I will not be able to go and vote. She signed up for a mail in ballot but has decided it will be best to deliver it in person. Jeff

John Gibson National Postal Mail Handlers U. S Postal Service New Jersey Pennsylvania JOY General Lewis Jeff Brady Ohio Roth Wells President Trump Nancy Rothwell Philadelphia Jersey Shore NPR Delaware Congress Ocean City
"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:50 min | 5 months ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

"Right now. It is 93 degrees in Pasadena, 72 in Santa Monica, also 93 in Anaheim at 4 35 From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm married, at least, Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. Today, the Trump Administration rolled back another environmental rule. This one was aimed at reducing climate warming methane emissions. The oil and gas industry is the largest source of those emissions in the US, and yet some big oil companies wanted to keep the rule in place. NPR's Jeff Brady's covering this story, huh? Jeff? Hi, Ari. Why did the Obama administration create this rule in the first place about methane emissions back in 2016? There's a lot of concern about methane. It's the main ingredient in natural gas, and when it's burned, it's cleaner than other fossil fuels. But when it escapes into the atmosphere, unburned say, from a leaky valve at a well drilling site. It's a very potent greenhouse gas. It has more than 80 times the climate warming power of carbon dioxide over the 1st 20 years, it's in the atmosphere. So under the Obama administration, the Environmental Protection Agency required oil and gas companies to monitor and limit methane leaks first to newer wells and eventually to thousands of wells installed before 2015. Also, that's why some oil companies, especially smaller ones, opposed the rule. They said. It's too costly. Now the Trump administration deciding with those companies and rolling back the requirement, it says that they'll save those companies up to about $19 million a year in compliance costs. Is the flip side of that cost saving on acceptance that methane emissions are going to rise. Yeah, Yeah. Yeah, The administration echoes an industry argument. It says oil companies have an incentive to stop methane from leaking because That's the product that they sell, and the industry already has a voluntary program to reduce methane emissions. The administration also says the Obama EPA rule that they say it was duplicative. They say methane can already be regulated under other rules. But environmentalists say methane is such a problem that it needs special attention. Here's Peter's AL South is with the group Environmental Defense Fund. Reducing that vein emissions eyes one of the fastest, most low cost and most effective ways that we can combat climate change in the near term. And he says they're side benefits to that old rule that the Obama administration had had passed because it also reduces other pollution. The terms people's health. That's what we would expect to hear from an environmental group, but explain why some big oil companies also want to stick with the 2016 rule even if it does cost the money to comply. Yeah, And these are companies names. We recognize Exxon Mobil BP shell. They have a lot invested in natural gas. And they worry that if methane leaks continued to be a problem that could undermine their arguments that natural gas is a cleaner burning fossil fuel than, say Cole, the president of Shell in the U. S. Gretchen Watkins told us in a statement that she finds it frustrating and disappointing. The administration is rolling back these regulations. Her companies and others plan to continue their efforts to reduce methane emissions, and some states also have their own programmes underway. So if states and big companies are still focused on stopping these leaks, is the Trump administration's robot gonna have much of an effect it likely will especially because there won't be that requirement to go back and stop leaks at older Wells Environmental Defense Fund calculates the effect would be about the same as adding greenhouse gas emissions. From 100 coal fired power plants every year by rolling back thes these these regulations, but there are two caveats here. One is the roll back will be challenged in court and second. If Joe Biden wins in November, and Democrats take control of the Senate, this methane rule could be reversed again. NPR's Jeff Brady. Thank you. Thank you. New data from around the US confirms drug overdoses are spiking during the Corona virus pandemic rural areas have been hit hard, so have black and Latin next communities that often lack access to affordable healthcare and addiction treatment. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Man reports I meet Jennifer Austin at a Salvation Army Center in Ogdensburg. It's a working class town in upstate New York. She says. The last few months have been heart breaking. The longer people had to isolate it, Wass A relapse, relapse, overdose, relapse overdose. Austin's in recovery and works as a coach, helping others, she says. People like herself needs structure. They need routine and support the pandemics. Quarantine rules rectal that narcotics anonymous classes held here were cancelled for weeks. When people relapse, they often wind up using street drugs that are more dangerous now that because of a separate trend, more dealers are lacing drugs with a deadly synthetic opioid called fentanyl. I had a young lady reach out to me who Heroin wasn't even her drug of choice. She tried it for the first time. And it wasn't heroin. It was. Finally she overdoes data collected nationally shows this happening more often during the pandemic. Elise Altar is with an organization that tracks overdoses. In real time. We did find that the number of spike or and also the duration of the spike had increased nationally since the commencement of state mandated today at home orders her project called OD Maps. Found roughly an 18% increase in overdoses since Covad 19 hit, including a big spike in fatal overdoses, and in more areas overdosed clusters had shifted from traditional centralized urban locations to adjacent and surrounding suburban and rule areas. This is happening at a time when the rapid spread of fentanyl was already unravelling years of effort aimed at reducing overdose deaths. Admiral Brett Jawad is assistant secretary for the US Health Department. Basically all the progress that we made has now been reversed, and this was even before the pandemic overdose deaths were already on the rise lastyear, killing roughly 72,000 Americans, speaking on a panel examining the collision of covert 19 and the addiction crisis. Joie said the scramble is on to prevent an even larger death toll every indication we have in terms of stress in terms of surveyed about increasing used during the pandemic. Basically everything is pointed in the wrong direction. You know, it's just a nightmare, Jihua says. All these risk factors are hitting people of color, especially hard minority on Native American native Alaskans. People who we know also bear a lot of the disproportionate burden of substance, misuse and substance use disorders, the manifestations of our historic disparities. Are really just in everyone's face. Right now. The American Medical Association has also raised alarms about this about the link between covert 19 and drug overdose is especially in black and Latin ex communities. This pandemic has brought into stark reality. Many things, Dr Patrice Harris, who heads the Opioid task force. Says racial inequities in health care have grown more visible as the addiction crisis and the pandemic crash into each other. She largely blames one policy decision a decades long underfunding. Under resource ing of the public health infrastructure, state and federal agencies have responded to the overdose surge, easing regulations so people in recovery have better access to medical treatments and allowing Mohr drug counselling using telemedicine. But as the pandemic ravages the economy, addiction services and public health face even more cuts, which means for people most at risk of overdose. Finding.

Obama administration Jeff Brady NPR US Ari Shapiro drug overdose fentanyl Jennifer Austin Heroin Obama EPA Anaheim Exxon Mobil
"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:27 min | 5 months ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is the largest source of those emissions in the US, and yet some big oil companies wanted to keep the rule in place. NPR's Jeff Brady's covering this story, huh? Jeff? Hi, Ari. Why did the Obama administration create this rule in the first place about methane emissions back in 2016? There's a lot of concern about methane. It's the main ingredient in natural gas, and when it's burned, it's cleaner than other fossil fuels. But when it escapes into the atmosphere, unburned say, from a leaky valve at the well drilling site, it's a very potent greenhouse gas. It has more than 80 times the climate warming power of carbon dioxide over the 1st 20 years. It's in the atmosphere. So under the Obama administration, the Environmental Protection Agency required oil and gas companies to monitor and limit methane leaks first to newer wells and eventually to thousands of wells installed before 2015. Also, that's why some oil companies, especially smaller ones, opposed the rule. They said. It's too costly. Now the Trump administration deciding with those companies and rolling back the requirement, it says that they'll save those companies up to about $19 million a year in compliance costs. Is the flip side of that cost saving on acceptance that methane emissions are going to rise. Yeah, Yeah. Yeah, the the administration echoes an industry argument. It says oil companies have an incentive to stop methane from leaking because That's the product that they sell, and the industry already has a voluntary program to reduce methane emissions. The administration also says the Obama EPA rule that they say it was duplicative. They say methane can already be regulated under other rules. But environmentalists a methane is such a problem that it needs special attention. Here's Peter's AL South is with the group Environmental Defense Fund. Reducing that vein emissions eyes one of the fastest, most low cost and most effective ways that we can combat climate change in the near term. And he says they're side benefits to that old rule that the Obama administration had had passed because it also reduces other pollution. The terms people's health. That's what we would expect to hear from an environmental group, but explain why some big oil companies also want to stick with the 2016 rule even if it does cost the money to comply. Yeah, And these are companies names. We recognize Exxon Mobil BP shell. They have a lot invested in natural gas. And they worry that if methane leaks continued to be a problem that could undermine their arguments that natural gas is a cleaner burning fossil fuel than, say Cole, the president of Shell in the U. S. Gretchen Watkins told us in a statement that she finds it frustrating and disappointing. The administration is rolling back these regulations. Her companies and others plan to continue their efforts to reduce methane emissions, and some states also have their own programmes underway. So estates and big companies are still focused on stopping these leaks. Is the Trump administration's robot gonna have much of an effect it likely will especially because there won't be that requirement to go back and stop leaks at older Wells Environmental Defense Fund calculates the effect would be about the same as adding greenhouse gas emissions. From 100 coal fired power plants every year by rolling back thes these these regulations, but there are two caveats here. One is the roll back will be challenged in court and second. If Joe Biden wins in November, and Democrats take control of the Senate, this methane rule could be reversed again. NPR's Jeff Brady. Thank you. Thank you. New data from around the US confirms drug overdoses are spiking during the Corona virus pandemic rural areas have been hit hard, so have black and Latin next communities that often lack access to affordable healthcare and addiction treatment. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Man reports I meet Jennifer Austin at a Salvation Army Center in Ogdensburg. It's a working class town in upstate New York. She says. The last few months have been heart breaking. The longer people had to isolate it, Wass A relapse, relapse, overdose, relapse overdose. Austin's in recovery and works as a coach, helping others, she says. People like herself needs structure. They need routine and support the pandemics. Quarantine rules rectal that narcotics anonymous classes held here were cancelled for weeks. When people relapse, they often wind up using street drugs that are more dangerous now that because of a separate trend, more dealers are lacing drugs with a deadly synthetic opioid called fentanyl. I had a young lady reach out to me who Heroin wasn't even her drug of choice. She tried it for the first time, and it wasn't heroin. It was. Finally she overdoes data collected nationally shows this happening more often during the pandemic. Elise Altar is with an organization that tracks overdoses. In real time. We did find that the number of spike or and also the duration of the spike had increased nationally since the commencement of state mandated today at home orders her project called OD Maps. Found roughly an 18% increase in overdoses since Cove in 19 hit, including a big spike in fatal overdoses, and in more areas over those clusters had shifted from traditional centralized urban locations to adjacent and surrounding suburban and rule areas. This is happening at a time when the rapid spread of fentanyl was already unravelling years of effort aimed at reducing overdose deaths. Admiral Brett Jawad is assistant secretary for the US Health Department. Basically all the progress that we made has now been reversed, and even before the pandemic overdose deaths were already on the rise lastyear, killing roughly 72,000 Americans. Speaking on a panel examining the collision of covert 19 and the addiction crisis, Joie said the scramble is on to prevent an even larger death toll. Every indication we have In terms of stress in terms of surveys about increasing used during the pandemic. Basically, everything is pointed in the wrong direction. You know, it's just a nightmare. Joie says. All these risk factors are hitting people of color, especially hard minority on Native American native Alaskans, people who we know also bear a lot of the disproportionate burden of substance, misuse and substance use disorders. The manifestations of our historic disparities are really just in everyone's face. Right now. The American Medical Association has also raised alarms about this about the link between covert 19 and drug overdose is especially in black and Latin ex communities. This pandemic has brought into stark reality, many things Dr. Patrice Harris, who heads the Opioid task force says racial inequities in health care have grown more visible as the addiction crisis and the pandemic crash into each other. She largely blames one policy decision a decades long underfunding. Under re sourcing of public health infrastructure, state and federal agencies have responded to the overdose surge, easing regulations so people in recovery have better access to medical treatments and allowing Mohr drug counselling using telemedicine. But is the pandemic ravages the economy, addiction services and public health face even more cuts, which means for people most at risk.

Obama administration Jeff Brady US NPR fentanyl drug overdose Joie Obama EPA Heroin Ari Exxon Mobil Wells Environmental Defense Fu Joe Biden
Trump Administration Rolls Back Obama-Era Restrictions On Methane Emissions

Environment: NPR

03:37 min | 5 months ago

Trump Administration Rolls Back Obama-Era Restrictions On Methane Emissions

"Today the trump administration rolled back another environmental rule. This one was aimed at reducing climate warming methane emissions. The oil and gas industry is the largest source of those emissions in the US and get some big oil companies wanted to keep the rule in place NPR's Jeff Brady's covering this story. Jeff Hi, Ari. Why did the Obama Administration create this rule in the first place about methane emissions back in two thousand, sixteen it there's a lot of concern about methane. It's the main ingredient in natural gas and when it's burned, it's cleaner than other fossil fuels. But when it escapes into the atmosphere unburned safe from a leaky valve at a well drilling site, it's a very potent greenhouse gas it. Has More than eighty times the climate warming power of Carbon Dioxide over the first twenty years it's in the atmosphere. So under the Obama Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency required oil and gas companies to monitor and limit methane leaks, I to newer wells, and eventually to thousands of wells installed before twenty fifteen Also, that's by some oil companies. especially smaller ones oppose the rule they said. It's too costly. Now, the trump administration deciding with US companies and rolling back the requirement it says that they'll save those companies up to about nineteen million dollars. A year in compliance costs is the flip side of that cost saving an acceptance that methane emissions are gonNA rise. Yeah. Yeah. you know the the administration echoes and industry argument says oil companies have an incentive to stop. Methane from leaking because that's the product that they sell, and the industry already has a voluntary program to reduce methane emissions The administration also says the Obama EPA rule that they say it was duplicative they say methane can already be regulated under other rules but environmentalists methane is such a problem that it needs special attention. Here's a Peter Zahle South with the Group Environmental Defense, fund? Reducing methane emissions. Is One of the fastest whammos, low cost and most effective ways that we can combat climate change in the near term, and he says, there are side benefits to that old rule that the Obama administration had had passed because it also reduces other pollution that harms people's health. That's what we would expect to hear from an environmental group. But explain why some big oil companies also want to stick with the twenty sixteen rule even if it does cost the money to comply. Yeah and these are companies names we recognize Exxon Mobil BP shell they have a lot invested in natural gas and they worry if methane leaks continue to be a problem that could undermine their arguments that natural gas is a cleaner burning fossil fuel than say coal the president of Shell in the US Gretchen Watkins told us in a statement that she finds it frustrating and disappointing. The Administration is rolling back these regulations, her companies and others plan to continue their efforts to reduce methane emissions and some. States also have their own programs underway. So states and big companies are still focused on stopping these leaks is the trump administration's robot going to have much of an effect. It likely will especially because there won't be that requirement to go back and stop leaks at older wells Environmental Defense Fund calculates. The effect would be about the same as adding greenhouse gas emissions from one hundred coal fired power plants every year by rolling back these these these regulations. But there are two caveats here. One is the rollback will be challenged in court and second if Joe Biden wins in November and Democrats take control of the Senate, this nothing rule could be reversed again NPR's Jeff Brady thank you. Thank

Obama Administration United States Jeff Brady NPR Environmental Defense Fund Jeff Hi Group Environmental Defense Joe Biden Environmental Protection Agenc Shell Peter Zahle South Obama Epa
United Arab Emirates spacecraft blasts off from Japan

Latino USA

00:54 sec | 6 months ago

United Arab Emirates spacecraft blasts off from Japan

"Arab Emirates has launched its first spacecraft. A probe headed for Mars. NPR's Jeff Brady reports. The craft was launched from a space centre in Japan. After the launch Countdown in Arabic in a Japanese rocket launched the unmanned spacecraft. United Arab Emirates named the probe a mall or hope. Project director Amron Sharrif says in a promotional video that the Emirates Mars mission delivers a message of hope to young Arab people the same way we used to generate knowledge in the past. You can generate knowledge today and in the future to serve humanity. The craft is expected to reach Mars next February, as the Emirates celebrates 50 years since the country was founded. Once they're the probe will study the planet's upper atmosphere and monitor it's changing climate. Jeff Brady NPR news

United Arab Emirates Jeff Brady NPR Mars Amron Sharrif Japan Director
Absent From Stimulus Packages: Overhauling Energy, Climate Programs

Environment: NPR

04:22 min | 7 months ago

Absent From Stimulus Packages: Overhauling Energy, Climate Programs

"Some countries are literally printing money to rescue their economies from the ravages of covid nineteen. The UN and some others argue that some of that money should be spent to fight climate change. The European Union has a plan to do that. The US so far does not despite the fact that this country has a tradition of overhauling our energy sector to promote economic recovery. Here's NPR's Jeff Brady. Consider President Franklin. Roosevelt's new deal a century ago, electricity may not come to mind, but a big element was building massive hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River then the government paid woody Guthrie to write songs about. Colonial. Power returning our. Law. The legacy of those dams is mixed. They forever changed the environment, but they also brought electricity to rural America during the Nineteen Twenties and Nineteen Thirties about ninety percent of the US. Farms had no electricity. Ted Case is executive director of the Oregon. Rural Electric Cooperative Association his Co. up. Members exist because the new deal brought utility, Poles and power lines down many miles of dusty Rhodes and connected homes to the grid that day was the most incredible day for a lot of families when they finally got to throw. Throw that kerosene lantern out the window which many people did decades later? President Obama was sworn into office amid an economic downturn. His stimulus plan included ninety billion dollars that helped reshape the US energy landscape. It's an investment that will double the amount of renewable energy produced over the next three years solar and wind grew quickly, and now the cheapest source of electricity in some places, but hundreds of thousands of renewable energy jobs have been lost. Scientists say carbon emissions must be reduced dramatically to avoid the worst effects of. Of Climate Change, that requires significant changes at a time. The country already is spending a lot of money about three trillion dollars on relief packages so far Julian brave noise cat is with the group data for progress. It is irresponsible from like a very basic good government perspective to not have any of that money. Go to Queen Energy and fighting climate change noise cat says money should be spent creating jobs to build retrofit houses install rooftop, solar and deploy electric vehicles. Heather reams also is concerned about climate change, but. But her politics are more conservative and market focused. If we're talking about if you'RE GONNA put taxpayer money someplace, put it where you're going to get a good return, and that is in clean energy. Reams heads citizens for responsible energy solutions. She says there are bills. In Congress. That could become stimulus programs even with an administration that shows little interest in climate change they do recognize the economic value that clean energy brings the jobs that brings particularly to a lot of red states, so I think the business certainty. Trump's if you will any kind of political challenges, another idea has the support of some conservatives and big oil companies taxing carbon dioxide emissions I. Think it's fair to say that carbon taxes are economists favorite way of addressing climate change Yona. Marinescu is an economist at the University of Pennsylvania, but she says this would be a bad time to levy new taxes. She suggest the government invest lots of money in clean energy upfront, and then Levy carbon tax to pay for it when the economy recovers, it's one idea among many the point. Is that climate? Climate Change arguably is the biggest problem humans face now and fixing. It requires sweeping solutions at a time. The US's spending lots of money. It's a sad time, but also an opportunity to do investments that perhaps we didn't have the Mo-jo to get our act together and do before. Sometimes it takes a good crisis to finally move in a whole new direction just like the new deal. Here's what's different. Though after the Great Depression and the two thousand eight recession, the country had presidents who believed in fixing the big energy problems of

United States Queen Energy Covid UN European Union Nineteen Twenties Jeff Brady NPR Marinescu Rural Electric Cooperative Ass President Franklin Heather Reams Woody Guthrie Ted Case Columbia River
Coronavirus will trigger biggest ever plunge in energy demand, emissions: IEA

Morning Edition

06:41 min | 9 months ago

Coronavirus will trigger biggest ever plunge in energy demand, emissions: IEA

"The corona virus pandemic is delivering the biggest shock to the global energy system in seven decades according to the international energy agency NPR's Jeff Brady reports plunging demand for energy is hitting fossil fuels especially hard global energy demand will fall by six percent this year seven times the decline after the financial crisis ten years ago I E. a projection show oil and gas hit hard but demand for coal falls by an extraordinary eight percent the largest decline since World War two the agency says renewable energy fair as well while among grows much as in the past the IEA projects electricity generation from wind solar and hydro power will increase five percent the agency says all this will reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions that lead to climate change by almost eight percent the largest annual decrease ever recorded though emissions will rebound in an economic recovery unless countries focus relief packages on boosting clean energy Jeff Brady

NPR Jeff Brady IEA
Coronavirus Relief Efforts To Help Energy Industry Stall On Capitol Hill

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:30 min | 9 months ago

Coronavirus Relief Efforts To Help Energy Industry Stall On Capitol Hill

"How should the United States helped the energy business? The oil industry has more petroleum that it can sell. The solar industry warns that up to half. Its jobs could be lost this year and rescue efforts in has so far stalled. Npr's Jeff Brady is on the line from Philadelphia. Jeff Good Morning Good Morning. What is the president promising to do for the energy industry well? He has instructed the secretaries of Energy and Treasury to come up with a plan to make money available specifically to the oil and gas industry. It's not really clear what that means. A Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says the administration is looking at federal loans for the oil industry. There's been talk of the government. Buying a bunch of oil. The Energy Department already is making space available for lease in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and that takes oil off the market. That's pretty important now. Because there's a huge glut of crude around the world. Demand is way down people aren't traveling and part of that. Glut of oil is coming from other countries like Saudi Arabia. And there's also been talk putting anti dumping tariffs on that oil but none of these ideas have really gained any traction themselves. Maybe part of the problem is there's so many different ideas. But what does the industry itself want? And that is even difficult to answer. Because it's not one monolithic oil industry in this country. There are hundreds of companies of different sizes. They have competing interests for example. Some of them would like to see reduced federal royalties for drilling in the Gulf of Mexico Mexico or on federal land but that really does nothing for drillers in South Texas who are working on private land they might prefer government loans. A few states are taking action on their own. Texas and Oklahoma are considering mandatory production cuts. That would be pretty extraordinary. Some states are giving oil companies more time to pay taxes One of those states is Louisiana. That is where the Democratic Governor John Bel Edwards. He expressed frustration the Just last week that the oil industry wasn't included in some of these federal relief packages. Obviously that would be helpful to the industry and it'd be helpful to stay slack Louisiana That are is relying on that particular industry and economic sectors. We are at one point. Congress did consider appropriating three billion dollars Philip. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve but Democrats block that arguing that if lawmakers are going to help the oil companies they should help renewable energy

Strategic Petroleum Reserve Jeff Brady United States Energy Department John Bel Edwards Saudi Arabia Secretaries Of Energy NPR Louisiana Mexico Mexico President Trump South Texas Steven Mnuchin
Ten years later: The Deepwater Horizon disaster

Morning Becomes Eclectic

01:00 min | 9 months ago

Ten years later: The Deepwater Horizon disaster

"Today marks ten years since the deadly explosion occurred on the deepwater horizon oil drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico eleven workers on that rate lost their lives in crude oil flowed from the under water well for nearly three months NPR's Jeff Brady examines what's been learned in the decade since one of the largest environmental disasters in U. S. history the consequences of that accident and spill are still felt along the US Gulf coast today the disaster cost oil giant BP sixty five billion dollars and lead to tighter regulation of the offshore oil industry but even now environmental groups say regulators especially under the trump administration are too cozy with the industry retired Coast Guard admiral Thad Allen was the incident commander for the government's response what is the single most important change was made was a requirement to have well containment equipment available as a condition of the permitting but apartment of interior that equipment is standing by in the industry says it could respond to a similar incident much faster now Jeff Brady NPR

Mexico NPR Jeff Brady Thad Allen Commander Jeff Brady Npr U. S. United States Gulf
10 Years After Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Industry Says It's Better Prepared

Environment: NPR

03:38 min | 9 months ago

10 Years After Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Industry Says It's Better Prepared

"Ten years ago an explosion on the deepwater horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico killed eleven people and oil gushed into the Gulf for almost three months today. Offshore drilling is more regulated but has enough been done to prevent another accident. Here's NPR's Jeff Brady one of the biggest changes since the deepwater horizon accident is on the Gulf coast near Corpus Christi Texas at the Dockside Facility of marine well containment company with the wind blowing. Ceo David Nickerson shows off five capping. Stacks similar to the device that finally stopped crude flowing into the goal. Each one of them is about as tall as a two story building the heaviest one the largest one that we have which is over here ways almost as much as forty full-sized. Suv's Nickerson says for big oil companies. Put up a billion dollars to create the company in two thousand ten six more joined sense then. The company's only job is to respond to the next well blowout when they give us the word go. We can get offshore with the cabinet stack. Hopefully at the well capped off within the matter of a week right. So that's about ten times faster than it took the shut off flow during deepwater horizon. If they can't stop the oil right away. There's a fleet of equipment to capture it. Put it in tankers and bring it onshore ten years ago absolutely none of this existed. All of this has been built directly responsive horizon incident. This is on the response side. There's also been changes to prevent an accident including stricter regulations. The Obama Administration created the bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Director. Scott on Gel recently offered members of Congress a positive view of what the bureau has accomplished. We've made our regulation safer when comparing the past six years of inspection data. We've increased the number of inspections by twenty six percent increase the number of inspections per facility by eighty six percent increase. The number of inspectors by twelve percent but before on Gel was a regulator of the offshore oil and gas industry. He was a cheerleader for it. Here he is as Louisiana's lieutenant governor at a rally praising the oil industry and taking this dig at the Renewable Energy Business America is not yet ready to get all of its fuel from the birds and the bees and the flowers and the trees among those who want the US to transition to cleaner energy. More quickly is Diane with the Environmental Group. Oshii Anna she says. Under President Trump an on Gel. The bureau is too cozy with the industry it regulates we've also seen the trump administration rolling back. Some of the far too few safeguards that were put in place as a response to the horizon rolling back things like key measures of the well control. That complex rule was designed to prevent future blowouts and give drillers detailed requirements. They must follow to safely drill in offshore. Well Eric Melito. With the Industry Group National Ocean Industries Association argues that changes during the trump administration strengthen not weaken safety for the past ten years. The industry has had a laser. Like focus on improving and enhancing NHS now. The question is whether enough has been done retired. Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen. Was the incident commander for the government's deepwater horizon. Response the question over the years. Is it safe to drill? My answer is that's not the question because there's no risk free way to extract fossil fuels from the earth and says it is safer now but we won't know if regulators and the industry are adequately prepared until the next accident.

Gulf Scott Ceo David Nickerson Jeff Brady Dockside Facility Of Marine Corpus Christi Texas Industry Group National Ocean Mexico Thad Allen Oshii Anna Donald Trump NPR Obama Administration Eric Melito Congress Commander Environmental Enforcement Dire
10 Years After Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Industry Says It's Better Prepared

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:38 min | 9 months ago

10 Years After Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Industry Says It's Better Prepared

"Ten years ago an explosion on the deepwater horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico killed eleven people and oil gushed into the Gulf for almost three months today. Offshore drilling is more regulated but has enough been done to prevent another accident. Here's NPR's Jeff Brady one of the biggest changes since the deepwater horizon accident is on the Gulf coast near Corpus Christi Texas at the Dockside Facility of marine well containment company with the wind blowing. Ceo David Nickerson shows off five capping. Stacks similar to the device that finally stopped crude flowing into the goal. Each one of them is about as tall as a two story building the heaviest one the largest one that we have which is over here ways almost as much as forty full-sized. Suv's Nickerson says for big oil companies. Put up a billion dollars to create the company in two thousand ten six more joined sense then. The company's only job is to respond to the next well blowout when they give us the word go. We can get offshore with the cabinet stack. Hopefully at the well capped off within the matter of a week right. So that's about ten times faster than it took the shut off flow during deepwater horizon. If they can't stop the oil right away. There's a fleet of equipment to capture it. Put it in tankers and bring it onshore ten years ago absolutely none of this existed. All of this has been built directly responsive horizon incident. This is on the response side. There's also been changes to prevent an accident including stricter regulations. The Obama Administration created the bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Director. Scott on Gel recently offered members of Congress a positive view of what the bureau has accomplished. We've made our regulation safer when comparing the past six years of inspection data. We've increased the number of inspections by twenty six percent increase the number of inspections per facility by six percent increase. The number of inspectors by twelve percent but before on Gel was a regulator of the offshore oil and gas industry. He was a cheerleader for it. Here he is as Louisiana's lieutenant governor at a rally praising the oil industry and taking this dig at the Renewable Energy Business America is not yet ready to get all of its fuel from the birds and the bees and the flowers and the trees among those who want the US to transition to cleaner energy. More quickly is Diane Hoskins with the Environmental Group. Oshii Anna she says. Under President Trump an on Gel. The bureau is too cozy with the industry it regulates we've also seen the trump administration rolling back. Some of the far too few safeguards that were put in place as a response to the horizon rolling back things like key measures of the well control. That complex rule was designed to prevent future blowouts and give drillers detailed requirements. They must follow to safely drill in offshore. Well Eric Melito. With the Industry Group National Ocean Industries Association argues that changes during the trump administration strengthen not weaken safety for the past ten years. The industry has had a laser. Like focus on improving and enhancing NHS now. The question is whether enough has been done retired. Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen. Was the incident commander for the government's deepwater horizon. Response the question over the years. Is it safe to drill? My answer is that's not the question because there's no risk free way to extract fossil fuels from the earth and says it is safer now but we won't know if regulators and the industry are adequately prepared until the next

Gulf Scott Ceo David Nickerson Jeff Brady Dockside Facility Of Marine Corpus Christi Texas Industry Group National Ocean Mexico Thad Allen Oshii Anna Donald Trump NPR Obama Administration Diane Hoskins Eric Melito Congress Commander
"jeff brady" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Support this NPR station from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm ari Shapiro and America these Kelly throughout his time in office president trump has tried to help the coal industry is rolled back environmental regulations he's pushed for subsidies and yet coal fired power plants continue to close today's casual to a major coal company run up by one of trump's biggest supporters and here's Jeff Brady reports on the bankruptcy of Marie energy in the Murray energy lobby in Saint Clairsville Ohio there's a photo of founder Bob Murray with president trump giving two thumbs up and in Murray's big corner office there's a replica of airforce two signed on the wing by vice president Mike pence there's also a constant hissing sound at seventy nine years old Bob Murray suffers from a lung condition that requires him to be on oxygen he says it's not related to his business check for that and it's not as a vendor was working in the coal mines which I did for seventeen years underground every day Murray built his business over decades and now says it's the largest underground coal mining firm in the country he accomplish that by buying other coal companies now a combination of large debts and a declining call market has forced them into bankruptcy my goal is to keep the company that keep it together for my employees as part of Marie's agreement that lenders his nephew Robert Moore will become president and CEO Murray will remain as chairman despite president trump's campaign promise to help the coal business dozens of coal power plants are shut down since he was elected Murray doesn't blame trump for his company's bankruptcy he says the administration has been helpful in rolling back environmental regulations Murray specifically asked for most of them including replacing president Obama's clean power plan and withdrawing from the Paris climate agreement but Murray says the coal industry needs even more help the government should be stepping in keeping coal fired generation in existence it's done nothing Marie once the federal energy regulatory commission or for contest subsidize struggling coal plants he says Cole with its fuel stored on site is more reliable the natural gas that has to be piped in hand renewable energy that only generates when the sun is shining in the wind blows so far regulators in grid operators have not been persuaded wearable crisis resiliency reliability and apart people want to freeze in the dark that is a prediction Marianne hit of the Sierra Club regex frankly this is just a scare tactic for those who want to try to take our country backwards into a twentieth century energy economy it says now the world needs renewable energy that doesn't contribute to climate change she says US power grids are managed by knowledgeable engineers focused on keeping electricity flowing every time a coal plant is proposed for retirement their job is to make sure that as that coal plant retires that our lights will stay on and there will be any threat to the reliability of our electricity coal miners represented by the United mine workers of America that will likely will suffer because of this bankruptcy industry analysts Natalie Biggs with wood mackenzie says Murray was one of the last remaining companies contributing to the union's pension fund you know without Murray energy a lot of the retired coal miners are gonna you know find themselves potential in a difficult situation when it comes to the pensions the union is asking Congress for help meantime US coal consumption has fallen to its lowest level in forty years as more utilities and states commit to energy with lower or no greenhouse gas emissions Jeff Brady NPR news Saint Clairsville Ohio earlier this month to business partners of Rudy Giuliani were arrested on their way out of the country they're accused of violating federal campaign finance laws part of the scheme allegedly involved funneling more than three hundred thousand dollars from a shell company to a super PAC supporting president trump we've been talking with some experts in election law and many of them are surprised not the size of the donation or the attempt to cover up the source of the funds those things are actually pretty common their surprise the love part us and Igor Fuhrman didn't cover their tracks better because there are options for people who want to completely obscure big political donations and here to talk about that is Robert McGuire of citizens for responsibility and ethics in Washington welcome thanks for having me our colleague Jeff Brady talk to left partners before the arrest and here's how he explained the donations this is actually the first couple times that I really started doing some bigger donations because I wanted to get notoriety from my energy company and I thought it might be a great way to you know play with the big boys as you call it now its so called energy company appears to have just been a shell company created weeks before the big donations but if you imagine the parties came to you and said here's what I want to do and I want to hide the money what would you have advised well you know America first action for example the super PAC they gave to house a five oh one C. for social welfare arm the doesn't have to disclose its donors it's run by essentially the same people out of the same address it is nominally a social welfare organization that's supposed to do things that benefit the community but these function essentially as stealth political groups that have the benefit of not disclosing the donor so the easiest way for them to have avoided the situation the now find themselves in is just to have given to that arm of the group there's obviously difference in transparency between the super pac on the one hand in the C. four on the other hand is there also a difference in how these groups can spend that money there is sort of on paper their rules for these groups and how much political activity they can engage in but the rear he is that in practice these groups can act essentially as stealth political committees they can spend millions of dollars to buy tens of thousands of apps for months and months and months out before an election and not report that spending to the Federal Election Commission unless it's thirty days before primary sixty days before general but there's also they can give grants to other politically active five one C. fours and count that as social welfare activity and that creates this turn where you see sort of daisy chains of groups they give grants to each other to offset their political spending so there's sort of a a wealth of options for these groups to make sure that they are maximizing the amount of money they're spending on politics without disclosing any donors so if I'm trying to donate half a million dollars to a campaign in order to buy some influence and curry favor with the candidate but I don't want the public to now is there any way that the candidate can find out because because I want them to know that I'm a big supporter there is right that is actually the key of dark money so we're not talking about no one knowing who is behind the group we're saying the public doesn't know but the candidates know who's funding these groups given that there are these more secretive options available why do you think left harness and eager freemen allegedly gave in a way that was so easy for them to get caught well I think if you listen to the clip it kind of gives some indication of they weren't sophisticated political donors they realize the reality that is if you are a major donor you are buying access to powerful people and indeed there are photos of them with very powerful people ranging from the governor of Florida to the president himself precisely what they didn't know so much as how to cover their tracks and it's unfortunate that there are much more sophisticated political donors that know exactly how to do that and make sure that the public doesn't know who is funding these groups and who is being repaired once these people are in office but it seems that in this case we had two people who it just sort of dove in head first and ran into the reality that there are ways to do this where you don't get in situation where they are now Robert McGuire.

"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I've been drinking Budweiser for forty some years you don't really want coffee in your beer and mandir stays like did you want to try it absolutely not well you can't please everyone Jeff Brady NPR news Philadelphia and you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news just ahead on All Things Considered refugee agencies say scores of migrants have drowned off the coast of Libya again highlighting the failure by regional leaders to address the dangerous migrant sea route right now let's check traffic with Julie definition is still clear in the motorcycle Raqi in San Jose south than eighty five after union Avenue loans the S. U. V. either the center divide now big back up though to Winchester Boulevard up to the end north Bates a motorcycle collision on north won a one after Petaluma Boulevard south and that's how the right lane now you're in slow traffic as usual from alpha gin Santa Rosa north one one before Hearn couple vehicles around of lanes Albert solid from golf course drive to the deputy forty Q. ET thank you Julie that report was brought to us by unbound dot org support for KQED comes from Pacific catch featuring a summer menu with platters of ceviche okay and shellfish on ice from their fish bar new west coast style sushi tacos and fresh pineapple cocktails Pacific catch of west coast fish house and the Lawrence hall of science featuring dinosaurs in motion visitors can engage with Connecticut life sized metal dinosaur sculptures to learn about science art.

Philadelphia Libya San Jose Petaluma Boulevard Julie KQED Jeff Brady NPR Bates Hearn Lawrence hall of science Connecticut
"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

"That. Craig Keller is an exception. People weren't happy about what was going on. And the way the protesters were treating other people demonstrators even clashed with police at the state capital and a local shopping center in many here saw that as rude, but fewer than six percent of those arrested. We were from North Dakota says Morton county Commissioner Cody Scholz, a lot of troubles and problems that happened were created by people that are no longer here. So there is no reason for anger at our neighbors and friends, and I think that's part of the healing process as well. Schultz says the protests cost his county nearly forty million dollars for police fire repairing damaged infrastructure cleaning up protest camps and prosecutions that dwarfed the county's half million dollar emergency fund. So the state legislature picked up most of the tab. It can afford to do that. Because North Dakota's oil business is booming. The Dakota Access pipeline is moving more than a half million barrels of oil a day and Ron Ness with the North Dakota Petroleum Council says despite the protests two years ago, the oil industry is expanding. We're building pipelines here every day, and they may not all be the size and magnitude of the Dakota Access pipeline. But there are various. Construction projects pipeline projects happening in North Dakota on a daily basis. North Dakota's oil production is growing so fast. The state likely will run out of pipeline capacity next year, which is one reason energy transfer recently announced it plans to expand its Dakota Access pipeline. So that it can transport even more oil Jeff Brady NPR news, Bismarck, North Dakota. This is NPR news,.

North Dakota North Dakota Petroleum Council Craig Keller NPR Jeff Brady Cody Scholz Bismarck Ron Ness Schultz Commissioner forty million dollars million barrels million dollar six percent two years
"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

"And a local shopping center in many here saw that as rude, but fewer than six percent of those arrested. We were from North Dakota says Morton county Commissioner Cody Scholz, a lot of troubles and problems that happened were created by people that are no longer here. So there is no reason for anger, you know, at our neighbors and friends, and I think that's part of the healing process as well. Schultz says the protests cost his county nearly forty million dollars for police fire repairing damaged infrastructure cleaning up protest camps and prosecutions that dwarfed the county's half million dollar emergency fund. So the state legislature picked up most of the tab. It can afford to do that. Because North Dakota's oil business is booming. The Dakota Access pipeline is moving more than a half million barrels of oil the day and Ron Ness with the North Dakota Petroleum Council says despite the protests two years ago, the oil industry is expanding. We're building pipelines here every day, and they may not all be the size and magnitude of the Dakota Access pipeline. But there are various. Construction projects pipeline projects happening in North Dakota on a daily basis. North Dakota's oil production is growing so fast. The state likely will run out of pipeline capacity next year, which is one reason energy transferred recently announced it plans to expand his Dakota Access pipeline. So that it can transport even more oil Jeff Brady NPR news, Bismarck, North Dakota. This is NPR news, and this is morning edition on KCRW ahead.

North Dakota North Dakota Petroleum Council Cody Scholz NPR Jeff Brady Commissioner Bismarck Ron Ness Schultz KCRW forty million dollars million barrels million dollar six percent two years
"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Cost about the same NPR's. Jeff Brady, stocks are trading mixed on Wall Street at this hour, the Dow is down seventeen points. The NASDAQ up twenty this is NPR from Kikuchi news, Ted Goldberg policy experts have been warning for years that California will face a shortfall up to two million educated workers in the near future. A report out this week suggests adults who've dropped out of college could be vital to filling that gap Vanessa run KANU has more four million Californians have taken some college classes, but dropped out. Before getting degree. That's according to the report from California, competes, policy and advocacy group. Four times as many women as men with some college are single parents and only half of black and Latino Californians who start college finish lawn day Josie runs the organization you look at the future of the state of California. And you think about higher education this being the escalator out of poverty? We can't get there. If we actually have whole populations that are affected by some of these broader trend Josie hopes having a clearer picture of who hasn't finished college can lead to more informed policies. I'm Vanessa in Kenya. Te-kuiti news, a six million dollar grant. From the US department of labor will help create two hundred and sixty temporary jobs in areas ravaged by wildfire in Shasta county. Kiki's Tiffany camhi has more the money is intended to create jobs that will clean up and repair wildfire damages from the car fire and other large fires in the county. The national dislocated worker. Grant was awarded to the California employment development department. This week department director Patrick Kennedy says the temporary jobs will go to unemployed workers in the affected areas. Like, the city of reading the car fire, burn more than two hundred thousand acres in and around reading and destroyed more than a thousand homes there. I'm Tiffany Cam. Hi, Katie news. There's more kick. You D news dot org. I'm Ted Goldberg. Support comes from bay area cancer connections, celebrating twenty five years of offering breast and ovarian cancer support bay area. Cancer dot org. Yesterday. President Trump addressed the disappearance of Saudi Arabian journalist, saying he had also spoken to the Saudi government about the situation. We'll have more about that story. Just ahead..

California Ted Goldberg NPR Josie Vanessa Jeff Brady Shasta county US department of labor Saudi government Tiffany Cam President Trump Kikuchi Kenya Patrick Kennedy Tiffany camhi director Katie Kiki
"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is winning. Author VS Naipaul also is is targeting Latino activists. Advocates allege a recent detention of a prominent local man who is undocumented is part of a pattern and David joys new book. The line that held us tells the story of an accidental murder in Appalachia. It's Sunday August twelve twenty eighteen the news is next. Live from NPR news in Washington non-royal Snyder one year after a protest. By white supremacists and others, in Charlottesville Virginia turned, deadly organizers are holding an, anniversary rally near the White House today NPR's Jeff. Brady reports, that police and city officials say they are confident they. Can maintain order even as counter protests are planned. Nearby police in Charlottesville last year were criticized for not being prepared this year the district of Columbia police National Park Service police and the secret service say extensive plans. Are in place to secure the event DC. Police chief Peter Newsham says his entire department will. Be. Engaged and one goal, is to keep opposing. Groups separate the unite the right to rally was originally planned for Charlottesville again that when a permit was denied the organizer move. The event to Lafayette square near the White House that rally is scheduled to. Start this afternoon counter protests are expected throughout the day Jeff Brady NPR news Washington Charlottesville several hundred people rallied at the university of Virginia last night many of them students faculty members protesting the heavy police presence. This weekend sandy houseman is with member station. W. v. t. app she's in Charlottesville The gathering began at the, university's, iconic, building the, rotunda where, protesters unfurled a banner reading last year they came with torches, this year they come, with badges security fences at the site. And the. Large number of police on handmade organizers uneasy and they. Quickly changed plans And so began a. Two hour March across.

Charlottesville Jeff Brady Columbia police National Park White House sandy houseman NPR Washington Naipaul DC David Peter Newsham murder Lafayette square Appalachia Virginia university of Virginia Two hour one year
"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have a lot of respect for mostly because of its coverage of local politics in sports that's npr's jeff brady in annapolis jeff thank you thank you jerry jackson is a sports editor at the baltimore sun he used to work at the capital gazette and that is where he hired a reporter named john mcnamara jerry jackson joins me now hey there how are you i'm all right thank you i want to start by asking how did you hear about the events unfolding about what was happening yesterday well i actually was getting ready to go to work in my cell phone several miss calls and it was from our offices in baltimore telling us that there was an active shooter in annapolis end they knew that you know i had a long tenure there and knew a lot of people so i started mmediately like any journalists started calling people to see if i could find some things in the second phone call i made i found out that one of my dearest friends had died and you know was was pretty rough yeah and this is john mcnamara yes yes he and i worked together for more than twenty years are deaths abutted one another john was the rock of his family and he and i had a great deal in common more both from big catholic family some he was the oldest of seven to nine so we just yeah we quit immediately why did you hire him in the first place what did you see him well he was on our news desk i and he loves sports and we are always talking sports and he really wanted to write sports that was his passion he was loved the university of maryland and just was an absolute basketball freak and he took a job at a smaller publication because it was in sports and when we had an opening he was the first person i thought out not only because of his journalism abilities but because i knew what a good person he was and you know when you're going to hire somebody on staff the size of ours which was back then about five to six people you need people that can get along with people and he was just a tremendous person everybody got along with some great and basketball was a particular passionate isn't he still played in a couple of times a week really yes we used to have the correct or something yeah yeah he played pick up ball we used to play a bunch of us the paper played every thursday at lunch before a few of us got a little too old john continued to play in some form or fashion because he just loved basketball they're asking you last talked to him just last week you know we work side by side for twenty some years and now i'm in a departments forty minutes away and we usually got together once a year to go to a horrible game and we were trying to decide on which day was best and alan fortunately we hadn't gotten together on a date yet this year may i ask giving you worked at the capitol because for twenty years yourself what went through your head when you saw the front page today i was just stunned i knew that the sun would put out a publication but i was just blown away that the capital would still produce a paper you know just blows you away that kind of dedication and commitment to putting that local news jerry jackson thank you no problem and i'm sorry for your loss thank you that is jerry jackson now of the baltimore sun formerly the capital gazette was speaking about his friend and colleague john mcnamara who died yesterday.

twenty years forty minutes
"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Have a lot of respect for mostly because of its coverage of local politics sports that's npr's jeff brady in annapolis jeff thank you thank you jerry jackson is a sports editor at the baltimore sun he used to work at the capital gazette and that is where he hired a reporter named john mcnamara jerry jackson joins me now hey there how are you i'm all right thank you i want to start by asking how did you hear about the events unfolding about what was happening yesterday well i actually was getting ready to go to work in my cell phone several miss calls and it was from our offices at baltimore telling us that there was an active shooter in annapolis and they knew that you know i had a long tenure there and knew a lot of people so i started mmediately like any journalists started calling people to see if i could find some things in the second phone call i made i found out that one of my dearest friends had died and you know was was pretty rough yeah and this is john mcnamara yes yes he and i work together for more than twenty years our deaths abutted one another john was the rock of his family and he and i had a great deal in common both from big catholic family some he was the oldest of seven to nine so we just you yeah we clicked immediately why did you hire him in the first place what did you see an well he was on our news desk i and he loves sports and we are always talking sports and he really wanted to write sports that was his passion he was loved the university of maryland and just was an absolute basketball freak and he took a job at a smaller publications because it was in sports and when we had an opening he was the first person i thought out not only because of his journalism abilities but because i knew what a good person he was and you know when you're going to hire somebody on staff the size of ours which was back then about five to six people you need people that can get along with people and he was just a tremendous person everybody got along with great and basketball was a particular passionate is east still played in a couple of times a week so really yes we used to have the correct anderson yeah yeah meet play pick up ball we used to play a bunch of us at the paper played every thursday at once before few of us got a little too old john continued to play in some form or fashion because he just loved basketball they're asking you last talk to him just last week you know we work side by side for twenty some years and now i'm in a departments forty minutes away and we usually got together once a year to go to morial game and we were trying to decide on which day was best and now well unfortunately we hadn't gotten together on a date yet this year may i ask giving you worked at the capitol for twenty years yourself what went through your head when you saw the front page today i was just stunned i knew that the sun would put out a publication but i was just blown away that the capital would still produce a paper just blows you away that kind of dedication and commitment to putting out local news jerry jackson thank you no problem and i'm sorry for your loss thank you that is jerry jackson now of the baltimore sun formerly of the capital gazette he was speaking there about his friend and colleague john mcnamara who died yesterday.

twenty years forty minutes
"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is a newspaper they have a lot of respect for mostly because of its coverage of local politics and sports that's npr's jeff brady in annapolis jeff thank you thank you jerry jackson is a sports editor at the baltimore sun he used to work at the capital gazette and that is where he hired a reporter named john mcnamara jerry jackson joins me now hey there how are you i'm all right thank you i want to start by asking how did you hear about the events unfolding about what was happening yesterday well i actually was getting ready to go to work in my cell phone had several miss calls and it was from our offices in baltimore telling us that there was an active shooter in annapolis then they knew that you know i had a long tenure there and new people so i started mmediately like any journalists started calling people to see if i find some things and the second phone call i made i found out that one of my dearest friends died and you know was was pretty rough yeah and this is john mcnamara yes yes he and i work together for more than twenty years are abutted one another john was the rock of his family and he and i had a great deal in common we're both from the catholic family some he was the oldest of seven to nine so we just yeah we quickly mmediately why did you hire him in the first place what did you see him well he was on our news desk i and he loves sports and we are always talking sports and he really wanted to write sports that was his passion he was a loved the university of maryland and just was an absolute basketball freak and he took a job at a smaller publications because it was in sports and when we had an opening he was the first person i thought not only because of his journalism abilities but because i knew what a good person was and you know when you're going to hire somebody on staff the size of ours which was back then about five to six people you need people that can get along with people and he was just a tremendous person everybody got along with some great and basketball was a particular passionate isn't he still played in a couple of times a week really yes we used to have the correct or something yeah yeah meet play pick up ball we used to play a bunch of us at the paper played every thursday at once before few of us got a little too old john continued to play in some form or fashion because he just loved basketball may i ask when you last talked to him just last week you know we work side by side for twenty some years and now i'm in a departments forty minutes away and we usually got together once a year to go to horrible game and we were trying to decide on which day was best in now unfortunately we hadn't gotten together on a date yet this year may i ask giving you worked at the capitol for twenty years yourself what went through your head when you saw the front page today i was just stunned i knew that the sun would put out a publication but i was just blown away that capital would still produce a paper just blows you away that kind of dedication and commitment to putting out local news jerry jackson thank you no problem and i'm sorry for your loss thank you that is jerry jackson now of the baltimore sun formerly of the capital gazette he was speaking there about his friend and colleague john mcnamara who died yesterday.

twenty years forty minutes
"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Beater for salles the special agent in charge the nami field office of the bureau of alcohol tobacco firearms and explosives he says the assaultstyle weapons used in the shooting was purchased legally the firearm w lies in his event was burgess lawfully here in the state of florida just short of a year ago by the individual with harden was wrong law enforcement officials say cruise after firing a new five classrooms then allegedly dropped his weapon and tried to leave the scene of the shooting by blending in with other students he was apprehended about forty minutes later while the accused gunman is being held without bond npr's jeff brady says the suspect stood silently with his head down as he appeared for brief hearing today nicolas crews appeared wearing an orange jailed uniform his hands and apparently his feet were bound as he walked up to a microphone to talk to the judge she asked if he's nicolas jacob cruz and he said yes ma'am the judge readiness writes the state's attorney late at a brief time line of the school shooting cruises attorney offered no counter argument against why he should not be held than the judge said he would be held without bond npr's jeff brady the senators rebel vance a slew of immigration measures including president donald trump's proposed bill creating a to twelve year pathway for citizenship for young immigrants known as dreamers the failure of two republican into bipartisan measures to advance means there appears to be no legislation under consideration as the sixty votes needed that makes it unlikely lawmakers will advance any legislation in before a deadline next month when the deferred action for childhood arrivals program or daca is set to expire over to courts have ruled the administration's plans to shudder data are in.

florida harden npr jeff brady nicolas crews nicolas jacob cruz attorney president special agent in charge donald trump forty minutes twelve year
"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And a string of negative news about trump and his administration rupert remains a supporter of the president so i don't regret voting for trump i regret maybe believing now as much in putting as much faith into a politician and we all know that politicians will say whenever you want to here to get into office trump still has more than three years in office so rupert is waiting before delivering a final judgment honor candidates performance jeff brady npr news nearly a third of african americans reporter experiencing discrimination when they've been to the doctor according to a poll from npr the robert wood johnson foundation and the harvard t h chan school of public health preps nowhere is that discrimination felt more profoundly than and sickle cell disease a disorder that primarily hits african americans cara so problematic that patients are dying younger now than they did twenty years ago here's jenny gold with the first two stories for our series you me and them experiencing discrimination in america for more than a year medina brock's avoided one room and her large jp rightly coloured san francisco house the bathroom on the second floor it was really hard to bathe in here i found myself not way the touch the walls the bathroom is where brock son karim jones died in 2013 he was thirty six years old and had sickle cell disease that means his red blood lead cells spent into a.

trump rupert president african americans robert wood johnson foundation jenny gold america medina brock jp karim jones jeff brady reporter npr harvard t h chan school of pub san francisco thirty six years twenty years three years
"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

"My take her tweet is at the take away we'll be right back after these headlines live from npr news in washington i'm windsor johnston attorney general jeff sessions is testifying in front of the senate judiciary committee today on capitol hill democratic lawmakers are questioning him on a wide range of topics including the fbi investigation into russian metal ling in the us presidential election i have never had a meeting with any russian officials to discuss any kind of coordinating campaign in his opening statement sessions also discussed his agencies focus on fighting terrorism prosecuting hate crimes and attacking the the opioid crisis in the u s a man hunt is underway up and down the northeast corridor of interstate ninety five police are searching for a man after shootings in maryland and delaware that left at least three people dead and two wounded and pr is jeffrey reports the first shooting was just before nine a m at of business northeast baltimore where the suspect radi prince worked wilmington delaware police released a photo of the thirty seven year old man and a description of an suv he was driving a black gmc acadia authorities say prince has an address in family in the wilmington area and should be considered armed and dangerous police from maryland delaware in pennsylvania along with the f fbi are involved in the manhunt npr's jeff brady a hotel security guard wounded by a gunman who opened fire on a crowd of concert goers in las vegas is getting his first media interview npr's laura walmsley reports he's appearing on the ellen degeneres show he's compost says that it was an alert about an an open door at that sent him to the 30second floor of the mandalay bay that night a door that he found blocked with metal bracket suddenly compost says he heard rapid fire at first i took cover i felt a burning sensation i went to go lifting without leg up on us all the blood that's all i called it an on my radio the shots have and fired a hotel engineer had arrived to look at the door and compost says he yelled at the engineer and a hotel gas to take cover as more shots rang out authorities now believe that steven paddock shot compost around the same time that he began firing on the crowd at.

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"jeff brady" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from npr news in washington i'm jim hawk in houston rescue crews are still searching flooded areas of the city to evacuate stranded residents in pierre's jeff brady reports at least two people have died in the wake of hurricane harvey houston's nine one one system received over fifty six thousand calls in the fifteen hours after heavy rain started falling saturday night some residents were awakened by water in their home around the city there were dramatic scenes of people carrying what belongings they could salvage through water that was chest deep in some places texas governor greg abbott says three thousand state and national guard troops were deployed driving around the region is treacherous some freeways have been turned into rivers all flights were cancelled at both airports in the city the national weather service says more heavy rain is forecast to fall through tuesday jeff radi npr news houston new orleans is bracing for the heavy rains generated by harvey with a pumping system that's not one hundred percent operational i lean fleming of member station wwl reports officials are confident the pumps will handle the deluge new orleans mayor mich landrieu says crews have been working 24 hours a day to repair it pumps that failed during heavy rain earlier this month some neighborhoods sustained several feet of standing water he says the system is now ninety two percent operable we have more than enough to hand of what we think is coming our way of based on the forecast right now new orleans is expecting the heaviest rain to hit tuesday the twelfth anniversary of hurricane katrina and wednesday parts of southwestern louisiana or under voluntary evacuation orders and flash flood watches.

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"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The roads around here are flooded the delivery trucks couldn't get to the shelter to bring the food to them a lot of people are telling us they did not feel prepared for this but there were warnings of a of some kind of significant weather event that would probably affect he's an obviously there's going to be a lot more talking about this in the coming days but what my wrong did something go wrong you know there was a lot of debate m a before if a houston should be evacuating people in their looked like there was some disagreement chain governor abbot dent have some local officials about that and the people here were saying well you know this is houston we know how to deal with rain this is going to be a rainstorm no need to evacuate but today governor abac has said all that aside and at a press conference and here's what he had to say we move beyond uh whether or not there should have been an evacuation or not uh we are at the stage where we just need to respond to the emergencies and assessories the people of houston have but again is not just people run houston uh is in this large trying and that triangle region that he's talking about there's a huge area stretching from about houston two austin to corpus christi and to give you a better sense of how big that is if you drove around the perimeter would take you about nine hours to do that at just briefly jeff before we let you go is there any indication of when the weather will start to let up the heavy rain through tuesday and then it looks like it's going to start to let up after that but still showers in the forecast that's in pierce jeff brady in houston jeff thank you thank you now we're going to continue our coverage of the storm that's inundating parts of houston as we just heard by going to.

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"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And paris jeff brady tells us at surprising to oil industry analysts typically gas prices rise this time of year but tom closer with the oil price information service has lower oil prices changed that recall about uh opec new reading of the market the oil cartel cut per production to boost prices but that didn't work because closer says other countries including the us increased production and fill the gap close us as prices could still go up quickly watch drop it's this summer we are long overdue for an event that impact you wish control imply sheesh such as a tropical storm in the gulf of mexico but in the future close sees the current dynamics continuing he expects oil and gas prices to remain close to where they are now jeff brady npr news global stocks rose monday afternoon proving outlook for japan's manufacturing wall street will have a shortened trading day today ahead of the fourth of july holiday the dow futures are up this is npr and this is wnyc in new york four minutes after 8 o'clock good morning i'm david i mostly sunny today a high of eighty eight degrees at seventy seven now in new york city and looking at the morning commute on i eighty in new jersey an overturned tractor trailer is blocking the westbound the ramp at exit sixty eight so watch out for some early morning traffic in that area a and c trains are running with delays new jersey lawmakers are heading back to threaten this morning to address the ongoing government shutdown the shutdown as a result of a dispute between governor chris christie and democratic leaders in the state assembly over whether to take revenues from a nonprofit health insurance company for state programs a top democrat leader in.

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