35 Burst results for "Jeff Brady"

"jeff brady" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:06 min | 3 months ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on Here & Now

"The northeast still cleaning up all of the destruction caused by the remnants of hurricane ida last week at least fifty people died and while residents in some public health officials were surprised by the severe weather. Storms like this or what. Scientists have long warned about jeff brady from npr's climate team reports in bridgeport pennsylvania about one in the morning thursday vernon perry says the nearby river was rising and the fire department. Woke him up. They just were saying evacuate. Now get out the only chance you to go. Now get out run. There wasn't even time to move his car. It's flooded like others on this street a front loader hauls them to waiting trucks at the end of the muddy blocked. Brenda night is sitting under front step next to the sidewalk. Where a pipe. Gushes water into the street. It's being pumped up from her basement. The water came up to the first floor here and first floor. My rug was soaking wet in. There has whether she expected such a severe storm because of climate change. Not at all. This is a complete surprise. We had no idea of the magnitude of the damage. That was going to be called even new york governor. Kathy hokuto who talks about climate change fueling. More severe storms was surprised. We did not know that between eight fifty nine fifty pm that the heavens literally open up and bring niagara falls level water to the streets of new york. It's one thing to talk about the effects of climate change. It's another to experience them. Says burnet. woods blackie chief meteorologist with climate centro even. If you said to her there was going to be over three inches of rain in one hour if she's never seen that what does that mean. What does that look like. What does that look like on the ground. Same for the rest of us but we're getting more examples. There was superstorm. Sandy new york and new jersey nine years ago. The pacific northwest now understands what days of one hundred plus degree weather is like and across the country more people are experiencing wildfires and hazardous smoke.

Kathy hokuto woods blackie climate centro Sandy new york new york burnet niagara blackie pacific northwest Rachel cletus new jersey Klaas Jeff brady philadelphia
Climate Change Blamed for Havoc in Northeast US Floods

Here & Now

02:06 min | 3 months ago

Climate Change Blamed for Havoc in Northeast US Floods

"The northeast still cleaning up all of the destruction caused by the remnants of hurricane ida last week at least fifty people died and while residents in some public health officials were surprised by the severe weather. Storms like this or what. Scientists have long warned about jeff brady from npr's climate team reports in bridgeport pennsylvania about one in the morning thursday vernon perry says the nearby river was rising and the fire department. Woke him up. They just were saying evacuate. Now get out the only chance you to go. Now get out run. There wasn't even time to move his car. It's flooded like others on this street a front loader hauls them to waiting trucks at the end of the muddy blocked. Brenda night is sitting under front step next to the sidewalk. Where a pipe. Gushes water into the street. It's being pumped up from her basement. The water came up to the first floor here and first floor. My rug was soaking wet in. There has whether she expected such a severe storm because of climate change. Not at all. This is a complete surprise. We had no idea of the magnitude of the damage. That was going to be called even new york governor. Kathy hokuto who talks about climate change fueling. More severe storms was surprised. We did not know that between eight fifty nine fifty pm that the heavens literally open up and bring niagara falls level water to the streets of new york. It's one thing to talk about the effects of climate change. It's another to experience them. Says burnet. woods blackie chief meteorologist with climate centro even. If you said to her there was going to be over three inches of rain in one hour if she's never seen that what does that mean. What does that look like. What does that look like on the ground. Same for the rest of us but we're getting more examples. There was superstorm. Sandy new york and new jersey nine years ago. The pacific northwest now understands what days of one hundred plus degree weather is like and across the country more people are experiencing wildfires and hazardous smoke.

Hurricane Ida Jeff Brady Vernon Perry Nearby River Kathy Hokuto Bridgeport NPR Fire Department Pennsylvania Brenda Woods Blackie Climate Centro New York Burnet Niagara Sandy New York Pacific Northwest New Jersey
"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:45 min | 6 months ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NPR's Jeff Brady has been following the controversy for most of the past decade and joins us now. Hey, Jeff! Hey. Okay, So what did the company say today? Well, TC energy is the company. They used to be called Trans Canada. And they said after reviewing options and after consulting with their partner on the pipeline, That's the government of Alberta, one of the partners. They are terminating the project. It's dead, and it's not likely to be revived. The company had stopped construction back in January, when President Biden revoked a key cross border permit. It was assumed back then that the $8 billion project wouldn't happen, But this makes it official. Wow. Alright, well, tell us how environmental groups have been reacting to today's announcement because I know that they have been fighting this project for a really long time. Yeah, The reactions are nothing short of jubilation and an attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity called this a landmark moment in the fight against the climate crisis. The Keystone XL. You know it become to symbolize a lot more than what it was. It's not just the pipeline transporting oil sands, some called the tars hands crude from landlocked Alberta, down to the U. S Gulf Coast, where it could get under the world market. It really became a symbol of whether big new fossil fuel projects could be stopped. And over the last decade, we've seen this keep it in the ground movement emerged, scientists say, to avoid the worst effects of climate change. Most of the known fossil fuel reserves have to be left in the ground, and environmentalists really put all their chips on stopping this project, and they succeeded. They sure did. Well. How is the oil industry responding to this decision to terminate the project? Yeah, This is a big loss for them. The American Petroleum Institute put out a statement, saying this is a blow to US energy security and a blow to the thousands of good paying union jobs the project would have supported The industry has argued all along the big projects like this create a lot of jobs, and they say pipelines are the safest way to transport crude oil. That argument worked for former President Trump. He revived the Keystone XL after President Obama blocked it. Now that political back and forth is over. Well, can we just talk a little more about the kind of oil this pipeline would have transported Because from what I understand, it's not the kind of crude oil that comes from a typical oil well, right. No, it's not this oil sands crude. It has to be mined and I visited one of these sites up in Alberta, and it was this huge hole in the ground. It looks like something you see at the Grand Canyon, and it doesn't come out of the ground as liquid. It's this gunky substance that has the consistency of play Doh and because of that, it requires extra processing to turn it into crude oil. That processing emits more greenhouse gases than even traditional oil production. And that's one of the reasons why this kind of crude has been so controversial. Well, the world is talking a lot more about climate change. Then even when this project was launched more than a decade back, What do you think this decision means for climate efforts? You know, I talked with Jane Club at the group Bold Nebraska, which really started this campaign against Keystone XL because landowners there didn't want the pipeline crossing their property. She said. This announcement today means early predictions that a big pipeline from a big company can't be stopped. That's just not true. And that's going to embolden pipeline opponents across the country. That is NPR's Jeff Brady. Thank you, Jeff. Thank you. Vice President Harris is back in the U. S. After her first foreign trip in office, she made stops in Guatemala and Mexico. She was there talking about the root causes of the migrant crisis at the U. S. Mexico border, and Harris came away with some modest agreements. But as NPR's Tamara Keith reports, this first trip wasn't entirely smooth. It was just 20 minutes into the trip when spokeswoman Simone Sanders rushed to the press cabin on Air Force two There was a problem with the landing.

Jeff Brady Tamara Keith Jeff Guatemala Mexico Simone Sanders $8 billion January U. S Gulf Coast Center for Biological Diversit 20 minutes Grand Canyon TC energy U. S. today Bold Nebraska Keystone XL Trans Canada NPR American Petroleum Institute
How Will Biden Administration Reach Its Clean Energy Goal?

Environment: NPR

01:54 min | 8 months ago

How Will Biden Administration Reach Its Clean Energy Goal?

"President biden's administration said a big climate goal two zero out greenhouse gas emissions from power plants by twenty thirty five last week we talked with epa administrator michael regan about this believe that we can set up the right policy instrumentation and regulatory framework to encourage continued innovation to get us to that carbon-neutral goal that we know we can't achieve continued innovation. Industries still has to figure some of this out. So what more do we know about how the government is going to encourage it. Npr's jeff brady has been following up. Jeff good morning good morning. I just wanna know. 2035 sounds really distant. And then you start counting fourteen years not that long when you talk about changing all the power plants in the country house administration going to do it. Well you know is getting. The details are getting a little bit clear from the president's budget proposal and groups talking with the administration about this Details are still being worked out but a central focus is creating a national clean energy standard. And this would be a countrywide requirement that overtime increasing of is generated from fuels that don't emit the greenhouse gases that fossil fuels do conrad schneider at the clean air task. Force says it's similar to renewable energy standards that many states have they essentially required an increasing percentage electricity sales from renewable energy like clean energy standard simply broadens the list of energy resources that are eligible under the standard so in addition to wind and solar. This national standard would include things like hydropower and nuclear and another bit of detail. Here of energy likely will create this standard. And that's a little controversial. Some of the epa to do it. It's better known for setting and enforcing standards but some of the largest environmental groups. Say what's important is it. It gets

President Biden Michael Regan Jeff Brady House Administration EPA Conrad Schneider NPR Jeff
Biden pushing for a major expansion of offshore wind energy

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | 8 months ago

Biden pushing for a major expansion of offshore wind energy

"Expansion of offshore wind energy that could bring thousands of wind turbines to the east and West Coast. NPR's Jeff Brady reports the U. S. Is trying to catch up with Europe, which already has many more offshore wind farms. The White House set a goal of 30 gigawatts of offshore wind power by 2030 enough to power more than 10 million U. S homes Right now only one wind project is operating in the North East. Still, Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm says such a quick increase is possible. It is gonna be a full force gale of good paying union jobs that lifts people up. The administration says the plan will support about 32,000 construction related jobs through 2030 agency heads say their departments will work more closely together to speed environmental reviews, and the Energy Department is making $3 billion in loans available to the offshore wind industry. Jeff Brady.

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Biden Is Pushing For A Major Expansion Of Offshore Wind Energy

Environment: NPR

02:00 min | 8 months ago

Biden Is Pushing For A Major Expansion Of Offshore Wind Energy

"Today the white house announced in am vicious plan to expand the nation's use of offshore wind power it's part of president biden's campaign promise to create new jobs and tackle climate change by investing in green infrastructure. Npr's jeff brady joins us now and jeff. The us doesn't produce much wind energy at all right now. So what's the administration's plan. This is something that europe is far ahead on compared to the us Though several states have their own plans basically the administration is trying to make up for lost time so it setting a big goal. Thirty gigawatts of offshore wind power by twenty thirty. That's enough electricity to power more than ten million american homes for a year according to the white house now. Currently there's only one offshore project operating massachusetts and rhode island but they have to ramp up quickly to meet biden's climate goal of net zero greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector by twenty thirty five and fast change like that can make people uneasy especially in the fossil fuel industry. That's one reason white house. National climate adviser gina mccarthy focused her comments on opportunities. This is all about creating great jobs in the ocean and opposite cities and in our heart win all across america revitalize communities in particular those that have been left behind the administration says this expansion will support thirty two thousand construction and support jobs through twenty. Thirty mccarthy says some of those heartland jobs include manufacturing turbans making steel and building the special boats. It'll be needed now. The administration has this big goal for building a lot. More wind turbines. But how are they actually going to make that happen. The interior department is establishing a new wind energy area and the new york bite. And that's the relatively shallow water between long island and the new jersey coast. The agency is starting an environmental review process for the proposed ocean wind project off new jersey. Then they're looking at locations on both coasts and in the gulf of

Jeff Brady Biden White House Gina Mccarthy United States NPR Jeff Rhode Island Europe Massachusetts Mccarthy Interior Department New Jersey Coast Long Island New York New Jersey Gulf Of
"jeff brady" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:40 min | 10 months ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The Buccaneers ready Still another week to go in the waiting, as they say for the rest of us is the hardest part. But You want to step up your living room viewing game, don't you? WBC's Jim Mackay tells us why a big brand new TV might be a hazard. Let's face it, even without the Super Bowl around the corner. Our living rooms have become the centerpiece of our lives during the pandemic, a kid climbing all over furniture in exploring. We got parents who have to deal with it being a school playground and Jim Joe Martin Jack with Consumer Protection Safety Commission on the dangers of large TVs out of the open and not secured, especially with the kids around. To a chance that a TV or a piece of furniture is going to tip over and hurt your child. Now, many of us upgrade our big screens around Big games. Correct installation can save you a trip to the hospital Put it just up on the wall. That's the ideal situation. It's not you need to get an anchor kit. Sometimes those anchor kids even come with new TVs. They're only about 10 bucks. If you buy one separately, Jim McKay, WBC Boston's news radio, It's up for the big weekend. Nothing. We ain't got no football this weekend, but When it does return. It's the Super Bowl on WBZ TV, Stephanie Chan says it's payback time for some lucky coronavirus Frontline worker. It's a surreal opportunity for patients Supervisor Godfrey Adama. Good football took up phone and you know what's the game that I love? You know chair Jeff Brady, you know ground Patriots see over, Robert Kraft described these health care workers as superheroes who have risked their lives during the pandemic. Keep us all healthy, er nurse Gira, Zinni says it makes it even more special to be chosen by her favorite team. It's just incredible attack,.

WBC football Jim Joe Martin Jack Buccaneers Jim Mackay Supervisor Godfrey Adama Jim McKay Jeff Brady Robert Kraft Consumer Protection Safety Com Zinni Stephanie Chan Boston
Congress passes $900 billion compromise COVID-19 relief package

Morning Edition

01:15 min | 1 year ago

Congress passes $900 billion compromise COVID-19 relief package

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Winter Johnston Congress has passed the next coronavirus relief bill, ending a monthlong stalemate. Roughly $900 billion measure includes an extension of jobless benefits and another round of direct payments. It also includes the most significant federal legislation addressing climate change in over a decade. NPR's Jeff Brady reports. The bill contains a phase down of heat trapping greenhouse gas is used in brief Redrants hydrofluorocarbons or HFCs are used in refrigerators and air conditioners. But in the environment there are powerful contributor to climate change. Governments agreed to phase down there use over 15 years. This legislation accomplishes that in the U. S. Environmental groups and affected companies supported the legislation. Chain of it with the U. S. Chambers has developing new refrigerants creates thousands of jobs. The US has been a leader in this space, and this will allow us to maintain that leadership, reducing imports from international technologies and increasing exports of US develop technologies. The relief package also includes billions of dollars for renewable energy research and development. Jeff Brady. NPR News

Npr News Winter Johnston Congress Jeff Brady NPR U. S. Chambers Washington U. United States
Climate Activists Want Biden To Bar Appointees With Fossil Fuel Ties

Environment: NPR

03:27 min | 1 year ago

Climate Activists Want Biden To Bar Appointees With Fossil Fuel Ties

"Joe biden has an ambitious climate plan and there are a lot of people with government experience. Who could help implement that plan. But some of them have ties to fossil fuel industries and that is a problem for climate change activists. Npr's jeopardy reports in philadelphia recently. A group of young climate activists marched to biden's campaign headquarters. The sunrise movement often pressures democrats. Back the green new deal but instead biden offered his own climate plan for a slower transition away from coal oil and gas. He has not committed to barring people with fossil fuel ties from his administration. Lauren martinez was sunrise. Thinks he should biden ran on the most progressive climate agenda in us history and one on it. So it's incumbent upon him to take that seriously and put forward people who are accountable to the people that elected him to office the head of the natural resources defense council and former epa administrator gina mccarthy says she understands why young activists want to ban on appointees connected to fossil fuels especially after trump. Put them in key posts including andrew wheeler a former coal industry lobbyist. I mean that's who has been running the environmental protection agency and has gotten us nowhere fast. It's backed us up. It hasn't supported a growing clean energy economy. But here's a problem with a fossil fuel will litmus test biden won't govern alone the us senate could remain under republican leadership that means passing legislation would require compromise and bradbury is ceo of the american exploration and production council. Americans voted for divided government. As part of that you know. I think they voted for moderation. And i think they voted for commonsense. Bradberry sees a future for fossil fuels even under biden's ambitious plan for net zero carbon emissions by twenty fifty worried about climate. Change say there are issues. Republicans and democrats likely can agree on heather. Reams was citizens for responsible. Energy solutions suggests activist focus on things like economic stimulus that boost clean energy. They should looking at the bigger policies and getting to what's possible with getting climate action done today rather than arguing about the position on one's resume among the names on the biden transition team a few have limited ties to fossil fuel but more are from environmental groups. Jody freeman served as councillor for energy and climate change on the obama white house now freeman is at harvard law school and says she sees a trend in the people selected so far i think the clear messages vitality one good people in place wrestling start who have experienced any days and not wasting any time. Freeman is a good example of those who could be excluded. If a biden administration rejects people connected to fossil fuel companies. She sits on the board of oil company conaco phillips but she also led obama's effort to double car fuel efficiency standards. She's also an expert on using presidential powers to address climate change. That's knowledge that likely will be necessary if both parties can't agree on new climate legislation when biden his sworn in next year. Jeff brady npr news.

Biden Lauren Martinez Gina Mccarthy Andrew Wheeler EPA Joe Biden American Exploration And Produ Bradberry Natural Resources Defense Coun NPR Philadelphia Us Senate Bradbury Jody Freeman Heather United States Biden Administration Harvard Law School Freeman Conaco Phillips
Trump and Biden debate their climate and environmental policies

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:42 min | 1 year ago

Trump and Biden debate their climate and environmental policies

"A lot at Thursday's debate. There was this telling exchange about climate change. Would you close the have a transition from their own industry? Yes. It is a big statement, President Trump again boosted the fossil fuel industries contributing to global warming. Joe Biden is campaigning on a plan for Net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. NPR's Jeff Brady has more on his $2 trillion proposal. Joe Biden's climate plan is ambitious for an economy is big and complex as the United States, but even those connected to fossil fuel industry say it may be doable. Scott Siegal with the energy focused law firm. Bracewell says the plan is pragmatic and includes both regulations and incentives for the growing list of companies focused on using cleaner energy in the future. One thing that makes Biden's approach somewhat comfortable is that you can sketch out that linear commitment to additional resource is to achieve these objectives, which I think most people in business, believe me. Are going to be the future anyway. The country has one example of meeting an ambitious climate goal. The Obama administration's clean power plan aimed to cut emissions from power plants, about a third by 2030. Even though court challenges stopped the plan from going into effect, the country is ahead of schedule. David Doniger is with NRDC Action Fund, The political arm of the natural resource is defense counsel. The power sector is already undergoing changes that have reduced their emissions by more than 30% 10 years ahead of the target that the Obama administration thought was aggressive. In 2015, a big part of that was the collapse of the coal industry. Coal fired power plants continue to go out of business, replaced with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Still, the bite and climate plan faces significant hurdles. It relies on technologies that haven't been developed or may not be commercially viable. That's why the plan includes $400 billion over a decade for research. With the economic hit from the Corona virus pandemic. Biden's campaign updated the plan this summer. It includes billions of dollars to hire people for things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations. Steph Feldman, with the bite and campaign says the plan also focuses on environmental justice. 40% of the benefit of those investments go to community, the color and low income communities that have been disproportionately harmed by pollution and the effects of climate change. This is especially important to the most vocal climate change activists. While Biden has distanced himself from the green new deal, it is popular, especially with the left wing of his party. Jenny Marino, Zimmer with 3 50 actions as this's thie strongest plan yet from a Democratic presidential nominee, the Biden campaign has committed to doing some really great things like ending leasing of fossil fuels on public lands. We'd like to see them go further and create a true phase out for the entire fossil fuel mystery over Of course of the next decade. Biden's plan has a longer timeline for a transition and includes a role for fossil fuels with offsets and carbon capture. Amy Myers Jaffe manages the climate policy Labatt Tufts University and says overall, this is a credible plan for addressing climate change. The Biden campaign has listed the right things. But the difference between listing things and implementing those things is a big difference. If Biden is elected, he'll likely need a Democratic Congress willing to pass laws and allocate money

Joe Biden Obama Administration Fossil Fuel Industries Amy Myers Jaffe Jeff Brady NPR Scott Siegal United States Bracewell Steph Feldman President Trump Nrdc Action Fund Labatt Tufts University David Doniger Congress
Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

Environment: NPR

03:44 min | 1 year ago

Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

"At Thursday's debate, there was this telling exchange about climate change. Would you close the? Transition from oil minister yes. I was trying to. It is a big statement president trump again boosted the fossil fuel industries contributing to global warming. Joe. Biden is campaigning on a plan for net zero greenhouse gas emissions by twenty fifty and peers. Jeff Brady has more on his two trillion dollar proposal Joe Biden's climate plan is ambitious for an economy as big and complex as the United States but even those connected to fossil fuel industry. Say it. May Be Doable Scott Siegel with the energy focused law firm Bracewell says plan is pragmatic and includes both regulations and incentives for the growing list of companies focused on using cleaner energy in the future one thing that makes Biden's approach somewhat comfortable is that you can sketch out that linear commitment to additional resources to achieve these objectives which I think most people in business believe are going to be. The future anyway, the country has one example of meeting an ambitious climate goal. The Obama Administration's clean power plan aimed to cut emissions from power plants about a third by twenty thirty even though court challenges stopped the plan from going into effect, the country is ahead of schedule David. Doniger. IS WITH NRDC Action Fund the political arm of the Natural Resources Defense Council, the power sector is already undergoing. Changes have reduced their emissions by more than thirty percent ten years ahead of the target that the Obama Administration thought was aggressive in two thousand fifteen. A big part of that was the collapse of the coal industry coal fired power plants continue to go out of business replaced with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Still, the Biden, climate plan faces significant hurdles it relies on technologies that haven't been. Developed or may not be commercially viable. That's why the plan includes four hundred billion dollars over a decade for research with the economic hit from the coronavirus pandemic Biden's campaign updated the plan this summer it includes billions of dollars to hire people for things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations. Steph Feldman with the Biden campaign says, the plan also focuses on environmental justice forty percent. Of the benefits of those investments, go to communities of color and low income communities that have been disproportionately harmed by pollution and the exit climate change. This is especially important to the most vocal climate change activists while Biden has distanced himself from the green new deal. It is popular especially with the left wing of his party Jenny Marino Zimmer with three fifty actions as this is the strongest plan. Yet from a Democratic presidential nominee, the Biden campaign has committed to doing some really great things like ending leasing of also feels on public lands. We'd like to see them go further and create a true phase out for the entire fossil fuel mystery over the course of the next decade. Biden's plan has a longer time line for a transition and includes a role for fossil fuels with offsets and. Carbon Capture Amy Myers Jaffe manages the climate policy lab at Tufts University and says, all this is a credible plan for addressing climate change. The Biden campaign has listed the right things but the difference between listing things and getting those things is a big difference. If Biden is elected, he'll likely need democratic congress willing to pass laws and allocate money to make his plan a reality. Jeff Brady NPR

Joe Biden Obama Administration Fossil Fuel Industries Jeff Brady Jeff Brady Npr Amy Myers Jaffe Natural Resources Defense Coun Nrdc Action Fund Jenny Marino Zimmer United States President Trump Scott Siegel Congress Steph Feldman Bracewell
Climate Change Is A Top Campaign Issue  At Least For Democrats

Environment: NPR

06:54 min | 1 year ago

Climate Change Is A Top Campaign Issue At Least For Democrats

"This year climate change is a top campaign issue at least for Democrats. Yesterday, we looked at president trump's record. On the issue today, we'll explore toe Biden's plan, which is the most ambitious climate proposal. Any presidential candidate has ever laid out. We've got NPR's Nathan rods and NPR's Jeff Brady both of our climate team with us. Hi, guys good morning. So. Let's just the obviously our Joe Biden and Donald Trump do not exactly agree on climate? Change. Absolutely yeah I think that's a fair way to put it. President trump repeatedly rejects climate science and generally he depicts regulations to address climate. Change is bad for the economy and bad for jobs Joe Biden calls climate change existential threat to our health, our economy, our national security, the whole thing but he's also trying to frame it right now as an opportunity you know when? Donald. Trump thinks about climate change he thinks hoax. When I think about I think jobs. Good paying union opposite put. To work. Building a stronger more. Climate resilient nation I mean nate. That sounds great. But has he laid out a plan for how he would actually make that happen. Yes, and it is a lot Hewitt invest money for one climate. Change is part of his economic recovery plan for the pandemic. But he's also says he'll do executive actions right? Other Gate. He says he's GONNA re enter the Paris climate agreement and put the US back in the global climate conversation He's talking about conserving land for biodiversity stopping offshore drilling in the Arctic. Methane from existing oil and gas tell me when you want me to stop. But he's also putting money towards climate adaptation measures to make communities more resilient to sea level rise flooding hurricanes fires. You know the type of things we've experienced over the last few months and he's also promising massive investments in green energy and infrastructure. This is where the. Jobs part of what he's promising comes in. So that means more solar more wind high speed rail, electric car chargers all with the goal of zeroing out carbon pollution from our electrical sector by twenty, thirty five and making the country carbon neutral. So it's contributing anymore to climate change by twenty fifty. And I mean I know a lot of campaigns I mean the rhetoric is aspirational, right but even so I mean by twenty fifty shifting the entire US economy to be carbon neutral to sounds like a massive undertaking is he going to be able to accomplish that Jeff? You know most of the experts I've talked with thinking is possible. The plan includes a lot of executive actions. The Biden says, he would take right away some of the nature mentioned. It also this plan requires new laws passed by Congress to create policies for meeting that overall goal. Now, that's going to require a democratic majority in the Senate most likely I talked with Scott Siegel. He's a partner with the law firm Bracewell, which represents a lot of energy clients including fossil fuel companies, and you can imagine that they have a lot at stake care. He thinks guidance climate plan is realistic. He says, it includes both regulations and incentives for people. In Industries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and I think when a plan has both and doesn't rely only on the carrot or the stick, it's a sign of maturity in approaching these issues. Siegel likes that it leaves room for some fossil fuels with carbon offsets and capture, and he points out that the electric power sector is already on its way to meeting that interim 2035 call some of those companies in utilities are setting net zero carbon goals all on their own. Yeah, and that's an important point. I talked to Karl Frisch who worked at the US Department of Energy under three administrations including trump's she's now at the Rocky Mountain Institute you know and I asked her if she thinks it could all be done by Biden alone if he gets elected. No. So to get where we need to go on climate in the United States to reduce emissions and build a sustainable economy, it takes action by the executive branch action by Congress. And action by state leaders, city leaders, business leaders on the ground, and she says, you know a lot of these actions are already happening at the local level. So a Biden administration would be smart to try to build on that existing momentum. So something we hear president trump attack Joe Biden on a lot is fracking fracking for natural gas. The president alleging that Joe Biden wants to ban it. Let's just clear this up Jeff Does Joe Biden WanNa. Ban fracking. No, he doesn't want to ban fracking. He has repeatedly said that he would not ban all fracking just new fracking on federal land and when trump says that it's aimed at voters and energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania, which actually has very little federal land but that's still a point of contention for for Biden, with mini climate activists who say the country should stop all fracking and keep all fossil fuels in the ground to slow climate change. So. What about the politics of climate change you know I mean we know what the facts are that it is happening that humans have contributed to it as well. But what about the politics of climate change because we know for Republicans it's an incredibly divisive issue where do Democrats stand on Biden's proposals? Well, polling indicates a majority of registered voters in the US view climate change as a real threat to the country, and when you look at Republicans climate change is actually a lot less divisive you get. But in terms of Democrats a recent poll by Pew found that more than two-thirds of Joe Biden supporters sit climate change is very important to them. So Biden's. Plan is not as ambitious as what some Progressive Democrats want to see it is not the green new deal despite what the president repeatedly says, but it is more ambitious than what Joe Biden had initially proposed. So for example, his plan now includes an environmental justice component which would aim to address the fact that people of color are disproportionately affected by pollution climate change and have been for a long time. His plan says he'd do that by investing in disadvantaged communities pulling polluters accountable I talked to Michelle Roberts with the Environmental Justice Health Alliance about this, and she has a long history with Biden because she's actually from Delaware, his home state and she says historically. Always overly supportive when it came to dealing with polluters like dupont over communities like hers he was a Filibuster for the political economy that was running the great state of Delaware. Does that make sense BA- Roberts says she's met with Biden since and she thinks his views have a she supports him but it's going to be important. She says if he's elected to hold them accountable all the things that he's promising to do now. NPR's nate wrought and NPR's Jeff. Brady, thank you for your reporting. Thank you. Thank

Joe Biden Donald Trump Jeff Brady President Trump United States Executive NPR Congress Scott Siegel Michelle Roberts Us Department Of Energy Nate Dupont Delaware Senate Nathan Hewitt
What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 1 year ago

What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

"News. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro. We're spending a few days this week digging into where the presidential candidates stand on some of the key issues in this election. Today, it's climate change. President Trump and Joe Biden have dramatically different views. Biden has an aggressive plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. President Trump is focused on boosting fossil fuels. We learn more. We're joined by Jeff Brady of NPR's climate team. Hi Jeff Diary start by summing up force. What President Trump has done on climate in his first term climate change is not a priority for him in the past. He's even called it a hoax. But Trump has softened his language a bit on this. At the first presidential debate Last month, the president was asked what he believes about climate change. I want crystal clean water and air. I want beautiful, clean air. We have now the lowest carbon. If you look at our numbers right now, we are doing phenomenally, but I haven't destroyed our businesses. Trump's still doesn't display much understanding about how humans are changing the climate. But as you heard there, he does brag about carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector going down. That's not because of anything Trump has done. It's because cleaner and cheaper renewable energy and natural gas air replacing coal for generating electricity. Trump has this energy dominance agenda. It's a combination of promoting domestic energy, mostly fossil fuels. And getting rid of regulations that might hinder the drilling and mining that produces those fuels. So he pulled out of the Paris climate agreement. He's rolled back dozens of environmental regulations, including President Obama's clean power plan, and also strict fuel efficiency standards for cars. On the campaign trail. President Trump often ties Joe Biden two proposals like the Green new Deal and banning fracking. Those issues might hurt biting and ki energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania but clear this up for us What our Biden's position On those topics and what are his actual climate proposals? Well, Biden says the green new deal is a good framework. But he has his own climate plan, and the only supports burnt banning new fracking on public land. And there's very little of that. In Pennsylvania on climate change bite an echo scientists that humans are changing the climate and emissions must be reduced quickly. His detailed climate plan has a big job creation focus. He calls for spending $2 trillion over four years for a wide range of environmental projects, Things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations across the country. There's so many things that we can do now to create thousands of thousands of jobs. We can get to net zero in terms of energy production by 2035, not only not costing people jobs, creating jobs. On top of that 2035 goal for the electricity sector that he mentioned at the first debate. Biden's plan aims for net zero carbon emissions across the entire US economy, including transportation by 2050. That seems like an enormous pivot. When you think of all the power plant's vehicles, airplanes in the U. S it zbig reach. Is it possible it would cost trillions of dollars and require big changes really fast. Under this plan, fossil fuels, though, would still be used, but there would be offsets and carbon capture projects to reach that. Net zero goal. Biden has a long list of what he calls day. One executive actions Some are about reversing trumps rollback. Something's like methane emissions and those car fuel efficiency standards. There's also directives for the federal government by zero emission vehicles and make buildings more efficient. He has an ambitious legislative agenda that includes an enforcement mechanism mechanism to meet that net zero by 2050 goal. And to do all this. Given the political polarization around climate change, his party probably will have to control both houses of Congress. Looks like Democrats will hold on to the house, but the Senate is still in question there. And if President Trump is re elected, what is his second term climate agenda look like AA lot of the environmental rollbacks from his first four years are being challenged in court now, so resolving those battles and cementing trumps deregulation agenda would be a big focus. He'd continue pushing for more exploration and drilling on public land and offshore. But very little focus on addressing climate change, which you know, scientists say the world needs to do that to minimize its worst effects in coming decades. That's NPR's Jeff Brady. Thanks, Jeff. Thank you. The film

President Trump Joe Biden Jeff Brady Pennsylvania NPR President Obama Jeff Diary Elsa Chang Ari Shapiro Jeff
What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 1 year ago

What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

"All things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro. We're spending a few days this week digging into where the presidential candidates stand on some of the key issues in this election. Today, it's climate change. President Trump and Joe Biden have dramatically different views. Biden has an aggressive plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. President Trump is focused on boosting fossil fuels. We learn more. We're joined by Jeff Brady of NPR's climate team. Hi Jeff Diary start by summing up for us. What President Trump has done on climate in his first term climate change is not a priority for him in the past. He's even called it a hoax. But Trump has softened his language a bit on this. At the first presidential debate Last month, the president was asked what he believes about climate change. I want crystal clean water and air. I want beautiful, clean air. We have now the lowest carbon. If you look at our numbers right now, we are doing phenomenally, but I haven't destroyed our businesses. Trump's still doesn't display much understanding about how humans are changing the climate. But as you heard there, he does brag about carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector going down. That's not because of anything Trump has done. It's because cleaner and cheaper renewable energy and natural gas air replacing coal for generating electricity. Trump has this energy dominance agenda. It's a combination of promoting domestic energy, mostly fossil fuels. And getting rid of regulations that might hinder the drilling and mining that produces those fuels. So he pulled out of the Paris climate agreement. He's rolled back dozens of environmental regulations, including President Obama's clean power plan, and also strict fuel efficiency standards for cars. On the campaign trail. President Trump often ties Joe Biden two proposals like the Green new Deal and banning fracking. Those issues might hurt biting and ki energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania but clear this up for us What our Biden's position On those topics and what are his actual climate proposals? Well, Biden says the green new deal is a good framework. But he has his own climate plan, and the only supports parent banning new fracking on public land. And there's very little of that. In Pennsylvania on climate change bite an echo scientists that humans are changing the climate and emissions must be reduced quickly. His detailed climate plan has a big job creation focus. He calls for spending $2 trillion over four years for a wide range of environmental projects, Things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations across the country. There's so many things that we can do now to create thousands of thousands of jobs. We can get to net zero in terms of energy production by 2035, not only not costing people jobs, creating jobs. On top of that 2035 goal for the electricity sector that he mentioned at the first debate. Biden's plan aims for net zero carbon emissions across the entire US economy, including transportation by 2050. That seems like an enormous pivot. When you think of all the power plant's vehicles, airplanes in the U. S it zbig reach. Is it possible it would cost trillions of dollars and require big changes really fast. Under this plan, fossil fuels, though, would still be used, but there would be offsets and carbon capture projects to reach that. Net zero goal. Biden has a long list of what he calls day. One executive actions Some are about reversing trumps rollback. Something's like methane emissions and those car fuel efficiency standards. There's also directives for the federal government by zero emission vehicles and make buildings more efficient. He has an ambitious legislative agenda that includes an enforcement mechanism mechanism to meet that net zero by 2050 goal. And to do all this. Given the political polarization around climate change, his party probably will have to control both houses of Congress. Looks like Democrats will hold on to the house, but the Senate is still in question there. And if President Trump is re elected, what is his second term climate agenda look like AA lot of the environmental rollbacks from his first four years are being challenged in court now, so resolving those battles and cementing trumps deregulation agenda would be a big focus. He'd continue pushing for more exploration and drilling on public land and offshore. But very little focus on addressing climate change, which you know, scientists say the world needs to do that to minimize its worst effects in coming decades. That's NPR's Jeff Brady. Thanks, Jeff. Thank you. The film that

President Trump Joe Biden Jeff Brady Pennsylvania NPR President Obama Jeff Diary Elsa Chang Ari Shapiro Jeff
How Nomination Of Amy Coney Barrett To Supreme Court Might Affect U.S. Climate Action

Environment: NPR

03:46 min | 1 year ago

How Nomination Of Amy Coney Barrett To Supreme Court Might Affect U.S. Climate Action

"Environmental Policies Almost always end up in court these days and several of president trump's most contested chart changes to environmental policy are likely headed to the Supreme Court if Conservative nominee amy, Coney Barrett confirmed, it could have a major impact on how the US treats climate change as NPR's Jeff Brady explains it's difficult to predict how Amy Coney Barrett will rule on specific cases. Environmental Law was not her focus as a professor and not something she dealt with a lot during her time on the Court of Appeals for the seventh circuit. Her judicial philosophy does offer clues discussed that when her nomination was announced, a judge must apply the law as written. Judges are not policymakers and they must be resolute and setting aside any policy views. They might hold Barrett's judicial philosophy show skepticism of government and favors. Deregulation over-regulation says, Harvard law professor and former Obama administration official Jody Freeman I think generally speaking it's GonNa be a corporate court good for business good for corporation. Freeman says Barrett is skeptical federal agencies stretching their authority under laws where Congress hasn't given them clear direction. But Freeman, says agencies need to have flexibility. Even when Congress passes new laws are always ambiguities they're always things congress doesn't fade there always is new science new understanding new risks, new problems, new data. And it's impossible to specify each and every small kind of decision that the agencies make and sometimes agencies have to use existing laws to address new problems like climate change. That's what the Obama Administration did after failing to convince Congress to pass legislation focused on the polarizing topic, the EPA turned to the decades-old Clean Air Act to regulate greenhouse gases a two thousand seven. Supreme. Court case Massachusetts versus the EPA determined carbon dioxide could be regulated under the act. It became an important environmental ruling and now some worry a more conservative Supreme Court could overturn or weaken it case Western. Reserve University Law Professor Jonathan Adler. Unlikely on the question of whether greenhouse gases are pollutant, but he says it's more likely on the constitutional issue of standing whether Massachusetts and the other states had the right to sue the federal government standing inclement cases can be a challenge and I think based on what we've seen on the seventh circuit. A Justice Barrett. Certainly won't make that challenge. Any easier Adler Conservative agrees that bear it a skeptical of agencies overreaching their authority but says that doesn't mean Barrett is hostile to addressing climate change just that Congress needs to pass more specific laws constant do a lot of that these days but but yes. I'm old fashioned in that I. think that's what we had members of Congress and that's what we elect senators to do this appeals to conservatives like Tom Pile with the American energy alliance he supported Barrett's nomination on his podcast was duke it out where it belongs in Congress you guys win congratulations expanded to include co two regulation. You got it but Reverend Lennox Yearwood with the hip hop caucus says, he wants a different kind of justice who will lead on fixing big problems like climate change is a lifetime position and so that's why you have to have people in those positions who have a world view. that. Is One that Debbie will go by the Constitution. But also understands the nuances of the world we live today year would is among those who say they want the Senate to wait on a confirmation vote until after the presidential election. Jeff Radi? NPR

Justice Barrett Congress Environmental Law Amy Coney Barrett Jody Freeman Supreme Court Court Of Appeals NPR Obama Administration Professor EPA Massachusetts Jeff Brady
'Light Years Ahead' Of Their Elders, Young Republicans Push GOP On Climate Change

Environment: NPR

03:29 min | 1 year ago

'Light Years Ahead' Of Their Elders, Young Republicans Push GOP On Climate Change

"A recent NPR PBS Newshour poll showed that the top issue for Democratic voters. This election is climate change for Republicans it barely registers, but there is a divide within the GOP on the issue. Other surveys show that younger Republicans are more concerned than their elders by nearly two to one margin. NPR's Jeff Brady reports Benji backers started the American conservation coalition in two thousand seventeen while still in college he says his love of nature comes in part from his family there audubon members, Nature Conservancy members, but they were conservative and. I grew up not thinking that the environment should be political at all yet these days, environmental politics and dominate his life from now until election day backer is driving an electric car across the country talking about his groups climate agenda and posting videos along the way we are in the San National Park about to kick off the electric election road trip. Promoting his groups American climate contract. That's his conservative market focused response to the green new deal. Backer is critical of fellow conservatives who ignore climate change he's praised Swedish. Climate activist gratitude. And says, he wants to work with liberal climate activists to pass legislation. So how will he vote in November? If president trump wants to get my vote, he's going to have to prioritize climate change in the way that he has not done over the past four years. Backer says he's undecided so far he was disappointed climate change wasn't even discussed at the Republican National Convention. The trump campaign says in a statement to NPR that the president has proven, you can have energy independence and a clean healthy environment but the statement doesn't even mention climate change. Young Republicans are light years ahead of their elder counterparts on this issue here O'Brien HEADS YOUNG CONSERVATIVES FOR CARBON DIVIDENDS WHICH SUPPORTS A carbon tax to reduce greenhouse gas emissions grew up in Alaska and says, young people are motivated by mounting evidence that the climate is changing. They're seeing the impacts firsthand whether it's myself in Alaska with Algal blooms that are turning the ocean weird colors or with flooding in the Gulf coast hurricanes that are unprecedented at this point this is the climate generation and people are witnessing these things that we had been told growing up far off in real time that urgency is prompting young conservatives to join others in their generation and pushing for more action on climate change according to Bob English is a former Republican congressman from South Carolina I. Think it's a with their progressive friends. Plan on living on the earth longer than say their parents or grandparents English now directs the Conservative Climate Group Republic E. N. he says among young conservatives addressing climate change is becoming a moral issue more than a political one and that makes him optimistic. The country will eventually take more action. The demographics are definitely going to deliver a win for climate change. I am absolutely certain that we are going to win on climate policy the questions whether we win soon, enough to avoid the worst consequences scientists say the timeline is short. English says the country is more likely to succeed if both sides of the aisle are focused on climate change jeopardy NPR

Backer NPR GOP President Trump Bob English Nature Conservancy Jeff Brady Alaska Republican National Convention San National Park American Conservation Coalitio O'brien South Carolina
"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

"Their job. Meanwhile, all three n ba playoff game scheduled for today have been postponed. His players protest the shooting of Blake. The MBA says the games will be rescheduled. Hurricane Laura is barreling toward the Gulf Coast as a Category four storm with maximum sustained winds of 145 miles an hour. Forecasters say The storm is also wide some 120 miles and could cause catastrophic destruction. Evacuation orders a route for tens of thousands in its past. Cath rather. Meanwhile, oil drillers in the Gulf of Mexico have shut down operations and evacuated workers ahead of the storm. NPR's Jeff Brady reports. Drilling in the Gulf of Mexico accounts for about 17% of the total US crude oil production, so it's significant when a storm shuts down offshore production there. The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement says about half of the more than 640 production platforms in the Gulf have been evacuated. Workers have been removed from 11 of the 12 stationary drilling rigs there and 16 other rigs have moved out of the storm's projected path. Some refineries also have shut down ahead of the storm. So far. Analysts don't think this will affect oil and gas prices much but that could change if production is interrupted for an extended period. Jeff Brady NPR news and you're listening to NPR. And this is Casey ar W. Ellery Parole on a Wednesday August 26th. Here's what's happening at 3 30 to the State Justice Department has reached settlements with three California school districts over discriminatory treatment ofthe black students and students with disabilities. Thie investigations found the district's failed to respond to complaints of discrimination and harassment in some cases, racial slurs and rely too heavily on harsh, exclusionary.

Jeff Brady US NPR Gulf Coast Bureau of Safety and Environme Mexico W. Ellery Parole Hurricane Laura Cath Blake harassment State Justice Department California
Trump's Postmaster General DeJoy will testifies before Congress

Morning Edition

03:26 min | 1 year ago

Trump's Postmaster General DeJoy will testifies before Congress

"Lewis to Joy testifies before Congress Today he is sure to be questioned about just how he is changing the U. S Postal Service. Joy has already promised to suspend his plans until after the election, but still faces concern about male delays and mail in ballots. That is especially the case in states where the vote may be close. Such as Pennsylvania, where NPR's Jeff Brady is based. Just about every summer. For more than two decades, Nancy Rothwell and her family have rented a vacation house at the Jersey Shore. This was the first year she ran into a problem with the mail. The realtor contacted me after about two weeks. And said, Hey, where is your money? And I said, What are you talking about? I mailed it in July. Sir, usually takes just a few days for mail to travel 80 miles from Roth Wells, Philadelphia suburb to the shore town. Fortunately, the check arrived, but just barely in time, three weeks from now. Tell him village to Ocean City, New Jersey is like ridiculous. The Postal Service declined to comment for this story. It referred NPR TOE. Postmaster General Lewis to Joy's announcement that cost cutting measures will be suspended until after the election to joy says the agency will be ableto handle whatever volume of election mail it receives. But postal service unions are not convinced. John Gibson is president of the National Postal Mail Handlers Union. Local 30 Wait, which covers Delaware. Pennsylvania and New Jersey. He says. Giant mail sorting machines that have already been removed aren't coming back. The trend facility took out 60 VCs machines, which sorts mail there not being returned. They're just not going to perceive with removing the other three. The loss of those machines now is a concern, says Gibson, because they also sort mail in ballots because of the pandemic. New Jersey is mailing ballots to everyone, and Gibson thinks not having these machines will slow down processing. Times. The steps that have been taken initially by the postmaster general have led to the slowing of the mail deliveries. No doubt about it. Ohio is another politically important state this election and at least one case, they're postal workers say equipment they thought would just be unplugged and covered with a tarp was instead dismantled and stored outside exposed to the elements. Ensuring it can't be used again. On top of these changes. Union official Gibson says the Corona virus pandemic also has slowed mail delivery. He says absenteeism among his members was up to 50% in spring, he says that's improving and has been cut in half. Still, even with change is suspended and workers coming back. Some voters like Yumi Kwan near Philadelphia are losing confidence that the Postal Service can ensure their votes will be counted and I going to get my mail in ballots on time. If I mail my ballots really get there on time. Voting is important to Quan. She's not a fan of President Trump, who won Pennsylvania four years ago by a narrow margin. With the Corona virus. She doesn't want to risk missing election day. Like if I get physically sick and I have to be hospitalized, I will not be able to go and vote. She signed up for a mail in ballot but has decided it will be best to deliver it in person. Jeff

John Gibson National Postal Mail Handlers U. S Postal Service New Jersey Pennsylvania JOY General Lewis Jeff Brady Ohio Roth Wells President Trump Nancy Rothwell Philadelphia Jersey Shore NPR Delaware Congress Ocean City
"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

"By getting rid of that rule. The administration says it wants to help drillers. But NPR's Jeff Brady reports that some big oil companies argued against changing the rules. The announcement was delivered in Pittsburgh in the heart of Pennsylvania's gas drilling region. In 2016 the state voted for President Trump, but polls show it leaning Democratic this year. Thes rules or promise is kept by the Trump administration and president Trump himself to the energy industry. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler says the Obama era methane rules were illegal and re sending them fix is a mistake. Methane is a concern because when it escapes unburned, it's a greenhouse gas that is more than 80 times as potent as carbon dioxide. At least for the 1st 20 years. It's in the atmosphere. The EPA says the oil industry is the largest source of methane leaks. But Wheeler says the old rules were duplicative and burdensome because some states and the industry already have programmes to reduce methane emissions industry already has more than enough incentive to capture methane without reporting requirements and other obligations. This is because methane is the key constituent of natural gas in a valuable commodity and announcing the proposed rules last year, the agency said the changes would save the industry up to $19 million a year in compliance costs. A significant concern for smaller drillers is that down the road, the Obama era regulations also would have applied toe older wells drilled before 2015. With this change. That requirement goes away. Oil industry trade groups praised the new EPA regulations. Environmental groups are critical. Peter's Al's Alice with Environmental Defense Fund, there's no scientific basis for the actions of the administration is taking The action's opposed by a wide range of stakeholders, among them big oil companies like Exxon Mobil, BP and Shell. They worry that if methane leaks continued to be a problem that could undermine their arguments that natural gas is a cleaner burning fossil fuel than coal. President of Shell in the US called the rollback, frustrating and disappointing and said her company will continue its program to reduce methane emissions. While the EPA says the new regulations will not increase methane emissions Environmental Defense fund disputes that we estimate that the administration's action will increase methane pollution by about 4.5 1,000,000 tonnes per year. Zazzle says that's equivalent to the greenhouse gas emissions from 100 coal fired power plants. His group plans to sue the Trump administration over these changes that could lead to years of legal battles. Even a scientist say time is running out to avoid the worst effects of climate change. There's one way this rollback could be short lived, though. If Joe Biden wins in November, and Democrats gained control of the Senate, this change and others the Trump administration finalized recently could be reversed. Jeff Brady NPR news This is NPR news. And this is Casey era W. Every home cook has that summer dish, but how to.

EPA Trump administration President Trump Jeff Brady Administrator Andrew Wheeler Obama president Environmental Defense Fund NPR Joe Biden Zazzle
"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

"Right now. It is 93 degrees in Pasadena, 72 in Santa Monica, also 93 in Anaheim at 4 35 From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm married, at least, Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. Today, the Trump Administration rolled back another environmental rule. This one was aimed at reducing climate warming methane emissions. The oil and gas industry is the largest source of those emissions in the US, and yet some big oil companies wanted to keep the rule in place. NPR's Jeff Brady's covering this story, huh? Jeff? Hi, Ari. Why did the Obama administration create this rule in the first place about methane emissions back in 2016? There's a lot of concern about methane. It's the main ingredient in natural gas, and when it's burned, it's cleaner than other fossil fuels. But when it escapes into the atmosphere, unburned say, from a leaky valve at a well drilling site. It's a very potent greenhouse gas. It has more than 80 times the climate warming power of carbon dioxide over the 1st 20 years, it's in the atmosphere. So under the Obama administration, the Environmental Protection Agency required oil and gas companies to monitor and limit methane leaks first to newer wells and eventually to thousands of wells installed before 2015. Also, that's why some oil companies, especially smaller ones, opposed the rule. They said. It's too costly. Now the Trump administration deciding with those companies and rolling back the requirement, it says that they'll save those companies up to about $19 million a year in compliance costs. Is the flip side of that cost saving on acceptance that methane emissions are going to rise. Yeah, Yeah. Yeah, The administration echoes an industry argument. It says oil companies have an incentive to stop methane from leaking because That's the product that they sell, and the industry already has a voluntary program to reduce methane emissions. The administration also says the Obama EPA rule that they say it was duplicative. They say methane can already be regulated under other rules. But environmentalists say methane is such a problem that it needs special attention. Here's Peter's AL South is with the group Environmental Defense Fund. Reducing that vein emissions eyes one of the fastest, most low cost and most effective ways that we can combat climate change in the near term. And he says they're side benefits to that old rule that the Obama administration had had passed because it also reduces other pollution. The terms people's health. That's what we would expect to hear from an environmental group, but explain why some big oil companies also want to stick with the 2016 rule even if it does cost the money to comply. Yeah, And these are companies names. We recognize Exxon Mobil BP shell. They have a lot invested in natural gas. And they worry that if methane leaks continued to be a problem that could undermine their arguments that natural gas is a cleaner burning fossil fuel than, say Cole, the president of Shell in the U. S. Gretchen Watkins told us in a statement that she finds it frustrating and disappointing. The administration is rolling back these regulations. Her companies and others plan to continue their efforts to reduce methane emissions, and some states also have their own programmes underway. So if states and big companies are still focused on stopping these leaks, is the Trump administration's robot gonna have much of an effect it likely will especially because there won't be that requirement to go back and stop leaks at older Wells Environmental Defense Fund calculates the effect would be about the same as adding greenhouse gas emissions. From 100 coal fired power plants every year by rolling back thes these these regulations, but there are two caveats here. One is the roll back will be challenged in court and second. If Joe Biden wins in November, and Democrats take control of the Senate, this methane rule could be reversed again. NPR's Jeff Brady. Thank you. Thank you. New data from around the US confirms drug overdoses are spiking during the Corona virus pandemic rural areas have been hit hard, so have black and Latin next communities that often lack access to affordable healthcare and addiction treatment. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Man reports I meet Jennifer Austin at a Salvation Army Center in Ogdensburg. It's a working class town in upstate New York. She says. The last few months have been heart breaking. The longer people had to isolate it, Wass A relapse, relapse, overdose, relapse overdose. Austin's in recovery and works as a coach, helping others, she says. People like herself needs structure. They need routine and support the pandemics. Quarantine rules rectal that narcotics anonymous classes held here were cancelled for weeks. When people relapse, they often wind up using street drugs that are more dangerous now that because of a separate trend, more dealers are lacing drugs with a deadly synthetic opioid called fentanyl. I had a young lady reach out to me who Heroin wasn't even her drug of choice. She tried it for the first time. And it wasn't heroin. It was. Finally she overdoes data collected nationally shows this happening more often during the pandemic. Elise Altar is with an organization that tracks overdoses. In real time. We did find that the number of spike or and also the duration of the spike had increased nationally since the commencement of state mandated today at home orders her project called OD Maps. Found roughly an 18% increase in overdoses since Covad 19 hit, including a big spike in fatal overdoses, and in more areas overdosed clusters had shifted from traditional centralized urban locations to adjacent and surrounding suburban and rule areas. This is happening at a time when the rapid spread of fentanyl was already unravelling years of effort aimed at reducing overdose deaths. Admiral Brett Jawad is assistant secretary for the US Health Department. Basically all the progress that we made has now been reversed, and this was even before the pandemic overdose deaths were already on the rise lastyear, killing roughly 72,000 Americans, speaking on a panel examining the collision of covert 19 and the addiction crisis. Joie said the scramble is on to prevent an even larger death toll every indication we have in terms of stress in terms of surveyed about increasing used during the pandemic. Basically everything is pointed in the wrong direction. You know, it's just a nightmare, Jihua says. All these risk factors are hitting people of color, especially hard minority on Native American native Alaskans. People who we know also bear a lot of the disproportionate burden of substance, misuse and substance use disorders, the manifestations of our historic disparities. Are really just in everyone's face. Right now. The American Medical Association has also raised alarms about this about the link between covert 19 and drug overdose is especially in black and Latin ex communities. This pandemic has brought into stark reality. Many things, Dr Patrice Harris, who heads the Opioid task force. Says racial inequities in health care have grown more visible as the addiction crisis and the pandemic crash into each other. She largely blames one policy decision a decades long underfunding. Under resource ing of the public health infrastructure, state and federal agencies have responded to the overdose surge, easing regulations so people in recovery have better access to medical treatments and allowing Mohr drug counselling using telemedicine. But as the pandemic ravages the economy, addiction services and public health face even more cuts, which means for people most at risk of overdose. Finding.

Obama administration Jeff Brady NPR US Ari Shapiro drug overdose fentanyl Jennifer Austin Heroin Obama EPA Anaheim Exxon Mobil
"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is the largest source of those emissions in the US, and yet some big oil companies wanted to keep the rule in place. NPR's Jeff Brady's covering this story, huh? Jeff? Hi, Ari. Why did the Obama administration create this rule in the first place about methane emissions back in 2016? There's a lot of concern about methane. It's the main ingredient in natural gas, and when it's burned, it's cleaner than other fossil fuels. But when it escapes into the atmosphere, unburned say, from a leaky valve at the well drilling site, it's a very potent greenhouse gas. It has more than 80 times the climate warming power of carbon dioxide over the 1st 20 years. It's in the atmosphere. So under the Obama administration, the Environmental Protection Agency required oil and gas companies to monitor and limit methane leaks first to newer wells and eventually to thousands of wells installed before 2015. Also, that's why some oil companies, especially smaller ones, opposed the rule. They said. It's too costly. Now the Trump administration deciding with those companies and rolling back the requirement, it says that they'll save those companies up to about $19 million a year in compliance costs. Is the flip side of that cost saving on acceptance that methane emissions are going to rise. Yeah, Yeah. Yeah, the the administration echoes an industry argument. It says oil companies have an incentive to stop methane from leaking because That's the product that they sell, and the industry already has a voluntary program to reduce methane emissions. The administration also says the Obama EPA rule that they say it was duplicative. They say methane can already be regulated under other rules. But environmentalists a methane is such a problem that it needs special attention. Here's Peter's AL South is with the group Environmental Defense Fund. Reducing that vein emissions eyes one of the fastest, most low cost and most effective ways that we can combat climate change in the near term. And he says they're side benefits to that old rule that the Obama administration had had passed because it also reduces other pollution. The terms people's health. That's what we would expect to hear from an environmental group, but explain why some big oil companies also want to stick with the 2016 rule even if it does cost the money to comply. Yeah, And these are companies names. We recognize Exxon Mobil BP shell. They have a lot invested in natural gas. And they worry that if methane leaks continued to be a problem that could undermine their arguments that natural gas is a cleaner burning fossil fuel than, say Cole, the president of Shell in the U. S. Gretchen Watkins told us in a statement that she finds it frustrating and disappointing. The administration is rolling back these regulations. Her companies and others plan to continue their efforts to reduce methane emissions, and some states also have their own programmes underway. So estates and big companies are still focused on stopping these leaks. Is the Trump administration's robot gonna have much of an effect it likely will especially because there won't be that requirement to go back and stop leaks at older Wells Environmental Defense Fund calculates the effect would be about the same as adding greenhouse gas emissions. From 100 coal fired power plants every year by rolling back thes these these regulations, but there are two caveats here. One is the roll back will be challenged in court and second. If Joe Biden wins in November, and Democrats take control of the Senate, this methane rule could be reversed again. NPR's Jeff Brady. Thank you. Thank you. New data from around the US confirms drug overdoses are spiking during the Corona virus pandemic rural areas have been hit hard, so have black and Latin next communities that often lack access to affordable healthcare and addiction treatment. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Man reports I meet Jennifer Austin at a Salvation Army Center in Ogdensburg. It's a working class town in upstate New York. She says. The last few months have been heart breaking. The longer people had to isolate it, Wass A relapse, relapse, overdose, relapse overdose. Austin's in recovery and works as a coach, helping others, she says. People like herself needs structure. They need routine and support the pandemics. Quarantine rules rectal that narcotics anonymous classes held here were cancelled for weeks. When people relapse, they often wind up using street drugs that are more dangerous now that because of a separate trend, more dealers are lacing drugs with a deadly synthetic opioid called fentanyl. I had a young lady reach out to me who Heroin wasn't even her drug of choice. She tried it for the first time, and it wasn't heroin. It was. Finally she overdoes data collected nationally shows this happening more often during the pandemic. Elise Altar is with an organization that tracks overdoses. In real time. We did find that the number of spike or and also the duration of the spike had increased nationally since the commencement of state mandated today at home orders her project called OD Maps. Found roughly an 18% increase in overdoses since Cove in 19 hit, including a big spike in fatal overdoses, and in more areas over those clusters had shifted from traditional centralized urban locations to adjacent and surrounding suburban and rule areas. This is happening at a time when the rapid spread of fentanyl was already unravelling years of effort aimed at reducing overdose deaths. Admiral Brett Jawad is assistant secretary for the US Health Department. Basically all the progress that we made has now been reversed, and even before the pandemic overdose deaths were already on the rise lastyear, killing roughly 72,000 Americans. Speaking on a panel examining the collision of covert 19 and the addiction crisis, Joie said the scramble is on to prevent an even larger death toll. Every indication we have In terms of stress in terms of surveys about increasing used during the pandemic. Basically, everything is pointed in the wrong direction. You know, it's just a nightmare. Joie says. All these risk factors are hitting people of color, especially hard minority on Native American native Alaskans, people who we know also bear a lot of the disproportionate burden of substance, misuse and substance use disorders. The manifestations of our historic disparities are really just in everyone's face. Right now. The American Medical Association has also raised alarms about this about the link between covert 19 and drug overdose is especially in black and Latin ex communities. This pandemic has brought into stark reality, many things Dr. Patrice Harris, who heads the Opioid task force says racial inequities in health care have grown more visible as the addiction crisis and the pandemic crash into each other. She largely blames one policy decision a decades long underfunding. Under re sourcing of public health infrastructure, state and federal agencies have responded to the overdose surge, easing regulations so people in recovery have better access to medical treatments and allowing Mohr drug counselling using telemedicine. But is the pandemic ravages the economy, addiction services and public health face even more cuts, which means for people most at risk.

Obama administration Jeff Brady US NPR fentanyl drug overdose Joie Obama EPA Heroin Ari Exxon Mobil Wells Environmental Defense Fu Joe Biden
Trump Administration Rolls Back Obama-Era Restrictions On Methane Emissions

Environment: NPR

03:37 min | 1 year ago

Trump Administration Rolls Back Obama-Era Restrictions On Methane Emissions

"Today the trump administration rolled back another environmental rule. This one was aimed at reducing climate warming methane emissions. The oil and gas industry is the largest source of those emissions in the US and get some big oil companies wanted to keep the rule in place NPR's Jeff Brady's covering this story. Jeff Hi, Ari. Why did the Obama Administration create this rule in the first place about methane emissions back in two thousand, sixteen it there's a lot of concern about methane. It's the main ingredient in natural gas and when it's burned, it's cleaner than other fossil fuels. But when it escapes into the atmosphere unburned safe from a leaky valve at a well drilling site, it's a very potent greenhouse gas it. Has More than eighty times the climate warming power of Carbon Dioxide over the first twenty years it's in the atmosphere. So under the Obama Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency required oil and gas companies to monitor and limit methane leaks, I to newer wells, and eventually to thousands of wells installed before twenty fifteen Also, that's by some oil companies. especially smaller ones oppose the rule they said. It's too costly. Now, the trump administration deciding with US companies and rolling back the requirement it says that they'll save those companies up to about nineteen million dollars. A year in compliance costs is the flip side of that cost saving an acceptance that methane emissions are gonNA rise. Yeah. Yeah. you know the the administration echoes and industry argument says oil companies have an incentive to stop. Methane from leaking because that's the product that they sell, and the industry already has a voluntary program to reduce methane emissions The administration also says the Obama EPA rule that they say it was duplicative they say methane can already be regulated under other rules but environmentalists methane is such a problem that it needs special attention. Here's a Peter Zahle South with the Group Environmental Defense, fund? Reducing methane emissions. Is One of the fastest whammos, low cost and most effective ways that we can combat climate change in the near term, and he says, there are side benefits to that old rule that the Obama administration had had passed because it also reduces other pollution that harms people's health. That's what we would expect to hear from an environmental group. But explain why some big oil companies also want to stick with the twenty sixteen rule even if it does cost the money to comply. Yeah and these are companies names we recognize Exxon Mobil BP shell they have a lot invested in natural gas and they worry if methane leaks continue to be a problem that could undermine their arguments that natural gas is a cleaner burning fossil fuel than say coal the president of Shell in the US Gretchen Watkins told us in a statement that she finds it frustrating and disappointing. The Administration is rolling back these regulations, her companies and others plan to continue their efforts to reduce methane emissions and some. States also have their own programs underway. So states and big companies are still focused on stopping these leaks is the trump administration's robot going to have much of an effect. It likely will especially because there won't be that requirement to go back and stop leaks at older wells Environmental Defense Fund calculates. The effect would be about the same as adding greenhouse gas emissions from one hundred coal fired power plants every year by rolling back these these these regulations. But there are two caveats here. One is the rollback will be challenged in court and second if Joe Biden wins in November and Democrats take control of the Senate, this nothing rule could be reversed again NPR's Jeff Brady thank you. Thank

Obama Administration United States Jeff Brady NPR Environmental Defense Fund Jeff Hi Group Environmental Defense Joe Biden Environmental Protection Agenc Shell Peter Zahle South Obama Epa
United Arab Emirates spacecraft blasts off from Japan

Latino USA

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

United Arab Emirates spacecraft blasts off from Japan

"Arab Emirates has launched its first spacecraft. A probe headed for Mars. NPR's Jeff Brady reports. The craft was launched from a space centre in Japan. After the launch Countdown in Arabic in a Japanese rocket launched the unmanned spacecraft. United Arab Emirates named the probe a mall or hope. Project director Amron Sharrif says in a promotional video that the Emirates Mars mission delivers a message of hope to young Arab people the same way we used to generate knowledge in the past. You can generate knowledge today and in the future to serve humanity. The craft is expected to reach Mars next February, as the Emirates celebrates 50 years since the country was founded. Once they're the probe will study the planet's upper atmosphere and monitor it's changing climate. Jeff Brady NPR news

United Arab Emirates Jeff Brady NPR Mars Amron Sharrif Japan Director
Absent From Stimulus Packages: Overhauling Energy, Climate Programs

Environment: NPR

04:22 min | 1 year ago

Absent From Stimulus Packages: Overhauling Energy, Climate Programs

"Some countries are literally printing money to rescue their economies from the ravages of covid nineteen. The UN and some others argue that some of that money should be spent to fight climate change. The European Union has a plan to do that. The US so far does not despite the fact that this country has a tradition of overhauling our energy sector to promote economic recovery. Here's NPR's Jeff Brady. Consider President Franklin. Roosevelt's new deal a century ago, electricity may not come to mind, but a big element was building massive hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River then the government paid woody Guthrie to write songs about. Colonial. Power returning our. Law. The legacy of those dams is mixed. They forever changed the environment, but they also brought electricity to rural America during the Nineteen Twenties and Nineteen Thirties about ninety percent of the US. Farms had no electricity. Ted Case is executive director of the Oregon. Rural Electric Cooperative Association his Co. up. Members exist because the new deal brought utility, Poles and power lines down many miles of dusty Rhodes and connected homes to the grid that day was the most incredible day for a lot of families when they finally got to throw. Throw that kerosene lantern out the window which many people did decades later? President Obama was sworn into office amid an economic downturn. His stimulus plan included ninety billion dollars that helped reshape the US energy landscape. It's an investment that will double the amount of renewable energy produced over the next three years solar and wind grew quickly, and now the cheapest source of electricity in some places, but hundreds of thousands of renewable energy jobs have been lost. Scientists say carbon emissions must be reduced dramatically to avoid the worst effects of. Of Climate Change, that requires significant changes at a time. The country already is spending a lot of money about three trillion dollars on relief packages so far Julian brave noise cat is with the group data for progress. It is irresponsible from like a very basic good government perspective to not have any of that money. Go to Queen Energy and fighting climate change noise cat says money should be spent creating jobs to build retrofit houses install rooftop, solar and deploy electric vehicles. Heather reams also is concerned about climate change, but. But her politics are more conservative and market focused. If we're talking about if you'RE GONNA put taxpayer money someplace, put it where you're going to get a good return, and that is in clean energy. Reams heads citizens for responsible energy solutions. She says there are bills. In Congress. That could become stimulus programs even with an administration that shows little interest in climate change they do recognize the economic value that clean energy brings the jobs that brings particularly to a lot of red states, so I think the business certainty. Trump's if you will any kind of political challenges, another idea has the support of some conservatives and big oil companies taxing carbon dioxide emissions I. Think it's fair to say that carbon taxes are economists favorite way of addressing climate change Yona. Marinescu is an economist at the University of Pennsylvania, but she says this would be a bad time to levy new taxes. She suggest the government invest lots of money in clean energy upfront, and then Levy carbon tax to pay for it when the economy recovers, it's one idea among many the point. Is that climate? Climate Change arguably is the biggest problem humans face now and fixing. It requires sweeping solutions at a time. The US's spending lots of money. It's a sad time, but also an opportunity to do investments that perhaps we didn't have the Mo-jo to get our act together and do before. Sometimes it takes a good crisis to finally move in a whole new direction just like the new deal. Here's what's different. Though after the Great Depression and the two thousand eight recession, the country had presidents who believed in fixing the big energy problems of

United States Queen Energy Covid UN European Union Nineteen Twenties Jeff Brady NPR Marinescu Rural Electric Cooperative Ass President Franklin Heather Reams Woody Guthrie Ted Case Columbia River
Coronavirus will trigger biggest ever plunge in energy demand, emissions: IEA

Morning Edition

06:41 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus will trigger biggest ever plunge in energy demand, emissions: IEA

"The corona virus pandemic is delivering the biggest shock to the global energy system in seven decades according to the international energy agency NPR's Jeff Brady reports plunging demand for energy is hitting fossil fuels especially hard global energy demand will fall by six percent this year seven times the decline after the financial crisis ten years ago I E. a projection show oil and gas hit hard but demand for coal falls by an extraordinary eight percent the largest decline since World War two the agency says renewable energy fair as well while among grows much as in the past the IEA projects electricity generation from wind solar and hydro power will increase five percent the agency says all this will reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions that lead to climate change by almost eight percent the largest annual decrease ever recorded though emissions will rebound in an economic recovery unless countries focus relief packages on boosting clean energy Jeff Brady

NPR Jeff Brady IEA
"jeff brady" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"And ask him to release these elderly people from prison my call in addition to that can you talk briefly about a freedom of information laws right now tip of the hat to our producer Jeff Brady offer put in assigned to this story the freedom of information act is a federal law but they've also got him at the state and city level and is called a sunshine law it's a real victory for democracy it will these laws were passed as a consequence of the radicalization of the sixties well using the cover of the pandemic a lot of state and city officials have shut the window on transparency so that people who are applying for government records on getting them they're being stalled are being turned down and what I'm worried about is that this may turn into a permanent situation it's what dynamic Klein talks about the shock doctrine are they use these disasters to do bad stuff to us and this is one the elimination of the sunshine laws could be one and people should be prickly alert to that danger Michael that's so true I think what we're going to see is a rash of measures and laws enacted during this pandemic and then they will remain with us for years to come yeah exactly on the other hand and this is what our show was about last week as well when we interviewed Doug and what the situation presents also positive possibilities I think people are realizing that Sanders notion of health care is a human right and that everybody should have it that's so obvious now also the fact that the government can step in and support people economically is obvious and the fact that the government can step in and take over various factories and use them for the public good not for private profit is also obvious so this is opening up people's notions of how a better world could unfold I'd like to encourage people to go to launder sorted dot org and sign up so that we can send them occasional notices when something is relevant so please do that law and disorder dot org the department of justice is now seeking to exploit the coronavirus calamity to get Congress to give.

Michael Doug Congress producer Jeff Brady Klein Sanders department of justice
"jeff brady" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:10 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Support this NPR station from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm ari Shapiro and America these Kelly throughout his time in office president trump has tried to help the coal industry is rolled back environmental regulations he's pushed for subsidies and yet coal fired power plants continue to close today's casual to a major coal company run up by one of trump's biggest supporters and here's Jeff Brady reports on the bankruptcy of Marie energy in the Murray energy lobby in Saint Clairsville Ohio there's a photo of founder Bob Murray with president trump giving two thumbs up and in Murray's big corner office there's a replica of airforce two signed on the wing by vice president Mike pence there's also a constant hissing sound at seventy nine years old Bob Murray suffers from a lung condition that requires him to be on oxygen he says it's not related to his business check for that and it's not as a vendor was working in the coal mines which I did for seventeen years underground every day Murray built his business over decades and now says it's the largest underground coal mining firm in the country he accomplish that by buying other coal companies now a combination of large debts and a declining call market has forced them into bankruptcy my goal is to keep the company that keep it together for my employees as part of Marie's agreement that lenders his nephew Robert Moore will become president and CEO Murray will remain as chairman despite president trump's campaign promise to help the coal business dozens of coal power plants are shut down since he was elected Murray doesn't blame trump for his company's bankruptcy he says the administration has been helpful in rolling back environmental regulations Murray specifically asked for most of them including replacing president Obama's clean power plan and withdrawing from the Paris climate agreement but Murray says the coal industry needs even more help the government should be stepping in keeping coal fired generation in existence it's done nothing Marie once the federal energy regulatory commission or for contest subsidize struggling coal plants he says Cole with its fuel stored on site is more reliable the natural gas that has to be piped in hand renewable energy that only generates when the sun is shining in the wind blows so far regulators in grid operators have not been persuaded wearable crisis resiliency reliability and apart people want to freeze in the dark that is a prediction Marianne hit of the Sierra Club regex frankly this is just a scare tactic for those who want to try to take our country backwards into a twentieth century energy economy it says now the world needs renewable energy that doesn't contribute to climate change she says US power grids are managed by knowledgeable engineers focused on keeping electricity flowing every time a coal plant is proposed for retirement their job is to make sure that as that coal plant retires that our lights will stay on and there will be any threat to the reliability of our electricity coal miners represented by the United mine workers of America that will likely will suffer because of this bankruptcy industry analysts Natalie Biggs with wood mackenzie says Murray was one of the last remaining companies contributing to the union's pension fund you know without Murray energy a lot of the retired coal miners are gonna you know find themselves potential in a difficult situation when it comes to the pensions the union is asking Congress for help meantime US coal consumption has fallen to its lowest level in forty years as more utilities and states commit to energy with lower or no greenhouse gas emissions Jeff Brady NPR news Saint Clairsville Ohio earlier this month to business partners of Rudy Giuliani were arrested on their way out of the country they're accused of violating federal campaign finance laws part of the scheme allegedly involved funneling more than three hundred thousand dollars from a shell company to a super PAC supporting president trump we've been talking with some experts in election law and many of them are surprised not the size of the donation or the attempt to cover up the source of the funds those things are actually pretty common their surprise the love part us and Igor Fuhrman didn't cover their tracks better because there are options for people who want to completely obscure big political donations and here to talk about that is Robert McGuire of citizens for responsibility and ethics in Washington welcome thanks for having me our colleague Jeff Brady talk to left partners before the arrest and here's how he explained the donations this is actually the first couple times that I really started doing some bigger donations because I wanted to get notoriety from my energy company and I thought it might be a great way to you know play with the big boys as you call it now its so called energy company appears to have just been a shell company created weeks before the big donations but if you imagine the parties came to you and said here's what I want to do and I want to hide the money what would you have advised well you know America first action for example the super PAC they gave to house a five oh one C. for social welfare arm the doesn't have to disclose its donors it's run by essentially the same people out of the same address it is nominally a social welfare organization that's supposed to do things that benefit the community but these function essentially as stealth political groups that have the benefit of not disclosing the donor so the easiest way for them to have avoided the situation the now find themselves in is just to have given to that arm of the group there's obviously difference in transparency between the super pac on the one hand in the C. four on the other hand is there also a difference in how these groups can spend that money there is sort of on paper their rules for these groups and how much political activity they can engage in but the rear he is that in practice these groups can act essentially as stealth political committees they can spend millions of dollars to buy tens of thousands of apps for months and months and months out before an election and not report that spending to the Federal Election Commission unless it's thirty days before primary sixty days before general but there's also they can give grants to other politically active five one C. fours and count that as social welfare activity and that creates this turn where you see sort of daisy chains of groups they give grants to each other to offset their political spending so there's sort of a a wealth of options for these groups to make sure that they are maximizing the amount of money they're spending on politics without disclosing any donors so if I'm trying to donate half a million dollars to a campaign in order to buy some influence and curry favor with the candidate but I don't want the public to now is there any way that the candidate can find out because because I want them to know that I'm a big supporter there is right that is actually the key of dark money so we're not talking about no one knowing who is behind the group we're saying the public doesn't know but the candidates know who's funding these groups given that there are these more secretive options available why do you think left harness and eager freemen allegedly gave in a way that was so easy for them to get caught well I think if you listen to the clip it kind of gives some indication of they weren't sophisticated political donors they realize the reality that is if you are a major donor you are buying access to powerful people and indeed there are photos of them with very powerful people ranging from the governor of Florida to the president himself precisely what they didn't know so much as how to cover their tracks and it's unfortunate that there are much more sophisticated political donors that know exactly how to do that and make sure that the public doesn't know who is funding these groups and who is being repaired once these people are in office but it seems that in this case we had two people who it just sort of dove in head first and ran into the reality that there are ways to do this where you don't get in situation where they are now Robert McGuire.

"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

"Work the officer had his head Grays just a little bit more and those two little boys will drop out for that because some people because this government hello federal and state level don't want to do anything about getting these guns off the street to get them out of the hands of criminals he wasn't seriously injured so they'll have their dad but as you can imagine that really got the conservative media buzzing criticizing people for politicizing the shooting here in Philadelphia I can be as a Democrat and a few democratic presidential candidates on the campaign trail also mention the shooting to highlight their calls for stricter gun laws alright just a close call I'm glad all those officers are okay and peers Jeff Brady I recorded Philadelphia thanks a lot Jeff thank you the majority of children enrolled in the federal Medicaid program are not getting appropriate treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD that's the conclusion of a new report from a federal watchdog agency in pairs Patty neighmond has far Elizabeth caving knows just how important it is to get a child with ADHD diagnosed and treated as soon as possible for her daughter the first year of school kindergarten was a disaster she was constantly being reprimanded and forced to sit still and she's a bright child but she kept falling further and further behind in learning letters and language because she could not concentrate the pressure and stress took its toll her five year old daughter became anxious and depressed it was a constant struggle says KV but on the last day of kindergarten her daughter finally was diagnosed with ADHD she was prescribed medication and qualified for special help at school she would have teachers that they could tell when she was just overwhelmed and when something was really hard and they take you know let's go get a drink water and they'd walk down the hall and they could get her back and focused but that kind of success is not the case for the majority of children enrolled in Medicaid according to Brian Whitley with the office of inspector general nationwide or five hundred thousand Medicare role children newly prescribed and ADHD medication did not receive any timely follow up care they didn't see a health care provider for a month.

officer Philadelphia Jeff Brady Patty neighmond Elizabeth ADHD Brian Whitley Medicaid Medicare five year
"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

"The officer had his head graze all just a little bit more and those two little boys will drop out for that because some people because this government hello federal and state level don't want to do anything about getting these guns off the street to get them out of the hands of criminals he wasn't seriously injured so they'll have their dad but as you can imagine that really got the conservative media buzzing criticizing people for politicizing the shooting here in Philadelphia Kenny is a Democrat and a few democratic presidential candidates on the campaign trail also mention the shooting to highlight their calls for stricter gun laws all right just a close call on gladiolus officers are okay and peers Jeff Brady are reporting Philadelphia thanks a lot Jeff thank you the majority of children enrolled in the federal Medicaid program are not getting appropriate treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD that's the conclusion of a new report from a federal watchdog agency in pairs Patty neighmond has far Elizabeth caving knows just how important it is to get a child with ADHD diagnosed and treated as soon as possible for her daughter the first year of school kindergarten was a disaster she was constantly being reprimanded and forced to sit still and she's a bright child but she kept falling further and further behind in learning letters and language because she could not concentrate the pressure and stress took its toll her five year old daughter became anxious and depressed it was a constant struggle says KV but on the last day of kindergarten her daughter finally was diagnosed with ADHD she was prescribed medication and qualified for special help at school she would have teachers that they could tell when she was just overwhelmed and when something was really hard and they take you know let's go get a drink water and they'd walk down the hall and they could get her back and focused but that kind of success is not the case for the majority of children enrolled in Medicaid according to Brian Whitley with the office of inspector general nationwide or five hundred thousand Medicare role children newly prescribed and ADHD medication did not receive any timely follow up care they didn't see a health care provider for a month.

officer Kenny Jeff Brady Patty neighmond Elizabeth ADHD Brian Whitley Philadelphia Medicaid Medicare five year
"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The officer had his head grace all just a little bit more and those two little boys will drop out for that because some people because this government hello federal and state level don't want to do anything about getting these guns off the street to get them out of the hands of criminals he wasn't seriously injured so they'll have their dad but as you can imagine that really got the conservative media buzzing criticizing people for politicizing the shooting here in Philadelphia I can be as a Democrat and a few democratic presidential candidates on the campaign trail also mention the shooting to highlight their calls for stricter gun laws all right just a close call on one of those officers are okay and peers Jeff Brady are reporting Philadelphia thanks a lot Jeff thank you the majority of children enrolled in the federal Medicaid program are not getting appropriate treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD that's the conclusion of a new report from a federal watchdog agency in pairs Patty neighmond has far Elizabeth caving knows just how important it is to get a child with ADHD diagnosed and treated as soon as possible for her daughter the first year of school kindergarten was a disaster she was constantly being reprimanded and forced to sit still and she's a bright child but she kept falling further and further behind in learning letters and language because she could not concentrate the pressure and stress took its toll her five year old daughter became anxious and depressed it was a constant struggle says KV but on the last day of kindergarten her daughter finally was diagnosed with ADHD she was prescribed medication and qualified for special help at school she would have teachers that they could tell when she was just overwhelmed and when something was really hard and they take you know let's go get a drink water and they'd walk down the hall and they could get her back and focused that that kind of success is not the case for the majority of children enrolled in Medicaid according to Brian Whitley with the office of inspector general nationwide or five hundred thousand Medicare role children newly prescribed and ADHD medication did not receive any timely follow up care they didn't see a health care provider for a month.

officer Philadelphia Jeff Brady Patty neighmond Elizabeth ADHD Brian Whitley Medicaid Medicare five year
"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

"Officer had his head grace all just a little bit more and those two little boys will drop out for that because some people because this government are both a little federal and state level don't want to do anything about getting these guns off the street to get them out of the hands of criminals he wasn't seriously injured so they'll have their dad but as you can imagine that really got the conservative media buzzing criticizing people for politicizing the shooting here in Philadelphia Kenny is a Democrat and a few democratic presidential candidates on the campaign trail also mention the shooting to highlight their calls for stricter gun laws alright just a close call and let all those officers are okay and peers Jeff Brady are reporting Philadelphia thanks a lot Jeff thank you the majority of children enrolled in the federal Medicaid program are not getting appropriate treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD that's the conclusion of a new report from a federal watchdog agency and here's Patty neighmond has far Elizabeth caving knows just how important it is to get a child with ADHD diagnosed and treated as soon as possible for her daughter the first year of school kindergarten was a disaster she was constantly being reprimanded and forced to sit still and she's a bright child but she kept falling further and further behind in learning letters and language because she could not concentrate the pressure and stress took its toll her five year old daughter became anxious and depressed it was a constant struggle says KV but on the last day of kindergarten her daughter finally was diagnosed with ADHD she was prescribed medication and qualified for special help at school she would have teachers that they could tell when she was just overwhelmed and when something was really hard and they take you know let's go get a drink water and they'd walk down the hall and they could get her back and focused but that kind of success is not the case for the majority of children enrolled in Medicaid according to Brian Whitley with the office of inspector general nationwide or five hundred thousand Medicare role children newly prescribed and ADHD medication did not receive any timely follow up care they didn't see a health care provider for a month.

Officer Kenny Jeff Brady Patty neighmond Elizabeth ADHD Brian Whitley Philadelphia Medicaid Medicare five year
"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I've been drinking Budweiser for forty some years you don't really want coffee in your beer and mandir stays like did you want to try it absolutely not well you can't please everyone Jeff Brady NPR news Philadelphia and you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news just ahead on All Things Considered refugee agencies say scores of migrants have drowned off the coast of Libya again highlighting the failure by regional leaders to address the dangerous migrant sea route right now let's check traffic with Julie definition is still clear in the motorcycle Raqi in San Jose south than eighty five after union Avenue loans the S. U. V. either the center divide now big back up though to Winchester Boulevard up to the end north Bates a motorcycle collision on north won a one after Petaluma Boulevard south and that's how the right lane now you're in slow traffic as usual from alpha gin Santa Rosa north one one before Hearn couple vehicles around of lanes Albert solid from golf course drive to the deputy forty Q. ET thank you Julie that report was brought to us by unbound dot org support for KQED comes from Pacific catch featuring a summer menu with platters of ceviche okay and shellfish on ice from their fish bar new west coast style sushi tacos and fresh pineapple cocktails Pacific catch of west coast fish house and the Lawrence hall of science featuring dinosaurs in motion visitors can engage with Connecticut life sized metal dinosaur sculptures to learn about science art.

Philadelphia Libya San Jose Petaluma Boulevard Julie KQED Jeff Brady NPR Bates Hearn Lawrence hall of science Connecticut
"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

"Lakshmi singh. Congress is expected to vote today on a seven Bill spending package ahead of tomorrow's deadline to avoid another partial government shutdown NPR's. Kelsey Snell reports the legislation includes roughly one point three billion dollars to build fifty five miles of new fencing along the border with Mexico. In addition to the new fencing negotiators agreed to increase security funding for existing border crossings and ports of entry and investments in technology like drones and sensors along the border the package does not include on related priorities like an extension of the violence against women act funding for disaster aid or money to pay back federal contractors who lost pay during the last shutdown. That's Kelsey Snell. Reporting despite pressure from President Trump, the Tennessee valley authority board of directors is voted to close a large coal fired. Power plant NPR's Jeff Brady reports Trump's involvement drew criticism because the plant buys coal from a company headed by supporter of the president's campaign staff from the TV had concluded. Paradise coal plant in Kentucky and another in eastern. Tennessee should be shut down the president focused his pressure on just the paradise plant which buys coal from Murray Energy Corporation, headed by Trump campaign donor, Bob Murray, TV a board member Virginia lodge says she heard and understood the heartfelt pleas from communities that will lose jobs because of closing the plant if we could make our decisions based on our sympathetic feeling. It would be easy. Unfortunately, we've all taken oaths to do what we think is best for the entire valley. TV a staff concluded closing the aging coal plants will save three hundred twenty million dollars. Jeff Brady NPR news public school. Teachers in Denver may soon be back with their students their union has agreed to tentative labor contract with the school system. That includes up to eleven percent pay raise more opportunities for future salary increases. However, all union members have yet to ratify the agreement that would end the three day walkout, an internal watchdog is giving. Four marks to the US department of education student loan division. NPR's Corey Turner has more on a new report that finds a system failing some student borrowers and making them pay dearly for it. The report comes from the department's office of inspector general. I though you need to understand something about federal student loans. The federal government doesn't actually manage them. Instead, it pays companies called loan servicers to do it. And today the inspector general said two important things about why this system's not working. Well, servicers are not always following basic rules, like miscalculating loan repayment amounts and steering borrowers into costly forbearance. The watchdog rebuked the department for not holding these companies accountable. The student loan unit says it strongly disagreed, but that it had already or would implement all of the inspector general's recommendations, this is NPR news and on a wet Thursday. This KCRW news at twelve oh four. Good afternoon to you. I'm Benjamin Gottlieb..

President Trump Kelsey Snell NPR Jeff Brady president Lakshmi singh Tennessee valley authority federal government Congress Tennessee Benjamin Gottlieb Mexico KCRW US Kentucky Murray Energy Corporation Denver
"jeff brady" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"A huge victory for the thousands of DEA agents worldwide that all of our law enforcement partners in the United States in Mexico and around the world who work tirelessly to bring this man. Justice has the leader of Mexico's Sinoloa cartel. It's estimated Guzman help bring nearly two hundred tons of cocaine into the US President Trump wants the Tennessee valley authority to keep operating a coal fired power plant. The agency staff is determined should be shut down. And Jeff Brady reports. The plant receives call from a company headed by a large donor to the president's campaign. President Trump said on Twitter he thinks the TV should give serious consideration before closing coal power plants like paradise number three in Kentucky. It's an unusual mention of a specific facility in the president's overall campaign to help the coal industry. Especially considering the agency also plans to close another coal-fired facility in eastern, Tennessee. The plant in Kentucky receives coal from a mine operated by Murray Energy Corporation, headed by chairman Bob Murray in a statement, the company says the plant is more reliable in lower cost than others just about exactly the opposite conclusion TV a staff reached a vote by TV as board could come. Thursday. Jeff Brady NPR news a strong day for the US financial markets. The Dow's up three hundred seventy two points to close at twenty five thousand four twenty five the NASDAQ rose one hundred six points to seventy four fourteen standard and Poor's five hundred gained thirty four points. This is NPR. Virginia's Lieutenant governor continues to deny allegations he sexually assaulted two women years ago vowing to stay in office scenario that has already played out in other states. And at least half a dozen cases since two thousand seventeen that includes two governors two attorneys, general and two secretaries of state several of whom were automatically forced to step down. Lieutenant governor Justin Fairfax has denied the allegations against him. The us preventative services task force has up dated its recommendations for preventing and treating paranormal depression appears penny. Name us the story as many as one in seven women suffer this common complication of pregnancy and childbirth earlier recommendations called for screening all women for depression, but the new recommendations focused on preventing the problem in the first place the task force reviewed fifty studies and concluded that cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal therapy, which both focus on changing perception and behavior where most effective for women at risk. That includes women with a history of depression women who are low income young or single. The task force says healthcare providers should offer at risk women. These useful counseling interventions the task force is an independent panel of national experts in disease prevention, Patty, named NPR news agency says a draft regulation that will require new cars and light commercial vehicles to be equipped with automated braking systems has been..

President Trump president depression Jeff Brady NPR Kentucky United States Bob Murray Mexico cocaine DEA Tennessee valley authority Justin Fairfax Tennessee Guzman
"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

"Much such as Seattle and Tacoma for the second year in a row, the number of people working in the US solar energy business has declined NPR's. Jeff Brady reports and annual survey from the solar foundation shows eight thousand solar jobs were lost in two thousand eighteen there are two main reasons for job losses. The Trump administration placed tariffs on solar panels last year, and there has been uncertainty over state policies and big solar states such as California and Massachusetts Ed Gila land with a solar foundation says there was job growth in twenty nine states. Mostly those where solar energy is still emerging, for example, Farda glue by almost eighteen hundred jobs. It is now. Second behind California and the number of total jobs in the solar industry. Overall, Gilliland says the number of solar jobs is expected to grow this year with uncertainty over tariffs and state policies mostly resolved, Jeff Brady NPR news, US Trade Representative Robert lighthizer is in Beijing where he'll join trade talks later this week Chinese and US negotiators are working on trade disputes ahead of a March first deadline that is when President Trump has threatened to increase US tariffs on Chinese goods. He's insisting that Beijing drop, it's unfair trade practices. I'm korva Coleman. NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include curiosity stream a documentary streaming service from.

NPR US Jeff Brady Trump Beijing California Seattle Tacoma Robert lighthizer korva Coleman Gilliland Washington Massachusetts Representative President