18 Burst results for "Jed Match"

"jed match" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:07 min | Last month

"jed match" Discussed on KOMO

"At all. I don't think was malicious. I just don't think that officer was being officer. At that point. In time. At least two people were hurt. Police say there were at least 100 people in the crowd and that the patrol car was surrounded by them shouting and hitting at it. Captain Dan Passion is with the Pierce County Force investigation team. We need to look at all those circumstances and that's part of the investigation to determine what exactly occurred. The officer is on leave demonstrators Sunday night say they wanted him fired, sued Romero companies. Detectives have identified another victim of the Green River killer Gary Ridgway. DNA testing was able to identify the remains of Wendy Stevens, who was just 14 years old when she was killed in 1983. Tim Mayer, with the King County Sheriff's office says the DNA's a Doe project was able to locate her family in Colorado remains that were recovered. They were able to extract a sample of Edna Able to sequence that that produces a tremendous amount of data that then the Didna DOH project uses through Jed Match. Ridgeway confessed to killing 48 women. Wendy Stevens is believed to be his youngest victim, Jeff Pooja. Look come on news. A stabbing at the Lynwood Fred Meyer becomes a homicide and police are asking for the public's help in finding the suspect. Almost Kelly Blier reports. The victim, a man in his early sixties, was stabbed at the Fred Meyer parking lot Sunday morning after he got into an argument with at least three people, according to witnesses. Some good Samaritans did provide first aid, but the man later died at Harborview. Detectives are asking for the public's help in finding the belief suspect. What Mrs say an African American woman in her late teens to early twenties about 54 thin was short, too. Middle length curly black hair stabbed the man. They say she and another woman and man got into a white or silver late model Nissan Sentra type car with an Arizona license plate and left the scene If you could help police find the suspect. You are asked to contact Linwood police or Crimestoppers of Puget Sound. Kelly Blier Coma News when citizens come to Olympia to testify on proposed legislation. We're often told to limit their remarks, especially if there are a lot of people signed up to testify. Lawmakers will often extend the time to accommodate public interest. But that didn't happen Last week, Como's Carleen Johnson reports than 1600 people signed up in support of Senate Bill 5114 to move the state to phase two reopening Those who wish to speak were given one minute despite public testimony on other bills during that same hearing Getting much longer come from several folks who tried to participate who were muted or incredibly turned off by that and our questioning why they even engage with the Legislature and all Jason Mercy. A with the conservative Washington Policy Center says Being this is the first time for the public to weigh in on issues related to the pandemic, which is turned lives upside down. There should be more accommodation given Democratic state Senator Andy Billing on the Rules committee says they understand the frustration particular concern. Gonna be looked into this particular bill says he's optimistic lawmakers will correct this and not automatically.

Wendy Stevens officer Kelly Blier Captain Dan Passion Lynwood Fred Meyer Edna Able Fred Meyer Green River Tim Mayer Gary Ridgway Nissan Sentra Senator Andy Billing Pierce County Force Ridgeway Washington Policy Center King County Sheriff Jed Match Romero companies Colorado
How constant surveillance puts protesters at risk

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

08:23 min | 6 months ago

How constant surveillance puts protesters at risk

"As black lives matter protests continue around the country police are using facial recognition and all kinds of other technology to arrest protesters and organizers, and while in some cases, the people arrested did commit crimes. After the fact, arrests can have a chilling effect on free speech and lead to cases of mistaken identity. They also show us just how much surveillance is part of our lives. Simone Brown is a professor at Ut Austin. She's also author of the book dark matters on the surveillance of blackness. She told me about how police identified and arrested a protester and Philadelphia there was a tattoo on her arm and she was wearing a t shirt. That was you know quite. Said Keep, the immigrants deport the racist and so the police used the images of her. They went to find out you know where did she get this shirt made and they found her comment that she made on Oetzi they looked at her instagram they looked at her linked in profiles and they were able to match her this image to identify her and she was eventually charged. So all this is to say that there's still just kind of trails of data actually that we leave about ourselves that is being used to form a case to what extent to your knowledge is some of this technology being used to find arrest protesters and even protest organizers. Chilling effect that organizers but also the ACLU became quite aware and worked to challenge was around twenty, fifteen, twenty sixteen or so this company Gio Fia, which is really a company that's kind of social media analysis company that was working on hand in hand with various policing agencies to monitor key words, black lives, matter protests, Jihad all of these things were then tagged and flag to. then. In some cases visit, you'd have a policing agency, visit a potential protester, and of course, if you go onto Gio phidias website now there's like nothing really just contact information, but we know if something is out there if gop has gone, another company will pop up and you know fill in that gap when you layer on all of this technology that you described, it sounds like. It could be relatively accurate and I could see police departments falling into the idea that you know that although there have been concerns facial recognition is now is accurate once you add. In social media like this should work. Great. What is the push back to that and so the idea of something you know working great. If just one person is wrongly. Identified, say, for example with facial recognition technology, then it's not working at all these technologies rely on this idea that they are perfect correct but they really they really aren't and so people are asking for a pause because these technologies are not outside of this system in which we live in where you know black people are criminalized right how do you feel like this? The longterm implications of this surveillance might play out will people be less willing to take the risk of exercising their right to protest? I don't think so I think in terms that people you know we're in the middle of a pandemic and yet people are still you know risking a lot to go out and protest and demand something better I think one case and I'll give you an example that I think is important is in terms of DNA collection, and so a lot of people want to their armchair genealogists are also want to find family or some type of connection and they use a company like say twenty three and me or ancestry dot com or jet match, and that same company Jed match was then recently purchased i. Think just last year by a company that has close ties to you know a policing agency and this company is not just about finding long lost relatives, but they save their primarily for forensic analysis. So the question of whether it's sea or whether it's ancestry dot com it's like we have to really think about what happens to that data. Well, it's interesting. It's it feels like it's a thing that that privacy researchers have warned about for a long time that there is essentially a big web of surveillance and were leaving tracks all the time and that it isn't always obvious what the harm might be. Until something like this happens exactly. But you know they're also tech one of the places that I looked to see you know what's what's the future perhaps for the future that's already here is looking at airport security and there have been a lot of push in terms of AI enabled technologies to. Assess risk to assess threat and one of the things that you know a few companies are starting to develop now is emotion recognition, and so that might be that a traveler present themselves at an airport speak to an Avatar one company. Avatar actually stands for Automated Virtual Agent for truth assessments and this Avatar will then ask them a series of questions and then measurements are then taken. By the changes in their voice by. Heat or sweats or any type of what what might be termed a micro expression. Of guilt like your heart rate, increasing those types of things, and then assign a certain threat category to see if that person might be a threat to airport security, and so I don't necessarily know if these types of technologies are being used to monitor protests, activists and other moments of rebellion, but it is something to look out for. That pause was yeah that's. Terrifying. IS THEIR EAR recognition? Is that a thing? Yes. And so there's there's recognition of everything and it's almost like throwing something to the wall and seeing. What hits but the air's been it's a relatively stable part of the body. And that has been known since Al Proteon, which is said to be the father of forensic. Sciences. was using that in the eighteen hundreds as a stable way of recognizing or. Identifying the human body to catalog them, and so there are researchers that are working on every part in piece of the body that you could think imaginable as a way to try and. Shore. Up, this idea. which is just an idea that the human body is stable that the human can be categorized and identified, and we know that's Bodies don't work that way but you know the science does. Your book is called dark matters on the surveillance of blackness. We've been talking about this in the context context of protest. Why is this surveillance of particular concern to Black Americans? It's a particular concern because it's has been the state you know I say surveillance is the facts of anti blackness not only in the US but globally, and so it's been a concern here in the US for centuries we thinking about slave patrols, plantation control, all of these technologies that were. Put in place. To deem black people as. Outside of the right to have rights, but it's also why I think it's important to study the history of surveillance within transatlantic slavery within Plantation Slavery because it also offers US moments of resistance and moments of rebellion and escape to something different something that looks like freedom. Simone. Brown is a professor at Ut Austin and author of the Book Dark Matters.

Simone Brown United States Ut Austin Professor Gio Phidias Philadelphia Aclu Gio Fia JED GOP Al Proteon
"jed match" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

04:17 min | 9 months ago

"jed match" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Your family tree and watch the nuts fall out. And we have a real Navy mariner kind of base show going on today, a lot of interesting stuff happening. We're going to be talking to Daphne Palmer Jean Accomplice. She's written a book about pirates and their families and their wives have what their lives were like. In fact, you're going to find that pirates weren't quite the stereotype that you knew them as well. Be talking to her in a little more than 10 minutes And then later in the show, we're going to talk to a guy named Ray Weiss. And Ray has been researching his Mariner ancestors for decades and then traveling to the places that they sailed to, and in fact, he's getting ready to go see three more of them in the coming weeks. We're going to talk to Ray about how this all got going where he's been what the experience has been like It's going to be pretty fun. Plus at the back end of the show. We're going to talk to our friend Melanie McComb from any H GS. And coming up later on in the show. See Seymour from the ABC, Siri's the Genetic detective talking about her upcoming episode, the final episode for this season. Hey, just a reminder. If you haven't signed up for our weekly Jeannie newsletter, yet you've got to do it. It's absolutely free. Make sure you get all the stories that you'll need is a genealogist to stay caught up on what's going on, catch my block and of course, links to past and present podcasts. Right now. It's off to Boston to talk to David Alan Lambert, the chief geologist for the New England Historic Genealogical Society in American ancestors dot org's David. How you Doing? I'm doing great into its your dental of its born in Amsterdam, New York on December 9th, 1916 Happy 103rd. Might not mean anything to you. But if I told you Spartacus and issue Israel stage name is Kirk Douglas Kirk Douglas 103 this week. That's unbelievable. It really is. All right, Let's get going with our family. He's to our news. Where do you want to start now? The big story right now is, of course, the acquisition of Jed Match which has been in the news and many of you, of course, have a jet match account and have uploaded your data. It has now been acquired by Vero Jenna company out in California. And right now that doesn't look like there's going to be any change to what it is. It looks like it's still going to be free. Or just watching over the next few months as things transpire. Yeah, see how things evolve. We know one thing that's evolved really well. Is this work that has been done in Ireland to sort of reclaimed the archive back in 1920 to the four courts burned and you saw the movie Michael Collins with Liam Neeson years ago, you might have seen the bombing. 1st 4 courts had the archives senses the church records a pro Bates for Ireland, most of them went up in flames. Now they're looking to reclaim them by looking at research people did before 1922 or transcribed or maybe a duplicate copy of something that was in another place in Ireland or in England, or somewhere else this that amazing and they say that they have found farm or information that was lost in that by doing this technique than they ever imagined possible, and it's all going to come out in 2022. On the 1/100 anniversary of the bombing. Well, I'll tell you, my Lamberts are going to be searched high and low on that one, because that's my biggest problem is that there's not a lot of early Irish records and we came over in 17 92 well before the famine and all this, by the way, it's going to be indexed is well, so you're going to be able to research this in a way that nobody has ever been able to do it before. Well, I'll tell you the next story. We have to dig a little deeper to find that many of you may have photographs of your ancestors in the Civil War in in Camp Nelson, Kentucky. They've done some archaeology and they've found a lot of Hair dye bottles where our ancestors may know. It could be that their hair color was so light it would have looked washed out in a photograph. So that looks like before you had your picture done. He did your hair. Yeah. This was an amazing story. I had no idea that if you had light hair during the Civil War era, the picture would come out like really, really white, so they would die their hair And this was all from this camp extraction. They were doing all kinds of digs at this camp Nelson. They also found, for instance, the name The photographer carved out on a piece of metal that they found in this camp. Isn't that incredible? Yeah, a stencil or something that we would have used its a great calling card. They've also found who the photographer was, is an image of him in the article, which you confined on extreme jeans dot com. I tip my hat to Dickie's mom who always have some great ideas for our family History news..

Ray Weiss Kirk Douglas Kirk Douglas Jean Accomplice Camp Nelson Ireland Bates New England Historic Genealogi Daphne Palmer David Alan Lambert Melanie McComb Jed Match Jeannie ABC Vero Jenna Boston Dickie Seymour chief geologist
"jed match" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"jed match" Discussed on KCRW

"To law enforcement one person who would like to see genetic genealogy taken away from police is a Maryland legislator name Charles said nor we need to breaks then look it was cool Charles believes it's wrong for innocent people to be scrutinized by police for no other reason than sharing DNA found at a crime scene there's no suspicion that law enforcement should have about us yet we are now court in this DNA dragnet it's almost as if we if turned of the whole concept of innocent until proven guilty on his head in fact he's so against it he wouldn't even wanna let IT help his own family not because he was shot and killed and and and and Baltimore and to this day I don't think the case has been resolved and wouldn't want to find out by going through Jed match and letting the police come through other people's DNA now now this too much constitutional collateral damage Charles is mistrustful of CODIS the national criminal DNA database because it holds a disproportionate number of minorities DNA and he points to police over reach as why they should not have access to the much more powerful consumer DNA databases when they're looking into my DNA they're looking at my parents they're looking at my children in January last year he tried to get a bill through the Maryland legislature to ban police searches in these databases but the bill failed then in September the federal.

Charles Baltimore Maryland
"jed match" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"jed match" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"One person who would like to see genetic genealogy taken away from police is a Maryland legislator name Charles said nor we need to breaks look it was cool Charles believe it's wrong for innocent people to be scrutinized by police for no other reason than sharing DNA found at a crime scene there's no suspicion that law enforcement should have about us yet we are now court in this DNA dragnet it's almost as if we I've turned of the whole concept of innocent until proven guilty on his head in fact he's so against it he wouldn't even wanna let it help his own family not because he was shot and killed and and and and Baltimore and to this day I don't think the case has been resolved and wouldn't want to find out by going through Jed match and letting the police come through other people's DNA now now this too much constitutional collateral damage Charles is mistrustful of CODIS the national criminal DNA database because it holds a disproportionate number of minorities DNA and he points to police over reach as why they should not have access to the much more powerful consumer DNA databases when they're looking into my DNA they're looking at my parents they're looking at my children in January last year he tried to get a bill through the Maryland legislature to ban police searches in these databases but the bill failed then in September the federal government stepped in the justice department announced an interim policy on genetic genealogy.

Charles Baltimore justice department Maryland
"jed match" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"jed match" Discussed on Reveal

"So jed match change their policy again this time swinging the pendulum in the opposite direction it completely cut off access to police unless customers specifically opt in overnight law enforcement lost I access to all one million or so genetic profiles on Jed match since then people have started opting back in. CC explains the current status to her class so we only have about one hundred thousand profiles to compare against now which is a huge blow obviously but it doesn't mean that cases are unworkable Kabul. It's just a lot harder after CC's talk. I want to know what police think about all this and are you also in law enforcement. Would you mind chuck. Anderson is a detective give in Oregon. He tells me police need to be careful about how they used Annetta genealogy so they don't lose it once we start using some maybe legal but not necessarily savory techniques to get information in there. I think that's when we're GONNA start having problems. What comes to mind is as an example I'm not really a fan of the submitting the anonymous profiles for that individual site so that would be like crime-scene. DNA is has put up onto ancestry but it's not disclosed that it's law enforcement posted it there. I see that can be done. I I have no idea but I guarantee you. If if it's possible somebody is trying it in fact something like this has been done in the very first case using genetic genealogy to catch a killer the alleged golden state killer investigators created an alias to not reveal themselves as law enforcement then they uploaded applauded crime scene. DNA into genealogy site and found a relative. It's you know a mistake or two away from overzealous agency before they decide that they're not open to law enforcement anyway. One person who'd like to see genetic genealogy taken away from police is a Maryland legislator named Charles said nor we need to combine breaks. Go look at what's going on on Charles believes it's wrong for innocent people to be scrutinized denies by police for no other reason than sharing. DNA found at a crime scene. There's no suspicion of that. Law Enforcement should have about us yet we are now caught in this. DNA Dragnet almost as if we I've turned the whole concept of innocent until proven guilty on his head in fact he's so against it he wouldn't even WanNa let it help his own family family my cousin he shot and killed in in Baltimore and to this day I I don't think the case has been resolved wouldn't wanna find out by going through Jed match and letting the police comb through other people's People's. DNA No no this too much constitutional collateral damage Charles's mistrustful of code the national criminal DNA database because it holds a disproportionate number of minorities DNA and he points to police overreach as why they should not have access to them much more powerful consumer DNA databases when they're looking into my DNA they're looking at my parents. They're looking at my children this past year. He tried to get a bill through the Maryland legislature to ban police searches in these databases but the bill failed without state or federal rules to regulate when police are allowed to access these databases and when they're not it's it's been pretty much a free for all with individual companies having the biggest say as we heard jed match decided to restrict.

Charles Jed Kabul Anderson Maryland Oregon Baltimore Annetta
"jed match" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:04 min | 2 years ago

"jed match" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"We were just talking about artifacts testing, which is fascinating. And now we're going to do a little switch here over to talk you about ethics and police work right now because there's a lot of debate on that among the genealogical specialists around the country and blamed I know we chatted a little about this over lunch in Indiana. It's a complicated issue. It really is. There are a lot of different sides to this issue. There are a lot of ethical dilemmas that are involved. There are no easy answers. Yeah. I look at this. And I think okay for people who are not following this. You need to understand that there's really one. Site only one site that's openly available for police agencies to match DNA too. And that is jed match out of Florida. And they're all about it at this point. They're all in. They were very worried about it in the beginning as you may have seen on. What was it sixty minutes or was it Sunday morning on CBS that was sixty minutes. I believe. Yeah. I think it was sixty minutes, and then they talked to the founders of jed match, and they were kind of horrified. They felt maybe like they had betrayed the purpose of their site to their customers who by the way get in there for free. And then realized oh my gosh, there's overwhelming support for this. But that doesn't mean that all the questions have been answered. So let's start with this. What are the concerns? Blaine when when you talk to people the first thing that comes up. Well, what I'm experiencing now is a concern about a potential chilling effect on tests taken so one of the issues is that as the crime. Are essentially solved or since none of them ever really gone to trial yet. We I think we have to technically say as this is my hat thing. The suspects that have been identified as these are potentially solved. The are getting a lot of publicity and people are looking at this potential law enforcement use of DNA and have some privacy concerns or have some concerns about the use of their DNA in that manner. Now again, as you point out, it's really only one database that is and it's a third party tool. That's that's enabling this type of law enforcement. And so technically people really shouldn't be concerned about testing their their DNA companies like ancestry of twenty three family tree DNA for law enforcement, use these databases. They don't really make it easy for that type of use. And in fact, many of their terms and conditions specifically prohibit that type of Houston and so Bill again, I am getting more and more comment about people saying that their family member. Refusing to test as a result of the recent news coverage than I've ever received before. And so some of us are concerned that there may be a chilling effect inadvertently as a result of this use. I would have thought the chilling effect. If it was going to come was going to be specifically with jet match. They're the ones who say, hey, this is open for anything. It's in their terms of service. And they made sure after the Golden State killer case came out that they let everybody know. Hey, this is being used for this purpose. And I guess they had a net gain as a result of all the publicity surrounding that. So I hope that's a good sign. Right. Well, I think it could be the the issue is is whether people that are at Jag netra uploading. The Jag match are a more biased group in one direction or another for people that have already undergone DNA testing. Maybe people that are less concerned about potential law enforcement us. And indeed when you hold people in Jag match or in. DNA focused Facebook groups, for example, there is indeed overwhelming support for law enforcement use of our DNA test results in an unethical way to identify suspects. But the question is is it a bias group is that there's a population as a whole or is it not? That's an issue that that no one really has any good answers for I would seek the ethics question really has to come down to this. Are you going into your DNA testing through jed match specifically with your eyes wide open aware that you may implicate somebody that you're related to Eddie fairly close level in a crime, right? Because I think that's absolutely right. And that's basically the gist of the whole thing because it's not like you say, it's not the case for ancestry or twenty three and me or family tree DNA. It's only for jed match. They obviously make their terms available. I would think the real question right now is is everybody who was in jed match before. This came up are they aware that their DNA is being used for it. Because everybody's since certainly does. Right. So anyone since then since the terms and conditions change, obviously, they have to review those and and accept those terms and conditions. And it's spelled out that what uses that could include in that definitely includes law enforcement, very explicit in and that it is an ongoing question about whether or not people that were in the database beforehand, and then uploaded their DNA there before that was made explicit whether they have sufficient informed consent. Now, the terms and conditions did imply that there would there were potentially uses other than fate traditional genealogical research deputy, and it could be used for. But it did not sell out explicit uses such as law enforcement. So that is an ongoing question about whether or not those individuals have given their informed consent. I would think though that there has never been a more publicized terms of consent. That's out there concerning DNA though since. This whole thing came out. So that those people who aren't paying much attention to it. They don't have a huge excuse really not to know. Right. Yeah. I mean, well, I in the traditional world of informed consent there there really isn't this concept of informed consent by the news. So you know, I've seen that argument that it's so widespread that everyone should have knowledge of this by now, and certainly that is very much the case, many, many people are going to be aware of this as a result and have the option of removing their DNA making it private and other things that jed match. The question is does adequate news coverage equate to informed consent. And I think many people that Gil with informed consent would say that's probably not the case from a legal standpoint. From a legal standpoint. Do you think there's a risk for jed match from a legal standpoint for those who are in the system since before the change? And I think it was more of a tweak really than a change just further clarification that somebody might go after them and saying, hey, wait a minute. I didn't agree to this. No, no. I don't think. So because I'm not I don't want to give legal advice. As is. Just sure. But I don't think so because there's no there's no evidence of harm the individuals in the database are unlikely to have standing, and so it's not a situation where this is not so much a legal issue. It's more of just the ethical issues. So sure as far as it goes. Well, you know, in my mind, and I'm sure many many people feel the same way. Hey, if I could catch a second or third cousin that's done some of the horrendous things that the people have done that have been nailed as a result of this technology. I'm more than happy to help, you know. Yeah. That certainly I it's hard to argue with what's being done with it right now that is both a blessing curse in a way. Because it makes it more difficult for ethical discussions to happen. Because see that's the worst of the worst are being identified using this process. Yeah. So it's really hard to say there might be problems with this process because it is the outcome is just so getting these individuals off the street, if they're ultimately in shown to be guilty, right? So getting them off the street is obviously a very important outcome, but maybe that has a potential for and it's hard to even say this that has the potential to lure our vision a little bit when we discussed some of the ethical issues. He's playing Bettinger. He's a.

jed Indiana CBS Facebook Blaine Florida Houston Eddie Bill Gil sixty minutes
"jed match" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

08:04 min | 2 years ago

"jed match" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"We were just talking about artifacts testing, which is fascinating. And now we're going to do a little switch here over to talk about ethics and police work right now because there's a lot of debate on that among the genealogical specialists around the country and blamed I know we chatted a little about this over lunch in Indiana. It's a complicated issue. It really is. There are a lot of different sites. But this this show, there are a lot of ethical dilemmas that are involved. There are no easy answers. Yeah. I look at this. And I think okay for people who are not following this. You need to understand that there's really one. Insight only one site that's openly available for police agencies to match DNA too. And that is jed match out of Florida. And they're all about it at this point. They're all in. They were very worried about it in the beginning as you may have seen on. What was it sixty minutes or was it Sunday morning on CBS that was sixty minutes. I believe. Yeah. I think sixty minutes, and then they talk to the founders of jed match, and they were kind of horrified. They felt maybe like they had betrayed the purpose of their site to their customers who by the way get in there for free. And then realized oh my gosh. There's overwhelming support for this. But that doesn't mean that all the questions have been answered. So let's start with this. What are the concerns? Blaine when when you talk to people the first thing that comes up. Well, what I'm experiencing now is a concern about a potential chilling effect on test taking so one of the issues is that as these. Crimes are essentially solved or since none of them ever really gone to trial yet. We I think we have to technically say as this is my lawyer hat thing the suspects that have been identified as these are potentially solve the are getting a lot of, publicity and people are looking at this potential law enforcement use of DNA and have some privacy concerns or have some concerns about the use of their DNA in that manner. Now again, as you point out, it's really only one database that is and it's a third party tool. That's that's enabling this type of law enforcement. And so technically people really shouldn't be concerned about testing their their DNA companies like ancestry Twenty-three family, tree DNA for law enforcement, use these databases. They don't really make it easy for that type of you stand. In fact, many of their terms and conditions specifically prohibit that type of use. And so Bill again, I am getting more and more comment about people saying that their family members are refusing to test as a result of the recent news coverage than I've ever received before. And so some of us are concerned that there may be a chilling effect inadvertently as a result of diffuse, I would have thought the chilling effect. If it was going to come was gonna be specifically with jet match. They're the ones who say, hey, this is open for anything. It's in their terms of service. And they made sure after the Golden State killer case came out that they let everybody know. Hey, this is being used for this purpose. And I guess they had a net gain as a result of all the publicity surrounding that. So I hope that's a good sign. Right. Well, I think it could be the the issue is is whether people that are at Jack uploading. The Jag match are a more bias group in one direction or another for people that have already undergone DNA testing, maybe people that are less concerned about potential law enforcement us, and indeed when you hold people in Jack match, or in DNA focused Facebook groups, for example, there is indeed overwhelming support for law enforcement use of our our DNA tests results in an ethical way to identify suspects. But the question is is there a bias group is that the population as a whole or is it not that's an issue that that no one really has any good answers for I would think the ethics question really has to come down. To this. Are you going into your DNA testing through jed match specifically with your eyes wide open aware that you may implicate somebody that you're related to Eddie fairly close level in a crime, right because. Absolutely, right. And that's basically the gist of the whole thing because it's not like you say, it's not the case for ancestry or twenty three and me or family tree DNA. It's only for jed match. They obviously make their terms available. I would think the real question right now is is everybody who is in jed match before this came up. Are they aware that their DNA is being used for it because everybody since certainly does. Right. So anyone since then since the germs Indonesians change. Obviously, they have to review those, and and accept those terms and conditions, and it's spelled out that uses that could include in that definitely includes law enforcement. That's very explicit in and that it is an ongoing question about whether or not people that were in the database beforehand, and then uploaded their DNA there before that was made explicit whether they have sufficient informed consent. Now, the terms and conditions did imply that there were there were potentially other than traditional genealogical research that the DNA could be used. For. But it did not spell out explicit uses such as law enforcement. So that is an ongoing question about whether or not those individuals have given their informed consents. I would think though that there has never been a more publicized terms of consent. Spin out there concerning DNA, though since this whole thing came out. So that those people who aren't paying much attention to it. They don't have a huge excuse really not to know. Right. Yeah. I mean, well, I in the traditional world of informed consent there there really isn't this concept of informed consent by the news. So you know, I've seen that argument that it's so widespread that everyone should have knowledge of this by now, and certainly that is very much the case, many, many people are going to be aware of this as a result and have the option of removing their DNA making it private and other things that jed match. The question is does adequate news coverage equate? To informed consent. And I think many people that feel with informed consent would say that's probably not the case from a legal standpoint. From a legal standpoint. A risk for jed match from a legal standpoint for those who are in the system since before the change. And I think it was more of a tweak really than a change just further clarification that that somebody might go after them and saying, hey, wait a minute. I didn't agree to this. No, no. I don't think. So because I'm not I don't want to give legal advice is just make sure. Sure. But I don't think so because there's no there's no evidence of harm the individuals in the database are unlikely to have standing, and so it's not a situation where this is not so much a legal issue. It's more of just the the ethical issue. Sure. As far as it goes. Well, you know, in my mind, and I'm sure many many people feel the same way. Hey, if I could catch a second or third cousin that's done some of the horrendous things that the people have done that have been nailed as a result of this technology. I'm more than happy to help, you know. Yeah. That's certainly I it's hard to argue with what's being done with it right now that is both a blessing and a curse in a way. Because it it makes it more difficult for ethical discussions to happen. Because we see that the worst of the worst are being identified using this process. So it's really hard to say there might be problems with this process because it is the outcome is just so getting these individuals off the street, if they're ultimately in shown to be guilty, right? So getting them off the street is obviously a very important outcome, but maybe that has the potential for and it's hard to even say this that has the potential to blur. Our vision a little bit when we discussed some of the ethical issues. He's playing Bettinger. He's a.

jed Indiana CBS Blaine Florida Bill Facebook Eddie Jack sixty minutes
"jed match" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:04 min | 2 years ago

"jed match" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"We were just talking about artifacts testing, which is fascinating. And now we're going to do a little switch here over to talking about ethics and police work right now because there's a lot of debate on that among the genealogical specialists around the country and blamed I know we chatted a little about this over lunch in Indiana. It's a complicated issue. It really is. There are a lot of different types of this this show. There are a lot of ethical dilemmas that are involved. There are no easy answers. Yeah. I look at this. And I think okay for people who are not following this. You need to understand that there's really one site only one site that's openly available for police agencies to match DNA too. And that is jed match out of Florida. And they're all about it at this point. They're all in. They were very worried about it in the beginning as you may have seen on. What was it sixty minutes or was it Sunday morning on CBS that was sixty minutes, sixty minutes, and then they talk to the founders of jed match, and they were kind of horrified. They felt maybe like they had betrayed the purpose of their site to their customers who by the way get in there for free. And then realized oh my gosh, there's overwhelming support for this. But that doesn't mean that all the questions have been answered. So let's start with this. What are the concerns? When when you talk to people the first thing that comes up, well, what I'm experiencing now is a concern about a potential chilling effect on taking so one of the issues is that as these crimes are essentially solved or since none of them ever really gone to trial yet. We I think we have to technically say as this is my lawyer hat saying the suspects that have been identified as these are potentially solved. We are getting a lot of publicity and people are looking at this potential law enforcement use of DNA and have some privacy concerns or have some concerns about the use of their DNA that manner now again as you point out, it's really only one database that is and it's a third party tool. That's that's enabling this type of law enforcement. And so technically people really shouldn't be concerned about testing their their DNA companies like ancestry of twenty three family. DNA for law enforcement, use these databases. They don't really make it easy for that type of you stand. In fact, many of their terms and conditions specifically prohibit that type of use. And so Bill again, I am getting more and more comment about people saying that their family members are refusing to test as a result of the recent news coverage than I've ever received before. And so some of us are concerned that there may be a chilling effect in advertently as a result of with us. I would have thought the chilling effect. If it was going to come was going to be specifically with jet match. They're the ones who say, hey, this is open for anything. It's in their terms of service. And they made sure after the Golden State killer case came out that they let everybody know. Hey, this is being used for this purpose. And I guess they had a net gain as a result of all the publicity surrounding that. So I hope that's a good sign. Right. Well, I I think it could be the the issue is is whether people that are at Jag metro uploading the jed match. Are a more bias group in one direction on another for people that have already undergone DNA testing, maybe people that are less concerned about the law enforcement us. And indeed when you poll people in jed match, or in DNA focused Facebook groups, for example, there is indeed overwhelming support for law enforcement use of our our DNA tests results in an ethical way to identify suspects. But the question is is it a bias group is that the population as a whole or is it not that's an issue that that no one really has any good answers for I would seek the ethics question really has to come down to this. Are you going into your DNA testing through jed match specifically with your eyes wide open aware that you may implicate somebody that you are related to Eddie fairly close level in a crime, right? Because I think that's absolutely right. That's. Basically, the gist of the whole thing because it's not like you say, it's not the case for ancestry or twenty three and me or family tree DNA. It's only for jed match. They obviously make their terms available. I would think the real question right now is is everybody who was in jed match before this came up. Are they aware that their DNA is being used for it? Because everybody's since certainly dies. Right. So anyone since then since the terms and conditions change, obviously, they have to review those and accept those terms and conditions. And it's spelled out that what uses that could include in that definitely includes law enforcement just have very explicit in there, and that it is an ongoing question about whether or not people that were in the database beforehand, and then uploaded their DNA there before that was made explicit whether they have sufficient informed consent. Now, the terms and conditions did imply that there were there were potentially uses other than traditional genealogical research that the DNA could be used for. But it did not sell. Without explicit uses such as law enforcement. So that is an ongoing question about whether or not those individuals have given their informed consents. I would think that there has never been a more publicized terms of consent. It's been out there concerning DNA though, since this whole thing came out. So that those people who aren't paying much attention to it. They don't have a huge excuse really not to know. Right. Yeah. I mean, well, I in the traditional world of informed consent there there really isn't this concept of informed consent by the news. So you know, I've seen that argument that it's so widespread that everyone should have knowledge of this by now, and certainly that is very much the case, many, many people are going to be aware of this as a result and have the option of removing their DNA making it private and other things that jed match. The question is does adequate news coverage quake to informed consent. And I think many people that deal with informed consent would say that's probably not the case from a legal standpoint. From a legal standpoint, there's a risk for jed match from a legal standpoint for those who are in the system since before the change. And I think it was more of a tweak really than a change just further clarification that somebody might go after them and saying, hey, wait a minute. I didn't agree to this. No, no. I don't think. So because I'm not I don't want to give legal advice is just intimate. But I don't think so because there's no there's no evidence of harm individuals in the database are unlikely to have standing, and so it's not a situation where this is not so much a legal issue. It's more of just the the ethical issue associate. Sure as far as it goes. Well, you know, in my mind, and I'm sure many many people feel the same way. Hey, if I could catch a second or third cousin that's done some of the horrendous things that the people have done that have been nailed as a result of this technology. I'm more than happy to help, you know. Yeah. That's certainly I it's hard to argue with what's being done with it right now that is both a blessing and occurs in a way because it it makes it more difficult for ethical discussions to happen. Because we see that the worst of the worst are being identified using this process. Yeah. So it's really hard to say there might be problems with this process because it is the outcome is just so getting these individuals off the street, if they're ultimately shown to be guilty, right? So getting them off the street is obviously a very important outcome, but maybe that has the potential for and it's hard to even say this that has the potential to lure our vision. A little bit was discussed some of the ethical issues. He's playing Bettinger. He's a professional.

jed Indiana CBS advertently Florida Bill Facebook Eddie sixty minutes
"jed match" Discussed on Bear Brook

Bear Brook

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"jed match" Discussed on Bear Brook

"He might say, we'll just don't put your DNA online. But that's where it gets really interesting because when it comes to genetic genealogy your privacy is not only up to you. It's up to you. And all of the people you share DNA with every time one of your cousins puts their DNA online in a way, they're putting some of yours in there too with or probably without your consent. And that's what makes genetic genealogy so powerful chameleon of Golden State killer. They never put their DNA online some of their relatives. Nobody knows what the rules. Are. You know, they are in devising these really cool investigative techniques. They're making the rules up in terms of how what does the constitution tell us about this? They're making it up as they go along to now, it's really important to point out here that most genealogy databases are not being used by police right now. In fact, most of the major genealogy companies say they will go as far as possible to restrict police access to protect the privacy of their users. This means the biggest databases like ancestry and twenty three and me are more or less off limits to police now Lisa's case, by the way was a little different because she was alive and was submitting her own DNA. She could use those sites in the search for her identity, but there is one database that does allow police to use it one database. That's made identifying criminal suspects with genetic genealogy possible. It's called. Jed match. That's what Barbara rave enter used to identify the suspected Golden State killer. Jet match was started in two thousand ten to genealogy enthusiasts in lake worth Florida. It's not DNA testing company like ancestry or twenty three and me jet match is just a website that hosts a digital DNA database. In other words, you don't send jet match your spit. You just upload a file with the results of DNA tests that you took somewhere else. Jed match is popular with Genealogists because among other things it lets you compare results from different genealogy companies against each other say you tested on Twenty-three me, but your sister tested on ancestry before jed match one of you would have had to pay for a new DNA kit to compare your results. Now, you can just upload your results to the database for free. The jed match founders didn't know that cold case investigators would be among the people using their website. But they did understand the risks that come with putting your genetic information online. Here's an excerpt of the terms of service written before jed match was used to identify the Golden State killer results presented on the site are intended solely for genealogical research. We are unable to guarantee the users will not find other uses if you find the possibility unacceptable, please remove your data from this site to me. It's just completely unsatisfactory. To say, and we could use this for other research purposes. I think you need much clear notice that and we may give the government access to this. The jed match founders for their part said they didn't know police were using the database. It wasn't until the news of the Golden State killer arrests that they found out and in the months since they have issued an update to their terms of service now under the list of possible ways, your DNA might get used on jed match. There was a new bullet point searching by third parties such as law enforcement agencies to identify the perpetrator of a crime or to identify remains. Majed match founders could have decided to try and keep police author side. But instead they've opted for disclosure up front, which means for the time being at least jed match is the defacto police DNA database for genetic genealogy. It's the one being used right now to search for serial killers, and rapists and unidentified murder victims, which creates an interesting choice for all of us. If you want to help police investigate cold cases by volunteering your DNA. You can't. And in fact, that's exactly what Genealogists Barbara Rae. Venter invites you to do if people are interested in helping enforcement than it would be really good. If you went out and to deny testing going to sell me testing at any of the testing companies and then apology Neetu to tip. Will help catch criminals, and it will also help identify folks who are unknown victims. Your DNA could be the key to apprehending serial killer who has invaded police for decades or to identifying victims been nameless for years, but by putting your DNA in gen manage. You'll also be making a decision for your entire extended family for the thousands of cousins you have out there..

Jed Lisa Venter Barbara rave Barbara Rae Florida Neetu murder Majed
"jed match" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

11:21 min | 2 years ago

"jed match" Discussed on KCBS All News

"And it worked after months of research and investigation the twisted strands of family DNA lead them to the doorstep of one of their own a retired police officer my detectives arrested, James. Joseph Di Angelo seventy two years old living in citrus heights. Surreptitiously obtained a fresh DNA sample from the Angelo. And according to the arrest warrant, it was an identical match to that of the Golden State killer since that very first case in April local law enforcement agencies around the country have used the technique to make arrests in at least eleven other cold cases, all of them would still be cold. If it weren't for Curtis. Rodgers retired octogenarian in lake worth Florida runs the largest public DNA database in the US out of this re room bungalow. This is our headquarters for jed match. This is it this is it was built nineteen twenty five how many employees. Rogers, retired Quaker Oats executive in genealogy buff started jed match eight years ago is a hobby along with his partner, John Olsen and accomplished computer engineer in Texas. These are all first cousins they wanted to provide a free open source website where people could upload their DNA file and search for relatives. And ancestors, did you know the police were using this to solve crimes not at all? There was an Email from one of our users that said jed match was involved in find the Golden State killer. That was the first I knew of my world turned upside down at that point. In what way by the time? I got to work. There were satellite trucks up and down. This little narrow street that were on you see that yellow house over there with a blue shutters. There were reporters knocking on the door. I was you know, what do I do? We were upset. Oh, yes. Oh, yes. About what about whether we're invading our user juicers privacy, in some way, that they had no expectation of it being invaded jed matches policy statement, which had already cautioned that the public site might be used for purposes other than genealogy notified its community that people could withdraw their file if they didn't want their DNA used by police to solve crimes. So the blue indicates that there's a match there while it's office in Florida is spurting it's computer servers in an Oregon data center are not they can compare six hundred thousand separate locations in one person's DNA to those of its one million users and determine family matches just fortify. Hours listing as many as two thousand distant relatives with the closest ones at the top of the page along with their contact information. And then you have the the Email address of the people that it belongs to correct? So if you want to call them or twenty Email, you can just you can Email genealogies is a contact sport. You watch a contact people Roger says jed matches not in the business of finding criminals are solving crimes. He says it can be used by law enforcement to develop initial leads. But it's just the first step in a long process that requires special skills to turn hundreds of possibilities into a handful of suspects law enforcement. Can't do this. It takes an expert Genealogists that CeCe. She is the best of the best. He's talking about CC more genealogy is a small world. She has spent most of the past decade, working alone out of her home near San Diego, helping people identify their birth. Parents inputting name. Games on the unknown debt a precursor to our latest calling when I would be asked. What do I do? I'd say why professional genetic genealogist and people just look at me blankly like what is that people are just beginning to find out more is now the lead genealogist repair. Bon Nanno laps a small DNA technology company in reston Virginia that is leading the way in genetic genealogy the sheriff's office arrested, Michael F A Hanzlick without incident or the day, we visited her police halfway across the country announced that they had made an arrest on a nine year old murder case, which he'd been working on. This was just this morning. A couple of hours ago whereabouts in Champaign, Illinois. This is the Holly Kasan alerted. She had been stabbed repeatedly. I think about sixty times in her mobile home. And she was a young single mother more has played a pivotal role in identifying suspects in thirteen of the four. Eighteen cases that have arisen since the Golden State killer opened the floodgates six months ago. Looking at the people that share the most DNA with this unknown subject. She does it by taking the partial family matches that are generated by jed match in builds family trees that she hopes will point to the unknown suspect. So are unknown subject is here. Okay. So he's sharing DNA with this person and this person, but through different family trees. Yeah. This is how she identified the alleged killer in a high profile Thirty-one-year-old double homicide, and I'm trying to find an intersection where these two family trees come together. So we're getting that right? Mix of DNA. So I'm building these down. I'm saying who are their children who are their children their children their children who are their children. There's there's there's she uses things like marriage licenses birth announcements obituaries even Facebook to trace the ancestors found an obituary and that'll bitch had a descendant from this tree carrying a surname that I recognized from this tree, and I was able to find their marriage record. So a descendant from this couple a descendant from this couple married. Had only one son. Fascinating. That one son was William Earl Talbot. The second the only mail carrier of the DNA mix from the two families that could match the DNA founded the gruesome homicide scenes of Jay Cooke and Tanya van lemberg, the young Canadian couple was brutally murdered in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven in Washington state. CC's report went to detective Jim Sharpe. Who had worked a cold case for thirteen years? This was the tip of a lifetime to solve this case. He said Talbott was never even on their radar. But at the time of the murders. He was twenty four years old and living not far from where the bodies were discovered. Police tail Talbot collected his DNA from a discarded Cup and turned it over to a crime lab technician for analysis, and she told me that we had a match to the suspect that killed Tanya and. And it brought tears to highs. And then I screamed. Yeah. You know, we got him when I give these names to law enforcement. I am really sure because all those pieces have to come together really specific way. And then for them to end up right in the town where these crimes happened. They can't be a coincidence. Do you remember the day when you figured out who it was? Yes. I remember I remember the moment when I finally get to all of these people it's because it's a pretty profound moment. Two zero in on that. It's certainly a heavy discovery. Why? Why? Well, if I'm right, which I believe, I am I know a secret that only the killer knows are only rapist knows it's you know, it's it's a profound thing. This has changed lives and. I see what I believe is the answer. One of the hardest answers to come up with was who killed eight-year-old April Tinsley who was abducted while playing outside her home in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight her body was discovered three days later in a ditch outside Fort, Wayne, Indiana, she'd been raped and murdered the police had the DNA of her killer, but could never find a match for thirty years he taunted investigators scrawling threats on a barn door in tying notes. Two girls bicycle seats. The of interviews man hours that went into this case is unbelievable. Brian Martin has been a Fort Wayne homicide detective for six years. He was the one who got the call in July from CC more saying there had been a breakthrough we began looking at the individuals that she had given us and within four to five hours. We've fourteen days later that individual was taken into custody and is currently in the county jail. The suspect is John Miller Fifty-nine-year-old loner who worked at WalMart and lived in this trailer six miles away from where APRIL's body was found. He's pled not guilty. But according to this affidavit when police went to arrest him, they asked Miller if he had any idea why they wanted to talk to it. Miller looked at them and said, April Tinsley exactly what it was for. Southbound about satisfying part of the job. There's two things that are satisfying. Finally, having the pieces come together is very satisfying. And then giving these families some Justice to have an arrest. That is the most meaningful thing to me. The support for genetic genealogy in the worn forcement community is virtually unanimous Nanno labs, the company CC more works for it'd been anticipating it for years. It's already marketing technology to police agencies that creates computer generated composites suspects predicting I color, skin tone, and perhaps even facial structure based on their DNA, Steve trout, Girvan CEO. So you're ready when the Golden State case happened. Yeah. Wheels are already in motion. We sat back and watched the public response. It was overwhelmingly positive. This was like a starting gun to go ahead and move out. Arman, trout says already has more than one hundred cases in the pipeline. But there is no shortage of cautionary questions being raised by civil rights groups and bioethicists about the reliability of crime scene. DNA the lack of standards and protocol in this. Revolutionary new field in whether website users have become genetic informants on their relatives the field is so new it's almost impossible to predict consequences. None of the cases have gone to trial, and no one has pled guilty. You anticipate that there will be legal objections. I would think any good defense attorney is going to challenge. This just because there has never been a precedent setting decision on specifically using genetic genealogy and Jeb match. So I look forward to the day that we get that decision. You're listening to a replay of last Sunday's sixty minutes on KCBS..

jed match John Miller Joseph Di Angelo April Tinsley Florida US Tanya van lemberg Curtis officer Rodgers Texas Arman James Rogers Champaign Facebook John Olsen Holly Kasan
"jed match" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

11:47 min | 2 years ago

"jed match" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Angelo seventy two years old living in citrus heights. Surreptitiously obtained a fresh DNA samples from the Angelo. And according to the arrest warrant, it was an identical match to that of the Golden State killer since that very first case in April local law enforcement agencies around the country. If used a technique to make arrests in at least eleven other cold cases, all of them would still be cold. If it weren't for Curtis. Rodgers retired octagenarian in lake worth Florida who runs the largest public DNA database in the US out of this three room bungalow. This is our headquarters for jed match. This is it this is it was built nineteen twenty five how many employees none. Rogers, retired Quaker Oats executive in genealogy. Buff distorted jed match eight years ago is a hobby along with his partner, John Olsen and accomplished computer engineer in Texas. These are all first cousins they wanted to. Provide a free open source website where people could upload their DNA file in search for relatives. And ancestors, did you know the police were using this to solve crimes not at all? There was an Email from one of our users said jed match was involved in find the Golden State killer. That was the first I knew of it my world turned upside down at that point. By the time. I got to work. There were satellite trucks up and down. This little narrow street that were on you see that yellow house over there with the blue shutters. There were reporters knocking on the door. I was you know, what do I do? We were upset. Oh, yes. Oh, yes. About what about whether we're invading our user juicers privacy, in some way, that they had no expectation of it being invaded jed matches policy statement, which had already cautioned that the public site might be used for purposes other than genealogy notified its community that people could withdraw their file if they didn't want their DNA used by police to solve crimes. So the blue indicates that there's a match there while it's office in Florida is spurting it's computer servers in an Oregon data center are not. They can compare six hundred thousand separate locations in one person's DNA to those of its one million users and determine family matches. It just four to five hours listing as many as two thousand distant relatives with the closest ones at the top of the page along with their contact information. And then you have the the Email address of the people that it belongs to correct? So if you wanna call them or twenty Milam, you can just you can Email genealogies his a contact sport. You watch a contact people at Rogers says jed matches not in the business of finding criminals are solving crimes. He says it can be used by law enforcement to develop initial leaves. But it's just the first step in a long process that requires special skills to turn hundreds of possibilities into a handful of suspects law enforcement. Can't do this. It takes an expert genealogist CC. She is the best of the best. He's talking about CC more. Genealogy is a small world. She has spent most of the past decade, working alone out of her home near San Diego, helping people identify their birth parents in putting names on the unknown dead a precursor to our latest calling when I would be asked. What do I do? I'd say I'm a professional genetic genealogist and people just look at me blankly like what is that people are just beginning to find out more is now the lead genealogist for a pair bond. Nanno lamps small DNA technology company in reston Virginia that is leading the way in genetic genealogy the sheriff's office arrested, Michael F A Hensley without incident. Today, we visited her police halfway across the country announced that they had made an arrest on a nine year old murder case, which he'd been working on. This was just this morning. A couple of hours ago whereabouts in Champaign, Illinois. This is the Holly Kasana later she had been stabbed repeatedly. Think about sixty times in her mobile home. And she was a young single mother more has played a pivotal role in identifying suspects in thirteen of the fourteen cases that have arisen since the Golden State killer opened the floodgates six months ago. The people that share the most with this unknown subject. She does it by taking the partial family matches that are generated by jed match in builds out family trees that she hopes will point to the unknown suspect. So are unknown subject is here. Okay. So he's sharing DNA with this person and this person, but two different family trees. Yeah. This is how she identified the alleged killer in a high profile thirty one year old double homicide, and I'm trying to find an intersection where these two family trees come together. So we're getting that right? Mix of DNA. So I'm building these down. I'm saying who are their children who are their children their children their children who are their children. There's there's there's she uses things like marriage licenses birth announcements obituaries even Facebook to trace the ancestors found an obituary and that'll bitch had a descendant from this tree carrying a surname that I recognized from this tree, and I was able to find their marriage record. So a descendant from this couple and a descendant from this couple married. Only one son fascinating. That one son was William Earl Talbot. The second the only mail carrier of the DNA mix from the two families that could match the DNA founded the gruesome homicide scenes of Jay Cooke and Tanya van calemburg, the young Canadian couple was brutally murdered in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven in Washington state. CC's report went to detective Jim Sharpe. Who had worked the cold case for thirteen years. This was the tip of a lifetime to solve this case. He said Talbott was never even on their radar. But at the time of the murders. He was twenty four years old and living not far from where the bodies were discovered. Police tailed Talbot collected his DNA from a discarded Cup and turned it over to a crime lab technician for analysis, and she told me that we had a match to the suspect that killed tenure. And jay. And it brought tears to highs. And then I screamed. Yeah. You know, we got him when I give these names to law enforcement. I am really sure because all those pieces have to come together really specific way. And then for them to end up right in the town where these crimes happened. They can't be a coincidence. Do remember the day when you figured out who it was? Yes. I remember I remember the moment when I finally get to all of these people it's because it's a pretty profound moment. Two zero in on that certainly a heavy discovery. What? Well, if I'm right, which I believe, I am I know a secret that only the killer knows only rapists knows it's you know, it's it's a profound thing. This has changed lives and. I see what I believe is the answer. One of the hardest answers to come up with was who killed eight-year-old April Tinsley -ducted while playing outside her home in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight her body was discovered three days later in a ditch outside Fort, Wayne, Indiana, she'd been raped and murdered the police had the DNA of her killer, but could never find a match for thirty years he taunted investigators scrolling threats on a barn door in tying notes, two girls bicycle seats. The amount of interviews man hours that went into this case is unbelievable. Brian Martin has been a Fort Wayne homicide detective for six years. He was the one who got the call in July from CC more saying there had been a breakthrough we began looking at the individuals that she had given us and within four to five hours. We began surveillance fourteen days later that individual was taken into custody and is currently and the Allen county jail. The suspect is John Miller. The fifty nine year old loner who worked at WalMart and lived in this trailer six miles away from where APRIL's body was found. He's pled not guilty. But according to this affidavit when police went to arrest him, they asked Miller if he had any idea why they wanted to talk to it. Miller looked at them and said, April Tinsley exactly what was for. Sat about satisfying part of the job. There's two things that are satisfying. Finally, having the pieces come together is very satisfying. And then giving these families some Justice to have an arrest. That is the most meaningful thing to me. The support for genetic genealogy in the war enforcement community is virtually unanimous Nanno labs, the company CC more works for it'd been anticipating it for years. It's already marketing technology to police agencies that creates computer generated composites of suspects predicting I color skin tone in perhaps even facial structure based on their DNA, Steve and trout, Girvan CEO. So you're ready when the Golden State case happened wheels are already in motion. We sit back and watch the public response. It was overwhelmingly positive. This was like a starting gun to go ahead and move out. Arman, trout says already has more than one hundred cases in the pipeline. But there is no shortage of cautionary questions being raised by civil rights groups and bioethicists about the reliability of crime scene. DNA the lack of standards and protocol in this. Revolutionary new field in whether website users have become genetic informants on their relatives the field is so new it's almost impossible to predict consequences. None of the cases have gone to trial, and no one has pled guilty. You anticipate that there will be legal objections share. I would think any good defense attorney is going to challenge. This just because there has never been a precedent setting decision on specifically using genetic genealogy Jeb match. So I look forward to the day that we get that decision. Sixty minutes airs in its entirety every Sunday at seven pm and again at one o'clock on Monday morning coming up on KCBS Jeffrey shout to San Francisco, forty Niners grades are honored at Levi stadium. Dwight Clark and Joe Montana difficult to be back here. Without dc. Let's check sports right now with Caroline burns. San Francisco forty Niners of now lost five in a row after losing to the Los Angeles Rams thirty nine to ten the Rams defense. Kept after Niners quarterback CJ Beathard all day. He was sacked a career high seven times committed three turnovers including two interceptions starting on the very first series..

jed match John Miller Angelo Rogers April Tinsley Florida William Earl Talbot Jay Cooke San Francisco US Curtis Rodgers Texas Facebook Champaign executive Niners John Olsen
"jed match" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

11:47 min | 2 years ago

"jed match" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Did. And it worked after months of research and investigation the twisted strands of family DNA lead them to the doorstep of one of their own a retired police officer, my detectives arrested James Joseph Di Angelo, seventy two years old living in citrus heights. Thirties had surreptitiously obtained a fresh DNA samples from the Angelo. And according to the arrest warrant, it was an identical match to that of the Golden State killer. Cincinnati very first case in April local law enforcement agencies around the country. If used the technique to make arrests in at least eleven other cold cases, all of them would still be cold. If it worked for Curtis. Rodgers a retired octogenarian in lake worth Florida runs the largest public DNA database in the US out of this re room bungalow. This is our headquarters for jed match. This is it this is it. It was built nineteen twenty five how many employees Rogers retired Quaker Oats executive in genealogy. Buff distorted jed match eight years ago is a hobby along with his partner, John Olsen and accomplished computer engineer in Texas, and these are all first cousins they wanted to. Provide a free open source website where people could upload their DNA file and search for relatives. And ancestors, did you know, the police were using this assault crimes? Not at all. There was an Email from one of our users to said jed match was involved in find the Golden State killer. That was the first I knew of it my world turned upside down at that point. In what way by the time? I got to work. There were satellite trucks up and down. This little narrow street that were on you see that yellow house over there with the blue shutters. There were reporters knocking on the door. It was you know, what do I do? We were upset. Oh, yes. Oh, yes. About what about whether we're invading our user juicers privacy, in some way, that they had no expectation of it being invaded jed matches policy statement, which had already cautioned that the public site might be used for purposes. Other than genealogy notified it's a community that people could withdraw their file if they didn't want their DNA used by police to solve crimes. So the blue indicates that there's a match there while it's office in Florida is Spartan. It's computer. Servers in an Oregon data center are not. They can compare six hundred thousand separate locations in one person's DNA to those of its one million users and determine family matches. It just four to five hours listing as many as two thousand distant relatives with the closest ones at the top of the page along with their contact information. And then you have the the Email address of the people that it belongs to correct? So if you wanna call them or twenty Milam, you can just you can Email genealogy is a is a contact sport. You watch a contact people Roger says jed matches not in the business of finding criminals are solving crimes. He says it can be used by law enforcement to develop initial leads. But it's just the first step in a long process that requires special skills to turn hundreds of possibilities into a handful of suspects law enforcement can't do this. It takes an expert genealogist that sees she is the best of the best. He's talking about CCC more genealogy is a small world. She has spent most of the past decade, working alone out of her home near San Diego, helping people identify their birth. Parents inputting names on the unknown debt a precursor to our latest calling when I would be asked. What do I do? I'd say why I'm a professional genetic genealogist and people just look at me blankly like what is that people are just beginning to find out more is now the lead genealogist for a pair of Nanno lamps, a small DNA technology company in reston Virginia that is leading the way in genetic genealogy the sheriffs. Office arrested Michael F A hands like without incident. Or the day we visited her police halfway across the country announced that they had made an arrest on a nine year old murder case, which he'd been working on. This was just this morning. A couple of hours ago whereabouts in Champaign, Illinois. This is the Holly Kasan alerted. She had been stabbed repeatedly. I think about sixty times in her mobile home. And she was a young single mother more has played a pivotal role in a dentist. Trying suspects in thirteen of the fourteen cases that have arisen since the Golden State killer opened the floodgates six months ago. The people that share the most DNA with this unknown subject. She does it by taking the partial family matches that are generated by jed match and builds out family trees that she hopes will point to the unknown suspect. So are unknown subject is here. Okay. So he's sharing DNA with this person and this person, but through different family trees. Yeah. This is how she identified the alleged killer in a high profile Thirty-one-year-old double homicide, and I'm trying to find an intersection where these two family trees come together. So we're getting that. Right. Mix of DNA. So I'm building these down. I'm saying who are their children are their children their children their children who are their children. There's there's there's she uses things like marriage licenses birth announcements obituaries even Facebook to trace the ancestors, I found an obituary and that'll bitch had a descendant from this tree carrying a surname that I recognized from this tree, and I was able to find their marriage record. So the Senate from this couple and a descent from this couple married and had only one son. This fascinating that one son was William Earl Talbot. The second the only mail carrier of the DNA mix from the two families that could match the DNA founded the gruesome homicide scenes of Jay Cooke and Tanya van Lomborg, the young Canadian couple was brutally murdered in nineteen eighty seven in Washington state. CDC's report went to detective Jim Sharpe. Who had worked the cold case for thirteen years. This was the tip of a lifetime to solve this case. He said Talbott was never even on their radar. But at the time of the murders. He was twenty four years old and living not far from where the bodies were discovered. Police tailed Talbot collected his DNA from a discarded Cup and turned it over to a crime lab technician for analysis, and she told me that we had a match to the suspect that killed Tanya. And jay. And it brought tears to buy is. And then I screamed. Yeah. You know, we got him when I give these names to law enforcement. I am really sure because all those pieces have to come together really specific way. And then for them to end up right in the town where these crimes happened. They can't be a coincidence. Do you remember the day when you figured out who it was? Yes. I remember I remember the moment when I finally get to all of these people it's because it's a pretty profound moment. Two zero and all that. It's certainly a heavy discovery. Well, if I'm right, which I believe, I am I know a secret that only the killer knows are only the rapist knows it's you know, it's it's a profound thing. This has changed lives and. I see what I believe is the answer. One of the hardest answers to come up with was who killed eight-year-old April Tinsley who is abducted while playing outside her home in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight her body was discovered three days later in a ditch outside Fort, Wayne, Indiana, she'd been raped and murdered the police have the DNA of killer, but could never find a match for thirty years he taunted investigators scrolling threats on a barn door in tying notes, two girls bicycle seats. The amount of interviews man hours that went into this case is unbelievable. Brian Martin has been a Fort Wayne homicide detective for six years. He was the one who got the call in July from CC more saying there had been a breakthrough we began looking at the individuals that she had given us and within four to five hours. We began surveillance fourteen days later that individual was taken into custody and is currently in the Allen county jail. The suspect is John Miller. The fifty nine year old loner who worked at WalMart in lived in this trailer six miles away from where APRIL's body was found. He's pled not guilty. But according to this affidavit when police went to arrest him, they asked Miller if he had any idea why they wanted to talk to it. Miller looked at them and said, April Tinsley exactly what it was for. About satisfying part of the job. There's two things that are satisfying. Finally, having the pieces come together is very satisfying. And then giving these families some Justice to have an arrest. That is the most meaningful thing to me. The support for genetic genealogy in the war enforcement community is virtually unanimous Nanno labs, the company CC more works for it'd been anticipating it for years. It's already marketing technology to police agencies that creates computer generated composites of suspects predicting eye color, skin tone in perhaps even facial structure based on their DNA, Steve and trout, Girban CEO. So you're ready when the Golden State case happened. Yeah. Wheels are already in motion. We set back and watch the public response. It was overwhelmingly positive. This was like a starting gun to go ahead and move out. Arman, trout, says Parabak already has more than one hundred cases in the pipeline. But there is no shortage of cautionary questions being raised by civil rights groups and bioethicists about the reliability of crime scene. DNA the lack of standards in protocol in this room. Revolutionary new field in whether website users have become genetic informants on the relatives the field is so new it's almost impossible to predict consequences. None of the cases have gone to trial, and no one has pled guilty. Do you anticipate that there will be legal objections share? I would think any good defense attorney is going to challenge. This just because there has never been a precedent setting decision on specifically using genetic genealogy Jeb match. So I look forward to the day that we get that decision. You can watch sixty minutes on KPI ex wife, and you can hear sixty minutes on KCBS, sixty minutes every Sunday night at seven on x five eight an all news, seven forty and FM one zero six nine KCBS. And now a page from the diary of Flo. Dear diary, there's something about protecting people's homes through progressive that inspires me. 'cause I just had an idea for a book. Well, it was originally an idea for a movie based on a play inspired by.

jed match James Joseph Di Angelo John Miller April Tinsley Florida William Earl Talbot Jay Cooke Tanya van Lomborg US Quaker Oats Curtis assault officer Cincinnati Rodgers Texas Rogers Arman
"jed match" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"jed match" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Never had a good lead until this year. It wasn't a new witness or a snitch, but something that they had had for years the killers DNA they knew everything about his genetic makeup, but not as identity no matches in law enforcement computers, then just before his retirement cold case investigator pole holes pursue a final gamp using an alias. He submitted the killers DNA to an obscure public database called jed match popular with genealogy enthusiasts and good at finding family members. If we can't find him can we find somebody related to him and then work our way back to him. And so ultimately, that's what we did. And it worked after months of research and investigation the twisted strands of family DNA lead them to the doorstep of one of their own a retired police officer my detectives arrested, James. Joseph Di Angelo seventy two years old living in citrus heights. Surreptitiously obtained a fresh DNA samples from the Angelo. And according to the arrest warrant, it was an identical match to that of the Golden State killer since that very first case in April local law enforcement agencies around the country. If used the technique to make arrests in at least eleven other cold cases, all of them would still be cold. If it weren't for Curtis. Rodgers a retired octogenarian in lake worth Florida who runs the largest public DNA database in the US out of this three room Bugalo. This is our headquarters for jed match. This is it this is it. It was built nineteen twenty five how many employees. Rogers, retired Quaker Oats executive in genealogy buff started jed match eight years ago is a hobby along with his partner. John Olsen, an accomplished computer engineer in Texas. These are all first cousins they wanted to provide a free open source website where people could upload their DNA file in search for relatives. And ancestors, did you know the police for using this assault crimes? Not at all. There was an Email from one of our users to said jed match was involved in find the Golden State killer. That was the first I knew my world turned upside down at that point. By the time. I got to work. There were satellite trucks up and down. This little narrow street that were on you see that yellow house over there with the blue shutters. There were reporters knocking on the door. I was you know, what do I do? We were upset. Oh, yes. Oh, yes. About what about whether we're invading our user user's privacy, in some way, that they had no expectation of it being invaded jed matches policy statement, which had already cautioned that the public site might be used for purposes other than genealogy notified its community that people could withdraw their file if they didn't want their DNA used by police to solve crimes. So the blue indicates that there's match there while it's office in Florida is sporting computer servers in an Oregon data center are not. They can compare six hundred.

jed match Joseph Di Angelo Florida investigator US assault Curtis officer John Olsen Rodgers Oregon Rogers Texas James engineer partner executive
"jed match" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

11:58 min | 2 years ago

"jed match" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"The police never had a good lead until this year. It wasn't a new witness or a snitch, but something that they had had for years the killers DNA they knew everything about his genetic makeup, but not as identity no matches in law enforcement computers, then just before his retirement cold case investigator pole holes pursued a final gambit using an alias. He submitted the killers DNA to an obscure public database called jed match popular with genealogy enthusiasts and good at finding family members. If we can't find him can we find somebody related to him and then work our way back to him. And so ultimately, that's what we did. And it worked after months of research and investigation the twisted strands of family DNA lead them to the doorstep of one of their own a retired police officer, my detectives arrested James Joseph Di Angelo, seventy two years old living in citrus heights. Tissue obtained a fresh DNA sample from the Angelo. And according to the arrest warrant, it was an identical match to that of the Golden State killer since that very first case in April local law enforcement agencies around the country have used a technique to make a ranks in at least eleven other cold cases, all of them would still be cold. If it weren't for Curtis. Rodgers retired octogenarian in lake worth Florida who runs the largest public DNA database in the US out of this rear room. Bungalow? This is our headquarters for jed match. This is it this is it was built nineteen twenty five how many employees Rogers retired Quaker Oats executive in genealogy. Buff distorted jed match eight years ago is a hobby along with his partner, John Olsen and accomplished computer engineer in Texas. These are all first cousins they wanted. Provide a free open source website where people could upload their DNA file in search for relatives. And ancestors, did you know the police were using this to solve crimes not at all? There was an Email from one of our users said jed match was involved in find the Golden State killer. That was the first I knew my world turned upside down at that point. In what way by the time? I got to work. There were satellite trucks up and down. This little narrow street that were on you see that yellow house over there with a blue shutters. There were reporters knocking on the door. I was you know, what do I do? We were upset. Oh, yes. Oh, yes. About what about whether we're invading our user user's privacy, in some way, that they had no expectation of it being invaded jed matches policy statement, which had already cautioned that the public site might be used for purposes. Other than genealogy notified it's a community that people could withdraw their file if they didn't want their DNA used by police to solve crimes. So the blue indicates that there's a match there while it's office in Florida is spurting it's computer servers in an Oregon data center are not. They can compare six hundred thousand separate locations in one person's DNA to those of its one million users and determine family matches. It just four to five hours listing as many as two thousand distant relatives with the closest ones at the top of the page along with their contact information. And then you have the the Email address of the people that it belongs to correct? So if you want to call them or twenty Email, I'm you can just you can Email genealogy is a contact sport. You watch a contact people. Roger says jed match is not in the business of finding criminals are solving crimes. He says it can be used by law enforcement to develop initial leads. But it's just the first step in a long process that requires special skills to turn hundreds of possibilities into a handful of suspects law enforcement. Can't do this. It takes an expert genealogist. She is the best of the best. He's talking about CC more. Genealogy is a small world. She has spent most of the past decade, working alone out of her home near San Diego, helping people identify their birth parents in putting names on the unknown dead a precursor to our latest calling when I would be asked to what do I do? I'd say why professional genetic genealogist and people just look at me blankly like what is that people are just beginning to find out more is now the lead genealogist for a pair bond. Nanno laps a small DNA technology company in reston Virginia that is leading the way in genetic genealogy the sheriff's office arrested, Michael F A Hanzlick without incident. The day we visited her police halfway across the country announced that they had made an arrest on a nine year old murder case, which he'd been working on. This was just this morning. A couple of hours ago whereabouts in Champaign, Illinois. This is the Holly Kasana later she had been stabbed to repeatedly. Think about sixty times in her mobile home. And she was a young single mother more has played a pivotal role in identifying suspects in thirteen of the fourteen cases that have arisen since the Golden State killer opened the floodgates six months ago. The people share the most DNA with this unknown subject. She does it by taking the partial family matches that are generated by jed match and builds out family trees that she hopes will point to the unknown suspect. So are unknown subject is here. Okay. So he's sharing DNA with this person and this person, but do different family trees. Yeah. This is how she identified the alleged killer in a high profile Thirty-one-year-old double homicide, and I'm trying to find an intersection where these two family trees come together. So we're getting that right? Mix of DNA. So I'm building these down. I'm saying who are their children who are their children their children their children who are their children. There's there's there's she uses things like marriage licenses birth announcements obituaries even Facebook to trace the ancestors found an obituary and that'll bitch had a descendant from this tree carrying a surname that I recognized from this tree, and I was able to find their marriage record. So the Senate from this couple and a descendant from this couple married. Had only one son. Fascinating. That one son was William Earl Talbot. The second the only mail carrier of the DNA Knicks from the two families that could match the DNA founded the gruesome homicide scenes of Jay Cooke and Tanya van board the young Canadian couple was brutally murdered in nineteen eighty seven in Washington state. CC's report went to detective Jim Sharpe. Who had worked the cold case for thirteen years. This was the tip of a lifetime to solve this case. He said Talbott was never even on their radar. But at the time of the murders. He was twenty four years old in living not far from where the bodies were discovered. Police tailed Talbot collected his DNA from a discarded GOP and turned it over to a crime lab technician for analysis, and she told me that we had a match to the suspect that killed tenure in Jay. And it brought tears to is. And then I screamed. Yeah. You know, we got him when I give these names to law enforcement. I am really sure because all those pieces have to come together really specific way. And then for them to end up right in the town where these crimes happened. The can't be a coincidence. Do you remember the day? Yes. I remember. I remember the moment when I finally get to all of these people it's because it's a pretty profound moment. Two zero in on that certainly a heavy discovery. What? Well, if I'm right, which I believe, I am I know a secret that only the killer knows only rapist knows it's you know, it's it's a profound thing. This has changed lives and. I see what I believe is the answer. One of the hardest answers to come up with was who killed eight-year-old April Tinsley who was obstructed while playing outside her home in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight her body was discovered three days later in a ditch outside Fort, Wayne, Indiana, she'd been raped and murdered the police had the DNA of her killer, but could never find a match for thirty years he taunted investigators scrolling threats on a barn door in tying notes. Two girls bicycle seats. The amona interviews man hours that went into this case is unbelievable. Brian Martin has been a Fort Wayne homicide detective for six years. He was the one who got the call in July from CC more saying there had been a breakthrough we began looking at the individuals that she had given us and within four to five hours we've against fourteen days later that individual was taken into custody and is currently in the county jail. The suspect is John Miller fifty nine year old loner who worked at WalMart and lived in this trailer six miles away from where APRIL's body was found. He's pled not guilty. But according to this affidavit when police went to arrest him, they asked Miller if he had any idea why they wanted to talk to it. Miller looked at them and said, hey, girl, tensely exactly what it was for. Sat about satisfying part of the job. There's two things that are satisfying. Finally, having a pieces come together is very satisfying. And then giving these families some Justice to have an arrest. That is the most meaningful thing to me. The support for genetic genealogy in the law enforcement community is virtually unanimous Nanno labs, the company CC more works for it'd been anticipating it for years. It's already marketing technology to police agencies that creates computer generated composites of suspects predicting I color skin tone in perhaps even facial structure based on their DNA Armand, trout, Girban CEO. So you're ready when the Golden State case happened. Yeah. The wheels were already in motion. We sat back and watched the public response. It was overwhelmingly positive. This was like a starting gun to go ahead and move out. Arman, trout says already has more than one hundred cases in the pipeline. But there is no shortage of cautionary questions being raised by civil rights groups and bioethicists about the reliability of crime scene. DNA the lack of standards in protocol in this. Revolutionary new field in whether website users become genetic informants on their relatives the field is so new it's almost impossible to predict consequences. None of the cases have gone to trial, and no one is pled guilty. You anticipate that there will be legal objections, sir. I would think any good defense attorney is going to challenge. This just because there has never been a precedent setting decision on specifically using genetic genealogy and Jeb match. So I look forward to the day that we get that decision..

jed match James Joseph Di Angelo Florida William Earl Talbot John Miller US Quaker Oats Curtis officer Rodgers Arman Rogers investigator Facebook Champaign Senate executive murder
"jed match" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

12:03 min | 2 years ago

"jed match" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"The police never had a good lead until this year. It wasn't a new witness or a snitch, but something that they had had for years the killers DNA they knew everything about his genetic makeup, but not as identity no matches in law enforcement computers, then just before his retirement cold case investigator pole holes pursued a final gambit using an alias. He submitted the killers DNA to an obscure public database called jed match marketer with genealogy enthusiasts and good at finding family members. If we can't find him can we find somebody related to him and then work our way back to him. And so ultimately, that's what we did. And it worked after months of research and investigation the twisted strands of family DNA lead them to the doorstep of one of their own a retired police officer might detectives arrested James. Joseph Di Angelo seventy two years old living in citrus heights. Forties had served tissue obtained a fresh DNA samples from the Angelo. And according to the arrest warrant, it was an identical match to that of the Golden State killer since that very first case in April local law enforcement agencies around the country have used a technique to make arrests in at least eleven other cold cases, all of them would still be cold. If it weren't for Curtis. Rodgers a retired octogenarian in lake worth Florida who runs the largest public DNA database in the US out of this rear room. Bungalow? This is our headquarters for jed match. This is it this is it was built nineteen twenty five how many employees fear Rogers, retired Quaker Oats executive in genealogy. Buff distorted jed match eight years ago is a hobby along with his partner, John Olsen and accomplished computer engineer in Texas. These are all first cousins they wanted. Provide a free open source website where people could upload their DNA file in search for relatives. And ancestors, did you know the police were using this to solve crimes not at all? There was an Email from one of our users that said jed match was involved and find the Golden State killer. That was the first I knew my world turned upside down at that point in what way by the time. I got to work. There were satellite trucks up and down. This little narrow street that were on you see that yellow house over there with the blue shutters. There were reporters knocking on the door. Was you know, what do I do? We were upset. Oh, yes. Oh, yes. About what about whether we're invading our user user's privacy, in some way, that they had no expectation of it being invaded jed matches policy statement, which had already cautioned that the public site might be used for purposes other than genealogy notified its community that people could withdraw their file if they didn't want their DNA used by police to solve crimes. So the blue indicates that there's a match there while it's office in Florida is Spartan. It's computer servers in an Oregon data center are not they can compare six hundred thousand separate locations in one person's DNA those of its one million users and determine family matches. It just fortify. Hours listing as many as two thousand distant relatives with the closest ones at the top of the page along with their contact information. And then you have the the Email address of the people that it belongs to correct? So if you want to call them, her twenty Milam, you can just you can Email genealogy is his a contact sport. You watch a contact people verger says jed matches not in the business of finding criminals are solving crimes. He says it can be used by law enforcement to develop initial leads. But it's just the first step in a long process that requires special skills to turn hundreds of possibilities into a handful of suspects law enforcement. Can't do this. It takes an expert Genealogists that CeCe. She is the best of the best. He's talking about CC more genealogy is a small world. She has spent most of the past decade, working alone out of her home near San Diego, helping people identify their birth. Parents inputting name. Names on the unknown debt a precursor to our latest calling when I would be asked. What do I do? I'd say why I'm a professional genetic genealogist and people just look at me blankly like what is that people are just beginning to find out. See more is now the lead genealogist for a pair bond. Nanno laps a small DNA technology company in reston Virginia that is leading the way in genetic genealogy the sheriff's office arrested Michael F A Hanzlick without incident or the day, we visited her police halfway across the country announced that they had made an arrest on a nine year old murder case, which he'd been working on. This was just this morning. A couple of hours ago whereabouts in Champaign, Illinois. This is the Holly Cassano she had been stabbed to repeatedly. I think about sixty times in her mobile home. And she was a young single mother more has played a pivotal role in identifying suspects in thirteen. Of the fourteen cases that have arisen since the Golden State killer opened the floodgates six months ago. Looking at the people share the most DNA with this unknown subject. She does it by taking the partial family matches that are generated by jed match in builds out family trees that she hopes will point to the unknown suspect are unknown subject is here. Okay. So he's sharing DNA with this person and this person, but different family trees. Yeah. This is how she identified the alleged killer in a high profile thirty one year old double homicide, and I'm trying to find an intersection where these two family trees come together. So we're getting that right? Mix of DNA. So I'm building these down. I'm saying who are their children who are their children their children their children who are their children. There's there's a nurse. She uses things like marriage licenses birth announcements obituaries even Facebook to trace the ancestors found an obituary, and that obituary had a descendant from this tree carrying a surname that I recognized from this tree, and I was able to find their marriage record. So a descendant from this couple and a descendant from this couple married. Only one son. It's fascinating. That one son was William Earl Talbot. The second the only mail carrier of the DNA Knicks from the two families bit could match the DNA founded the gruesome homicide scenes of Jay Cooke and Tanya van calemburg, the young Canadian couple was brutally murdered in nineteen eighty seven in Washington state. CC's report went to detective Jim Sharpe. Who had worked a cold case for thirteen years? This was the tip of a lifetime to solve this case. He said Talbott was never even on their radar. But at the time of the murders. He was twenty four years old and living not far from where the bodies were discovered. Police tail Talbot collected his DNA from a discarded Cup and turned it over to a crime lab technician for analysis, and she told me that we had a match to the suspect that killed Tanya in Jay. And it brought tears to is. And then I screamed. Yeah. You know, we got him when I give these names to law enforcement. I am really sure because all those pieces have to come together really specific way. And then for them to end up right in the town where these crimes happened. They can't be a coincidence. Do remember the day when you figured out who it was? Yes. I remember I remember the moment when I finally get to all of these people it's because it's a pretty profound moment. Two zero in on that certainly a heavy discovery. Why? Why? Well, if I'm right, which I believe, I am I know a secret that only the killer knows are only rapist knows it's you know, it's it's a profound thing. This has changed lives and. I see what I believe is the answer. One of the hardest answers to come up with was who killed eight-year-old April pins pennsly- who was abducted while playing outside her home in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight her body was discovered three days later in a ditch outside Fort, Wayne, Indiana, she'd been raped and murdered the police had the DNA of her killer, but could never find a match for thirty years he taunted investigators scrolling threats on a barn door in tying notes, two girls bicycle seats. The amount of interviews man hours that went into this case is unbelievable. Brian Martin has been a Fort Wayne homicide detective for six years. He was the one who got the call in July from CC more saying there had been a breakthrough we began looking at the individuals that she had given us and within four to five hours fourteen days later that individual was taken into custody and is currently in the Allen county jail. The suspect is John Miller. The fifty nine year old loner who worked at WalMart and lived in this trailer six miles away from where APRIL's body was found. He's pled not guilty. But according to this affidavit when police went to arrest him, they asked Miller if he had any idea why they wanted to talk to it. Miller looked at them and said, hey, potentially exactly what it was for. Sat about satisfying part of the job. There's two things that are satisfying. Finally, having the pieces come together is very satisfying. And then giving these families some Justice to have an arrest. That is the most meaningful thing to me. The support for genetic genealogy in the law enforcement community is virtually unanimous Nanno labs, the company CC more works for it'd been anticipating it for years. It's already marketing technology to police agencies that creates computer generated composites of suspects predicting I color, skin tone, and perhaps even facial structure based on their DNA, Arman, trout CEO. So you're ready when the Golden State case happened. Yeah. Wheels are already in motion. We sit back and watch the public response. It was overwhelmingly positive. This was like a starting gun to go ahead and move out. Arman, trout says paragon already has more than one hundred cases in the pipeline. But there is no shortage of cautionary questions being raised by civil rights groups and bioethicists about the reliability of crime scene. DNA lack of standards in protocol in this. Revolutionary new field in whether website users have become genetic informants on their relatives the field is so new it's almost impossible to predict consequences. None of the cases have gone to trial, and no one has pled guilty. You anticipate that there will be legal objections, sir. I would think any good defense attorney is going to challenge. This just because there has never been a precedent setting decision on specifically using genetic genealogy and Jeb match. So I look forward to the day that we get that decision. Now,.

jed match Joseph Di Angelo Florida John Miller Tanya van calemburg Arman US Forties Curtis officer Rodgers investigator Oregon James Facebook Champaign WalMart Milam
"jed match" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

11:20 min | 2 years ago

"jed match" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"We did. And it worked after months of research and investigation the twisted strands of family DNA lead them to the doorstep of one of their own a retired police officer my detectives arrested, James. Joseph Di Angelo seventy two years old living in citrus heights. Forties had surreptitiously obtained a fresh DNA sample from the Angelo. And according to the arrest warrant, it was an identical match to that of the Golden State killer since that very first case in April local law enforcement agencies around the country. If used the technique to make arrests in at least eleven other cold cases, all of them would still be cold. If it weren't for Curtis. Rodgers retired octagenarian in lake worth Florida who runs the largest public DNA database in the US out of this three room bungalow. This is our headquarters for jed match. This is it this is it. It was built nineteen twenty five how many employees none. Rogers, retired Quaker Oats executive in genealogy buff started jed match eight years ago is a hobby along with his partner, John Olsen and accomplished computer engineer in Texas. These are all first cousins they wanted to. Provide a free open source website where people could upload their DNA file in search for relatives. And ancestors, did you know the police were using this to solve crimes not at all? There was an Email from one of our users that said jed match was involved in find the Golden State killer. That was the first I knew my world turned upside down at that point. If my way by the time, I got to work. There were satellite trucks up and down. This little narrow street that were on you see that yellow house over there with the blue shutters. There were reporters knocking on the door. It was you know, what do I do? We were upset. Oh, yes. Oh, yes. About what about whether we're invading our user juicers privacy, in some way, that they had no expectation of it being invaded Jeb matches policy statement, which had already cautioned that the public site might be used for purposes other than genealogy notified its community that people could withdraw their vile. If they didn't want their DNA used by police to solve crimes. So the blue indicates that there's a match there while it's office in Florida is spurting. It's computer servers in Oregon data center are not. They can compare six hundred thousand separate locations in one person's DNA to those of its one million users and determine family matches. It just four to five hours listing as many as two thousand distant relatives with the closest ones at the top of the page along with their contact information. And then you have the the Email address of the people that it belongs to correct? So if you want to call them, her twenty Milam, you can just you can Email genealogy is a a contact sport. You watch a contact people at Rogers says jed matches not in the business of finding criminals are solving crimes. He says it can be used by law enforcement to develop initial leads. But it's just the first step in a long process that requires special skills to turn hundreds of possibilities into a handful of suspects law enforcement. Can't do this. It takes an expert Genealogists that sees she is the best of the best. He's talking about more. Genealogy is a small world. She has spent most of the past decade, working alone out of her home near San Diego, helping people identify their birth parents in putting names on the unknown dead a precursor to our latest calling when I would be asked. What do I do? I'd say why professional genetic genealogist and people just look at me blankly like what is that people are just beginning to find out more is now the lead genealogist for a pair bond. Nanno lamps a small DNA technology company in reston Virginia that is leading the way in genetic genealogy the sheriff's office arrested, Michael F A hands like without incident. Or the day we visited her police halfway across the country announced that they had made an arrest on a nine year old murder case, which he'd been working on. This was just this morning. A couple of hours ago whereabouts in Champaign, Illinois. This is the Holly Kasana later she had been stabbed repeatedly. Think about sixty times in her mobile home. And she was a young single mother more has played a pivotal role in a dentist buying suspects in thirteen of the fourteen cases that have arisen since the Golden State killer opened the floodgates six months ago. Looking at the people at share the most DNA with this unknown subject. She does it by taking the partial family matches that are generated by jed match and builds out family trees that she hopes will point to the unknown suspect. So are unknown subject is here. Okay. So he sharing DNA with this person and this person, but do different family trees. Yeah. This is how she identified the alleged killer in a high profile Thirty-one-year-old double homicide, and I'm trying to find an intersection where these two family trees come together. So we're getting that right? Mix of DNA. So I'm building these down. I'm saying who are their children who are their children their children their children who are their children. There's there's there's she uses things like marriage licenses birth announcements obituaries even Facebook to trace the ancestors found an obituary, and that obituary had a descendant from this tree carrying a surname that I recognized from this tree, and I was able to find their marriage record. So a descendant from this couple and a descendant from this couple married. Only one son. It's fascinating. That one son was William Earl Talbot. The second the only mail carrier of the DNA Knicks from the two families that could match the DNA founded the gruesome homicide scenes of Jay Cooke and Tanya van lemberg, the young Canadian couple was brutally murdered in nineteen eighty-seven in Washington state. CC's report went to detective Jim Sharpe. Who had worked a cold case for thirteen years? This was the tip of a lifetime to solve this case. He said Talbott was never even on their radar. But at the time of the murders. He was twenty four years old and living not far from where the bodies were discovered. Police tail Talbot collected his DNA from a discarded Cup and turned it over to a crime lab technician for analysis, and she told me that we had a match to the suspect that killed Tanya in Jay. And it brought tears to highs. And then I screamed. Yeah. You know, we got him when I give these names to law enforcement. I am really sure because all those pieces have to come together really specific way. And then for them to end up right in the town where these crimes happened. The can't be coincidence. Do you remember the day when you figured out who it was? Yes. I remember I remember the moment when I finally get to all of these people it's because it's a pretty profound moment. Two zero in on that certainly a heavy discovery. Why? Well, if I'm right, which I believe, I am I know a secret that only the killer knows are only rapist knows it's you know, it's it's a profound thing. This has changed lives and. I see what I believe is the answer. One of the hardest answers to come up with was who killed eight-year-old April Tinsley who was abducted while playing outside her home in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight her body was discovered three days later in a ditch outside Fort, Wayne, Indiana, she'd been raped and murdered the police had the DNA of her killer, but could never find a match for thirty years he taunted investigators scrolling threats on a barn door in tying notes, two girls bicycle seats. The amount of interviews man hours that went into this case is unbelievable. Brian Martin has been a Fort Wayne homicide detective for six years. He was the one who got the call in July from CC more saying there had been a breakthrough we began looking at the individuals that she had given us and within four to five hours. We began surveillance fourteen days later that individual was taken into custody and is currently in the Allen county jail. The suspect is John Miller. The fifty nine year old loner who worked at WalMart and lived in this trailer six miles away from where APRIL's body was found. He's pled not guilty. But according to this affidavit when police went to arrest him, they asked Miller if he had any idea why they wanted to talk to it. Miller looked at them and said, hey, tensely exactly what it was for. About satisfying part of the job. There's two things that are satisfying. Finally, having the pieces come together is very satisfying. And then giving these families some Justice to have an arrest. That is the most meaningful thing to me. The support for genetic genealogy in the one forcement community is virtually unanimous Nanno labs, the company CC more works for it'd been anticipating it for years. It's already marketing technology to police agencies that creates computer generated composites of suspects predicting eye color, skin tone in perhaps even facial structure based on their DNA Armand trout, this Girban CEO. So you're ready when the Golden State case happened. Yeah. The wheels are already in motion. We sat back and watched the public response. It was overwhelmingly positive. This was like a starting gun to go ahead and move out. Arman, trout says Bon already has more than one hundred cases in the pipeline. But there is no shortage of cautionary questions being raised by civil rights groups and bioethicists about the reliability of crime scene. DNA the lack of standards in protocol in this. Revolutionary new field and whether website users have become genetic informants on their relatives the field is so new it's almost impossible to predict consequences. None of the cases have gone to trial, and no one has pled guilty. You anticipate that there will be legal objections, sir. I would think any good defense attorney is going to challenge. This just because there has never been a precedent setting decision on specifically using genetic genealogy Jeb match. So I look forward to the day that we get that decision. Who's the.

jed match John Miller Joseph Di Angelo Rogers Tanya van lemberg US Curtis officer Rodgers Florida Arman Texas Oregon James Facebook Champaign John Olsen
"jed match" Discussed on Perspective

Perspective

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"jed match" Discussed on Perspective

"You can listen every Wednesday for new guests and new perspectives. Some of these people, you know, celebrities, athletes executives. Some of them are more people that I'm obsessed with that. I think you might be obsessed with once you give them listen, and you can hear about how they're using that attention top their game in all these interesting areas of life. Again, the podcast is called ten percent happier. You can find it on apple podcasts or wherever you're listening right now and subscribe today. Welcome back to perspective. I'm Sherry. Preston. DNA lead to the arrest in a cold case murder of an eight year old girl in Indiana. John Miller was arrested after allegedly admitting to abduct ING, sexually assaulting and choking April Tinsley with more on the story. Here's ABC's wit Johnson. They FBI now has a more detailed description of the suspected killer. This guy is a monster. He's a coward. It's the unthinkable crime that haunted Fort Wayne, Indiana for three decades, a big break at a decades old cold case until a clue. Hidden in genetic code landed a suspected child murderer behind bars. The arrest, part of a new wave of crime solving linking DNA with genealogy to hunt the most violent offenders. Nineteen Eighty-eight a killer on the loose taunting police threatening to strike again the face of an innocent young girl thrust into the national spotlight eight-year-old April Tinsley going to play at a friend's house, but never making it home little April kidnapped raped and strangled her body dumped in dick the case baffling authorities, the mysterious killer inflicting more fear, leaving rambling, misspelled messages, authorities, say like this carving on a barn door, two years after the murder, I'd kill eight year old April. I will kill again then in two thousand four. According to police more notes left at the homes of other young girls reading. Hi, Honey, I've been watching you. You are my next victim investigators say DNA from some of those notes match DNA found at the crime scene, but for decades, nothing. Then a stunning development thirty years. Thirty years and Stanley's waited for answers. We were able to give them some of those answers police taking fifty nine year old. John D Miller into custody about six miles from where APRIL's body was found investigators say they asked Miller if he knew why he was being questioned his response, April Tinsley. Then according to police, a confession, today's a big win for law enforcement. In this investigation illustrates dogged determination of the investigators who never waver never gave up and kept moving forward for the last thirty years. The break police say, thanks to a new cutting edge tool. Combining the power of DNA genealogy and the internet, creating a genetic profile from crime scene DNA authorities say they uploaded it to a public database called jed match, leading police to identify relatives than zeroing in on a suspected killer John Miller investigators later. Covering a DNA sample for Miller's trash that they say tied him to APRIL's murder. This is the fifth case that has been announced in which we were able to help investigators determine who the suspect is. Genetic Genealogists CC more made a name for herself, connecting families, too long lost relatives. The power of genetic genealogy is tremendous. I've seen it for many years in its ability to reunite families, and it's just as powerful for law enforcement. Now she's working with the lab in Virginia and law enforcement attempting to solve the most challenging cold cases like the Tinsley murder. We were able to use genetic genealogy to narrow it down to two brothers. Once we get to that point, we turn it over to law enforcement and they have to investigate those brothers and determine which one is most likely the suspect John Miller's brother says he too was interrogated by police. Then they questioned me for about an hour and a half. Plus they took by DNA. He now says he wants nothing to do with his brother. As far as I'm concerned when I when they told me that he confess to this crime, my brother died. I'm done the murder of little April Tinsley. Just the latest in a series of high profile cases. Cracked investigators, say using the same cutting edge technique the first to make worldwide headlines, the so-called Golden State killer an elusive, criminal, whose reign of terror across California in the seventies and eighties police, say included threatening phone calls to his victims..

April Tinsley John D Miller murder Indiana FBI apple Fort Wayne ABC Preston California jed match Stanley Johnson Virginia thirty years eight year fifty nine year three decades Thirty years