19 Burst results for "Jed Kolko"

"jed kolko" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

08:56 min | 1 year ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Wouldn't stop. Well, I don't know that it would let's remember. These are people who have not been convicted yet. They've just been charged. And are U S Constitution says that they have a right to be released. On bonds, Mr before they are convicted. The problem is is so many of these judges are doing a terrible job of assessing whether they're going to be a threat to others when they're out on bond. Or whether they'll show up for their trial date. And it's putting people in jeopardy across society well, in the thing about making sure that they get a bond It has to. It doesn't make any sense to me that you when you've got people that have this long rap sheet and you're letting them out on a small dollar bond, and I know this. This is that big issue. Well, maybe they come from where they were. They can't afford that. So it's not fair to them. No, it is fair to them to set an extremely high bond for someone who has that rap sheet because they're obviously a minister society and they shouldn't Be able to make the bond so that they're out on the streets to offend again. Hey, Chris. Thanks. You have a good weekend. 51283605 91 of the economist with indeed the job site. Decided to start doing some checking. After all of these governors began saying, We're going to cut off the extra federal unemployment benefits the $300 per week every week from the federal government. I think it's up to 23 states have done that now. Jed Kolko is the economist with indeed and he started doing a little research back in April, when the first state started cutting off the extra benefits and what he found was surprise surprise. More people started searching job for jobs as soon as that announcement was made, they saw more. Clicks on looking for jobs and what I thought was interesting in this. The majority of those fell into that tourism. Hospitality sells marketing industry, the industry that we have heard from time and time again that are saying it's difficult. The higher right now. Yeah. Yeah. He went on to say it was a relatively brief spike for several days in each state, and then it would kind of taper back off. But clearly people were hearing the message. Yes, and and they were aware that okay, coming up in the not too distant future, things are changing for me. I'm gonna be losing those benefits. I better start figuring out what I'm gonna do. And to me, that alone shows yes, there was a segment of this population that was thinking they were just on easy street, getting the federal benefits on top of the state benefits and not having to go to work, and as long as that was going to be made available to them, they were going to take advantage of it. 23 states and growing And, uh, in a lot of these states already had pretty low unemployment rates Nebraska, New Hampshire, South Dakota and Utah all below 3%. That is really low in each of those states here with the numbers 51283605 93 us His house is going to be voting on a couple of measures today. One says that U S citizens who had family members killed by covert 19 could sue China. Violent lawsuit against China. The other one says that when the U. S government finishes its investigations in all of this, the president will release all the details. On the investigation. Remember, he announced that this week so they got two things they're considering well, and they also want one of their commissions to be the ones that look into this. What? What? Why do they think we have to have a commission for everything? When there's already people looking into these things? I just I don't understand that part of it, but yes, the bill about Allowing for these families to sue China is what really caught my attention here just in the sense of How would they be able to do how? How would Family go about doing that. And would they be backed by the United States? If they were you know what I mean? Like they filed the lawsuit with the United States helped them. Do whatever it is to actually bring this to court and get China to pay. I doubt it. No. So it looks good. I wouldn't say so. It's just a name on Lee. Yeah. Now I know they did the same thing regarding Saudi Arabia. For 9 11. Off the top of my head. I can't remember if anybody successfully sued and got some money out of the Saudis. I don't think anybody's going to get a penny out of China. But I do keep thinking about Thies. Reports of Dr Fauci was sending money to the lab in Wuhan for research and I can just imagine a clever lawyer going after that and going after him. Going after the U. S government out for a lot of money. Okay? Yeah, I could see that happening. Ted Cruz says he's now very firmly convinced that it did get out of one of the labs in Wuhan. We know the Chinese government was directly culpable for the cover up for silencing the initial outbreak. You look at the heroic Chinese whistle blowers, doctors, journalists who at the very beginning, this pandemic spoke out and the Chinese government arrested them. They disappeared them, They silenced them. And that played a major role in the spread of this pandemic globally. Now, remember, I think it was his latest Tuesday that Biden spokesperson Jen Psaki was saying. The U. S government has no interest in investigating the origin of the virus. We're going to leave it up to the World Health Organization and about face within 24 hours on that, when part of it to do with China, telling the W H O We're not cooperating with anything you do. You're not getting a second chance at us, right? And now there's a story today in The New York Times. Why the about face by Biden on this so quickly this week. And they're saying the reason is that Biden has just learned that there is some information that has not been examined yet that needs to be examined about this outbreak of the Corona virus. She spend sitting around the U. S government has it. It hasn't really been reviewed and fully examined. So that's why he announced the investigation. Okay? What? Who collected that information. How come it wasn't examined whose hands hasn't been in this whole time where they were sitting on them? That I would like answers to that, too. It's not like this is May of 2020, and we've only been in this a few months. What the heck, It's only the biggest story in the world. Yeah, the number one story three million dead trillions down the drain and worldwide economies are the Statesman is reporting this morning that the community court downtown here in Austin is very worried about getting overwhelmed with the homeless. Win. And if Austin police ever start giving out tickets for illegal camping, they've got about 20 people on their staff. They've been in business a few years. Most of the people they see an interact with are the homeless and before the city Council told the police to back off on handing out tickets for illegal camping. They were pretty busy with the homeless in this community courts. Yes, 70% of their docket was made up of the homeless individuals, So they have every reason to fear they're going to be overwhelmed. Because they already are with the situation which to me just begs the question. 70% of what you're dealing with on the docket already, or having to do with homeless your goal or what you state. Your goal is is to, um Get those people connected with services instead of the fine or whatever. Well, how's that going? Because we still have a huge homeless problem. You're backlogged on it. This is going to be something else. How is that going? And by that? We mean how many are off the drugs or the booze and now have jobs. There's much more to cover. We'll get to it coming up 2 to 4 live in local with Mister Ed Clements..

Jed Kolko World Health Organization Chris Ted Cruz Jen Psaki Wuhan Nebraska South Dakota New Hampshire April Austin 51283605 93 Tuesday 70% 51283605 91 Lee Utah Fauci May of 2020 Biden
Retailers Try to Hire Tens of Thousands of Workers

All Things Considered

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Retailers Try to Hire Tens of Thousands of Workers

"We're looking for a big jump in retail sales as consumers who got him cashed those $1400 virus relief checks. High retail sales, of course, could mean will be seeing a whole bunch more retail job openings, which would be a good thing. Dollar general in point of fact. Just announced it's looking to hire up to 20,000 people. Other chains IHOP, Taco Bell and McDonald's among them are on hiring sprees as well. But even with the labor market as loose as it's been retailers or having a hard time finding people marketplaces, Marielle Segarra explains, what's going on. We talked a lot about pent up demand this idea that people will spend more money when they get vaccinated that they'll go to restaurants and buy clothes to wear those restaurants and on vacations. Andy, Challenger, Challenger, Gray and Christmas, says retailers are preparing for this. These employers are clearly anticipating a huge surge in demand through the summer through the end of the year as people start to feel safe. But that doesn't mean potential Retail workers feel safe, Shawn Ashworth AlixPartners says. A lot of people are worried about getting sick and they're asking themselves Do I want to go back into retail and work in an environment with high contact with other employees and customers? Or do I want to consider work from home job? A lot of people who used to work in retail have probably found other jobs at home or not. Jed Kolko is chief economist at indeed, during insured when retail wasn't hiring many people, other sectors were manufacturing, warehousing, driving, jobs, Pharmacy and other help Your lady jobs. One obvious way for retailers to attract workers would be to offer more money. And Andy Challenger says some are giving bonuses. But when you look at like small retailers, small restaurants, those businesses have been under enormous pressure for a year. It's been a really, really difficult environment. It's easier for the big retailers. Mariel Sierra for

Marielle Segarra Ihop Shawn Ashworth Alixpartners Taco Bell Mcdonald Jed Kolko Andy Andy Challenger Mariel Sierra
"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"There are some sectors hiring right now, but not the ones young workers traditionally pursue. Jed Kolko is chief economist for indeed the sectors where hiring his fingers strong our goods related sectors construction driving retail warehouse jobs. These are sectors that are well because they support the state home economy. But they tend to hire fewer college grads, and they don't tend to the sectors that young college grads look at first, and the sectors that are hiring right now, for the most part, are jobs that pay less. We've seen much slower recovery job postings in higher wage sectors, partly because the entire wage sectors are on the one hand. Slower to lay people off, but also in kinds of uncertainty there slower to hire. There's also concerned that some traditional jobs the ones hit hardest by the pandemic. Could go away for good. Richmond. Fed President Tom Barker has been looking at the prospect of some positions disappearing entirely. So I think a lot of these jobs that have been threatened, I think, actually, there's a way to re imagine him that won't keep everyone of the job but actually may retain more than we've got right now. I know that you have kids who fit within this cohort. What would your recommendation be to someone of in this age group who was looking to retrain themselves some capacity? What skills are most in demand right now? They could give him best chance to say you have an interest in affinity for technology. Those skills are very much in demand, and certainly everything looks like that will continue to be in demand. I'd also say skilled trades be working around the house fixing cars. Any of those if you have that kind of affinity, That's another place that for sure we have needs now, and I think we will in the future and then the third place that point to his health care. Certainly this pandemic is pointed that out home health is a great example of a place that's likely to grow as nursing homes have challenged to getting into those fields. They're seeing similar trends at the University of Massachusetts, along with a pickup in recruitment for internships. Cheryl Brooks runs career and professional development at the school were seeing a big boost that in just the last couple of weeks in internships and co ops, what we called build experience, which makes sense for when these positions they're looking at for the spring, actually, spring coop positions or summer. S o. You know, employers? Do you realize that they need to continue to look at future hiring and to keep creating that pool of candidates for the pipeline for the future? But even so some parts of the workforce may need to retrain in an effort to move across industries. That's where the government could play a bigger role, according to former Labor Department chief economist Betsey Stevenson, We will have sexual redid realignments. We will have some industries that don't come back and we'll have other industries that grow and you can't think. Well, the companies that you know, cos they're going to provide this training. I think this is really about getting people to move across industries when we're trying to get people to switch their skills from one industry to another. That's when we need government trading. It's not about individual company offering some training that's really about government offering training programs that help people align the skills that they have with the skills that employers are currently seeking in the labor market. On that front, Younger workers may have a leg up. The prospect of retraining is much more palpable to someone in their early twenties than it is to those who've built up a decade or two of experience. Stevenson says generations he may also have another advantage. They are the least likely not immune, but the least likely to develop the worst parts of covert or to develop a very severe case, and I am seeing some young people actually being able to step into opportunities that are being hidden by older people stepping out of the labor force. So if you want to find the one tiny silver lining, it's that, But I would say that's a pretty small silver lining. Some also point to remote and virtual work as a possible advantage for young workers. Since they're likely more tech savvy than their older counterparts. But according to Jed Kolko it indeed the drawbacks for college grads far outweigh the benefits. We won't work can often be very productive for people who already have relationships. You already know how the organization's work on bond who already have really strong professional networks. I think what work is much harder. For younger people who maybe knew the hired or don't have the same professional networks as people who are later in your career, So I think they shift remote work. While it has lots of advantages, opening about communities, people who might not live where certain kinds of jobs are, it can offer flexibility. Lots of people who have lots of responsibilities outside of work. But I do think it creates challenges for younger people who might not know their organizational culture or have the same kinds of networks as older workers have. 2020 hasn't just been the year of the pandemic. It's also been a year of intense social activism and racial unrest. And for some that's changing career decisions. Earlier, we told you how undergraduate enrollment was falling at most colleges,.

Jed Kolko chief economist Betsey Stevenson Tom Barker Richmond Cheryl Brooks Labor Department President University of Massachusetts
"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"11 30. Now. Global News update. Customs and Border protection, says nearly 1000 Children entering the country illegally were apprehended at the southern border recently. That brings the total number of illegal miners caught. Nearly 10,000 since September, President Trump says he will leave the White House that the electoral College declares President elect Joe Biden the winner. The president says, If that happens, it means they've made a mistake. President Trump is thanking troops for their service. He made his traditional Thanksgiving called to service members stationed around the world. The search is over for Johnny Depp's replacement in the next fantastic beasts movie, Danish actor Mads Michaelson will take on the role of the villain. Re casting comes weeks after death was asked to leave the Harry Potter prequel. Syriza's I Smelt in Norway reveals ancient artifacts used by reindeer hunters thousands of years ago. That's the latest I'm Cameron Fairchild. Thistle's a Bloomberg radio Special Generation Interrupted. I'm Lisa Abramowitz, Theo Corona virus pandemic and in swinger session has had an outsized impact on Generation Z. Young people have had their education disrupted career plans upended and financial prospects diminished. Studies show generations that come of age during a downturn have lower long term earnings power. It has the potential to impact them and the economy for decades, and the courage shift to a state home economy is complicating the matter. There are some sectors hiring right now, but not the ones young workers traditionally pursue. Jed Kolko is chief economist for indeed the sectors where hiring.

President Trump president Jed Kolko Johnny Depp Mads Michaelson Joe Biden Cameron Fairchild Lisa Abramowitz Harry Potter chief economist Norway Bloomberg White House Thistle Syriza Theo Corona
"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The courage shift to a state home economy is complicating the matter. There are some sectors hiring right now, but not the ones young workers traditionally pursue. Jed Kolko is chief economist for indeed the sectors where hiring his finger strong our goods related sectors construction. Driving retail warehouse jobs. These air sectors that are doing well because they support the state home economy, But they tend to hire fewer college grads, and they don't tend to the sectors that young college grads look at first, and the sectors that are hiring right now, for the most part, are jobs that pay less. We've seen much slow recovery in job of things in higher wage sectors. Partly because those higher wage sectors are on the one hand slower to lay people off, but also in times of uncertainty there slower the higher there's also concerned that some traditional jobs the ones hit hardest by the pandemic. Could go away for good. Richmond. Fed President Tom Barker has been looking at the prospect of some positions disappearing entirely. So I think a lot of these jobs that have been threatened, I think, actually, there's a way to re imagine him that won't keep everyone of the job but actually made retain more than we've got right now. I know that you have kids who fit within this cohort. What would your recommendation be to someone of in this age group who was looking to retrain themselves some capacity? What skills are most in demand right now? They could give him best chance to say you have an interest in affinity for technology. Those skills are very much in demand, and certainly everything looks like that will continue to be in demand. I'd also say, skilled trades they working around the house fixing cars. Any of those, If you have that kind of affinity, That's another place that for sure we have needs now, and I think we will in the future and the third place that point to his health care. Certainly this pandemic is pointed that out home health is a great example of a place that's likely to grow as nursing homes have challenged getting into those fields. They're seeing similar trends at the University of Massachusetts, along with a pickup in recruitment for internships. Cheryl Brooks runs career and professional development at the school were seeing a big boost that in just the last couple of weeks in internships and co ops, what we called filled experience, which makes sense for when these positions they're looking at for the spring, actually, spring coop positions or summer. S o. You know, employers to realize that they need to continue to look at future hiring and to keep creating that pool of candidates for the pipeline for the future. But even so, some parts of the workforce may need to retrain in an effort to move across industries. That's where the government could play a bigger role, according to former Labor Department chief economist Betsey Stevenson, We will have sexual redid realignment. We will have some industries that don't come back and we'll have other industries that grow and you can't think. Well, the companies that you know, cos they're going to provide this training. I think this is really about getting people to move across industries, and when we're trying to get people to switch their skills from one industry to another. That's when we need government training. That's not about individual company offering some training. That's really about government's offering training programs that help people align the skills that they have with the skills that employers are currently seeking in the labor market. On that front, Younger workers may have a leg up. The prospect of retraining is much more palpable to someone in their early twenties than it is to those who've built up a decade or two of experience. Stevenson says generations he may also have another advantage. They are the least likely not immune, but the least likely to develop the worst parts of cove in order to develop a very severe case, and I am seeing some young people actually being able to step into opportunities that are being aided by older people stepping out of the labor force. So if you want to find the one tiny silver lining, it's that, But I would say that's a pretty small silver lining. Some also point to remote and virtual work as a possible advantage for young workers. Since they're likely more tech savvy than their older counterparts. But according to Jed Kolko it indeed the drawbacks for college grads far outweigh the benefits. We won't work can often be very productive for people who already have relationships. You already know how the organization's work on D, who already had really strong professional networks. I think what work is much harder for younger people who maybe knew the higher Or don't have the same professional networks as people who are later in your career, So I think they shift remote work. While it has lots of advantages, opening about killing these people who might not live where certain kinds of jobs are. It can offer flexibility for people who have lots of responsibilities outside of work. Why do you think it creates challenges for younger people who might not know their organizational culture or have the same kinds of networks as older workers have 2020 hasn't just been the year of the pandemic. It's also been a year of intense social activism and racial unrest. And for some that's changing career decisions. Earlier, we told you how undergraduate enrollment was falling at most.

Jed Kolko chief economist Betsey Stevenson Tom Barker Richmond Cheryl Brooks Labor Department President University of Massachusetts
"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Are some sectors hiring right now, but not the ones young workers traditionally pursue. Jed Kolko is chief economist for indeed the sectors where hiring his fingers strong our goods related sectors construction driving retail warehouse jobs. These are sectors that are doing well because they support the state home economy. But they tend to hire fewer college grads, and they don't tend to the sectors that young college grads look at first, and the sectors that are hiring right now, for the most part, are jobs that pay less. We've seen much slower recovery job postings in higher wage sectors, partly because the entire wage sectors are on the one hand. Slower to lay people off, but also in kinds of uncertainty there slower, the higher there's also concerned that some traditional jobs the ones hit hardest by the pandemic. Could go away for good. Richmond. Fed President Tom Barker has been looking at the prospect of some positions disappearing entirely. So I think a lot of these jobs that have been threatened, I think, actually, there's a way to re imagine him that won't keep everyone of the job but actually made retain more than we've got right now. I know that you have kids who fit within this cohort. What would your recommendation be to someone of in this age group who was looking to retrain themselves some capacity? What skills are most in demand right now? They could give him the best chance to say you have an interest in affinity for technology. Those skills are very much in demand, and certainly everything looks like that will continue to be in demand. I'd also say skilled trades be working around the house fixing cars. Any of those if you have that kind of affinity, That's another place that for sure we have needs now, and I think we will in the future and the third place that point to his health care. Certainly this pandemic is pointed that out home health is a great example of a place that's likely to grow as nursing homes have challenged to getting into those fields. They're seeing similar trends at the University of Massachusetts, along with a pickup in recruitment for internships. Cheryl Brooks runs career and professional development at the school were seeing a big boost that in just the last couple of weeks in internships and co ops, what we called filled experience, which makes sense for when these positions they're looking at for the spring, actually, spring coop positions or summer. S o. You know, employers? Do you realize that they need to continue to look at future hiring and to keep creating that pool of candidates for the pipeline for the future? But even so some parts of the workforce may need to retrain in an effort to move across industries. That's where the government could play a bigger role, according to former Labor Department chief economist Betsey Stevenson, We will have sexual redid realignments. We will have some industries that don't come back and we'll have other industries that grow and you can't think. Well, the companies that you know, cos they're going to provide this training. I think this is really about getting people to move across industries when we're trying to get people to switch their skills from one industry to another. That's when we need government training. That's not about you know, individual company offering some training that's really about government offering training programs that help people align the skills that they have with the skills that employers are currently seeking in the labor market. On that front, Younger workers may have a leg up. The prospect of retraining is much more palpable to someone in their early twenties that it is to those who've built up a decade or two of experience. Stevenson says generations he may also have another advantage. They are the least likely not immune, but the least likely to develop the worst parts of covert or to develop a very severe case, and I am seeing some young people actually being able to step into opportunities that are being hidden by older people stepping out of the labor force. So if you want to find the one tiny silver lining into that, But I would say that's a pretty small silver lining. Some also point to remote and virtual work as a possible advantage for young workers. Since they're likely more tech savvy than their older counterparts. But according to Jed Kolko, it indeed the drawbacks for college grads far outweigh the benefits. We won't work can often be very productive for people who already have relationships. You already know how the organization's work on D, who already had really strong professional networks. I think what work is much harder. For younger people who maybe knew we hired or don't have the same professional networks as people who are later in their career, So I think they shift to remote work. While it has lots of advantages, opening about opportunities, people who might not live where certain kinds of jobs are. It can offer flexibility. Lots of people who have lots of responsibilities outside of work. But I do think it creates challenges for younger people who might not know their organizational culture or have the same kinds of networks has older workers have 2020 hasn't just been the year of the pandemic. It's also been a year of intense social activism and racial unrest. And for some that's changing career decisions. Earlier, we told you how undergraduate enrollment was falling at most colleges, but it's gaining.

Jed Kolko chief economist Betsey Stevenson Tom Barker Richmond Cheryl Brooks Labor Department President University of Massachusetts
"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Again recapping equities, hire off session highs with the S and P up now by 11 again there of 4/10 of 1%. Final trading day off the quarter. I'm Charlie Telepaths, a Bloomberg business Flash. All right, Charlie. Thank you so much. Well, let's hear another installment from our colleague Lisa Prom, which she's got a special coming up. It's going to start airing later this week. It's called generation Interrupted all about The youngest members of the workforce. How they have been damaged and damage. Maybe in a long term way by the Corona virus pandemic. Check it out. The recovery in the labor market has been slow. You see it in the jobs numbers and also in data on jobs, Post IX. I spoke with Jed Kolko, chief economist for the job listing sight. Indeed, we see in terms of John Post things that they're down almost 20% compared to where they were last year, especially in a lot of sectors where young people, especially young graduates often look for their first jobs. College graduates tend to gravitate to positions and industries like tech or finance. That's where Jed Kolko, seeing some of the biggest downward trends are also down significantly in jobs like marketing in accounting. These air sectors that college grads often look to for their first job, and those are sectors were hard and really has slowed the sectors where hiring his fingers strong our goods related sectors construction. Driving retail warehouse jobs because they support the state home economy, But they tend to hire fewer college grads, and they don't tend to be the sectors that young college grads look at first and for college grads. Those jobs also tend to pay less. There is a silver lining, though, for those outside of metro areas like New York, indeed, seeing an increase in big city companies that are considering remote workers to fill positions. At the same time, Koko says, it could be harder for college grads to move up in the ranks without the benefit of office culture or face time. With the higher ups. They shift work has lots of advantages, opening up opportunities for people who might not live where certain kinds of jobs are taken off for flexibility. For people who have lots of responsibilities outside of work. But I do think it creates challenges for younger people who might not know their organizational culture or have the same kinds of networks as older workers have. And even if remote working phase in some of the biggest cities, it looks like offices won't be as full as they were before the pandemic. Data from indeed Shou San Francisco, New York, Boston and Washington, D. C. Near the top of the list for cities with the largest decline and job listings from the same time last year for more on the pandemics. Impact on young workers joined me on Friday at 7 P.m., eastern for a Bloomberg television Special report. Generation interrupted. And tune in tomorrow at the same time for part four of our Bloomberg Radio Siri's in New York on Lisa Abramowitz Bloomberg Radio. All right, and looking forward to hearing more from Lisa in the coming days. And that big special that is airing on Friday evening and throughout the weekend on Bloomberg television, and, you know, I mean, I think it is of a piece with a lot of the things we've been talking about on this show. Interesting to catch up with Connor San. I keep going back, and she was nice enough to tweet. The interview that we did yesterday. Ali Wolf, not the chief economist at my research, because she foretold a little bit of what we might hear. Even amidst all the Sturm and Drang of that debate yesterday about K shaped recovery and you did here if you were able to listen amid all the shouting and interrupting, Um former Vice President Biden Talking about, you know, he mentioned the stats several times about how much money billionaires have accrued over the course of the pandemic. And then in what I think, and I think a lot of people think was one of the most effective moves he made over the course of the debate. He looked right into the camera based said. How's it feeling for you if you're sitting around your kitchen table? Is this economy working for you? And that is the notion of the case shaped recovery. And I love what Michael McKee delineated with us at the top of the show This notion of like, talk about the the talk about the W That's really about the speed of the recovery. K is much more about the who, and and really Thie way that this economy is recovering and recovering unevenly, and it's also I think are deeper, systemic problems. It's not a new thing, but it's definitely been exaggerated. And I don't think we had put a letter on it or really thought about it right. We talked about Income gaps that we went toe wealth gaps right, But it really tells a very clear story about thes, deeper financial problems rooted in our economy and about some people. A smaller percentage of our population doing Really, really well and better better. It seems like each year and then the majority who are not and the better and better, I think is the interesting thing and again. I feel like I at least believe bring the K a little bit, But I think it's really important this idea that it's not a steady you know, the upward part of Kate really is going upwards. People are doing better. It's not just there like Hang on to what they got. You look at people's fora. One case they're based on the stock market. The and stock market's done pretty well, especially if you look at it over the last year to date, and certainly over the last four months, and I keep thinking that statistic that we said during the pandemic that most people don't have, like three or $400 Just decide that if there they've got a problem With the car. What? What have you They don't have the money to fix it. That says a lot. All right, let's head down to Washington now and.

Bloomberg New York Jed Kolko chief economist Charlie Telepaths Lisa Prom Michael McKee Lisa Lisa Abramowitz Koko Connor San John Washington Ali Wolf Vice President Thie
"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The Corona virus pandemic is a public health crisis. And an economic crisis felt by millions across the country. But the pain hasn't been distributed equally. The youngest members of the workforce have borne the brunt of the fallout and could face permanent damage. It's the subject of a Bloomberg television Special Report airing this week. Generation interrupted, hosted by Lisa Abramowitz and Lisa joins us Now, with the third installment of a five part Bloomberg Radio series on the matter, Lisa Nathan. The recovery in the labor market has been slow. You see it in the jobs numbers and also in data on jobs postings. I spoke with Jed Kolko, chief economist for the job listing sight indeed. We see in terms of job postings that they're down almost 20% to where they were last year, especially in a lot of the sectors where young people, especially young graduates often look for their first jobs. College graduates tend to gravitate to positions and industries like tech or finance. And that's where Jed Kolko seeing some of the biggest downward trends. Girls sit down significantly in shop like marketing in accounting. These air sectors that college grads often look to for their first job, and those are sectors were hard really has slowed the sectors where hiring his fingers strong our goods related sectors construction, driving retail warehouse jobs because they support the state home economy. But they tend to hire fewer college grads, and they don't tend to be the sectors that young college grads look at first and for college grads. Those jobs also tend to pay less. There is a silver lining, though, for those outside of metro areas like New York, indeed, seeing an increase in big city companies that are considering remote workers to fill positions. At the same time, Koko says it could be harder for college grads to move up in the ranks without the benefit of office culture or face time. With their higher ups. They shift work has lots of advantages. Opening up our attorneys, people who might not live where certain kinds of jobs are. They can offer flexibility for people who have lots of responsibilities outside of work. But I do think it creates challenges for younger people who might not know their organizational culture or have the same kinds of networks as older workers have. And even if remote working phase in some of the biggest cities, it looks like offices won't be as full as they were before the pandemic data from indeed Shou San Francisco, New York, Boston and Washington, D. C near the top of the list for cities with the largest decline and jobless things from the same time last year. For more on the pandemics. Impact on young workers joined me on Friday at 7 P.m. eastern for a Bloomberg television Special report. Generation interrupted and tune in tomorrow at the same time for part four of our Bloomberg Radio Siri's in New York on Lisa Abramowitz Bloomberg Radio. Nikolay says some other stories we're following this morning a major takeover in the gambling industry. Caesar's entertainment has agreed to by Britain's William Hill for $3.7 billion. Shares of Micron Technology are down nearly 5% in early trading. The largest U. S chip maker says it has now halted shipments to China SWAT away its biggest customer. Micron also cut capital spending plans warned about weaker demand forecast possible oversupply. American and United Airlines are among seven carriers taking federal loans to help stay afloat. Those loans Air captain $7.5 billion. Each company's accepting loans are required to put.

Bloomberg Jed Kolko Lisa Abramowitz New York Bloomberg Radio Koko San Francisco Lisa Nathan Micron chief economist Lisa United Airlines China Caesar Nikolay
"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"It doesn't matter who was against you. Just I'm just happy that I'm here brought in the Lakers come in as the heavy favorites, the NFL says As of now, Sunday's game between the Steelers and tightens and Nashville is on three Tennessee players and five staff members. Tested positive for Koba Jets and Bronco's plate tomorrow night at MetLife. Both teams are on three odds makers can't decide who's worse. It's a pick up point spread, the Denver quarterback will be Brett ripping. It'll be his first NFL star John Special Bluebird Sports. Alright, John. Thank you. It is 5 37 on Wall Street. The Corona virus pandemic is a public health crisis and an economic crisis felt by millions across the country, But the pain has not been distributed equally. The youngest members of the workforce have borne the brunt of the fallout and could face permanent damage. It's the subject of a Bloomberg television Special report airing this week. It's called Generation Interrupted, and it's hosted by Lisa Abramowitz. Lisa joins us Now, with the third installment of a five part Bloomberg Radio. Siri's on the matter of Lisa. Nathan, the recovering the labor market has been slow. You see it in the jobs numbers and also in data on jobs, Post IX. I spoke with Jed Kolko, chief economist for the job listing sight. Indeed, we see in terms of job postings that they're down almost 20% compared to where they were last year, especially in a lot of the sectors where young people, especially young graduates often look for their first jobs. College graduates tend to gravitate to positions and industries like tech or finance. That's where Jed Kolko, seeing some of the biggest downward trends are also down significantly in jobs like marketing in accounting. These air sectors that college grads often look to for their first job, and those are sectors were hard really has slowed the sectors where hiring his meager strong our goods related sectors construction driving retail warehouse jobs because they support the state home economy. But they tend to hire fewer college grads, and they don't tend to be the sectors that young college grads look at first and for college grads. Those jobs also tend to pay less. There is a silver lining, though, for those outside of metro areas like New York, indeed, seeing an increase in big city companies that are considering remote workers to fill positions. At the same time, Koko says it could be harder for college grads to move up in the ranks without the benefit of office culture or face time. With their higher ups. They shift work has lots of advantages opening about these people who might not live where certain kinds of jobs are. They can offer flexibility for people who have lots of responsibilities outside of work. But I do think it creates challenges for younger people who might not know their organizational culture or have the same kinds of networks as older workers have. And even if remote working phase in some of the biggest cities, it looks like offices won't be as full as they were before the pandemic data from indeed Shou San Francisco, New York, Boston and Washington, D. C near the top of the list for cities with the largest decline and jobless things from the same time last year. For more on the pandemics. Impact on young workers joined me on Friday at 7 P.m. Eastern for a Bloomberg television Special report. Generation interrupted and tune in tomorrow at the same time for part four of our Bloomberg Radio Siri's in New York on Lisa Abramowitz. Bloomberg Radio. All right, Lisa, thank you some other stories we're following this morning. American and United Airlines are among seven carriers taking federal loans help stay afloat. Those loans Air Captain $7.5 billion..

Bloomberg Lisa Abramowitz Jed Kolko New York NFL Koko Koba Jets MetLife Lakers Steelers Nashville Siri San Francisco Brett John chief economist Tennessee Nathan United Airlines
"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You're looking at bigger implications of technology, playing a role in keeping us all connected. Giving us access to information or goods very quickly, So we don't see any of those trans changing. In fact, they're likely to accelerate. There's some new things that have come along know that people might find useful like tele medicine. There were sceptics about that, and I think the more people using, especially the more doctors, they're using it today. The more they're liking it. You can see more patients that can be more effective. That might actually be a better solution here. More peach and perspectives at p jem dot com That's PG i m dot com partner with PGE in investment management business of Prudential. These statements are not intended to be investment advice and should not be used as the basis for any investment decisions. This is a Bloomberg money minute with record unemployment and millions of Americans out of work. The job market is looking a lot different these days. Jed Kolko, chief economist at the job Search engine, indeed says the biggest change is that companies aren't hiring as aggressively as in the past. Job postings are down by more than 20% relative to the trend last year, and it's even worse in some industries like hospitality and tourism, where postings are down 50% or more. He's seeing the biggest increases in employers that were shut down during the pandemic, but have since reopen beauty and wellness jobs like hair salon, lots of retail jobs. But Coco says what's most concerning is a drop in postings in businesses like technology and finance those sectors that aren't his volatile those air sectors with the hiring depends Mohr on what companies expect. The economy is going to look like a year or two from now, and that's a red flag. Overall, he says. The job market is rebounding from its worst point in early May. Jill Schneider Bloomberg radio. Elite advisory firms rely on being melons Pershing to meet the needs of.

Mohr Bloomberg Jed Kolko Jill Schneider Prudential Pershing PGE chief economist partner Coco
"jed kolko" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"And trouble breathing. His doctor tells us his condition worsened overnight and despite being on a ventilator, his heart was failing. Now, doctors do say is rare and can be detected early if parents recognize the symptoms. Those symptoms include abdominal pain, Redskin or skin, rash, fever, red eyes and headaches. The own Lissa peers to disproportionately affect Children of color, as well as Children considered obese. U Mass. Amherst is investigating Holyoke Mayor Alex Morse. Morse, also a congressional candidate over allegations of inappropriate conduct. Morris, who's running to replace US Rep. Richard Neil, has allegations that Morse used his position to foster inappropriate relationships with students. Over the course of several years. The student activist notified the 31 year old Holyoke mayor and his campaign manager, that Morse is no longer welcome at events held by the College Democrats of Massachusetts. U Mass Amherst Democrats and amorous College Democrats. The allegations were first reported on Friday by the Massachusetts Daily Collegian. Morris allegedly used dating APS to regularly match with college students and use college Democrats events to add students to his instagram account and then contact them directly. It's 3 37 we check on Bloomberg business. With record unemployment and millions of Americans out of work. The job market is looking a lot different these days. Jed Kolko, chief economist at the job Search engine, indeed says the biggest change is that companies aren't hiring as aggressively as in the past. Job postings are down by more than 20% relative to the trend last year, and it's even worse in some industries like hospitality and tourism, where postings are down 50% arm or he's seeing the biggest increases in employers that were shut down during the pandemic. But Since reopened beauty and wellness jobs like hair salon, lots of retail jobs. But Coco says what's most concerning is a drop in postings in businesses like technology and finance those air sectors that his volatile those air sectors with the hiring depends Mohr on what companies expect. The economy is going to look like a year or two from now and adapt a red flag. Overall, he says, the job market is rebounding from its worst point in early May. I'm Jill Schneider Bloomberg Business on W. B Z Boston's news radio before you start sharing news read about on Facebook, compared to what you hear from reporters. You can trust your only a smart as your source on W. B. Z Boston's news radio Arang ID tags. They're beautiful, playful and majestic..

Mayor Alex Morse College Democrats Morris Holyoke Boston Massachusetts Daily Collegian Amherst abdominal pain Bloomberg Mohr Bloomberg Business Lissa Jed Kolko Massachusetts Rep. Richard Neil Jill Schneider US Facebook
"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is a Bloomberg money minute, with record unemployment and millions of Americans out of work. The job market is looking a lot different these days. Jed Kolko, chief economist at the job Search engine, indeed says the biggest change is that companies aren't hiring as aggressively as in the past. Job postings are down by more than 20% relative to the trend last year, and it's even worse in some industries like hospitality and tourism, where postings are down 50% or more. He's seeing the biggest increases in employers that were Shut down during the pandemic, but have since reopened beauty and wellness jobs like hair salon, lots of retail jobs. But Coco says what's most concerning is a drop in postings in businesses like technology and finance those air sectors that aren't his volatile those air sectors with the hiring depends Mohr on what companies expect. The economy is gonna look like a year or two from now, and that's a red flag. Over all, he says. The job market is rebounding from its worst point in early May. Phil Schneider Bloomberg Radio. I've always wanted to learn another language. But every time I try, it never sticks. So I decided to give babble a try, and I really like the teaching method of the APP. I started with the beginner lesson on babble, and it starts with simple words and phrases. And soon you're putting those words into a conversation. Each lesson takes about 10 to 15 minutes, and they're all really different, which keeps things interesting. The APP is really smart. It actually keeps track of the words I'm struggling with so I can practice them and get better. I chose babble because it was created by Rhea language teachers. They built it around their life. How people actually communicate and what they care about..

Mohr Bloomberg Jed Kolko chief economist Phil Schneider Coco
"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We now wanna bring in Jed Kolko, who is chief economist at indeed, which is a search engine for job listings. And Jed. We've talked to several times in the past about the labor market, and we'll get to that. But I want you to weigh in here first on one of the issues that pervades the policy discussions over whether to continue the enhanced jobless benefits. At issue is whether we continue to give people $600 a week or less. And given the environment were in where people can't work because of Cove in 19. There's this thinking that the additional $600 a week keeps people from seeking work because they get paid more being on the Dole then if they were working You have a PhD in economics is that the case is that something that Disincentivize is people from working? Is that what we're seeing now? I would argue that there are not a lot of jobs available right now. It's the virus that's keeping people from working. Are like good to talk to you again. I think the main thing holding back the job market right now is that there's not enough jobs and not enough hiring. We see on our sight indeed. That job postings are down by more than 20% relative to the trend last year on and lots of industries they're down by much more than that, down by half in hospitality and tourism if there aren't enough jobs That are hiring then the main concern shouldn't be whether thie unemployment benefits might be discouraging people from working people want to work. If their health insurance depends on it in a pandemic. People definitely want to work, so the biggest issue is the lack of demand, not Ah, ah workers being unwilling to go back to work. So, Jen tell us more about what you're seeing through the data because one of the reasons we love talking to you is exactly what you alluded to, which is you have a window into the hiring environment, and so many of the lever is being pulled or not that few do so tell us more. What you're learning. So we track very closely What's happening with job postings on our site. We see the vast majority of job posting. Um, dinner up from lots of different sources. There are some industries where hiring it's fallen with a little rebound, so hospitality and tourism, of course, the hardest sector. There are some sectors, though. That's a huge decline right away, but have rebounded the types of businesses that you shut down and then reopened so beauty and wellness jobs like hair salon. Lots of retail jobs have seen a rebound in hiring, but most concerning is that there are other sectors that were not the ones shut down by the virus. Tech finance the types of jobs that typically can be done from home Indo sectors. Job postings are down by more than 1/3 still Those air sectors that aren't his volatile those air sectors with the hiring depends Mohr on what companies expect. The economy is gonna look like a year or two from now and adapts a red flag in the labor market today. And those air high income jobs as well. I wonder when you look at job postings, Things were looking pretty good from May until about early June. And then since then, we've seen this wave of infection sweep across the nation, certainly, parts of the south and parts of the West. Have we seen postings move as a result of this latest wave. Overall job posting to being gradually improving from its worst point in early May. But the mix of jobs has changed a bit in the past few weeks. That types of jobs that have really driven that increasing job postings are some of the virus related sectors. So we've seen an increase in jobs in pharmacy medical technicians in nursing a CZ well as insurance, probably lots of insurance claims. That will need to be dealt with a swell cleaning and sanitation job. There are other kinds of jobs, so we haven't seen much improvement in the past few weeks. The trend is flat or even down in a lot of office jobs like legal help, desk, accounting and marketing. And Jed as we look across this sort of Serge, we don't even think it's a second wave at this point that still may be coming. And as you look across geography is Are you seeing the effect of essentially re shutdowns yet? Or is that still to come in terms of the labor market? Good question. Yes. So we are starting to see the trend in job postings, weakening a bit in the types of metro that saw that experience to search this summer. Notably job postings in Miami started back sliding in the past couple of weeks. In most places, though we have seen improvement, especially in smaller places, smaller tones small metro areas, they've seen a bigger rebound. In job postings, then some of the larger metro areas where more people can work from home, one of the big differences across places that in the types of Metro's where people can work from home. They are not going to restaurants. They're not shopping and so in some of those expensive tech hubs finance centers in those places like New York and San Francisco. That's where retail job and restaurant jobs are suffering because their customers aren't out in about Yeah, ableto work from home. Right? That's so interesting. Yeah, these knock on economic effects in labor effects are really fascinating and candidly troubling when we really break it down. Thank you. So much for your insights. We really appreciate Jed Kolko. Chief economist for indie, joining us on the phone from San Francisco. And I think about this a lot of scarlet. I mean, you know, you and I are fortunate to live in very nice towns in the New York suburbs and work in New York City. We've both seen. I think our own lives and behaviors of those around us dramatically changed like where we shop when we shop and how much we spend everyone's lives has been disrupted by this by this virus and I wonder a swell with the job market. Being the weight is typically people tend to go back to school in this kind of environment, right? They get another degree. They can afford it or they take out loans for that. We have no idea what school look like. So what does that mean? In this instance? You don't have a job. You would want to go back to school. You're not going to go back to school because the remote What do you do? Yeah, I know. I know. And the knock on effects of all of that, even though not going back to school, and you think about these college towns and everything else, all right, much more to come here. Let's head down to Washington..

Jed Kolko chief economist New York City Metro San Francisco Dole Disincentivize Jen Mohr Washington Miami Serge
"jed kolko" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Traffic and weather news radio seven hundred W. L. Cincinnati what will the jobs report look like later today this is the twelve o'clock report yes welcome to Friday may eighth I'm rob carpenter breaking now the US is bracing for Friday's jobs report covering the unemployment numbers from April when job losses from the corona virus outbreak swept the country unemployment could hit near twenty percent nearing the levels of the Great Depression some experts predict the unemployment rate could jump into the teens maybe above twenty percent but Jed Kolko chief economist with job search site indeed expect some of those jobs will come back once we put the pandemic behind us we should be a partial rebound into the mug shot down factors the question is how long this acute phase of the crisis goes on he says the job postings on indeed are down forty percent from last year at this time Ribeiro ABC news Chicago as for the latest cove in nineteen numbers three point eight million infections today worldwide in two hundred sixty nine thousand deaths the numbers in the US one point two million people infected seventy five thousand deaths but close to two hundred thousand people have recovered I'm Derek Dennis ABC news meanwhile more than sixty thousand Ohioans filing unemployment claims last week the department of jobs and family services saying more than one point one million state residents fought for benefits in the past several weeks that's more people in that time period in the past three years combine the states sending out one point nine billion with a B. dollars in payments in that time period latest traffic and weather together to start your Friday such a great board sleep logos southbound seventy one seventy five just north of the split in northern Kentucky other than that slow down freeways are doing very well now the latest forecast from the advanced dentistry weather center during this challenging time advanced dentistry would like to say thank you to all the health care workers and folks on the front lines out there you are appreciated in the forecast warning rate with a low temperature of forty nine degrees and the rest of our Friday rain continues temperatures falling to the mid forties by the afternoon at night rain.

Cincinnati rob carpenter US chief economist Kentucky Jed Kolko Ribeiro Chicago Derek Dennis ABC
"jed kolko" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"ABC news I'm Terry all the over three million Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week tomorrow the government's April jobs report will be released and it's expected to be historic some experts predict the unemployment rate could jump into the teens maybe above twenty percent but Jed Kolko chief economist with job search site indeed expect some of those jobs will come back once we put the pandemic behind us he a powerful rebound in some of the most shut down factors the big question is how long this exchange street this crisis goes on he says the job postings on indeed are down forty percent from last year at this time Bryan Burrough ABC news Chicago Michigan governor Gretchen Whitmer extending her states stay at home order until may twenty eighth but will allow manufacturing including auto plans to resume Monday the Texas Supreme Court ordered the release of a Dallas salon owner who was jailed for refusing to keep her business closed frontier airlines will begin temperature screenings for passengers and crew members prior to boarding starting in June the White House says it isn't worried about the risk from a military aide to the president who's tested positive for over nineteen the president and vice president receiving multiple covert nineteen tests they say there's little chance the positive testing military aid infected them I've had very little contact personal contact with this gentleman know who is a good person but I've had very little contact neither the president vice president or their top staffers appear to wear protective masks of the White House Andy field ABC news Washington the justice department is dropping its criminal case against president trump's first national security adviser Michael Flynn very happy for general Flynn.

ABC White House vice president Dallas Michigan Chicago Bryan Burrough Jed Kolko Michael Flynn trump president vice president president Texas Supreme Court Gretchen Whitmer chief economist
"jed kolko" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on KOMO

"Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week tomorrow the government's April jobs report will be released and it's expected to be historical experts predict the unemployment rate could jump into the teens maybe above twenty percent but Jed Kolko chief economist with job search site indeed expect some of those jobs will come back once we put the pandemic behind us we should be a partial rebound into the motion detectors the big question is how long this acute phase of the crisis goes on he says the job postings on indeed are down forty percent from last year at this time Ribeiro ABC news Chicago Michigan governor Gretchen Whitmer extending her states stay at home order until may twenty eighth but will allow manufacturing including auto plans to resume Monday the Texas Supreme Court ordered the release of a Dallas salon owner who was jailed for refusing to keep her business closed frontier airlines will begin temperature screenings for passengers and crew members prior to boarding starting in June the White House says it isn't worried about the risk from a military aide to the president who's tested positive for over nineteen with the president and vice president receiving multiple covert nineteen tests they say there's little chance the positive testing military aid infected them I've had very little contact personal contact with this gentleman know who is a good person but I've had very little contact either the president vice president or their top staffers appear to wear protective masks at the White House Andy field ABC news Washington the justice department is dropping its criminal case against president trump's first national security adviser Michael Flynn very happy for general Flynn he was a a great warrior and he still is a great warrior now in my book is an even greater warriors landed midi lied to the FBI during Robert Muller's Russia investigation your listening to ABC news stay connected stay informed the como afternoon news it's four.

Robert Muller Russia ABC White House Dallas Michigan Chicago Ribeiro Jed Kolko como afternoon news FBI Michael Flynn trump president vice president president Texas Supreme Court
"jed kolko" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on WGN Radio

"With a high of forty five Saturday mostly sunny becoming breezy again by afternoon not quite as cool with a high of fifty six the Illinois department of public health says while Illinois is flat and the curb of coronavirus cases the state has not reached its peak public health director Dr in goes a Izzy Kay says the state has hit a plateau and they don't know how long that plug plateau Alastor cases could rise again there were two thousand six hundred forty one new coronavirus desk at our new coronavirus cases rather and one hundred thirty eight additional death still no decision from Wisconsin Supreme Court on a lawsuit filed by Republican lawmakers on the democratic governors state at home extension day Republicans sued saying an unelected cabinet secretary doesn't have the authority to do so and the extension is not the will of the people but the assistant Attorney General argued this week in a video conference with the Wisconsin state Supreme Court that lifting the order would result in more deaths last month the conservative majority court ruled against the governor's attempt to stop in person voting on election day Ryan Burr of WGN news more than three million Americans filed new unemployment claims last week Illinois residents made up more than seventy four thousand of those claims Jed Kolko is chief economist at job search site indeed on the job is being much milder and the decline in the hardest hit sectors hospitality and travel childcare argument between but it is still widespread decline he says job postings on indeed are down forty percent from last year at this time tomorrow the unemployment numbers for April will be released the head of the nation's largest pilots union is going to Congress to ask for a government mandate to keep passengers and flight crew safe during the pandemic captain Joe to Pete is the president of the airline pilots association I would like is that correct we need leadership right we need someone to step forward and believe me I believe it's the FAA because you know the regulator to mandate these requirements because he only really way to go it's the only way to restore the confidence in the flying public he says right now there's a patchwork of policies which vary from airline to airline which puts more responsibility pilots flying the planes the FDA is no longer approving facemask made by more than sixty Chinese companies because they don't filter out enough particles from the air instead of stopping ninety five percent they're only getting about twenty percent president trump and the First Lady celebrating national prayer day in the rose garden at the White House today America is engaged in a fierce battle against a very terrible disease in times of challenge are people of always called upon to give to face the power of prayer in the eternal glory of god the president as all Americans to pray for hope healing recovery and renewal during the crisis the annual observance was first marked by president Truman in nineteen fifty two the parades continued under nurses across Chicago the Chicago police department's tenth district out of recession this morning with flashing lights to honor nurses at Mount Sinai hospital Michele Mazza rack is the chief nursing officer.

Amazon plans to retrain 100,000 employees

90.3 KAZU Programming

02:11 min | 3 years ago

Amazon plans to retrain 100,000 employees

"The robots may eventually be coming for all of our job but Amazon's got a plan for its work force the company announced a seven hundred million dollar investment in retraining today it is going to up skill their word definitely not mine about a hundred thousand people a third of its workforce by the year twenty twenty five but here's the catch there's not much of a catch the programs are almost completely free and no commitment all the stadiums on when you're done for more workplace culture desk marketplace making McCarty Karina looks at what Amazon is getting for the money three training programs target employees at all levels of Amazon so already tech savvy workers can expand their skills and automation and non technical workers like the ones in warehouses can gain skills to work with that new tech Jed Kolko chief economist with job search site indeed says the programs help Amazon walk a fine line keeping morale high among current workers in a tight labor market while simultaneously facilitating the technology to replace them in the future working with models and robotics and other automated technologies will surely be in at least as much demand is today Brad her spine an economist at the Upjohn institute for employment research says training an existing employee for a future job can be more cost effective than hiring a new one but that's of the training is actually effective the evidence is somewhat mixed he says retraining programs work best when the teacher broad set of skills in depth that can be adapted to multiple types of jobs rather than narrow technical training because trying to figure out which skills are going to be in demand in the future it is very hard Amazon will also pay ninety five percent of tuition and fees for degrees in high demand fields outside its current business model like nursing and aircraft mechanics Michael's in an analyst at Piper Jaffray says the move makes sense as Amazon is already dipped its toe into new ventures in health care and drone technology to do that the company will need a strong work force that's well versed in whatever the company plans to kind of spread its tentacles into in the future imagine being examined by an Amazon tray nurse and getting an Amazon prescription delivered by an Amazon drone I'm making McCarty Carino for

Amazon Karina Chief Economist Upjohn Institute Michael Analyst Piper Jaffray Mccarty Jed Kolko Brad Seven Hundred Million Dollar Ninety Five Percent
"jed kolko" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:15 min | 3 years ago

"jed kolko" Discussed on KCRW

"And services every single year second of all store all right right now the job market as we learned again last Friday with the June jobs report is strong inflation the latest report on which we got this morning is right in line with where it's been picked up just a tad bit last month but the word from the federal reserve in the person of one Jerome how old board chair speaking for Congress yesterday and today is that by all appearances the fed is going to cut interest rates when it meets in a couple weeks not typical in otherwise fine economic times what we have here as market place's Kimberly Adams explains is an expectations game there's not really a hard and fast set of rules that say when X. happens the fed must cut rates given the current economic conditions Mandy Cheng who teaches economics at the university of Wisconsin Madison says the fed could kind of go either way probably they are erring on the side of of caution and letting the rates drop just because they don't see a big harm coming from it there are early signs of a slowdown but things aren't particularly dire plus the jobs numbers are still pretty solid and inflation is under control if the market weren't expecting a cut it's conceivable that they might err on the side of actually keeping the interest rates at the the current levels but the markets are expecting it and that can create kind of a chicken and egg scenario obviously market upset may not be good for the economy so it's not something that percentage point defeat for short which is too upset expectation Sarah bloom Raskin is a fellow at Duke law school she is also the former deputy secretary at the treasury department and served on the fed board Raskin's confident the fed isn't being overly swayed by the markets the staff is appropriately okay not what the economy may need now and what trajectory is found in the future and that trajectory can look different depending on what data you're looking at Ernie today asking as a policy economist at Evercore ISI before there was like a balance of risks on both the upside and the downside now there seem to be more downside risks Teske figures the fed can go ahead with the rate cut basically as an insurance policy just in case things start to go south in Washington I'm Kimberly Adams for market place the robots may eventually be coming for all of our jobs but Amazon's got a plan for its work force the company announced a seven hundred million dollar investment in retraining today it is going to up skill their word definitely not mine about a hundred thousand people a third of its workforce by the year twenty twenty five here's the catch there's not much of a catch the programs are almost completely free and no commitment all the stadiums on when you're done for more workplace culture desk marketplace making McCarty Karina looks at what Amazon is getting for the money three training programs target employees at all levels of Amazon so already tech savvy workers can expand their skills and automation and non technical workers like the ones in warehouses can gain skills to work with that new tack Jed Kolko chief economist with job search site indeed says the programs help Amazon walk a fine line keeping morale high among current workers in a tight labor market while simultaneously facilitating the technology to replace them in the future working with models and robotics and other automated technologies will surely be in at least as much demands today Brad her spine an economist at the Upjohn institute for employment research says training an existing employee for a future job can be more cost effective than hiring a new one but that's of the training is actually effective and near the evidence is somewhat mixed he says retraining programs work best when the teacher broad set of skills in depth that can be adapted to multiple types of jobs rather than narrow technical training because trying to figure out which skills are going to be an in demand in the future it is very hard Amazon will also pay ninety five percent of tuition and fees for degrees in high demand fields outside its current business model like nursing and aircraft mechanics Michael's in an analyst at Piper Jaffray says the move makes sense as Amazon is already dipped its toe into new ventures in healthcare and drone technology to do that the company will need a strong work force that's well versed in whatever the company plans to kind of spread its tentacles into in the future imagine being examined by an Amazon tray nurse and getting an Amazon prescription delivered by an Amazon drone I'm making McCarty Carino for market place Wall Street there couple record highs Dow hit twenty seven thousand and you know what that means right means the Dow at twenty seven thousand that five Bucks get yes skim latte extra phone we'll have the details when we do the numbers little bit of a slump in crude oil.

seven hundred million dollar ninety five percent