19 Burst results for "Jeb Blunt"

"jeb blount" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

07:27 min | 8 months ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on Accelerate!

"And in a like times I'm waiting to see what they're gonNa do and I'll just you know I'll end the call and go okay I got my calendar out. Let's go ahead and get the next call scheduled. So with with with inside reps so SDR's for example, they're always going to be almost one hundred percent by phone I mean they're making video prospecting calls may be doing video messaging message. To to connect, but they're there but the phone's been their, you know their primary tool and to that web chats with inbound leads a lot of inside sales. People are having to learn web chat, especially proactive web chat where you're engaging somewhat on the website. Now, like with our Wechat, we can make a phone call right in the web chat. So that's it's a great tool a beautiful. So they're learning they're. Learning those tools and I watch I, watch inside sales reps on chat frees up just like Phil cells do people do on a video call so it's just something they don't understand they get they get petrified on web chat. I watched Silsbee I mean of your take chat alone. That's the place where I see the most terror I. See people just absolutely shutdown on chat and I'm like it's just a conversation. I I was explaining to one of my people who was having a hard time with them like if the phone rang, you be having a conversation. This is just a phone ringing and they're not talking to you. But in any moment, they could push that little video button and they're going to be on with you. So you need to be video ready I think with account executives on the inside though as we start pushing account executives. So my trainers and consultants are working with a lot of companies to get the account executives to start moving more individuals. So so two things a lot of account executive'll do their discovery calls purely on the. And in a lot of cases, they'll do their demos where there's a screen share. So the their customers on essentially a zoom call with them or a video call with them, but they're not on video, right? So they con- executive you never see their face. So teaching them when you when you initiate the call, they can see the full frame you and if you stop. To ask questions, you turn the screen off and you put you back on the videocon right and you put you where it where it makes sense. You put you in a picture in picture and we see the same thing happening where we take account executives who are used to hiding behind the slide, and now they have to get out there they start getting a little bit. You know nut it up in front of the cameras. Well so it's it's just basic human vulnerability and I get it. I. Mean when I first started. This business I ran from the camera, the camera scared me to death and. I was telling him to appreciate a seven keynotes over the last two days where I'm standing in front of audiences to audiences were there were there were more than two thousand people in the audience watching me on video on terrified before I walk in because my my my world is standing on a stage where I can see people and interact with them and when you're looking into the camera making eye contact with the audience, I can't see them or anything like I have no idea of everybody's asleep. So yeah no, it's hard to play off it I. Thought I missed that part too and I'm doing it virtually. Play playoff the YEP so but you have to train yourself and and keep doing it until it gets better so I think that I think one of the biggest things to help salespeople understand if he is dialed it all in is that your customers experience when they're working with youth through the sales process is a more consistent predictor of outcome than any other variable. Yes and a lot. Of companies are really starting to figure this out now, I think that the the the the pandemic has I is depends on the swinging faster than I've ever seen before I had beautiful conversation with the CEO of a big Tech Company and the one thing you were talking about is we got differentiate on emotional things we differentiate on our sauce skills on a relationship and how we sell. All. Right. So I'M GONNA. Stop you because this is something was just ranting about some of the other day. Is, you know in the Echo Chamber of Lincoln is relatively prominent sales thought leader if you will. Says still here's bigmouth. About sales. You have to have relationships are important basically. And I'm like well away this is this is coming up more and more actually it's like, why do people think the? Relationships are unimportant into your point when talking about that the buying experience customer experience with their buying journey as the biggest predictor of success. That's based on human interaction. Yeah, and so. Mean I think people get afraid of this idea that relationships of friendship, which is just complete not be bs as you and I both. If, you're connected with somebody. The definition in the dictionary? Our relationship is the way to or more people are things are connected. Yeah I mean if you're selling somebody your defacto interrelationship. Yes. Well, how can we talk? We put us to bed relationships are part of selling. It's a it's a huge part of selling and I think that the. Let's. Stop and look at one thing. Okay. Let me in every interaction you have with another human being at the either the conscious conscious level. They're asking five questions about you. The other person do I like you listen to me do you make me feel important? Do you get any like? Do you understand me and cannot I trust you and believe you like the in and if you check those questions off. It's very hard for people not to do business with you and. and. So if you think about it that way like that's the relationship and the relationship in on a let's say a one call close inside sales you're going to build a relationship and I. You know we work with companies that your relationship in five minutes and all it is is just do I like you I mean, are you? What did you ask me a question? Did you did you did you are you concerned about what how I feel or what I want and when you offered me a solution? Did you were you nice and if you're really nice I, WanNa buy that I'm going to buy from you but you call somebody if you really want to buy something and the person's a total jerk to you, you're going to go someplace else. So that well, most times. Yeah. Almost all the time. But here's here's the flipside of that relationship thing is explicitly people saying and these are people you and I both know saying you don't need to be likable. To be to be effective salesperson. And you and I both know jerks have done well in sales. But being likable costs you nothing why wouldn't you be if if if you're trying to gain every competitive advantage if every little thing? Why wouldn't you like? Well, let's I. Mean the first of all, there are people who are jerks that are good sales, but they're not jerks or their customers the jerks everybody else because well, because because it's just really simple like people don't always do business with people they like you I mean if you're a glad handing cares matic person and but you're like, you know your as Larry Levin says you're wearing an empty suit like you don't have the goods to back it up. Like you're going to sell something but eventually, people are going to catch on that. You don't really offer anything of value. So yeah, you gotta be valuable to your customer. I mean, you gotta get that piece. But if you're if you're the smartest human being in the world and you're a complete asshole nobody's going to want to work with you and they're not going to buy from you because people buy from people they don't like. So here's the thing about this echo chamber and Lincoln. So the first thing and I'm just going to be call it like it is nobody believes that bullshit except for the people that are saying nobody? Does. So because I, I've got a big company and and.

account executive Wechat SDR Echo Chamber of Lincoln videocon Phil Lincoln Larry Levin executive CEO
"jeb blount" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

06:17 min | 8 months ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on Accelerate!

"Fanatical prospecting and he's the founder and CEO, of sales, gravy. And in this episode I've talked with Jeb about. Well. We're meant to talk about negotiation much as we were talking about negotiation and his excellent book titled Inked The Ultimate Guide to powerful closing negotiation tactics that yes and sealed the deal. While of PARV along story, we're meant to talk about that about twice before when jobs come on the show, but we always get sidetracked by something Elson as as a habit that happened this last time we talked as well. We ended up talking about something else altogether. Win Got into the INS and outs of virtual selling. In particular dig on some of the major elements of jobs latest book titled Virtual Selling, quickstart guide to leveraging video technology and virtual communication channels to engage remote buyers and closed deals fast. And Jeff share some really excellent ideas on how to set yourself up to succeed in the world of virtual selling. So be sure to stick around to because this is another value packed conversation. Forget to Jabot undermined subscribe to this podcast wherever you listen to it, and if you subscribe would certainly appreciate, it could also give us your feedback about how we're doing in the form other review. So thank you. All right. Let's jump into it. Jeb Welcome, back to the show. It's Andy. Has. Awesome to be back. Thank you so much I think you've had me back now in the last one twice in the last three months or four months. So something like that. Yeah. Well, see here's here's the thing. Now you came last time and we're GONNA talk about your book about negotiation, and which are we didn't get to it because it got sidetracked. Risk when we talk and so nominally we're GONNA talk about that book today but. You my friend right books faster than I can read them. Since that time he published yet another book. Which I have to I have not read yet. So we'll sir say that and talk perhaps more in depth about it but but before we get to negotiation let's let's do talk watch book because it's so relevant what's going on? You wrote a book about virtual selling car virtual selling. The shock. How, how'd you come up with that name? I was a long time I worked hard on the shower. That's funny. That's where have all migrate creative thoughts to even bought. One of those pads can right on the rush hour I got one of those two I've never used it. Never. Never. Written on that thing. Why haven't installed mine so you're step ahead of me so. All right. So virtual selling tell let's talk about the bit because we're in the midst. Again politics I haven't had a chance to read the book yet. I always enjoy your folks, but so is virtual selling different than selling face to face in person? Well, it's facsimile of selling face to face and the ideas that we can create the closest facsimile of selling face to face as possible because nobody's going to argue that a face to face communication isn't the best type of human communication is just not always efficient or effective in you know in the moment. So one of the things that I that I'm teaching people as as a concept called blending, which is you take the sales process you map out and this the way is whether you're an inside salesperson field salespeople person and then you start taking a. Look at both your physical communication tools in your in your virtual communication tools, and then you map those into your cells process so that in each step of the sales process, prosser, Microsoft of the sales process process in with the right customer, etc. You're using the right communication channel that gives you the highest probability of getting your desired outcome at the lowest costs of time energy and money. So back to your original question is virtual selling different than than in person selling is still selling, and so the steps are the same and the motions of the same the questions of the same. The way we do things of the same, it's just there are some. especially when it comes to video some things that you need to keep in mind in order to. Deliver a better message to deliver a better experience for your customer and to make sure that you're not skipping steps in the sales process. Was So. Let's get that last part because. Is there a tendency when you're selling virtually? To skip steps or assume that they're steps to be skipped. Yes there is a bad tennessee. So one of the biggest problems that I'm noticing with sales people across the board is that when they're on a virtual call, they are much less likely to ask the next step and let's let's call a virtual call either a phone call or a video call 'cause all virtual. It's just a frightening facsimile being there for some reason, other ones salespeople especially feel sales people who are transitioning from being face to face when they're on those calls they they really struggle with that that close at the end of the call for the next call. And why I don't know why there's something I mean why field salespeople salespeople in general have that issue of why? Why's it more pronounced well, sales people in general I think that you know if you're if you're a inside rep, you have we all have that natural problem. If your inside rep, you're always selling virtually anyway most almost always by the phone. So your cells leaders are coaching you constantly to don't get to the end of the call and not ask, but with field reps, a lot of field reps just weren't used to doing like real sales calls on in a virtual environment. So they were they weren't used to it and they just get. I think it's the vulnerability that they feel when they're on virtual call doing something they're not accustomed to because I feel like a part of their sites been taken away from them and and they just freeze. There's something about that closing on a virtual call where they just feel like maybe they haven't earned enough trust or the relationship or they just don't get that. They'll get that loving feeling that they have in person when they know what's the right time? And see my own salespeople like and in a like times I'm waiting to see what they're gonNa do and I'll just you know I'll end the call and go okay I got my calendar out. Let's go ahead and get the next call scheduled. So.

Jeb Welcome founder and CEO Elson Jabot Jeff Andy Microsoft tennessee prosser
"jeb blount" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

The EntreLeadership Podcast

02:50 min | 10 months ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

"Really cares about me and then you go. Well, what do they do? How do they behave exactly when I behave that way with my prospects they're gonNA feel the same way. In our final thoughts here just in the last couple of minutes as we wrap up I'm a small business owner. I'm I'm listening to this podcast I've been driving in on my commute and I'm coming into the office right now, and I'm about to walk in and talk to my sales team. What's the first best step that I can take today? That's going to start to take all this and maybe moving towards a better future as a sales organization I think that if I were GonNa, just give you one thing and this is going to sound really strange. It is to take a deep breath and relax and start thinking differently about yourself team. So if you treat yourself team there your elite athletes, they'll began believing that their elite athletes and so much of what we do in sales because. The work is so difficult is around a belief system. So for you as the leader what I would start doing start. By basically going in and telling them how important they are, and then the very next thing you should do is exactly what we just explained. I would take a step back from everything that you're doing and I was start observing I was start watching I would let people fail from time to time. Don't let people break your business failure but allow them to fail, and then really start taking a look at the business. You know the cells business itself and see just to a diagnosis or an audit on what you're doing, and then once you do that, then my very next thing would be think about what you can do to raise the the. Level of performance you explain this with your self esteem we we we went and listened to the calls and we found that people who did this doing this we'll do the same thing in your business that didn't require data you just listen to the call. So go back and watch what's happening in. Listen go out with them in the field. Don't send your office, go be with yourself people I promise you that the information that you're seeking will reveal itself in that moment, and once you have that, then you'll be able to build a plan for how do you move to the next move to the next move to the next step that's the key. Well, one of the six drivers of a peak performing leadership company is profit. We believe that Prophet is the thing that fuels, your business that you invest back into your mission and you can't be profitable if you don't master sales if you have a sales mindset, not just with your sales team everybody in the organization and embracing this idea of continuing to improve in this area, and you guys have just heard a incredible conversation with lots of gold on exactly how to do that Jeff. Thank you so much. This has been such a joy and I know our listeners get great value out of what we've heard today. But thank you so much for having me on I. Am so grateful. Thank you. What a fun conversation and I love this topic, I'm proud to.

business owner Jeff
"jeb blount" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:21 min | 10 months ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

"So true if they don't know the answer that's training and that's teaching and sometimes you have to do that like. We're not. We're not asking questions of people and asking how calm an effort to terrorize them. This is not an effort to do that I think. So much of this is faith and this is a hard thing to put your arms around their data around faith but the faith that most people know what to do and the right thing to do most of the time, they just can't see it and my job as a leader. As a coach and as a consultant is to provoke awareness awareness is the mother of change not do the change. So as a leader, you asked me the question if you wanted to see where money ball is in your organization, stop doing and start observing and become curious speed three-year-old. Wanted we do it that way how can we do it like that because he brought a three year old in your office in go how come The the light looks like that how come the carpets? That way? How come is this talk? That's what they would do why don't you the same thing about your business you don't need data. You don't need a bunch of technology and software to be a great observer and I just love that you said curiosity I like this I was just a moment where I just want to give you a big hug because you gotTA BE A. I think the time you get to a point where you're not curious anymore is right before the time you stop learning and you stop learning, he stopped growing up growing you start dying. You know you have to stay curious. So let's draw that back to sales. If you WANNA take one lesson out of that eighty percent of sales, it's the same thing we do in coaching a selling right? Eighty percent of sales is discovery eighty percent. And it's it's the one thing nobody ever talks about right. We talk about prospecting cold calling about closing like those are the big things nobody talks about this covering in discovery is everything and what is discovery curiosity is asking questions. It is asking questions that help the person that you're. You're having a conversation with think differently, it's provoking them to think, wow, maybe I need to change because a lot of cases the buyer is frayed I mean. They're afraid of making a change because that's human. So if we're asking great questions if we're learning about them, then as we start thinking about building a business case or building a proposal, we're building it based on what's important to them and what their business needs and rebuilding it around them versus walking in and already having the solution. So and this is what back to your original question. Why does cells have a bad name because so Many sales people skip that step and they walk in they say Hello WanNa buy well and they just word vomit all over you. I. Love that you're talking about asking questions you know we figured out with ourselves team the top closing ratio's will record calls and go back and watch the game tape and we started tracking. This is one of those key metrics percentage of time that ourselves adviser is speaking versus listening and the highest closing ratio's. Most of the time that sells advisor. If you record thirty minute phone call, you know it's it's maybe ten or fifteen percent of the time that they're talking because they're asking and asking and tell me more and why is that a problem for you? What would it look like if that wasn't a problem tell me about success for your business and that discovery process but you know people are listening to us. We're we're talking the whole time because we're on a podcast but if you and I were on phone call right now with the Prospect We'd be listening probably ten times more than actually speaking am I right? Absolutely. I want you to think about the serve five questions that your customer prospect is asking of you every interaction do I like you. Do you listen to me? Do you make me feel important? Do you get me under you understand me and do a trust believe you and the easiest way to be likable what it says in that's really good. Do I like you do you listen to do you make me feel important do you get me in my? Problems to understand me right and do I trust believe you the easiest way to be likable solicit like the people that you like the most in your life for the people that listen to you that's why I have a happy marriage and you know been married to the same woman. I've been with women since we were in high school at some point I learned to shut up and start listening. I didn't do it for a long time. But did and if you WANNA make someone feel important or significant do you listen to what they're? Having to say and the need for significance are important is so insatiable in human beings that when you sit down and ask questions and listen to another human being you give them the greatest gift you can give another human being you give them your attention, and when you do that in sales, what happens is they begin to like you more and and when we we just break sales dally people are buying on emotion first ability great and it is that but we think likeability is you know giving them a compliment or talking or listening liquor Words, it's just shutting up, and then if you think about like if I were to ask you a question, you know think about the person in your life that you would describe like this. This person gets me like no one else other. No other person gets me like that's the most important relationship in your life. Well, the same thing happens in sales if I'm having a conversation with you and listening to you and I come back with a business case or proposal that maps out for you a solution that you define not me you did you think, wow, this person really gets me and get. Exercises to go. Okay. Who in my life really gets me. And really cares about me and then you go. Well, what do they do? How do they behave exactly when I behave that way with my prospects they're gonNA feel the same way. In our final thoughts here just in the last couple of minutes as we wrap up I'm a small business owner. I'm I'm listening to this podcast I've been driving in on my commute and I'm coming into the office.

consultant business owner advisor
"jeb blount" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

The EntreLeadership Podcast

04:55 min | 10 months ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

"I'm your host, , Daniel Tardy, , and today my guest is Jeb Blunt. . Jebsen author speaker, , but he's not just one of those motivational gurus. . The last thing we need is more hype around this topic we need real answers we need real people, , give it a solutions for not just how to sell stuff not how to push things on people, , but actually how to serve. . At entreleadership teach. . Doing sells well as it's all about serving people. . And that's what JEB beliefs. . Lot of organizations are doing this while they're serving their selling growing and some organizations they're not because they're actually spending less time selling, , serving and spend a lot more time just talking about it. . The problem for a lot of small business people and I was there I, , love the corporate environment and started my own business is that you plan to plan to plan to plan to sell. . So you spend more time trying to get your business cards set up than you actually do trying to go out and get customers. . So entrepreneurs are the first people. . And if you are an entrepreneur businessperson, , you're always going to be the number one salesperson for your organization. . You can't ever forget that. . So for small business people acquiring customers and keeping customers is the number. . One thing you do. . That's how you make an impact organization and is how you scale and if you don't do those things very well, , everything else doesn't matter. . I want to talk about the art of sales and how that works in a second. . But in let's stay with this idea that small business and entrepreneurs you know these guys figure out they figure out how to sell. . You know an oftentimes I'm visiting with the founder of a small business who you know they are still selling actively and they're actually kind of getting stuck because they can't go work on the business and build the operations and lead and build a team because like you said, , they're still there number one sales person. . There's this tension of will bring in revenue. . How do I let that? ? Go while I go build the business well, , that goes back to. . You can't scale yourself. . So if you're going to run a business you have to at some point, , elevate yourself to a leader that doesn't mean that you you're not selling anymore because in my business deals in the line myself people bring me in and sometimes I'll be the person that pushes it over. . But the goal is to coach them to the point and grow them to the point where they don't need me because my whole goal is leader to make myself obsolete and the people don't need me into deal however, , I think that is the inflection point for every small business as when does the business owner in the entrepreneur move from doer right to scaler and Listening to your podcast with Dave that you did a couple of three weeks ago and you know he's talking about not barring money or not taking the sea. . So when you're growing slow as he says and I'm a business that grew slow with no debt no, , no capital no investors get free. . You know the point is that you have to there's pain in that scale, , and the hardest thing that you're going to do is higher for a salesperson. . You're probably going to fail and then when you have the second salesperson. . The third salesperson you're probably GONNA fail until you find the right person. Why . is that? Why? ? ? Why do you have to feel so many times to get it right if you're a really big company and you're hiring salespeople, , you have the capital to go and find talent you've got you've got an HR department that does the recruiting for you. . You've got a battery of task to bring them in and you have the ability to hire lots of people and maybe maybe heart ten people in three of them work but you're. . Still Ahead. . But if you're a small business owner and you're selling and you're doing and you're delivering and you're taking care everything and then you're trying to be good at hiring people in professionals that are good. . Hiring sales people fail often. . So small business people come to me and you know that we coach and they say, , well, , you know how do I hire salesperson and I say the same thing it's not easy and you're gonNA fail but you need to do it and you need to understand that you're GONNA have. . To go through the process until you find that anchor and once you find that anchor then you take care of that person Thiessen which you know, , and then go on the next anchor we wanted to be easy. . We want there to be an easy button around there's not an easy by around it. . There's not an easy button I not an easy button anywhere there isn't, , and so what happens though is in then you end up hiring people can see the next steps you hire people and you do you scale yourself. . And then one day you walk into a conference room and I've been there and all your people are sitting in a conference room and they're having a conversation about systems and processes and workflows, , and all those things and you look around and there's nobody in the organization selling anything and you have to say stop wait a minute. . We can be the best organized system company in the world. . But if we don't go sell stuff, , this doesn't make a difference because we're not creating casual so you moved from balancing your time. . Into business versus working on the business to then helping balance other people's time working to grow the business versus working on the business and the problems continue to grow they just they're just different but the fact doesn't change that businesses job is to get and keep customers. . That's it. . That's number one you do that you're. . GonNa win and that's I.

business owner founder Thiessen Dave CFO
How to Coach Your Sales Team with Jeb Blount

The EntreLeadership Podcast

04:55 min | 10 months ago

How to Coach Your Sales Team with Jeb Blount

"I'm your host, Daniel Tardy, and today my guest is Jeb Blunt. Jebsen author speaker, but he's not just one of those motivational gurus. The last thing we need is more hype around this topic we need real answers we need real people, give it a solutions for not just how to sell stuff not how to push things on people, but actually how to serve. At entreleadership teach. Doing sells well as it's all about serving people. And that's what JEB beliefs. Lot of organizations are doing this while they're serving their selling growing and some organizations they're not because they're actually spending less time selling, serving and spend a lot more time just talking about it. The problem for a lot of small business people and I was there I, love the corporate environment and started my own business is that you plan to plan to plan to plan to sell. So you spend more time trying to get your business cards set up than you actually do trying to go out and get customers. So entrepreneurs are the first people. And if you are an entrepreneur businessperson, you're always going to be the number one salesperson for your organization. You can't ever forget that. So for small business people acquiring customers and keeping customers is the number. One thing you do. That's how you make an impact organization and is how you scale and if you don't do those things very well, everything else doesn't matter. I want to talk about the art of sales and how that works in a second. But in let's stay with this idea that small business and entrepreneurs you know these guys figure out they figure out how to sell. You know an oftentimes I'm visiting with the founder of a small business who you know they are still selling actively and they're actually kind of getting stuck because they can't go work on the business and build the operations and lead and build a team because like you said, they're still there number one sales person. There's this tension of will bring in revenue. How do I let that? Go while I go build the business well, that goes back to. You can't scale yourself. So if you're going to run a business you have to at some point, elevate yourself to a leader that doesn't mean that you you're not selling anymore because in my business deals in the line myself people bring me in and sometimes I'll be the person that pushes it over. But the goal is to coach them to the point and grow them to the point where they don't need me because my whole goal is leader to make myself obsolete and the people don't need me into deal however, I think that is the inflection point for every small business as when does the business owner in the entrepreneur move from doer right to scaler and Listening to your podcast with Dave that you did a couple of three weeks ago and you know he's talking about not barring money or not taking the sea. So when you're growing slow as he says and I'm a business that grew slow with no debt no, no capital no investors get free. You know the point is that you have to there's pain in that scale, and the hardest thing that you're going to do is higher for a salesperson. You're probably going to fail and then when you have the second salesperson. The third salesperson you're probably GONNA fail until you find the right person. Why is that? Why? Why do you have to feel so many times to get it right if you're a really big company and you're hiring salespeople, you have the capital to go and find talent you've got you've got an HR department that does the recruiting for you. You've got a battery of task to bring them in and you have the ability to hire lots of people and maybe maybe heart ten people in three of them work but you're. Still Ahead. But if you're a small business owner and you're selling and you're doing and you're delivering and you're taking care everything and then you're trying to be good at hiring people in professionals that are good. Hiring sales people fail often. So small business people come to me and you know that we coach and they say, well, you know how do I hire salesperson and I say the same thing it's not easy and you're gonNA fail but you need to do it and you need to understand that you're GONNA have. To go through the process until you find that anchor and once you find that anchor then you take care of that person Thiessen which you know, and then go on the next anchor we wanted to be easy. We want there to be an easy button around there's not an easy by around it. There's not an easy button I not an easy button anywhere there isn't, and so what happens though is in then you end up hiring people can see the next steps you hire people and you do you scale yourself. And then one day you walk into a conference room and I've been there and all your people are sitting in a conference room and they're having a conversation about systems and processes and workflows, and all those things and you look around and there's nobody in the organization selling anything and you have to say stop wait a minute. We can be the best organized system company in the world. But if we don't go sell stuff, this doesn't make a difference because we're not creating casual so you moved from balancing your time. Into business versus working on the business to then helping balance other people's time working to grow the business versus working on the business and the problems continue to grow they just they're just different but the fact doesn't change that businesses job is to get and keep customers. That's it. That's number one you do that you're. GonNa win and that's I.

Business Owner Jeb Blunt Daniel Tardy Founder Thiessen Dave
"jeb blount" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:29 min | 10 months ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

"I don't know what feelings come to mind for you when you hear the word sales. . Maybe you've been sold to. . AB. . Something's been pushed on you. . You're like a lot of people, , your experience with sales as somebody's manipulating you to do something that you don't really want to do. . That's gross. . Fear, , small business owner. . If you lead a business, , if you're part of a sales team, , the truth is you don't have a business if you don't sell. . From the Ramsey network this is the entree leadership podcast where we help business leaders, , grow themselves, , their teams and their profits. . I'm your host, , Daniel Tardy, , and today my guest is Jeb Blunt. . Jebsen author speaker, , but he's not just one of those motivational gurus. . The last thing we need is more hype around this topic we need real answers we need real people, , give it a solutions for not just how to sell stuff not how to push things on people, , but actually how to serve. . At entreleadership teach. . Doing sells well as it's all about serving people. . And that's what JEB beliefs. . Lot of organizations are doing this while they're serving their selling growing and some organizations they're not because they're actually spending less time selling, , serving and spend a lot more time just talking about it. . The problem for a lot of small business people and I was there I, , love the corporate environment and started my own business is that you plan to plan to plan to plan to sell. . So you spend more time trying to get your business cards set up than you actually do trying to go out and get customers. . So entrepreneurs are the first people. . And if you are an entrepreneur businessperson, , you're always going to be the number one salesperson for your organization. . You can't ever forget that. . So for small business people acquiring customers and keeping customers is the number. . One thing you do. . That's how you make an impact organization and is how you scale and if you don't do those things very well, , everything else doesn't matter. . I want to talk about the art of sales and how that works in a second. . But in let's stay with this idea that small business and entrepreneurs you know these guys figure out they figure out how to sell. . You know an oftentimes I'm visiting with the founder of a small business who you know they are still selling actively and they're actually kind of getting stuck because they can't go work on the business and build the operations and lead and build a team because like you said, , they're still there number one sales person. . There's this tension of will bring in revenue. . How do I let that? ? Go while I go build the business well, , that goes back to. . You can't scale yourself. . So if you're going to run a business you have to at some point, , elevate yourself to a leader that doesn't mean that you you're not selling anymore because in my business deals in the line myself people bring me in and sometimes I'll be the person that pushes it over. . But the goal is to coach them to the point and grow them to the point where they don't need me because my whole goal is leader to make myself obsolete and the people don't need me into deal however, , I think that is the inflection point for every small business as when does the business owner in the entrepreneur move from doer right to scaler and Listening to your podcast with Dave that you did a couple of three weeks ago and you know he's talking about not barring money or not taking the sea. . So when you're growing slow as he says and I'm a business that grew slow with no debt no, , no capital no investors get free. . You know the point is that you have to there's pain in that scale, , and the hardest thing that you're going to do is higher for a salesperson. . You're probably going to fail and then when you have the second salesperson. . The third salesperson you're probably GONNA fail until you find the right person. Why . is that? Why? ? ? Why do you have to feel so many times to get it right if you're a really big company and you're hiring salespeople, , you have the capital to go and find talent you've got you've got an HR department that does the recruiting for you. . You've got a battery of task to bring them in and you have the ability to hire lots of people and maybe maybe heart ten people in three of them work but you're. . Still Ahead. . But if you're a small business owner and you're selling and you're doing and you're delivering and you're taking care everything and then you're trying to be good at hiring people in professionals that are good. . Hiring sales people fail often. . So small business people come to me and you know that we coach and they say, , well, , you know how do I hire salesperson and I say the same thing it's not easy and you're gonNA fail but you need to do it and you need to understand that you're GONNA have. . To go through the process until you find that anchor and once you find that anchor then you take care of that person Thiessen which you know, , and then go on the next anchor we wanted to be easy. . We want there to be an easy button around there's not an easy by around it. . There's not an easy button I not an easy button anywhere there isn't, , and so what happens though is in then you end up hiring people can see the next steps you hire people and you do you scale yourself. . And then one day you walk into a conference room and I've been there and all your people are sitting in a conference room and they're having a conversation about systems and processes and workflows, , and all those things and you look around and there's nobody in the organization selling anything and you have to say stop wait a minute. . We can be the best organized system company in the world. . But if we don't go sell stuff, , this doesn't make a difference because we're not creating casual so you moved from balancing your time. . Into business versus working on the business to then helping balance other people's time working to grow the business versus working on the business and the problems continue to grow they just they're just different but the fact doesn't change that businesses job is to get and keep customers. . That's it. . That's number one you do that you're. . GonNa win and that's

Tricia cfo Ramsey solutions Dave founder
How to Coach Your Sales Team with Jeb Blount

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:29 min | 10 months ago

How to Coach Your Sales Team with Jeb Blount

"I don't know what feelings come to mind for you when you hear the word sales. Maybe you've been sold to. AB. Something's been pushed on you. You're like a lot of people, your experience with sales as somebody's manipulating you to do something that you don't really want to do. That's gross. Fear, small business owner. If you lead a business, if you're part of a sales team, the truth is you don't have a business if you don't sell. From the Ramsey network this is the entree leadership podcast where we help business leaders, grow themselves, their teams and their profits. I'm your host, Daniel Tardy, and today my guest is Jeb Blunt. Jebsen author speaker, but he's not just one of those motivational gurus. The last thing we need is more hype around this topic we need real answers we need real people, give it a solutions for not just how to sell stuff not how to push things on people, but actually how to serve. At entreleadership teach. Doing sells well as it's all about serving people. And that's what JEB beliefs. Lot of organizations are doing this while they're serving their selling growing and some organizations they're not because they're actually spending less time selling, serving and spend a lot more time just talking about it. The problem for a lot of small business people and I was there I, love the corporate environment and started my own business is that you plan to plan to plan to plan to sell. So you spend more time trying to get your business cards set up than you actually do trying to go out and get customers. So entrepreneurs are the first people. And if you are an entrepreneur businessperson, you're always going to be the number one salesperson for your organization. You can't ever forget that. So for small business people acquiring customers and keeping customers is the number. One thing you do. That's how you make an impact organization and is how you scale and if you don't do those things very well, everything else doesn't matter. I want to talk about the art of sales and how that works in a second. But in let's stay with this idea that small business and entrepreneurs you know these guys figure out they figure out how to sell. You know an oftentimes I'm visiting with the founder of a small business who you know they are still selling actively and they're actually kind of getting stuck because they can't go work on the business and build the operations and lead and build a team because like you said, they're still there number one sales person. There's this tension of will bring in revenue. How do I let that? Go while I go build the business well, that goes back to. You can't scale yourself. So if you're going to run a business you have to at some point, elevate yourself to a leader that doesn't mean that you you're not selling anymore because in my business deals in the line myself people bring me in and sometimes I'll be the person that pushes it over. But the goal is to coach them to the point and grow them to the point where they don't need me because my whole goal is leader to make myself obsolete and the people don't need me into deal however, I think that is the inflection point for every small business as when does the business owner in the entrepreneur move from doer right to scaler and Listening to your podcast with Dave that you did a couple of three weeks ago and you know he's talking about not barring money or not taking the sea. So when you're growing slow as he says and I'm a business that grew slow with no debt no, no capital no investors get free. You know the point is that you have to there's pain in that scale, and the hardest thing that you're going to do is higher for a salesperson. You're probably going to fail and then when you have the second salesperson. The third salesperson you're probably GONNA fail until you find the right person. Why is that? Why? Why do you have to feel so many times to get it right if you're a really big company and you're hiring salespeople, you have the capital to go and find talent you've got you've got an HR department that does the recruiting for you. You've got a battery of task to bring them in and you have the ability to hire lots of people and maybe maybe heart ten people in three of them work but you're. Still Ahead. But if you're a small business owner and you're selling and you're doing and you're delivering and you're taking care everything and then you're trying to be good at hiring people in professionals that are good. Hiring sales people fail often. So small business people come to me and you know that we coach and they say, well, you know how do I hire salesperson and I say the same thing it's not easy and you're gonNA fail but you need to do it and you need to understand that you're GONNA have. To go through the process until you find that anchor and once you find that anchor then you take care of that person Thiessen which you know, and then go on the next anchor we wanted to be easy. We want there to be an easy button around there's not an easy by around it. There's not an easy button I not an easy button anywhere there isn't, and so what happens though is in then you end up hiring people can see the next steps you hire people and you do you scale yourself. And then one day you walk into a conference room and I've been there and all your people are sitting in a conference room and they're having a conversation about systems and processes and workflows, and all those things and you look around and there's nobody in the organization selling anything and you have to say stop wait a minute. We can be the best organized system company in the world. But if we don't go sell stuff, this doesn't make a difference because we're not creating casual so you moved from balancing your time. Into business versus working on the business to then helping balance other people's time working to grow the business versus working on the business and the problems continue to grow they just they're just different but the fact doesn't change that businesses job is to get and keep customers. That's it. That's number one you do that you're. GonNa win and that's

Business Owner Jeb Blunt Daniel Tardy Founder Thiessen Dave
"jeb blount" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

06:45 min | 11 months ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on Accelerate!

"But you learn from him in all of the Great Celsius that I had were that way like they were challenging you all the time. What you thought was true, and I think that that we're totally off the subject now not I think that there be an awakening in cells leadership, understanding the role that you play in how important you are not only to making yourself people better, but to their livelihood, their careers and their families and understanding if you understand. Understand. That role that you play, get deeper into the deals that are running side by side with them. Understand what they're working on. Ask really hard questions. Put them on the spot. Let them fail from time to time. Let them let them lose a deal that they told you. They were GONNA to win. And you knew there are going to lose it, so they can learn from it and then come back and help them learn from it, I says. You know just being so data driven and and velocity driven that you never take time to develop the people that are going to have your job tomorrow. Well, let me ask you this question because you're. One of the most prominent sales trainers around. I'm wondering whether what impact sales training really has in a relative senses and we spend these. Billions of dollars a year twenty billion dollars I. Think in the US and sales training. And it's not really clear. It's moving the needle we look at the broad broad picture of sellers is like to your point, precisely is the impact comes from the bosses, and we're in this performance based profession and the managers, the bosses. The coaches don't know how to coach performance, so what if we are flipped that expenditure on its head and said well. Let's let's go spend the bulk of that twenty billion dollars. On training managers the coaches. How do their job to be these people that the teacher inspire closely? The sellers. I mean we've been talking about this for thirty years. I mean this is not. This is not new conversation and. There's not there's not a company or client that we engage the that we that that's not where we begin, which is if we teach yourself people? This and the leaders aren't engaged. Are they're not there or we don't teach them how to coach. Then there's a certain amount of what we teach gonNA. Just disappear into. You know into nowhere because the leaders aren't there and so it's one of the reasons as a training organization because we. We are focused on outcome we want. We want measurable outcomes from the training that we deliver now. Some of it is miserable. Some of isn't measurable and some ways just because of the nature of training, but I was on a on a call this morning with one of my clients in Hong. Kong and we were walking through the metrics matter we were walking through. You know we have five different groups of leaders that were running. Ten different set of metrics retraining the leaders were training to people, and we've been working with them for three years, and we've moved the needle greatly, and we see a lot of our company, our customers where we're doubling sales. Tripling sales companies are growing because of what we're teaching and there's two things that drive that. One the training is not an event so when when we're working with clients in our vernacular, it sells gravy integrator partnerships where were integrated into their world. They've given us a certain segment of the training so typically we they've. They've come to the conclusion that the The way I say traditional because new, but the way cells enablement is working as cells enablement our of administrators who really don't know how t-cells people how to sell, so we're. We're practitioners. Everybody on my team is practitioner, so we're not like coming in like dumping training on a sales organization at an. An event were teaching. The sales organization over a long period of time in one of those requirements is that the leaders go through our coaching program and that were there. The leaders are connected and that when we do training, the leaders are in the training leaders don't get to go someplace else and Oh, by the way the other rule, and this is I mean we're just we just dictate this or not. Asking for permission, the leaders can't be in the back of the room on a laptop and I've I've had this conversation with how many vice presidents of sales? Sales the I can't even imagine how many times of this conversation I'm like the they can't be on the back of their about top, and you need to tell them if you don't tell them, I'm going to call him out, and I'm GonNa tell me Dr, laptop because they send the wrong message, the salespeople people. This is an important, so it is a it is a connect connect the dots, and the reason why there is you know like you use the word of performance driven process cells is performance it is, it is a skill is no different than being. Being an athlete and it and I believe that sells professionals are the elite athletes in the business world I. Believe at my core is if you don't have salespeople, nothing else happens, so you have to train people? You have to train them and train them and train them. And then you have to coach them and coach them and coach them, so if you just look at the if you look at the continuum, its really simple you train, you observe you coach, and you give feedback and you run that play over and over and over again everything else is. So my message to a cell's leader is if you're not standing in front of your cells, people. You're not doing your job. I don't care how many reports I don't care about the email i. don't care about anything that you're doing in your office. You're unemployed. Your people, and by the way the same thing for salespeople salespeople. You're unemployed unless you were standing in front of a customer either physically are you know are are virtually doesn't make a difference to me where it is. That's where the job is, so I think that as from from a company standpoint, it's the it's the managerial courage to hold their sales leaders accountable for being in front of their people, whether it's training, or whether it's on the floor during an normal day, and whether those leaders by the way are gifted at coaching or have been trained to coach. Their presence alone matters because when the leader is on the floor. The floor gets better and I'll. Give you an example? Just a this is a with a group of leaders and I've been working with this group for eight years now. The the first time I met them. It was an inside sales team. Two hundred people on the floor and they had twelve leaders managing the hundred people so pretty wide span of control. And the first time I came in I, just came in and observed this how I. When I when I engage a company I go there and I. Sit so I got myself a chair I sat right in the no, the cell slower, and I watched never saw leader come to the floor all day long, so the next day I gotta leaders, and said are asked the question. What were you doing all day this so well? We're listening to recordings of calls. A said really like. Why are you listen to the recordings calls will. We're listening to see what people are doing wrong, so we can coach them as will when the calls that you're listening to. How old are those calls will usually there about two weeks old, but we're you know sometimes there sooner than that and. Let me..

sales training US Kong Hong
"jeb blount" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

06:57 min | 11 months ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on Accelerate!

"Well I was. If we if we took a look at the psychologist and said you know from a listening standpoint video was harder. Then then look at it from this side if you're the sales person. And you're you're engaging a prospect on video. It is much harder for you to listen and pay attention. You have to train your brain to use peripheral vision for instance to pick up body, language and tone of voice, and it's hard concentrating on the camera because you need to be making eye contact into the camera. However, you're there to sell people. You're there to influence people, and if you want to influence other people, there's something called encoding. We need to be able to to show them body language. You WanNa create as creative close effect similarly to in person communication. Communication as you can. Because there's no human being on earth except for a moron. Who would tell you that that you in person us, talking to each other is the worst type of communication is the absolute best of kitchen. It's just not the most efficient communication, and sometimes it can be dangerous in a pandemic, however if you can get as close as you possibly can to that, then you can win so a salesperson. I think the the psychologists are absolutely. Absolutely right it's much harder to listen and really take end the whole message deep listening on video call, but it doesn't matter because it, if the if the people on the other side of the call can see your face, and they can see your body language, and we teach people to make sure that their torso up, and you can see your hands. They can see your face your body language that can hear your tone of voice. They can they, can they? They can respond to your pace, and they can see that there's congruence between the words that you use and your and your body language in your voice. They're going to trust you. People Trust you. They have a tendency to buy from you. So for the salesperson. Being on screen is the best thing you can do, and by the way I can on a lot of calls where stakeholders are all. They have just their name up on the screen of death on. On Zoom I don't care I stand there my suit and I deliver like they're all looking at me because I have to assume that they can all see me and and the very next time I do it, everybody on video. But I think that that's I think it's that important and you know when we start thinking about negotiation for example. The one of the things in the an inked we talk about his as being selected as the vendor of choice. This is a big piece of that right, so they see you and they trust you and they know you, and as you take them through the process, they see you even more in the become familiar with your face, and it means something to them. We know that in sales. The most consistent predictor of outcome is the emotional experience that people have with you all things being equal, and if if that is the case, then you create. Create a greater emotional experience, and there's more motivation to do business with you. Then you're going to be a much better position from a negotiating standpoint than you are. If you are a faceless human being with just a voice well, but you also make the point in the book, and which is one that I brought out my books to as that you know if you can see somebody, you can then actually use ruined tuition and your instinct to say yeah, we are the vendor choice, so you call the implicit vendor of choice. Right this is. That's if you have any experience at all. I mean in my career. I knew the moment that happened right I developed instincts and experience. It could be six months for I wanNA deal but I. knew at that point I was the vendor of choice. And oftentimes secret blend to reinforce that being in person and I think there's. I don't call it a generational issue, but a lot. People grown up and serve the inside sales environment. This is a big challenge for them to understand that you actually can do a better job if you can actually see someone and I think this could lead I. Hope because I'm seeing. Some companies serve Tiptoe in this direction as Start using more judicious use Ashley going and meeting people once normal, and so you have that blends are coming out because they're seeing through video that Oh if I do this well, just think how much better be in person. Yes, that's exactly right, and so if you're a leader right now, what you should be doing is mapping your cells process and this is. This is GONNA shift. Shift based on the size of the customer based on the geography all those things there's no black or white here, but that would be mapping the sales process, and I would be looking at and trying to figure out where I can put in video versus in person, and if I'm inside, where do I need to go outside versus in person. That's going to give me A. Favor in that particular situation you you WanNa start doing that in the idea, here is the same reason why there was such a move into inside sales was if we took a group of say SAS sales representatives, and we put them out geographically. Let's say you know you have an office in Chicago Office in Tampa an office in Atlanta, and those sales people went out and met with clients face to face and. DID DEMOS FACE TO FACE? The close ratios would be much higher than the are on inside sales, because that humanity human would would move it, the problem is, is that you just? It limits number of people that you can that you can close, and when you have a SAS program that can you know that sixteen million businesses can use That's our. That's a long way you know law very expensive in. You know a really long time to ramp up and you need to wrap up. Grow fast, so if you're inside, you can get a lot more velocities because you can talk to a lot more people. Even though you're close, ratios are going to be lower, and you look at the trade off. It makes sense to do that, and if you just look at blending and your whole salesforce, which you want to do, is you in a blend the the the right communication channel whether it's in person or virtual channel which should be phone or email or text or video whatever? Whatever in the right way, so that you have the highest probability of closing more deals faster at the lowest cost, and all of that comes in and a it's A. It's a complete algorithm. It's not just one thing. Can I can I close can close business and do. It is cheap as I possibly can. You can do that, but you're not going to close a lot of business, so it's the it's the. It's all of those things together, and and in the middle of that what gives you the highest probability in which is which is why student of probability? Methodology I e the methodology to me is is is needs to match the moment so I'm not an evangelist people. I'm an evangelist for those I'm not an evangelist for anything other than talking with people Brian, having conversations and probability because nothing's nothing is right, nothing is wrong. Everything and sells works and and. And you can you say I could sell you know I can sell seven figure deals all day long on the phone. Sure you can. But you can also second sales sell seven days seven figure deals all day long in person can the question is what's what methodology or what blend of methodologies or communication channels is going to increase the probability that when you engage customers that you win those deals.

Brian Ashley I. Chicago Atlanta Tampa
"jeb blount" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

03:51 min | 11 months ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on Accelerate!

"Why are they why they're afraid of that? Though people are afraid of the camp and people are afraid of the camera when you. Are Soul. Well there is some there is some good data behind this and the way that human brain works, but if you think about it, most people spend thirty to seventy percent of the time a video call looking at themselves and what they see, the camera makes them discussed it because you look like crap and a camera cam, you just don't look good in a Webcam especially when you're looking at yourself, but but imagine. Imagine this at you, you're you go out to one year. Big Enterprise customers, Andy and you're going on a sales call and the put a mirror on your customers desk during the discovery call and you spend the entire time looking at yourself in the mirror. While you're asking them questions, you would feel the same way you pick out everything that was wrong with yourself, and they probably kick you out the officers. Up Talking and wait for you to look up. So. That's a it's just a natural thing for human beings to do so I there's it's understandable why that happens in look I'm Eeo even on this podcast I, ask you, is this a video call because I'm conscious of I, WanNa be in the best light and the in the right camera on the right set up because that matters and I think for account executives the same thing, but it's also helping. Helping them understand the consequences of not showing your face. If you show your face and there's beautiful data on this right now, Gong I did a really Nice survey on this. They looked at one hundred thousand customer interactions purely inside, so this was account executives, customers, and the account executives who were were showed their face on a Webcam had a forty four percent higher close rate than those that did not. Those are that's that's not nothing to laugh at and sells Lofton at another study with their group on on virtual calls that seventy five percents close rate when they showed their face on camera, and and and their conclusion that was. This isn't a joke. This is this is this means something. For everybody in sales. No matter what your role is aware you fit what we're discovering. Is that blending matters and it wasn't that we're discovering it suddenly. We've known this for a long time. You knew this for a long time. I've done this for a long time. It's just that suddenly. There's a spotlight on it, and and we're recognizing that it can work, and that like you know maybe another way of saying. Saying is that I thought the only way to write a book with the way I, wrote books until I wrote this last book and then I realized. You know what I can. I can I can pump out three or four bucks a year if I did it like this, so we've always thought that the only way to sell would be this or the only way to do. Training would be this and. Turns out. That isn't the only way and human beings because we're you know we we don't I. Guess, what do you call? It was an. Invention as are the necessity is the mother of invention. We. We figure it out and. It's got ain't nothing that's interesting on the video part two is is. More than ever is need to serve demonstrate your humanity in sales, and I think this idea of people become so accustomed for you zoom I, WanNa see you right for us. Zoomed or do a demo. Or gotomeeting or whatever? We just see people these days, and so it's like well. If you're not letting me see you, why is that s exactly right because there's been? Newer research, the whole zoom boom that. Look it's. It's actually not as an effective. Communication medium. To someone. which may be the case right that you missed some nuances because the the quality of signal and so on you don't get the nuance of the body which fine, but people still want to see you. Right this is a human business and I think trying to hide something people there walls go up and say well. What are you hiding?.

WanNa Big Enterprise Lofton Gong Andy
"jeb blount" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

08:49 min | 11 months ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on Accelerate!

"That, so I think that the I think it's been. It's been A. It's been an interesting process now. The last sixty days I've written eighty thousand word book. That will be out June fifteenth. Called virtual selling, and that dominated my life, so I had this little brief period for about three weeks where I was like man. I'm off the road I can think I can work can do these things. And then one morning in the shower had this grandiose idea to write this brand new book, and then off to the races, and you've you. You're an. An author as well so you can imagine it usually takes me twelve to eighteen months to write a book and compressing that into sixty days. impressive book got turned it on. Monday it's it's insanity, so it felt like. I was traveling at the time because I just had to turn the whole world off around me, go. How'd you do that because? I see you're still bill delivering training and other things. So where'd you find the time to write eighty thousand words, which is long book it's it's. It's barely stay married. Of It's working, it's working from you know I got before o'clock this morning i. You know we're. We're in the editing stage right now. So the book turned it on Monday and you. You filled in the spaces and then if you can get. Long periods of time what you have to do as you have to absolutely completely become myopic and focus on the book, which that's where your? You know your relationships get a little bit tense Mecca. Tell towards the end I'm starting to get these These you know death looks from from Kerry because she's talking to me and I'm like I'm barely paying attention, so it's it. There's there's a process obviously proving that you can do it, and and then maybe even thinking and I think this is important for salespeople as well as you start thinking about selling in the new world order that it took me so long to write books before because I was traveling all the time, and even though I wrote a lot on airplanes it's. It's hard to get a rhythm when cantering hours together at the same time, but if if you are doing all that travel suddenly, there's time that gets freed up in that space. You can do amazing things and one of the things. Andy that I've been working with our clients on and with their sales, people really all over the globe right now we're teaching classes in Japan and Beijing in Singapore and India and Australia south. Africa of course in the United States were were able to touch people all over the place because we have the ability through virtual studios a touch them. Where before that we have to get on an airplane and fly twenty four hours ago. See Somebody. That the same thing happens to you if you drive town to run an initial meeting. Then then that takes time, but if you could do the initial meeting over video now you may have to go in person to discovery because you sell a piece of equipment, or you sell something that requires you to go in and get hands on with the problem debts. Actress see what's going on there right right, but if you, if you put your effort in you, put the time investment in discovery where most of the sales process should be in complex deals on then. Then on either side of that your initial call, which is really a qualifying getting enough interest, move forward call, and you're in your presentation. Those could be moved into virtual, and if you're doing discovery with a bunch of different stakeholders. Maybe they're spread out. then. Some of your discovery can be in person. Some of your Scotteri can be virtual. You take all the travel time out, and suddenly you can see. You can have more prospects in your pipeline. You can have more time. Time to to build more proposals in, and and and and do more be more productive, and by the way short in the cell cycle so i. think that I think that there's going to be blinded. By the way even people even account executives we work with with the some of the companies that we deal with a lot of the the account. Executives never show their face on on camera, but what if we could get them to do more virtual calls and get off? Off The phone, they can probably improve their closing rates, so they're blending in a virtual call. You know video. Call into their process. What think that the the lesson that I've learned is I can get a lot done. If I'm not getting on airplanes and in cars and Uber's hotels and I think the same thing's going to happen for salespeople when they figure out that in this new world order, people are going to be more not open to, but more used to. Communicating on on a on a wide array of channels, and if sells, people can blend those channels appropriately for the customer, the opportunity, the sales cycle, and the product that sells people are GonNa find that it's easier to sell, and they can be more productive, and they can make more money I agree and I. Think you use the right word which is blend right I think that's often. People were traveling traveling indiscriminately because they felt like they needed to be out of the office. and. My experience for year selling very complex, expensive overseas. is yet to use it judiciously. To your point, I wanted to be there for discovery for sure, but I do most everything else remotely, and then I'd show up for the clothes or contract negotiation or whatever but. Could close multimillion dollar deals only seen the customer, two or three times, absolutely absolutely and part of it was a monetary pressure because we had the constraint 'cause working for startups. We couldn't afford the travel. So when you have, those constraints often is therefore should be better at what you're doing. This right without in in the new book I talk about when I started sales gravy thirteen years ago, I left a big fortune five hundred company, where I was a senior level executive and I had all the trappings of being a senior senior level executive Corner Office of assistance. You know we're riding around on a private jet and suddenly I'm building a business from scratch using my own bootstrap money and I couldn't do that either I. There's no way I could go. On physical sales calls, but my entire life had been in person selling, so I was forced like you said in a in a startup situation to figure out a way to sell big deals now. That doesn't mean that I didn't go to some in-person calls. Because the two biggest enterprise deals, I sold at the beginning of the starting my company that put my company on the map, and both of those cases I went to the closing meetings with the executives I got on the airplane, but I had to I had to make that very carefully. Because when you're starting up even spending five hundred dollars on a plane ticket if it doesn't work out like that, you're not getting that money back. What I think that that's the point I was making. Is that I see it I see it? A lot of time with companies of really embraced inside sales is that. They forget the magic of actually showing up in person at the right time, and the the thank all do it all remotely remember talking to a group of enterprise sellers and I said well. You know who's got average contract value over quarter million dollars. Number of people raised their hand I said well. How many do you actually go visit your customer? During sales process an almost none of them did. and My said. Well if I were competing against you. I'd go in all those deals because I'd go visit the customer. And that's what when we look at like. There was a big move. Go back. Go back. Two, thousand, ten, two, thousand, eight, nine, ten, coming out of the great recession we were, there was already a blend of inside and outside, and we think this is new, but back in nineteen ninety-three when I was carrying a briefcase. On the street I had an inside salesperson in California, who set appointments for me, so it wasn't. This isn't some not really a new thing that we've done repackaging US exactly so. If you go back, what happened was there. Was this pendulum swing to inside? So you know my my practice? We've started working with inside sales names and I can't tell you how many companies. When all inside, and then realize what a strategic mistake that was because they lost contact with the customers and really forward-looking once did exactly what you said they were. They were judicious about where they were gonNA spend their time, and especially with their larger customers. They made sure that even though it person might work an account executive or an account manager might work inside most of the time that there were there were customer visitation. Visitation there were there were contact with those folks and and really big deals that needed to get closed. You would you would go. You would go see them so i. think that it's that's why go back to blending blending is the name of the game, and even even pure inside sales group so when we're working with inside sales teams, especially with account executives and we've been doing this for a long time. It's like. Show your face on camera when you're doing a demo. Slept them see. Start a call, start with you on the camera. Stop hiding behind it because you're a real human being, and they need to see you and and account executive scared of that, so they hide behind the phone..

account executive Africa Mecca Kerry United States executive executive Corner Office Andy Japan account manager California Singapore India Australia Beijing
"jeb blount" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

02:56 min | 11 months ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on Accelerate!

"All Right? Let's jump into it. Jeb Welcome to the show or welcome back to the show. Thanks Andy I'm I'm really glad to be back I'm I've been waiting for this for a long time. You had me on a couple of times and like your show so hot that If you can get on here, you're you're rockstar. I think you're near near the top of the class. I think this could be number five, maybe appearance. That's something like that. Yeah, so you're in elite company as you should be so. Where are you weathering the storm? Well we're at the cells. GRAVY headquarters in Thomson Georgia, which is near Gusta Georgia and we are. Very fortunate that we're, we have good good offices to go to, so we haven't had to lock ourselves down in our houses too much. Now that's good I. Mean you're complex? Right there at your house or I? It's down the road and there are about two miles down the road from our house, so we've. We sent most of our administrative group home and a couple of ourselves people. People are working from home, but our production crew and that are running our studios because we were on so much virtual, a virtual training Outta here are production crew comes in every single day and then Kerry. Who is my wife? And our CFO is on every single day and then and then I come in when when I can, and frankly, this has been the longest stretch. I was calculating a day that I have been home without traveling since nineteen ninety four. Yeah Yeah I. was I was calculating and I as well and I think for me. It was Nineteen Eighty Five, wow! That's amazing. I mean there's this rhythm as talk about this. Is Another guest recently such? Just as you feel it in your body, right? It's like it's not that I'm in love with the travel, the business travel and so on, but it's just. It's something I've always done and yeah, it's just. It's it's hard. It is all although I did three hundred eleven nights last year on the road. You're the iron man and that's. And I've done that I've been three hundred nights plus for. Four years in a row so prior to that, you know we were in the two hundred fifty day range, and by the time we hit March. And this is the the good side and bad side of something so horrific happening, but by the time we hit March. I I mean I've been on the road pretty much every single day since January first and I was. I was just burnt already. And so the slowdown for me was in a Lotta ways was a it was an opportunity to catch my breath, and it's a lot. It's just been because businesses just been so good and the Connie's been so hot. It's been hard not to take every piece of business at came. Come away short, because as they say when it's when it sunshine, and you need to make Hay, and so we were doing.

Andy Thomson Georgia Gusta Georgia CFO Connie Kerry Hay
"jeb blount" Discussed on Scale The Podcast

Scale The Podcast

10:00 min | 1 year ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on Scale The Podcast

"What is the message that you think would land land most appropriately for them. Well what are what are they telling you and you send emails one of the emails that they're hitting that you get the most opens the most click through like what are the what what's what's emotionally connecting with your audience right now. You know it's interesting. You're there's definitely something going on in our industry. Commissions ends are getting compressed cindy ago market just kind of did a little bit of a switchover meaning. It's the first decline they've seen in like. I don't know since two thousand thirteen and we're the commission's go. They go into the brokers. Are they going to the now. They're they're getting compressed because of competition. They're getting compressed because of really different models out there. They're getting compressed. Because people you know are saying well why i can just sell my my house on zillow competition with with <hes> with for for south by owners for his bows and then you've got the automated ed <hes> bolt buying happening basically through machine learning and these big investment houses that are buying up all these single family homes you know that's a misnomer <hes> mm-hmm there's no such thing as machine learning and real estate and and even zillow who says that they're doing it they actually they use real illustrate brokers to i think maybe made me a better name for his <hes> whether they call it systematic buying or what have you where they're going through who like all these listings in their computers are crunching. The than human beings are looking at them but they're not walk through the door with cash. They're using brokers. I i mean they're using real estate agents but there have been at least god five articles in the wall street journal in the last ninety days about about about these investment firms all the all the v._c. Money that's rattle oil and into i mean they're they're clueless making a small impact now but but they're basically going into the residential market and they're walking with cash and they're saying based on these this stuff right here on a by this house from you. Absolutely you're right about that. So investors make cash investors are making a much higher impact on who sells and for how much <hes> and and these these <hes> you know these companies these larger companies they can go on very skinny margins where you and i would would wanna make twenty grand if we flipped a house in risk capital and did all that they can go in in risk and just make five grand 'cause they're doing fifty of them and latimer has written houses. I mean the the the bigger firms are bynum and they're. They're keeping them on the market so they're they're compressing the amount of time that the buyer this simple trade off right you can you can have your house on the market for six months or you can have on the market for two weeks. Take this hour. Take it later and and we just <hes> you know we're doing. We just did a big seminar for house slippers. I'm not in the house flipping world but teaching them how to prospect so going after <hes> you know folks and then were doing some online fanatical prospecting boot camps for how slipping and it's really about you know getting in the door a qualifying and then obviously convincing the person to sell their house for cash look much lower amount than they thought they were gonna get <hes> but it's it's interesting. What's happening out there. I think the real estate. I'm i own real estate. I own rental houses but it is. I think for for real estate agents. It's a pretty if i were real estate. It'd be a pretty scary time time i would. I gave a keynote at the f. for century twenty one and i followed there c._e._o. On stage and i thought his message was strong strong and his message that and i love this message was it's the world is changing and computers technology's zillow trulia all of these these these companies. They're they're getting in the way they're disrupting what we normally did. The value was an agent agent is your knowledge of the marketplace what you know i and the human experience that you bring to people who are trying to purchase a home and and i i thought well if you know if you've got a better disruptor than that tell me because robot can't do that for you and understand on the listing side for example. You know that i'm gonna i'm it's easier for me to be to sell it myself than to bring someone in but but the value of the agent is that they that they know things said said that other people don't know and i know that was i bought a vacation home recently and i found it on truly what i was was looking for <hes> i i went there and got in touch with an agent who did a fantastic job of teaching areas showing us around took to enough houses. Were we can make a good decision. The house that we originally looked at we didn't end up buying the one that we thought we wanted to buy from the picture. It got there and some insider knowledge can help <hes> we got a really really good deal on the home that we wanted an and and we learned about where to buy not buy but we would have never known that if it hadn't i'm ben for the agent that we work with. Nope way possible would have known that <hes> because it's just it's one of those things that have such a niche area and everything there. Is you know you're spending a million dollars to buy a house so you can't really you. Don't wanna screw that up and the future in your future resells gonna be predicated on where you are in that particular area so and you only the in real estate you make money at the by not at the cell everybody ready get that confused so yeah yeah. I love it. That's exactly right. That's the we were. We had the right ear right place some stuff that needs to be fixed and a really motivated debated buyer and you know we we did well there but but i think that that to me the messages it's human. It's about the human experience which i think i don't i don't. I don't know enough about real estate because i don't. I don't live in the real estate industry but i think that's the one thing that's missing and cells in general <hes> is teaching people. Here's all this digital stuff that you can use and we've forgotten forgotten about the human experience and i think the same thing in real estate you have to connect with human beings to sell the human beings that's important if to connect with you list their homes uh-huh <hes> you have to connect with physic- just the right time and then you have to maintain a nurture relationship with them over time if the new things but it truly is a human to human experience the answer if you forget that a robot can do your job yeah yeah so. Would you leak the like the buyer investors is coming in and purchasing stuff and then the changing landscape all the competition and all the money coming in <hes> and then link that together with the <hes> <hes> fanatical prospecting yeah. I don't know i think those are. I think those are the things that are scary to agents so mhm the world's changing all the things are happening. It scares me because i worry about what happens when <hes> when the market shifts and you have these these big corporations that have old this real estate in their portfolios and then they decide they need to get rid of it and they treat us the red button. They project red button button the you <hes> the housing market. I just worry about that as a as a real estate owner that i don't want to get depressed by these big machines that are buying tons of property. I muniz i as a percentage of all the properties out there. It's a very small percentage. The problem that they're creating in the marketplace right. Now is not really for agent so as so much for the the the first time homeowners the second time homeowners so you're you know all my first house when i was twenty five. I think people are going a a little bit later than that but i bought my first house in california at thirty which was a big purchase and that was my third house by the way and i think that you know if the people that are coming in at the very the very bottom they're getting it out of the of the marketplace by these institutional buyers who are buying these houses for cash spent forever trying to save up enough money for a down payment but i read an article in this is in wall street. Journal is about these he's <hes> the agents that are selling at the very top of the market so homes that are ten million dollars plus and they were they were interviewing this one guy who was like it's all about the relationships nations ships because you you have to have a wide network of people who combined these houses and then you've got to get on the telephone and co call them and tell them this houses for sale and figure out a way to get him into the house. 'cause you're like you don't list a fifty million dollar house and everybody goes oh yeah. I think i'll go see that you know it's it's a it's a different marketplace so oh i think that <hes> i think that every real estate agent you gotta know what nicci plan. Where are you. What are you doing. <hes> you have to understand the in the the buyers. There's that are out there. I think more than anything you've got to. You've got to provide a great human experience i just i don't think there's any other way round that my my brother-in-law is a very very successful real estate agent and tuscaloosa and you know that's what he does and he's and we were just talking to the deg all the leads that you know that like truly leads and zilla leads in how worthless they are and he's like i get these things in there forever and then he had bought into someone else's plan and unlike ward where to most your least come from. He goes friends people who sold houses to send their friends to me. I'm like yeah. Why don't you play that instead card. Instead of all this other stuff that you can make your money you my favorite question that your brother in law would be how much money have you spent on your friends and and sphere of influence and then ask him to look at for the last.

first house zillow wall street journal trulia bynum tuscaloosa latimer ward california Journal fifty million dollar ten million dollars million dollars ninety days
"jeb blount" Discussed on Conversations with Phil

Conversations with Phil

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on Conversations with Phil

"I was I mean, my brain was fried after the first paragraph. So think about the emails you sent it's the same thing. The art is is as how you doll things into a message that connects with people quickly provokes their emotion and gets them the respond to you. And and and across the board, and I'm just going to say this because y'all aren't gonna let me very much for it. But we got a problem with writing in our country because a lot of people don't do it. Very well, and it's mostly because people don't take the time to sit back, and edit what they write and step into the shoes you said this earlier field connecting with people right step issues, with empathy and look at things from the the other person's perspective and right for them. Not for you. Yeah. Absolutely. So whether you're writing to right or you're writing to style or you're writing to instruct whatever it is take the time to editor work, sledded breathe. You know, right. I you know to appoint. Julia Cameron talks about morning pages. Just get him out of your head on paper in your computer and an edit later because once it's out you can see a lot more. But one inside it's hard to see it because it's not clear. I'm glad you mentioned. Julia Cameron that was one of the very first books. I wrote a read on writing. And I forgot all about that book. I can't remember the name of it off top my habit. She is somebody on writing. If is it on writing. I thought that was is Steven Cohen what right? No, you're right. I'll find Julia Cameron's ebook. It's a great book. It's when I I wrote my first book, I read a little bit of Julia Cameron every single day, and that was the motivation that I used to to to keep going. I just shoot it was so inspirational just her words the artist's way. That's what it is the hardest way. Okay. Yup. That's what it is. So yeah. And it's funny. I've actually got that. Right right here. Jab. I've got bird by bird right here. They real which is funny. I heard by bird. That's a book that I read sometimes just to remind the awhile rider like why do this and it's a comfort book. And that's I know this is really weird because it sounds. It sounds idleness. So Koumba is. But I liked like if it's if it's a cold day in his raining outside. I like to get a Cup of coffee and just reality. Just get right in the middle of the book and just pick a place and just start reading awesome. That's great. Well, if you murder get people started on Jackson's, right? The objections is the book folks, if you haven't gotten it came up this week. It is awesome. I've got the kindle book. Like, I said about four hours to read the book Jap mention fifty five thousand words, but Jeb how how would one get started record for they buy the book with objections in handling them more effectively. What I would think about is. I would I would go through the process that you sell in right now. So whatever your self process in your organization, and what I would think about our. Where are the places in your sales process that you are getting shutdown with objections or you're getting really uncomfortable? Or you're having a hard time. Finding the words are just sketched. Those out the other thing that I would I would have you take a look at is windy. You get those objections. Are you getting them when you're being transactional? So you're not making the connection, and you're walking through are you getting them because you, you know, that you have to do something, for example, I know any to move to this next step. But I'm having a hard time articulating to the prospect why they should move to the next step we provide worksheets and in the book for going through that process of a building out those values statements, why should someone do this? So I would look at all those things and become you know, just just think about it. Let's where are they what's holding you back, and because as you begin the book it's going to, and I don't know if you experience this because, but as I was writing the book, it happened to me you're gonna you're gonna re-experience those those objections house of the way our brain treats objections..

Julia Cameron Steven Cohen Koumba editor Jeb murder Jackson four hours
"jeb blount" Discussed on Conversations with Phil

Conversations with Phil

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on Conversations with Phil

"If you offer value for their time, and it was a buying commitment of Jackson. The ledge is relating to your prospect as a human like you said connecting with them. So in a relate to you is human being what you said, your the way you feel about this is not a wrong thing. I'm going to argue with you. And then that gives me the mental acuity in the emotional acuity to step back and isolate and clarify exactly what the issue is. So that then I can minimize your concerns. But without that without that those parts it becomes difficult because we there jumped into solving the wrong problem dealing with the wrong problem trying to overcome or argue what have you and. Soon as we do that we trigger all the emotional responses in our prospect, which then causes our call to become a, you know, train wreck. Wow. While so so we can learn this in life, ten minutes. Jeb wouldn't take us relaunch to do this or how long did how long did it does it really take? So we were with a team of salespeople three weeks ago. And we were this is an inside sales team and in more much more transactional, so they're just calling in their outbound calls and of calling up and they're in there. They're trying to to close the business right there in the spot. They don't always do that. But they're trying to do that we spent an hour with them. And the only thing that we taught them was was how to ask. So how to manage your emotions and ask the right way. Because my my goal essentially is to reduce the number of rejections, I get by reducing the resistance than I get doesn't mean. I'm voiding rejections because I'm not I want objections on the table. But I went to reduce them and a strong confident assertive Assumpta vast. Even though it feels different but lot of people have a hard time with a filter being pushy, but the, but this is sort of a paradox. The more Assumpta than assertive, you are the less resistance. You get the more you are less pushy and try to be polite. The more resistance you get. So we just taught them that. And we taught him a couple of the frames like the legend frame and the disrupt fame, so they're they're they're able to to interrupt the the the the buyer script that they're getting we got a six hundred percent increase in their actual sales run rate from the time before training in the hour that we spent with them and then put them back on the telephone a six hundred percent increase. It was everybody was.

Jackson Jeb six hundred percent ten minutes three weeks
"jeb blount" Discussed on Conversations with Phil

Conversations with Phil

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on Conversations with Phil

"That is I ask you for something you tell me, no. And my brain perceives it and treats it as rejection, and then there's intimidated rejection now in -ticipant rejection is a real problem because that is all the worrying that you do before you ask them one for something about what might happen when you ask and one of the frameworks that we use to help you get control of your remote. Sion's in that moment. Like as you're as you're asking someone like, you know to let you walk to their facility. But you're thinking about your eighth grade. You know, love that you know, that this spurns her on your advances is is something called the ledge was basic framework in his in all of the objection frameworks all alleges is what neuroscientist called the magic quarter of second. So if you just think about your brain for second Ronald top of your brain, like a Russian nesting doll is the gray matter that's the Neo cortex. That's the rational part of your brain. That's the part of your brain that can consent here Naveh conversation about perceived anticipated and real rejection and do it in a non emotional way. Then you have the limbic system. The limbic system is the part of the brain that feels rejection, right? It feels the emotion, and it doesn't do logic. All it does feel. So even though we're talking about your eighth grade girlfriend. You can still feel what it feels like. Right. And then there's the the cerebellar Manasseh on brain in the middle of all of this is a little part of the brain called the Nikola. I call mine aiming. She's awesome. Right. But Amy is always looking out for. Threats. We talked about how humans are sensitive to rejection and the brain t treats rejection as if it's threat, no different than if you're physically threatened, a brain has the same exact response to that. And when you feel threatened your brain triggers something called fight or flight, which causes all kinds of crazy stuff to happen inside of you. So what you have to do when you are in that situation, either real objection perceived ejection or anticipated rejection is that you have to get your Neil cortex in executive control. That means you have to choose to rise above the emotion that you feel and where we make mistakes and sales training is that we tell people let it roll off your back. We tell people don't take it personal. But it doesn't work that way. The emotion is still there you have no consent of your motions. They happen. Without any decision was well, you don't choose your emotions you choose your response. And so you have to do is rise above the emotion that you feel in that moment. Right. When you're sitting there, and you're thinking, I'm going to ask them to do something. Oh my God. They might reject me at that. Moment, you've got to be able to do something that gets you an executive controls even though the emotions are happening. Right. As like that duck on the water, you're paddling like crazy underneath but on the top your smooth. And you're cool and your common, you're relaxed because relaxed confidence transfer to your prospects as well, and that allows you to influence their behavior you've got to be able to do that. And would alleges is typically something that you say a statement or a question that you ask it can be in the moment for buying commitment objections in in in in the faster objections like prospecting objections is something that you have to have memorized in its wrote. So for example, if I'm calling someone on the phone asking for time, they told me too busy by ledge. One hundred percent of the time is exactly why call I say every single time. I don't have to think about it. But as soon as I say that it triggers me my my Neo cortex say, wait a minute everybody. This is okay. It's a prospecting call. No bare naked kicked out of the cave, not my girlfriend. Everything's gonna be. Okay. And then I can I can leverage. The next step which is disrupting the clock that my prospects train of thought their attention thereby script, so I can pull them for towards me. So it's it's it's it all starts Alva frameworks begin with a ledge. And then depending on where you are if it's in processing, it's a legend, disrupt. And then ask if it's micro commitments, it's allege you have to deliver value because people will move to the next step with you..

Sion executive Amy Naveh Manasseh Nikola Ronald Neil sales training One hundred percent
"jeb blount" Discussed on Conversations with Phil

Conversations with Phil

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on Conversations with Phil

"I right as much as I possibly can every day. I get I there's a lot of things. I don't get to do that are fun because I'm focused on writing a book. And it's it's really all about the discipline in the self control to choose what you wanna do. And it's really about, you know, getting getting the the self-discipline to sacrifice what you want now which in a lot of times, it's doing something fun or you're sleeping, which is a good thing or or doing what you want most. And and and I've what I want most is to my mission. My why in life is advancing celsius profession and writing books as part of that mission and building my company, I've got a lot of people that depend on the in my organization, they're sixteen people that work here. So those are things that I won't most. And and there's no special formulate in by the way, ask you the question about book, there's a couple of a books if you wanna be a writer a couple of books at highly recommend one is Stephen king's book on writing and so beautiful book. And he gives you, you know, it's it's a it's a colorful book. So it's a lot of fun to read and there's another book called bird by bird, and it's not necessarily a book for for nonfiction writers. But it's a fantastic book on the art and the process of writing. And then there's what I tell every everybody's me as his how to write a book and most people will never do it. Is you have to right? I then you edit it, you don't you don't write an end at the same time. If you right Ned at the same time, you'll be you'll be on your deathbed thinking about the vote that you were going to right now. Awesome. That's great. And. Yeah, you're you're prolific. I mean, I can remember the first book that I bumped in the is at the airport, and I bought people by you. That was the first book of yours that are like, dude. This guy's talking my language. So, you know, how did you get started along this kind of communication with better people and sales kind of the joining of that Jeb? How'd you get started, man? Well from it for me. I this is what I did my whole life, Anthony arenas. One of my good friends. Got a new book coming out later this year called eat there. Launch in his book about competitive displacement. So it's it's when you're selling in an industry where the only way that you win is to is to kick the competitor, that's currently servicing your customer out. And I grew up in that type of an industry I had to I had to go in and compete for the business with people that already had the business and the the the product that I sold was a commodity, and it was treated like a commodity now essay commodity was like corn or poor bellies or something like that. It was a service that could be they can be shaped. So that it wasn't a commodity. But for most buyers, it was on the totem pole of things that were a priorities. It was below toilet paper. And you know, when I was twenty six years old. I was making almost four hundred thousand dollars a year selling this product that was not something that buyers been a lot of time thinking about until their contract was opera. And there was a problem and in order to differentiate the what I had to do was I had to make it about the relationship. So I had to sell me. I so what I what I what I learned was when they made a decision to buy they were. Buying me. There were buying me. And then the product, and then I had to ask questions I had to provoke awareness. I had to to help them solve problems in their business that they weren't thinking about with my product..

Stephen king Anthony arenas Jeb writer Ned four hundred thousand dollars twenty six years
"jeb blount" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

12:11 min | 2 years ago

"jeb blount" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Every episode of <hes> sales pipeline radio past president future is always available at sales pipeline radio DOT com very very excited to have our guest today. We are reaching every week some of the best and brightest minds in sales marketing. Today is no different. I don't think it's a big stretch to say. This is the harding hardest working man in B.. Two B. Sales at least to be sales training <hes> he is constantly on their own trading some of the large organizations in the country. He's the author of nine count them all nine books including this year's new book objections the art and Science of getting past no I am honored in thrilled to have with us today. Jeb Blount Jeff thanks so much is joining us. Thank you for having me on and just my need to say this straight out JEB for president. You can vote for me a happy. Keep your pipeline full. That's dead for president. He'll keep your pipeline full that is literal and metaphor. It counts for everything I mean think about this. I I tell people all the time like life is pipeline right. You're looking for a spouse. You're looking for an apartments. Whatever it is like you treat it like a pipeline? It's a better way of thinking about things so jet. Where where in the wide world are you calling from today because I'm pretty sure it's not from home? I'm not at home. I'm I'm working on my tent book and I'm pulled up in a cabin <hes> overlooking the beautiful <hes> Lake Rayburn and northwest northeast Georgia. That's not a bad way to do it well. I you know there's so many different directions. We could take this with you but I wanNa make sure we talk about a few things and I know are near your heart. You've written like I said nine books <hes> several bestsellers specific to sales sales leadership sales strategy and I wanNA talk about the more recent book objections because I think you know as has as selling gets harder as prospects get busier as it gets more difficult to get yes from prospects that in some cases need what you're selling but have a hard time getting out of their own way talk about why this book was so prescient to be your next book this here well. It's it's the one thing that everyone in sales. Faith is is objections objections. I maybe a better way democracy objections. If we want to continue on the the the voting process I guess is conversation but there's democracy there. Everybody faces you get objections. When you prospect you get objections? When you ask for Next Steps you get objections when you ask people to buy and no one's immune so it doesn't make a difference what you sell? It doesn't make a difference if you're short cycle long cycle cycle if your enterprise if you're less complex it doesn't make a difference if you're an S._D._R.. Or you're in a e or you have full death. It doesn't matter every single person themselves is going to face objections so it's important that you understand how to in deal with them to get past them so that you can be successful in your role and JEB. Would I was reading this book. I mean clearly it's a great resource for sales professionals business development professionals but I had a hard time. Thinking of anybody in a professional environment wouldn't benefit from this methodology the dollars. You know you're applying for a job. You're trying to get a raise. You know you're trying to sort of navigate a variety of professional obstacles. It seems like the methodologies in this book really do apply to a wide variety of people throughout the enterprise I think I think it goes beyond that I think I think it applies to people from all walks of life if you if you if you take the first part of the book that really focuses on how do you deal with rejection how'd you ask for things how oh you reduce resistant tickled the you're asking. How do you become rejection proof? Take anything that you do if you're a college kid and you're walking and trying to get your professor to improve your grade. You have to be able to ask people for things and deal with the potential of objection action or rejection if you're an entrepreneur asking for money so I wrote the book primarily for B.. Two B. Cells people the surprising thing about the book is how many people are reading it. They're not necessarily in sales but they still have to ask for things and they have to get people to say say yes to them. So I think that that no matter where you are the techniques work and they're important for you and the back of the half of the book gets a little bit deeper into you know how you deal with objections in particular in the cells belt process itself honored to have with us this week on sales pepperoni Jeb Blount. He is the author of nine books including the new book objections literally catching him he is he's often the hinterlands working on book number ten <hes> and you can check out more jab at talking about the hardest working man in in in <hes> in sales and sales training nine books sales gravy university. If you go to sales gravy dot com you can get a ton of great insights in great information from Jeb you get his books articles. Videos can subscribe to get some of his. His latest training of the email just at sales gravy dot com and JEB. I don't think I've actually ever asked you this question sales gravy. I mean it's.

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