17 Burst results for "Jeannette Rankin"

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:31 min | 3 weeks ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Thank you for coming. Tonight should be a lots of interesting questions on the 100th anniversary of the Senate's first rejection of the Versailles peace tree. What a great moment. Talk about America's place in the world. It was a time Of growing polarization and radicalization. There had been a Siri's of race riots, and the current estimate is that between probably the summer of 19 and the summer of 21 about 1000 Americans were killed. They would get the worst in pulses. Race riots, which led I think to the first bombing of an American city by our own air force. At the same time, there were For just two weeks before the Senate would take its vote a Siri's of bombings that led to something called the Red Scare. It's entirely wrongly named. The people who did the bombings were anarchists. But Attorney General Palmer, whose own house was bombed in one of those rage, launched a Siri's Ah, very vigorous raids to rest to detain about 10,000 and two arrest about 3000 anarchists about 552. Ported. It's a time when we have race riots. We have radicals. We have the government using force. It's also a time lest we forget when Americans were intensely polarized at the political level as well. On the day that Woodrow Wilson appeared to ask the U. S. Congress for a Declaration of war in April, 1917 His famous speech had to be postponed. A very important matter had to be settled first, which was who was goingto have the speakership of the U. S. House of Representatives in the 1916 elections, which Woodrow Wilson had barely one. At the presidential level. They're still some of the most closely fought in all of American history. Look what happened in the United States House of Representatives. You had A virtual tie, and there were hours of political financial ing over Who is going to get the majority. This is the only time that the largest party did not get the speakership. The Republicans had more seats than the Democrats, but they did not get the speakership. This was the last time in American history where the speakership was given because the Democrats formed a small alliance with small parties. And what's really interesting is that then the house turned to the question off the president's speech in the Declaration of War and a lot of very interesting members of Congress voted no on the declaration of war, including the first woman to sit on US outs of representatives, Jeannette Rankin, who would also by the way vote against war after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. She was a lifelong pacifist, could not accept the violation of her principal, even if United States had been attacked in 1941, but also very interestingly, the man who had just got the speakership of the House of Representatives broke with the president, the director of this party and refused to vote for the Declaration of War..

House of Representatives US Siri Woodrow Wilson Senate Congress Jeannette Rankin Attorney General Palmer Pearl Harbor America president principal director
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:03 min | Last month

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Captained by Devour. Miss Foxx. Caroline will captain to the right team, too. Iowa born ukulele virtuoso half a lion, half scalp oak, which I guess makes him Cal Pok Mr. Greg Porter, writer recovering attorney, a Kentucky thoroughbred through and through Bozeman's own Miss Denise Malai. And actor, producer and congressional committee Communications Wrangler, Mr Barry Nolan and whose lead horse today Porter Disorder. Greg is the captain. Our game is played in five rounds. Correct answers are worth 10 points or any fraction thereof deemed appropriate. We always advise new listeners to grab a pen and paper. That's how we do it. Here. Let's begin by celebrating a few get abouts from hereabouts. Many famous folk first turned their faces to the big sky here in big Sky Country from the following ridiculous clues, puns and references. Please tell me the well known Montana native I have in mind. For example, a TV actor born in Townsend, Montana, or Difficult routine during a Letterman segment might be a Anybody. Patrick Swayze E. It's a pet trick toughie. It's Patrick. Caroline, a film actor born in Helena, or an Indiana barrel maker. Luger, Chris Cooper know Gary Cooper, Gary Cooper. Gary, Indiana, and Cooper is a barrel maker. If you'd said it that way, Greg, a film director, born in Missoula, or Unable to hear during the midday meal, loud London death launcher. Oh, he's so close, lance Loud. A dif Diefenbach the supper. Deaf lips, upper. Definitely. Really. Lunch is where we should be hitting. Yeah, you're deaf. Oh, David Lynch. David, will you Will you parts that for us, Greg David Lynch, Death at lunch. That's exactly it. Murray? Yeah. Ceiling shattering politician born in Missoula County, Montana territory or having Jeannie's for subordinates. Heaven H have h I V I n apostrophe heaven having jeez for subordinates. Is there the there someone? No. There's no league teams for subordinates. Levi's jeans, Jeannie's Aladdin. Having gene having having Jeannie's As subordinates. Any idea what the feeling is that this person might have shattered? I guess it's a she glass. You know, you're right and Nancy Pelosi was born in Baltimore. OK, we're going to take it over to Greg Side and some of the people. The audience seemed to know it, Greg, what do you got? Jeannette Rankin and excuses. And how does that have anything to do with having Jeannie's for subordinates? Well, I believe she is Jin outranking. You know, in the annals of bad clues, got his ring. He knows what she's talking about. Jeannette Rankin was the first woman ever to hold federal office in the United He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1916 and again in 1940. There's a statue of her about a block away, and it's significant because it was before women could vote right to vote. So that's one point for Carolyn's team, a film actress born in Helena or weep for a metallic blend. Weep for a metallic run. So they start something like cry. It doesn't start with cry. We'd sob. You may have better luck with the metallic blend A metallic Glenn Eloy Eloy Eloy is the second part murder. Lee, Can you pick that apart for Estonia? No, I know that you don't go alloy. It's alloy, and then she figured out more and more shallow. Oh, c'mon, Deb, Yes, a basketball coach born in Deer Lodge or casually pilfer a mode of pronunciation. Filch. Uh, Phil Jackson Jackson, Right. Can you parse that for us? Phil Phil Phil, you got felt as a Senate acts gradually filch fact filled accent is Phil Jackson, Barry A showman born in Butte, or the one they call Peregrine who plummets s O. That's Falcon. Yes. James Falcon. Crumley, a showman. The one who the Peregrine who plummets Falcon Falls, You are extremely close. Oh, home, you are getting farther away, Phil. It's not Phil. This is a very apt name. This is a very wise, very apt name period. Who could possibly be a good name for Falco felt Malcolm Any help here? I can give you a clue at a cost of a few points. Give us a clue at a cost of a few points on our pride. Here's your pride, I wrote. This clue clue is The humor may be recycled, but the answer should jump right out at you. He's a showman. The humor is recycled. Know the humor, Isra cycled. What does that leave this have to do with evil? Evil? Evil shown. Falcon Falls Evil Falcon, help us here. Yeah, that part was showman housing a showman. I was thinking evil evil. But when we started with Falcon, I thought, OK, That's not it. But let me take care of this thing on the other side first. Is evil Can evil, not a showman, folks? The reason they called him Peregrine who plummets is because he had Falcon he fall. You guys get five points. I don't want to hear any more about it. So with the score 25 to 21 Greg's complaining team in the lead. Let's move on to round two as opposed to our complaining team..

Mr. Greg Porter Phil Phil Phil Jin outranking James Falcon Glenn Eloy Eloy Eloy Montana David Lynch Phil Jackson Jackson Caroline Mr Barry Nolan Jeannette Rankin Falcon Falls Indiana Helena Chris Cooper Greg Side Miss Foxx Greg Patrick Swayze Iowa
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

10:28 min | 1 year ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"First president trump tweeted ninety minutes ago European central bank acting quickly cuts rates ten basis points they are trying and succeeded in depreciation the euro against the very strong dollar hurting US exports and the fed said since since since since I get paid to borrow money and we are paying the interest joined now by congressman Greg G. on for today he is the only congressman representing Big Sky Montana is also running for governor of the Big Sky state congressman Jim forte welcome it's great that in the U. your show. you good to be would you please call me Greg Hey you know I I never do that with people because the audience gets confused them but Greg thank you for asking that I'll keep reminding with congressman Jim forty by the way the Twitter handle Greg for Montana all right here's the question that the average person that you got a nice gig in Congress your major bones in the private market place you're doing a lot of good charity with organizations like a scholarship dot org you can just basically put twenty years in the Congress and become significant instead you want to be the governor sure given that up why. well we've had sixteen years of democratic governors in Montana I'm a business guy I've spent my whole life in the private sector or you know one of the few members of Congress is actually run a public company we started in our home and grew it we need business experience in hell amok Helena Montana and that's why I'm running for governor now a lot of people including me despite the fact that having good friends like Janji during Carol Anderson up there do not understand Montana politics because it goes overwhelmingly for trump and then elected democratic governor what is that all about. well we are not a red state we have very some conservative leanings but it goes back if you want to understand is a great book Jeannette Rankin Montana elected the first woman to Congress back in nineteen sixteen there's a great biography entitled Jeannette Rankin the conscience of America and it explains Montana politics it hasn't changed in a hundred years we seven percent of our population is native American on the reservations we have to you big university towns we also have some historic mining towns in their their pro life or pro gun the pro natural resources but they vote their grandfathers union card and as a consequence it's not it's not a layout for a conservative Republican I would remind people Donald Trump beat Hillary Clinton by twenty points two years ago he had fifty five point six percent secretary Clinton at thirty five point four percent so we got twenty percent of the state that basically goes back and forth and sports tickets that's a historically high number so you must be used to it. it it's a very independent state in fact our current governor who happens to be running for president along with every other Democrat he he never got fifty percent of the vote. so in the last election I ran in and statewide I won by five points that was considered a landslide now how do you actually get around the state as vast it is difficult to navigate as Montana you fly well what we do some my role generally is if it's four hours or less all drive over that I I might get an airplane and to give people perspective on how big month and it's the fourth largest state Alaska Texas California and then Montana with just a million people you can fit Washington DC in the southeast corner. in Chicago in the northwest corner they both that. so do they know it does everybody know you having run state what you must have statewide name recognition but I don't know who's running against you on the democratic side but do people say Greg here's what I think about this here's what I think about that. yes and I'm out all the time I get to with fifty six counties I get to every county every year I'm proud when I go home I tell folks I have yet to spend a weekend in Washington DC I travel back to Montana and we live in Bozeman my wife and I we raise our four kids there but I spend every moment traveling the state we stay in people's homes typically and that's the way to get to know folks and build relationships are great Jim forty tell us a little bit about an issue set for an election Sir I have done to see on a lot I have Rhonda Sanders on a lot during his campaign those are very different states from Montana what matters to the average voter in Montana. well our exports are beef. grain and our kids we have not had. opportunities for Montanans we've we've had environmental extremists shut down our natural resources industry we've watched we watch are far as burn every summer there are tools in the governor's tool box that would allow the state to start managing our federal lands again so we don't have to walk in but we also have not we've not had a pro business administration and the consequences were you know we're at the very bottom of states in terms of wages and the result is our kids we can't our our kids and grandkids leave the state to find better opportunities so I'd my proposition pretty simple I'm the only one in this governor's race on the Democrat side or the Republican side that has a business background I want to bring that business background to Helena and lower taxes and reduce regulations just taken a page out of the national political so that Montanans can prosper. I want to finish by asking you about charter schools you are as I told people your big proponent along with your wife of a scholarship dot org which is private schools not charter schools people get a chance to fill a desk and I appreciate that I think it's a great organization which also charter school proponent how much does school reform matter in Montana. always I think that parents know what's best for their kids I think we have a big issue of Montana is going to help the entire country here shortly in this aspen those of the Montana department of revenue if you're familiar this was a challenge to our Blaine amendment our state constitution the Supreme Court just recently said they're going to hear the case this fall because we've had inconsistent rulings it could potentially really put a lot more power in the hands of parents to make sure their kids get the education they deserve right just as Gorsuch last night at the Nixon library in Yorba Linda we don't ask them about pending cases but if I had one case to ask him about it would be about that so in order to strike down all of the little Blain amendments across the United States and really free up the ability to help schools which are organized around faith based principles is it when is that a winning issue people care about that. the challenge I'm a strong proponent for parental choice in education we have many world communities in Montana where the economics don't support multiple schools so the challenge the schools have is we're not paying our teachers enough I was recently with a teacher in rural Montana who after meeting shared with me because of the low wages in our schools. he hadn't eaten three meals a day in over a year. and it's only because of the free food he got at school and he could support his family we've got a change this bureaucracy sucks up so much of our education dollars it's not get into the classroom that will be a priority one on the next cover. last question in justice Gorsuch is new book E. as I pathetic all about the Endangered Species Act I told him last ninety one responded to that sort of close to a pending case you know the Endangered Species Act is out of control I retired from the practice law but I did it for thirty years what is its impact on Montana I know it crushes Colorado but is the ESA in play in Montana. absolutely it's been weaponized by the environmental extremists they use it to shut down any reasonable projects forest management project we have a a proposed mine in the northwest are part of the state they are two hundred million dollars in twenty years into a permit process call has been the Endangered Species Act has been shot this project out we need to put we need some common sense reforms on the essay when I was on natural resources in the house we passed a number of these reforms and we've got to shut down these frivolous litigation cases you have to say right Greg jansport they keep coming back congressman good luck in this campaign and follow him on Twitter at Greg FOR Montana at great for Montana appreciate it very much congressman me interesting race up there I was such a beautiful state such an amazing state when I was up there force freeze was also hosting a scholarship so he flew all the whole team I was the speaker and the a scholarship team fluids apostrophes fluids over Yellowstone now that is something to say I've never you know I know it was going to blow it any time is I'm in tele check box a little bit worried about that but it was really something to see now I want to set up my next guest Alex says our health and Human Services secretary it was in the oval office yesterday talking about vaping and flavored vaping and all the favorites E. cigarettes here's what he had to say cut number eleven. it'll take us several weeks for us to put out the final guidance that with an ounce of the all the parameters around the enforcement policy and then they will likely be about a thirty day delay effective date as is customary with the FDA's good guidance practices and at that point all flavored E. cigarettes other than tobacco flavor would have to be removed from the market tobacco flavored sit he cigarettes the their manufacturers would by may twenty twenty have to file for approval by FDA of their products the other flavored product manufacturers can at any time also file but they would be off the market until approved by FDA the Obama administration had allowed these products to go on to the market in an unregulated way by delaying any enforcement in the hopes that people who were considered using combustible tobacco would transition.

trump president fed US twenty years two hundred million dollars ninety minutes twenty percent fifty percent hundred years seven percent sixteen years four percent thirty years six percent four hours thirty day two years
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

Let's Get Civical

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

"What are we gonna call it. What are we going to call it the statue of liberty no oh you of prosperity no. I've got it the statue of freedom john. You're so smart. I hanna china. Yeah i mean you. You did bring that up with the whole capitol act yeah so we're not i mean. We're not surprised we're just this morning. Yeah yeah basically. I don't know i keep getting my hopes up. There's something called the national statuary hall wow in the u._s. Capital bill and it is what it is <hes> it's now. It's in the old house chambers the this is where they used to have the house. It's a place that holds one hundred statues important historical figures to from each state good lord. What an incredible is. They're mostly white men <hes> <hes> but i i went ahead and i listed out the ones from new york texas and ohio since we're from texas i don't know i i wanna know i love to the ones new york. It's a statue of george clinton and robert robert livingston. Wait wait the parliament funke delic george clinton or another one. Oh the one that's saying atomic dog the old old black multicolored. I would be the so thrilled promise. It's a different okay. I just wanted to certify this one. I was going to take a trip to see how that george clinton is still alive and i don't i mean he on last friday will so he might have okayed a statue absolutely put a statue of me sure i wrote a comic dog. Let's go. Let's get wild right now. Those are the new york statues the texas statues shoes are steven austin and sam houston who are two people who made texas happen and now are the names of houston and austin. That's that's who the cities houston nassir named after great. I know who they are so they're big. <hes> couldn't graduate high school without knowing texas history actually gladys texas and then ohio. It's thomas edison and james garfield. This makes sense. I'm good you're good statutes really yes throwing a woman a person of color yes obviously but the names of the people we no no absolutely <hes> there are nine out of the one hundred statues nine of them are women. Oh so that checks out okay because we don't matter but also list. I listened to all who all the woman s yes so we have helen keller from alabama. The mother mother joseph from washington jeannette rankin from montana maria sanford from connecticut <hes> sack julia from north dakota coda which like i completely agree secretary. It should be in there but i love that they credit her from being from north dakota and not being from her try. Oh yeah yeah yeah. She's having storming session was we're like me where she met up with losing clark and what did she lead them to. Where did they wait. How do you even have they were just like i don't know oh put her a one of the dakotas yeah yeah doesn't have a lot of people are there's that yeah so i'm glad that she's included but i disagree with the fact that she's being credited is being from north dakota when that is not how she would credit herself next. One is francis willard from illinois. The next one is going to be tough sarah. Oh when mukul sorry myuka w. i n. N. e. m you see see a win myuka when america so sorry so sorry the next one is dr florence sabine an or sabin from colorado and then the last one is rosa parks. She's not credited with being from a state. She's actually a special statue. I chew and she's the this was the statue was made in the early two thousands and it's the first full body statue really african american in person in the u._s. Capitol wow parks and the early two checks chat is done right sure right. There's very few you obviously people of color in the national statuary sh she didn't say cardi b. She's i bet it's in the megan. Yeah give her honestly two more years. She'll be in their political definitely. Bring that to the floor yeah. The people of color who are included <hes> aside from rosa parks are are mostly native american figures <hes> or also a couple.

george clinton texas julia north dakota new york maria sanford ohio national statuary hall houston gladys texas helen keller thomas edison jeannette rankin robert robert livingston sam houston francis willard james garfield montana colorado
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"I am a bad woman. They should take my woman card away from me. I don't know a lot of these. I'm very upset. Of course, you'd be a lot of these. No. All right. Okay. I'm open. Here. We go question. One janette. Franken was the first American woman to hold federal office in the US, which Big Sky states to represent in the US house of representatives from nineteen seventeen to nineteen nineteen and again from forty one forty three Big Sky that God Wyoming now, but you're close, I know I'm close. It's not Colorado now bigger bigger bigger than then Colorado. Not utah. Is it just tell me Montana, Montana? It I know two people from Montana. That's probably more than most people in America. I know. And I I went to grade school with both of them in the same year. They're like your they didn't know each other. That's the thing there from opposite ends of Montana. Syracuse New York, China, right? The question it'd be like she didn't go to Helena Handbasket, but she went to Washington DC, which was almost the same place. But. So tonight Rankin was instrumental in initiating the legislation that eventually became the nineteenth constitutional amendment which granted unrestricted voting rights to women again, check out. Our our amendments episode, I plead the fifth in her victory speech. She recognized the power she held being the only woman to vote in congress saying, I am deeply conscious of the responsibility resting upon me. She's championed the causes of women's rights and civil rights throughout a career that spanned more than six decades, and she never married the Jeannette Rankin foundation. Now, the Ginette rank Rankin women's scholarship fund a five one c three on profit organization awards annual educational scholarships to.

Montana Franken Helena Handbasket Rankin Jeannette Rankin foundation Colorado US janette utah Wyoming congress America Syracuse China New York Washington six decades
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"To learn more about owner, you can check out the very excellent blanche wise in cooks biography of Eleanor Roosevelt, which is three volumes. You have the early years the defining years in the warriors and after so when you retire, and you have time to read these three volume biographies, go for it. Eleanor roosevelt. Also wrote the autobiography of Roosevelt. She also wrote you learn by living eleven keys for more fulfilling life, and then finally the book by Susan win, which came out in two thousand sixteen Eleanor hick, the low that shaped a first lady. So I know that was a lot. But. I feel like she's someone that people are like, yes, she was important. But like aren't totally sure why I always thought that she did all of this good after her husband died. I guess I didn't realize that. She was like actively like doing from moment one. Yeah. And you all should know that Julia is Ryan right now. History makes me emotional. Threes. The story of. Time and space reaching back. You should get emotional about history. It's like the best stories ever told. First cries of the. Seventy eight seventy eight. So to kind of fall of emir, my quizzes called first lady's. This is a quiz on exemplary women who were the first in their field. Question. One Jeannette Rankin was the first American woman to hold federal office in the United States, which Big Sky state. Did she represent in the US house of representatives from nineteen seventeen to nineteen nineteen and again from nineteen forty one to nineteen forty three. Question. Two on June sixteenth, nineteen sixty three the Vostok six a single person Soviet capsule was launched into space with the project designed to collect data on the female human bodies reaction to spaceflight the cosmonaut inside the crafts, but two days twenty.

Eleanor Roosevelt Eleanor hick Jeannette Rankin United States Ryan Susan Julia two days
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's fifteen minutes now before eight it's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin in nineteen seventy-two Shirley Chisholm declared her candidacy for. President. I am not the candidate of black America. Although I am black and proud. Candidate of the women's movement of this country. Although I am a woman and I'm equally proud of that. I am the candidate of the people on America. She was a trailblazer. Many times over Chisholm was the first African American woman elected to congress that was fifty years ago. She paved the way for a new milestone, the new congress that will convene in January. We'll have more women serving than any before. And that record number of women in congress has many of you asking questions. So let's bring a commentator Cokie Roberts to try to answer them in a regular series asked Cokie. Hey, hi, Rachel. All right. So our first question goes back to the very beginning. Mike Koeppen writes as follows who was the first female elected official. Well in the United States, according to the center for American women and politics. It was Susan Salter who was elected mayor of our Goania Kansas in eighteen eighty seven then in eighteen ninety two Laura who became the first woman elected to statewide office is superintendent of public education in North Dakota. Then started getting elected to state legislatures and then finally in one thousand nine hundred sixteen Montana famously sent the first woman to congress Jeannette Rankin and that gets a store next question. This is Lee Williams in Santa Barbara my question Cokie is how soon after we got the vote did we have representation in congress? Well, actually had representations before the vote women could vote and several western states before the national suffrage amendment was ratified in nineteen twenty Rankin was a suffragette helped move the congress to pass the amendment. She was such a curiosity rage. She got numerous speaking invitation to add marriage proposal. Yeah. She to the speeches nothing. Starting to dribble into congress many of them widows of congressmen, including my own mother when she was elected in a special election in nineteen Seventy-three. She joined only fifteen other women in the house, but many of those windows were elected many times over they rose to prominent and powerful positions. Remember, Rachel, you have to be elected to the house. Not appointed. Right. And even in the famous year of the woman in one thousand nine hundred ninety two however, only twenty four new women were elected to the house bringing the total to ten percent and seven women took seats in the Senate. All right. So our next listener wants to know what kind of Mark women make when they finally get the cars. This is Nancy voice in Austin, Texas, for what accomplishments will the women in congress be most remembered, well, they're involved in all kinds of legislation, but they've made a concerted effort to work together to help women children and families, and they formed in nineteen seventy seven the bipartisan congressional caucus on women's issues to do that. The focus has been a lot on economic issues. Equal credit pension reform childcare subsidies government contracts IRA's for homemakers, family and medical leave. And then they've also taken the lead on issues like domestic violence prevention breast cancer research on oh, they've made an enormous difference in women's lives. They really are the the women's movement in America is the women in elective office. All right Cokie Roberts. Thank you, so much you can send your questions about how politics and government work by emailing us at ask Cokie at NPR dot org, or you can tweet us your question with the hashtag ask Cokie. Thanks so much cookie. Good to talk to you. Rachel. It's.

congress Cokie Roberts Rachel Martin America Shirley Chisholm NPR Steve Inskeep Jeannette Rankin United States President Montana Mike Koeppen Susan Salter Santa Barbara Senate North Dakota Kansas Lee Williams IRA
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Women's movement of this country. Although I am a woman and I'm equally proud of that. I am the candidate of the people of America. She was a trailblazer. Many times over Chisholm was the first African American woman elected to congress that was fifty years ago. She paved the way for a new milestone, the new congress that will convene in January. We'll have more women serving than any before. And that record number of women in congress has many of you asking questions. So let's bring a commentator Cokie Roberts to try to answer them in a regular series. Ask cokie. Hey. Hi, rachel. All right. So our first question goes back to the very beginning. Mike Koeppen writes as follows who was the first female elected official well in the United States, according to the center for American women and politics. It was Susan Salter who was elected mayor of our Goania Kansas in eighteen eighty seven then in eighteen ninety two Laura is and who became the first woman elected to statewide office as superintendent of public education in North Dakota. Then women started getting elected to state legislatures and then finally one thousand nine hundred sixteen Montana famously sent the. The first woman to congress Jeannette Rankin and that gets a store next question. This is Lee Williams in Santa Barbara my question Cokie is how soon after we got the vote. Did we have representation in congress? Well, actually had representation before the vote women could vote in several western states before the national suffrage amendment was ratified in nineteen twenty Rankin was a suffragette helped move the congress to pass the amendment. She was such a curiosity. Rachel, she got numerous speaking, invitations and marriage proposal. Yeah. She kept to the speech is not the man. They wanna start to dribble into congress many of them widows of congressmen, including my own mother when she was elected in a special election in nineteen Seventy-three. She joined only fifteen other women in the house, but many of those windows were re elected many times over they rose to prominent and powerful positions, remember, racial. You have to be elected to the house. Not appointed. Right. And even in the famous year of the woman in one thousand nine hundred ninety two however, only twenty four new women were elected to the house bringing the total to ten percent and seven women took seats in the Senate. All right. So our next listener wants to know what kind of Mark women make when they finally get to cars. This is Nancy voice in Austin, Texas, for what accomplishments will the women in congress be most remembered, well, they're involved in all kinds of legislation, but they've made a concerted effort to work together to help women children and families, and they formed in nineteen seventy seven the bipartisan congressional caucus on women's issues to do that. The focus has been a lot on economic issues. Equal credit pension reform childcare subsidies government contracts IRA's for homemakers, family and medical leave. And then they've also taken the lead on issues like domestic violence prevention, breast cancer research on other made an enormous difference in women's lives. They really are the the women's movement in America is the women in elective office. All right Cokie Roberts. Thank you, so much you can send your questions about how politics and government work by emailing us at ask Cokie at NPR dot org, or you can tweet us your question with the hashtag ask Cokie. Thanks so much Cokie good to talk to you..

congress Cokie Roberts rachel Jeannette Rankin America Montana United States Chisholm NPR Mike Koeppen Santa Barbara Susan Salter North Dakota Lee Williams Senate Kansas IRA superintendent
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on KCRW

"Morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin in nineteen seventy-two Shirley Chisholm declared her candidacy for president. I am not the candidate of black America. Although I am black and proud. Candidate of the women's movement of this country. Although I am a woman and I'm equally proud of that. I am the candidate of the people on America. She was a trailblazer. Many times over Chisholm was the first African American woman elected to congress that was fifty years ago. She paved the way for a new milestone, the new congress that will convene in January. We'll have more women serving than any before. And that record number of women in congress has many of you asking questions. So let's bring in commentator Cokie Roberts to try to answer them in a regular series. Ask cokie. Hey. Hi, rachel. All right. So our first question goes back to the very beginning. Mike, Kevin writes as follows who was the first female elected official well in the United States Cording to the center for American women and politics. It was Susan Salter who was elected mayor of our Goania Kansas in eighteen eighty seven then in eighteen ninety two Laura Eisenhower became the first woman elected to statewide office as superintendent of public education in North Dakota. Then women started getting elected to state legislatures and then finally in one thousand nine hundred sixteen Montana famously sent the. The first woman to congress Jeannette Rankin and that gets a store next question. This is Lee Williams in Santa Barbara my question Cokie is how soon after we got the vote did we have representation in congress? Well, actually had representations before the vote women could vote in several western states before the national suffrage amendment was ratified in nineteen twenty Rankin was a suffrage just helped move the congress to pass the amendment. She was such a curiosity. Rachel that she got numerous speaking invitation to add marriage proposal. She did the speech is not the man. To dribble into congress, many of them widows of congressmen, including my own mother when she was elected in a special election in nineteen Seventy-three. She joined only fifteen other women in the house, but many of those windows were reelected many times over they rose to prominent and powerful positions, remember, racial. You have to be elected to the house. Not appointed. Right. And even in the famous year of the woman in one thousand nine hundred ninety two however, only twenty four new women were elected to the house bringing the total to ten percent and seven women took seats in the Senate. All right. So our next listener wants to know what kind of Mark women make when they finally get the cars. This is Nancy boys in Austin, Texas, for what accomplishments will the women in congress be most remembered, well, they're involved in all kinds of legislation, but they've made a concerted effort to work together to help women children and families, and they formed in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven the bipartisan congressional caucus on women's issues to do that the. Focus has been a lot on economic issues. Equal credit pension reform childcare subsidies government contracts IRA's for homemakers, family and medical leave. And then they've also taken the lead on issues like domestic violence prevention breast cancer research on oh, they've made an enormous difference in women's lives. They really are the the women's movement in America is the women in elective office. All right Cokie Roberts. Thank you, so much you can send your questions about how politics and government work by emailing us at ask Cokie at NPR dot org, or you can tweet us your question with the hashtag ask. Thanks so much cookie. Good to talk to you. Rachel..

congress Cokie Roberts Rachel Martin America NPR Shirley Chisholm Jeannette Rankin Steve Inskeep Montana president United States Cording Susan Salter Santa Barbara North Dakota Senate Kansas Lee Williams Laura Eisenhower Cokie
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin in nineteen seventy-two Shirley Chisholm declared her candidacy for president. I am not the candidate of black America. Although I am black and proud. Candidate at the women's movement of this country. Although I am a woman and I'm equally proud of that. I am the candidate of the people on America. She was a trailblazer. Many times over Chisholm was the first African American woman elected to congress that was fifty years ago. She paved the way for a new milestone, the new congress that will convene in January. We'll have more women serving than any before. And that record number of women in congress has many of you asking questions. So let's bring a commentator Cokie Roberts to try to answer them in a regular series. Ask cokie. Hey. Hi, rachel. All right. So our first question goes back to the very beginning. Mike Koeppen writes as follows who was the first female elected official. Well in the United States, according to the center for American women and politics. It was Susan Salter who was elected mayor of our Goania Kansas in eighteen eighty seven then in eighteen ninety two Laura is in tooth became the first woman elected to statewide office as superintendent of public education in North Dakota. Then women started getting elected to state legislatures and then finally one thousand nine hundred sixteen Montana famously sent the first woman to congress Jeannette Rankin and that gets a store next question. This is Lee Williams in Santa Barbara my question Cokie is how soon after we got the vote. Did we have representation in congress? Well, actually had representation before the vote women could vote in several western states before the national suffrage amendment was ratified. Nineteen twenty Rankin was the suffragette helped move the congress to passing the amendment. She was such a curiosity rage of she got numerous speaking invitations, add marriage proposal. Yeah. The speech is not the man. They're to start to dribble into congress many of them widows of congressmen, including my own mother when she was elected in a special election in nineteen Seventy-three. She joined only fifteen other women in the house, but many of those windows were reelected many times over they rose to prominent and powerful positions. Remember, Rachel, you have to be elected to the house not appointed. And even in the famous year of the woman in one thousand nine hundred ninety two however, only twenty four new women were elected to the house bringing the total to ten percent and seven women took seats in the Senate. All right. So our next listener wants to know what kind of Mark women make when they finally get to cars. This is Nancy voice in Austin, Texas, for what accomplishments will the women in congress be most remembered, well, they're involved in all kinds of legislation, but they've made a concerted effort to work together to help women children and families, and they formed in nineteen seventy seven the bipartisan congressional caucus on women's issues to do that the focus. This has been a lot on economic issues. Equal credit pension reform childcare subsidies government contracts IRA's for homemakers, family and medical leave. And then they've also taken the lead on issues like domestic violence prevention breast cancer research on oh, they've made an enormous difference in women's lives. They really are the the women's movement in America is the women in elective office. All right Cokie Roberts. Thank you, so much you can send your questions about how politics and government work by emailing us at ask Cokie at NPR dot org, or you can tweet us your question with the hashtag ask Cokie. Thanks so much cookie. Good to talk to you. It's.

congress Cokie Roberts Jeannette Rankin Rachel Martin America Shirley Chisholm NPR Steve Inskeep United States president Montana Mike Koeppen Santa Barbara Susan Salter Senate North Dakota Lee Williams Kansas IRA
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on KNSS

"This is November seventh on this date in nineteen fifty one nineteen fifty one around seven AM and extremely brilliant flash. A huge ball of fire and a terrific. Roar occurred over parts of Texas Oklahoma, and Kansas Lou she heard this thing was caused by a disintegrating meteoric windows were broken in Hinton, Oklahoma. The big media were of nineteen fifty one. Komo news. In nineteen sixteen Republican Jeannette Rankin of Montana became the first woman elected to congress winning a seat in the US house of representatives, the first woman elected to congress about that. All right community. Members have raised more than one hundred thousand dollars for a Los Angeles area teacher captured on video punching a student who had repeatedly called him a racial slur. And other names yesterday, a gofundme page had raised more than double. The stated goal of fifty thousand dollars for Marston Riley music teacher at Maywood academy high school video and social media shows Riley who is black repeatedly hitting the student who returned some blows before the scuffled video showed the student throwing a basketball at the sixty four year old Riley calling him names student was treated for minor injuries. Riley was released on bond after being arrested on suspicion of child abuse. Yeah. Right. One hundred thousand dollars to take care of business there. Your side with the kid. I don't you gotta have some order in those classrooms, and I understand sometimes he's especially in some of the schools. There's not a whole lot of order going on there. Chaos in some places, Ted Woodward. How was your drive in late night last night? Shocker locker room, right? Yeah. Didn't get a lot of sleep. You get out to do the voting yesterday to. Yes, I did pies. Interesting. It looks like the house is going to go over to the Democrats now and the US house and the Senate though is going to remain in Republican hands. Some of the highlights, I guess you would say Colorado elected, America's first openly gay governor, Jared polish Palestinian American Rashida Leib of Michigan and Somali American Ilhan, Omar Minnesota became the first Muslim women elected to the US congress. Wow. Some interesting things going on and who were standing and that we're talking about it a while ago and trying to explain what's going on with the electorate right now. And it's just some strange things are happening. But you know, there's a new face of America is changing. And it's it's it's getting away from what it's been and some of these younger people are gonna vote and they're gonna vote a little different going to surprise us. I think in some ways, then we have a native American lesbian from Kansas cherise, David's has one in a house vote. Let's a second one second. Yeah. Second district. So a lot of very interesting things going on with this election. Got any thoughts this morning, Ted? Spoken confuses. I'm not confused. I mean the votes. Turn out how people voted. The what the rationale is there. What are the what are they saying? Course, we have as you heard in our news. We have a a female governor here in Kansas. There is nothing new about that. We've had several. I'm just looking up democrat. Kansas governors. We've had George and Robert docking Democrats and a Republican state. Kathleen, Sibelius Giancarlo Joan Finney, so Finney to democrat women we had Vinnie back in the ninety s. And then civilians after that, I've interviewed Joan Finney Kathleen Sibelius never have interviewed dockings. John Carlin from Selena. Yeah. Carlin was elected forty years ago today is that is that right beat Bob Bennett. Bob Bennett was also the same day that Kassebaum got elected to the Senate Dr Bill ROY. Yeah. That was a big day. I didn't realize that was on the on the history ledger today at any rate like we were talking yesterday. We've had democrat. I also noticed the others before we go that same day forty years ago cans, also elected to allow liquor in restaurants as a forty years ago, we couldn't have liquor and I remember that. Yeah. Well, you you had to what you had was club. You had to it was a club member membership pay for a member of so stupid liquor by the drink. What was seventy eight seventy eight that was a two to one margin vote. Kansas said, this is done attorney general Vern Miller saying he wants to get on airline flights going over Kansas and bust people forever. Stupid. And he was was trying out how stupid the Lila's. Okay. Let me do this new don't want to do that. And of course, we, you know, younger people take it for granted, you're going out for dinner. Let's let's have a cocktail or glass of wine or whatever you want until late seventies. At that got approved. Interesting. Yeah. So there we go. We've got the the election is in in the books now like to make a thank you to a couple of our guys. Dan, O'Neill covering the election last night. And of course, Gordon Basham was on the scene. Phil Hildebrand showed up and helped out and Tony juicing was there. So we had a good good crew last. The team was mobilized team is mobilized in taking care of business. You had the ballgame. We're gonna talk about that we need to talk about that we need to sit and chat about that six seventeen with Stephen did lead of force, but.

Kansas US Ted Woodward Riley congress Komo Bob Bennett Senate Jeannette Rankin Marston Riley Los Angeles Oklahoma John Carlin Joan Finney Sibelius Giancarlo Joan Finney Hinton Kathleen Sibelius Montana Texas America
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Rankin. A woman who was born and raised in Montana, but who spent some formative years in New York City rank and moved here in one thousand nine hundred eight to study social work, and it's where she fell in with a group of feminists who were pushing for radical social change historian Lillian fadiman Jeannette Rankin became an adult at a very heady period for women who wanted independence and saw themselves as more than the domestic creatures that many women were consigned to during the Victorian era rank and spent a lot of time in Greenwich Village, where progressives of the day were reimagining the role of women in society. It's also where many women were turning toward each other for support and romance. I think that the most logical, and I think it's responsible conclusion is that genet- rank and was. Does either bisexual or lesbian rank and biographers Jim low patch and Jean-Luc hausky, but how exciting for her, you know, encounter women who were accomplished and making their own way financially. These relationships both romantic and platonic changed rankings life. She became convinced that society's problems could only be fixed. If women got involved in politics, and one of the first steps was getting women the vote soon after earning her degree Rankine started campaigning for suffrage. And the way look hausky tells it she was for Rochas she had energy for three people. She would go anywhere for the votes. She really connected with people grassroots. She didn't like lobbying on the high end. She wanted to be in the trenches with people. Her central argument went like this women ran homes. They took care of children tended to their communities, but had no part in the policy decis-. That impacted their daily lives. Here's one part of a speech. She gave in nineteen eleven it is beautiful and right that a mother should nurse her child through typhoid fever, but it is also beautiful and right that she should have a voice in regulating the milk supply from which the typhoid resulted after a few years, she's threw herself into the campaign in her home state of Montana, speaking on countless street corners and visiting far off towns and her efforts eventually paid off the state gave women the vote in nineteen fourteen by this time Rankin was a recognizable figure in Montana and since women could finally go to the polls. She boldly decided to run for congress using the same message. She'd used when fighting for voting rights within parallelly on suffering and suffering the idea that women should be represented, and that women should have something to say about the law. That I ran and was elected. That's Jeannette Rankin herself describing her historic win against steep odds in November of nineteen sixteen four years before women got the vote nationally rank and became the first woman ever elected to federal office. Although you wouldn't have known it by reading the state's newspapers Rankin said the morning after the election. She called them up herself. Jeannette rankin. Newspapers that she law. Rankin said it took most of the press days to admit that the state had elected the country's first congresswoman they knew from the beginning. Doc it. Why did the newspapers say I have all that time except for wishful thinking, but when she got to congress, she didn't last long Rankin was one of a handful of members to vote against World War, One her critics said she was week that she couldn't vote like a man and soon after that rank and challenged Montana's Anaconda copper mining company. An accident had killed more than one hundred of their workers when the miners went on strike rank and sided with them and called for the government to take control of metal mines. But the company was very powerful in Montana. They control employment. They control the economy. They have a very strong role in politics. Mary Murphy is a professor of history and philosophy at Montana state university and eventually over the course of the early part of the twentieth century. They take control of practically all the newspapers in the state, the condom company pressured state lawmakers to gerrymander rank and out of her seat. She lost her bid for reelection. In nineteen eighteen but twenty years later, she was elected again. And by then she was a devoted pacifist in one thousand nine forty one. She faced another gripping political decision. The United States Congress in the state of war and voted eighty two to nothing and they house be hundred eighty eight one days after Pearl Harbor rank and became the only member of congress to vote against World War Two. And once again, she was politically sidelined, the lone dissenting vote in congress by file woman, Representative Jeannette Rankin of Montana by so doing Montana hasn't sent another woman to congress since Janette rankings last win nearly eight years ago, but this year, there's a chance that could change. I recently followed democrat Kathleen Williams around a festival in Butte, Montana, actually, talked.

Jeannette Rankin Montana Jean-Luc hausky congress Mary Murphy Montana state university United States Congress typhoid fever New York City Rankine Greenwich Village Rankin. Jim low Lillian fadiman Kathleen Williams Rochas Butte
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:16 min | 2 years ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Richard Hake. A record number of women are running for office this year and WNYC's podcast. The United States of anxiety is looking at the role of gender in the midterm elections today reporter Mara silvers has the story of the first woman ever elected to congress. Do you know who the first woman was was elected to congress? I don't know. I have no clue. No, no idea. No idea most New Yorkers struggled with this question here with the woman who broke one of the ultimate glass ceilings her election made headlines around the world. But now one hundred years later, it was tough to find anyone who knew her name does the name Jeannette Rankin ring any bell and your head now. Jeannette rankin. A woman who was born and raised in Montana, but who spent some formative years in New York City rank and moved here in one thousand nine hundred eight to study social work, and it's where she fell in with a group of feminists who were pushing for radical social change historian Lillian Berman Jeannette Rankin became an adult at a very heady period for women who wanted independence and saw themselves as more than the domestic creatures that many women were consigned to during the Victorian era rank and spent a lot of time in Greenwich Village, where progressives of the day were reimagining the role of women in society. It's also where many women were turning toward each other for support and romance. I think that the most logical, and I think it's responsible conclusion is that genet- rank and was. Either by sexual or lesbian rank and biographers Jim low patch and Jean-Luc hausky, but how exciting for her, you know, to encounter women who were accomplished and making their own way financially. These relationships both romantic and platonic changed rankings life. She became convinced that society's problems could only be fixed. If women got involved in politics, and one of the first steps was getting women the vote soon after earning her degree Rankine started campaigning for suffrage. And the way look hausky tells it she was ferocious she had energy for three people. She would go anywhere for the votes. She really connected with people grassroots. She didn't like lobbying on the high end. She wanted to be in the trenches with people. Her central argument went like this women ran homes. They took care of children tended to their communities, but had no part in the policy decis-. That impacted their daily lives. Here's one part of a speech. She gave in nineteen eleven it is beautiful and right that our mother should nurse her child through typhoid fever, but it is also beautiful and right that she should have a voice in regulating the milk supply from which the typhoid resulted after a few years, she threw herself into the campaign in her home state of Montana, speaking on countless street corners and visiting far off towns and her efforts eventually paid off the state gave women the vote in nineteen fourteen by this time Rankin was a recognizable figure in Montana and since women could finally go to the polls. She boldly decided to run for congress using the same message. She'd used when fighting for voting rights within tirelessly on suffering and suffering the idea that women should be represented, and that women should have something to say about the law. That I ran. That's Jeannette Rankin herself describing her historic win against steep odds in November of nineteen sixteen four years before women got the vote nationally rank and became the first woman ever elected to federal office. Although you wouldn't have known it by reading the state's newspapers rink and said the morning after the election. She called them up herself. Ginette rankin. The newspaper said, oh, she law. Rankin said it took most of the press days to admit that the state had elected the country's first congresswoman they knew from the beginning that I hit. Now, why did the newspapers say I have all that time except for wishful thinking, but when she got to congress she didn't last long Rankin was one of a handful of members to vote against World War One. Her critic said she was week that she couldn't vote like a man and soon after that rank and challenged Montana's Anaconda copper mining company. An accident had killed more than one hundred of their workers when the miners went on strike rank and sided with them and called for the government to take control of metal mines. But the company was very powerful in Montana. They control employment. They control the economy. They have a very strong role in politics. Mary Murphy is a professor of history and philosophy at Montana state university and eventually over the. The early part of the twentieth century. They take control of practically all the newspapers in the state, the Anaconda company pressured state lawmakers to gerrymander rank and out of her seat. She lost her bid for reelection in one thousand nine hundred eighteen but twenty years later, she was elected again. And by then she was a devoted pacifist in nineteen forty one. She faced another gripping political decision. The United States Congress in that state of war and voted eighty two to nothing and they house three hundred eighty one days after Pearl Harbor rank and became the only member of congress to vote against World War Two. And once again, she was politically sidelined, the lone dissenting vote in congress file woman Representative Jeannette Rankin of Montana. By so doing Montana hasn't sent another woman to congress since Jeannette rank last win nearly eighty years ago, but this year, there's a chance that could change. I recently followed democrat Kathleen Williams around a festival in Butte Montana as she talked with voters,.

Lillian Berman Jeannette Ranki Montana congress Representative Jeannette Ranki United States Congress Jean-Luc hausky Butte Montana Jeannette Montana state university United States typhoid fever Richard Hake Mara silvers reporter Rankine New York City Kathleen Williams
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

"Day with the new wave of women running for office, Tony to cope will sizes up their chances. You would think that women are sort of taking over American big like enough already? Yeah, right. The attention is to the surge of their sue NAMI or the pink. And so all of the rhetoric makes it appear as if women are going to be well represented, October fifteenth, he'll did more has been tracking what in some ways, really is a standout year for female political candidates. Pennsylvania's all male congressional delegation will change when voters go to the polls in November. No more than five hundred women knowns runs for congress and governorships twenty eighteen. We're looking at a record year for women. Sure. We have a record number of women running. It sounds impressive, right? But this record year looks a little different when you take the longer view as Dittmar does at the center for American women and politics at Rutgers University in New Jersey. Since the first congress in seventeen eighty nine fewer than three percent of America's national political leaders have been women, and the pace of change has been slow. The first woman Jeannette Rankin from Montana joined the house in nineteen seventeen, but it took until nineteen Ninety-two the so-called year of the woman. Washington is going to be a very different place to get to ten percent representation. And today it's just twenty percent seen as a problem by any citizen in this country that over fifty percent of the population. Is only holding twenty percent of seats in its major policy, making body responsible desire to change. Those numbers is a major reason why many women are running, but it's not the only reason would all this be happening. If I had been elected president in a new afterward to her memoir published by Simon and Schuster a division of CVS corporation. Hillary Clinton says, she believes that in addition to Russian election, meddling us evidence and the investigation into emails, sexism also helps explain her loss. You mentioned a file on sexism in politics. Do you really have a file? I do. I do. It's a file that tells a somewhat sobering story about how hard it is to break through the mindsets that people have, and it is difficult for many people and not just men. A lot of women to think, wait a minute. This woman is going to be a governor or member of Kong. Grice our my mayor or maybe even a president. You're likable enough. Two time presidential candidate. Perhaps no one knows more about what it's like the campaign as a woman. If you watched the way Trump debated me. It was just imbued with sexism, making fun of me for preparing, will you know, that's the old like, oh yeah, the girl in the class who's always prepared. I don't need to be prepared. I'm into Hagar and tattoos can show you. One of the reasons I'm running for congress this year, the expectations and the perception for female candidates may be changing as a commander. Elaine didn't care what political party you always put country. First, as women can be seen campaigning as powerful leaders without downplaying gender current, just contagious. I can tell you, I would have never imagined running for any elected office two years ago, Johanna Hayes candidate for the house in Connecticut in twenty sixteen. She was teacher of the year, and now she's one of many women running as first time candidates. People should not vote for anyone because of one singular thing..

congress Trump president Hillary Clinton Washington NAMI Jeannette Rankin Tony Pennsylvania CVS corporation Johanna Hayes New Jersey Rutgers University Dittmar Kong Elaine Montana Grice America
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:41 min | 2 years ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To win a seat in the Senate when she was on the campaign trail, the Anita hill controversy complicated things for her as she tells in this story being both black and female. I had to go into the black churches and understand that this was not something they wanted to talk about and frankly, took one of my campaign workers to really draw the picture for me to make it make some sense to me we were sitting up in the church one day, and he pointed to the church, the choir was behind all the preachers and all the preachers, the pastors were all male, and the choir was almost entirely female. And he said, that's why the Nida hills not getting more support than she is in the black community. And that was true that goes for someone like Stacey Abrams. Yeah. I mean, I was I have to say I was surprised when when criminals around so that's that is not the anthrax back to hear from her. And it just points to a couple of things that points to how complicated all this stuff can be you know, the sort of the mix of race and gender and identity is a big part of our politics, and it doesn't always track as simply as we would like to track. And so black men in particular had trouble believing hell because of misogyny in the black community and and. There's been a lot of conversation now about Susan Collins as the as the decisive vote in Brett common. What does that mean? For Republican women at a time when women are saying that that we have are trying to create political power. So it I think she what her story to me really speaks to is the way that we it's not as simple as demographics and this. We're getting there there are some some cross-currents. And so here's a clip of a Republican woman from the Senate in that same episode of United States have anxiety. It's Nancy Kassebaum Republican from Kansas who served in the Senate from nineteen seventy nine to nine hundred ninety seven. And she well, she she talks about this one aspect of being in her role. And I was asked a lot of times I had like being one a only woman or one of the few people view you as two week. Are you strong enough? I said if I worried about all those kinds of things I'd never get anything done. Our iceberg. Talking to Nancy Lancaster bible is one of the best hours of my life. She was such a delight. I think what was one of the things we did in this is when we sat down and started the season, we were like, you know, we could talk we could just about talk to the majority of the women who have ever served in the United States Senate. That's how few have. And we we forget that in nineteen. Ninety-one win Anita hill was testifying. There were two women Nancy Kassebaum and Burma Kelsey in the United States. And if there had ever been thirteen in all of American history. There have been thirteen women in the body. And that election was the election that followed that changed American politics. And absolutely did the the number of women that came in four more women came into the Senate something like twenty something women came into the house. It was easily the largest number of women that had come into a federal office. And and it has continued to grow since then and the question then in two thousand eighteen becomes is this another reset. There are a record number of women running for office a record number of women won their primaries. Is this another massive reset in terms of the demographics of our elected officials, and so one more clip, and then we're going to run out of time. And this is maybe a surprise former Republican governor of New Jersey Christie Todd Whitman is talking about how immigration which we don't usually think of in terms of gender is becoming a woman's issue in this election, and how it may hurt Republicans when they see children being torn away from their parents as the border where they she children and their parents being incarcerated in an effort by the administration to extend that they're not comfortable with that the party. I think is going to have to change its rhetoric quite a bit moderate a little bit. Nancy Solomon this from your New Jersey reporter, she is fighting to. To keep the moderate wing of the Republican party alive. I will note she is has endorsed Leonard, Lance. She's a big fan of the problem solvers caucus in the house, which Josh got Heimer the democrat from the Bergen county seat is is one of the co chairs of that. She's she's making the argument. Yes. That that the Republican party has got to moderate on these issues, or they're gonna lose women and Kelly dimmer brought this up to that it it doesn't serve the interests. If if what we want is gender parody in our leadership. Then we don't want to see a Democratic Party of women and a Republican party of women and people of color and a democrat and a Republican party of white men. What we want to see our our female Republicans running and winning and being part of that mix. And I think it's fair to say that. Governor Whitman is that's her fight. And she's looking at reforming the system of how we elect independence because she and her fellow moderate Republicans have been so completely taken out of power of their party. And yet the system for independence is very difficult, and they're looking at reforming that so that they can resurrect themselves. Our New Jersey public radio managing editor Nancy Solomon and Cairo and listeners and folks here in the green space, I did promise one clip that we're not gonna actually be able to get to depict story clip that you will just have to go to Kai's podcast the United States of anxiety. And listen to for yourself of the first woman ever elected to congress Jeannette Rankin in one thousand nine hundred sixteen there was no radio yet in one thousand nine hundred sixteen but there is audio of her telling the story of that first election from a number of. Years later in the new absurd that just dropped today on the pike cast United States are being Zaidi. Please thank Cairo and ANSI. Solomon..

Republican party Senate United States Nancy Kassebaum Nancy Solomon New Jersey Christie Todd Whitman Democratic Party of women Nancy Lancaster Nida hills Stacey Abrams Jeannette Rankin Susan Collins Anita hill Cairo Kansas Brett Bergen county
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on Unladylike

Unladylike

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on Unladylike

"Single woman about first us congresswoman jeannette rankin and they allowed me to screen this at the smithsonian institution in washington dc and it was a very very big deal and so i was feeling quite high on the hog i really was i felt like my shit did not stink a here i was in the halls of power right in in the seat of our great nation showing an important fill about the history of our great nation before her screening camera and her husband took a walk through the smithsonian and they came upon a particular historical reenactor and i'm standing there in the lobby and i see a woman across the way dressed in the suffrage costume and she looks me straight in the eye and she says i'm alice paul and i'm back to haunt you because you've done nothing to ratify the qual writes back when she was alive alice paul was a radical suffer just an author of the equal rights amendment is janette rankin documentary even mentions paul but somehow through all of her work kimmel hadn't realized that the yarra never made it into the constitution well how did you how did you respond to this this woman in cost too i mean where you just blindsided i was just like for few days i thought that lady is wrong that's ridiculous we've you know we've got other things because i mean we're not in the stone age here we've got other things yet we kind of are in the stone age caroline i mean we are the only industrialized country without constitutional provision for gender equality and or antidiscrimination we were behind one hundred twelve other nations around the world in this regard the more camel thought about stuff like this the less she could let it go she was being haunted not just by alice paul but by this idea that something she thought was guaranteed protection she lived her life just assuming she had weren't there at all every once in a while i'd hear it again adhered again you don't have equal rights you don't have equal rights in america i didn't get it until i saw a woman wearing an outfit from one hundred years ago and realized nothing had effing changed it was all window dressing that had changed and that made me mad hold up a sec though didn't we hear rpg say at the top of the show today that even without the er ray we've achieved equality through legislation yeah and that's where the stuff gets so sneaky because really common anti era argument that we've heard since the fifties has been basically ladies ladies ladies you already have plenty of rights and it's true that in nineteen seventy one thanks to then lawyer ruth bader ginsburg sexbased discrimination was ruled unconstitutional under the fourteenth amendment's equal protection clause and this is a huge deal because prior to that discrimination was actually considered a privilege for women like it was considered chivalrous to not allow women into certain jobs he was protection yeah because they thought oh you know what we are the weaker sex and thus we just need more looking after two which nineteen seventies ruth plows in like a bulldozer with a pony tail winning a slew of cases dismantling sexist grenadian laws by demonstrating to the then all male supreme court how it violated not just women's rights but also men's rights for instance one of rb jeez favourite cases was representing a widower who has denied social security because only widows qualified for it at the time and of course all these men on the bench were like well wait a minute he's like me that's not right brilliant move ruth you sent her those men on now that we've kind of moved beyond the discrimination as privileges argument antiira folks say okay well yeah you've got your fourteenth amendment equal protection clause you've also got title nine which prohibits sex based discrimination in educational settings and let's not forget title seven of the civil rights act that bans genderbased employment discrimination again women what more are you asking for to which is says don't fall for that ship we have a massive case of cognitive dissonance because you have women all over for the country that feel completely empowered and i'm here like that wet blanket to tell you it's all smoke and mirrors it's all lies and.

jeannette rankin smithsonian institution washington one hundred years
"jeannette rankin" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"jeannette rankin" Discussed on KGO 810

"And it goes step by step women in the senate is an unusual thing but as of two thousand thirteen and so that is five years ago only half the states i had ever been represented by women and and it kinda and it kind of move forward in twenty thousand thirteen three more added twenty fifteen two more states have their first women senators and they went forward but again mississippi vermont no catch up and am part of the story is is you know the idea that i think a lot of ways that the women in those states were does it sorta reflect everything across the board as far as women being in politics i'm sure there's more women lawyers than in congress but it says that there's eighty four women in the house making women almost twenty percent of the house of representatives when they represent fifty one percent of the right of the population if they are in fact going into politics well i know but a lot of people kind of fall into the house of representatives has kind of a position that you can literally i mean since they're up for election yeah it changes over really quickly it's a two year term as soon as you get them you can be gone that women don't go into politics because they're smarter than that no i mean we need you ladies in there to change the world but i i gotta give them throw them a bone it says since nineteen seventeen the entrance of jeannette rankin a republican from montana so we've been doing it for a long time just not a lot very vigorously you know the irony of that don't you is that the year that women.

senate vermont congress jeannette rankin montana mississippi fifty one percent twenty percent five years two year