40 Burst results for "Jazz"

Fresh update on "jazz" discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM Show

WFAN Sports Radio_FM Show

01:06 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "jazz" discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM Show

"Fires it over to Kevin Herder three pointer. Kevin. It's good. Kevin Herder scores and the Hawks lead by 20 over the great Phoenix Suns had a time out feedings Woman on Hawks radio raise Phoenix Suns is a little bit of stress that this is their first year being good in a decades. I wouldn't call the greater Phoenix Suns, but they're very good. You're currently great V necks fading in the fourth, losing the quarter 38 15 losing the game. 1 35 103, the Jazz dumped the Spurs won 26 94 So Utah is alone atop the West this morning. As for the Hawks, it was just to win, says head coach Nate McMillan. Sending statements and all of that is for you know you guys to write, you know, we want to win the game, Defend home Court on. We knew that it was a good team coming in here. We were going to have to play Ah, Good games Hawks for a half game behind the Knicks for fourth in the East. New York, taking a 1 13 97 lost in Denver, Nicola Yokich with 32 points and 12 boards. The Bucks held off the Wizards 1 35 1 34 for a four game win streak. Filly winning in Houston. 1 35, 1 15 and the Celtics routed the Magic 1 30 to 96. Boston moves up to six in the East, putting the Heat at number seven. LeBron now officially out tonight, verse the Clippers because of his sore ankle, he could play tomorrow. Against Portland. The Rays couldn't score over five plus again, Shohei Otani. Despite six walks, they finally broke through against the Angel bullpen. The pitch swing and a.

Kevin Herder Nate Mcmillan Shohei Otani Phoenix Suns Nicola Yokich Lebron 12 Boards 32 Points Knicks Hawks Kevin Celtics 20 Six Walks Clippers 26 Bucks Denver 96 Boston
Capela, Hawks pull away late to take 135-103 win over Suns

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 7 hrs ago

Capela, Hawks pull away late to take 135-103 win over Suns

"Clint capella scored eighteen points and the hawks pulled away in the fourth quarter of the one thirty five one of three pounding of the Suns Atlanta late just ninety seven eighty eight before scoring the first fourteen points in the final period the sons were out scored thirty eight fifteen in the fourth and didn't hit their first basket of the period until there was two thirty three remaining Trae young had sixteen points and twelve assists for the hawks you know Gallinari also had sixteen points per day and we definitely need to bring the intensity in the energy for forty minutes is the the best team played against the best team in the league and so it was it was a great test agree challenge Devin Booker dropped in thirty for Phoenix which began the day tied with the jazz for the Western Conference lead I'm Dave Ferrie

Clint Capella Hawks Trae Young Suns Atlanta Gallinari Devin Booker Phoenix Dave Ferrie
Fresh update on "jazz" discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM Show

WFAN Sports Radio_FM Show

00:36 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jazz" discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM Show

"Gone now to the two seed the West in there battling night in night out against the Utah Jazz right now, the jazz are one game up in the standing of the Western Conference. So imagine the sons Go from missing the playoffs for a decade to being the one seed in the West. Pretty amazing kind of Complement to the way that they've built the roster and two significant moves and the two significant moves are Drafting Devin Booker, which was not as much of a slam dunk of it feels right now that he would be this type of elite scorer and then acquiring Chris Paul. Those have been the difference, making moments and moves and decisions for.

Chris Paul TWO Utah Jazz Devin Booker Two Significant Moves ONE One Game A Decade Western Conference
Booker Scores 32 as Suns Hold off Thunder 123-120

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 d ago

Booker Scores 32 as Suns Hold off Thunder 123-120

"The sons of regained a share of the Western Conference lead catching up with the jazz by getting past the thunder one twenty three one twenty Devin Booker scored thirty two points in Phoenix shot fifty four percent in improving to forty six and eighteen former thunder guard Chris Paul had eighteen points and eleven assists and Torrey Craig added eighteen points and ten rebounds for the sons who would start a game ending seventeen four run by the thunder what is what is this point of view that China power plants why not pretty as gang what a pretty Spanish Jerry's basically had nineteen points and nine rebounds for the thunder losers in twenty of their last twenty two games I'm Dave Ferrie

Devin Booker Torrey Craig Chris Paul Phoenix Thunder China Jerry Dave Ferrie
Fresh update on "jazz" discussed on The Wolf's Den

The Wolf's Den

01:04 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jazz" discussed on The Wolf's Den

"Come on sign up right now is thought control of your life and your money but we you'll be glad you did. What do you think about. Journalists interview is that. Play this sort of gotcha game. They tried to like bach. Someone in and get them to say saying what do you think about that is there. Is it a. Is it a good thing or is it just really just a terrible thing. Worst worst and as a media personality or reporter whatever you wanna call me when i see that it kills me because that takes away from that not only. Is it going to hurt that athlete. In the in the in the time being. But it's now get is putting a bad face on on media and your investigative reporter. You're obviously going to go after stories. That's not what. I'm on investing report so i feel responsibility to be either an ally for the athlete or at least someone they can trust in to evade need advice. Because i don't want to be the gotcha guy. And there's when i see that jordan killed what do you think about politics entering into the world of sports. Let me very differently. Not i'm the soda guy. I love watching sports for the sake of watching. Incredible athletes do something at the highest level. You know whatever that might be whether it's tennis golf basketball baseball football right. It's watching people compete. The stakes are high for the best in the world. And then i feel like for me when when politics comes into it almost like i feel like it's not the right forum like for example used made a point you said like investigative reporter so i'm not here to break stories or cap someone. Do you think it's okay. That athletes getting so political or now when they're supposed to be athletes or is there a place for that in sports bass. Back of sports has changed so much in the social media era because of the access athletes that fans apt athletes. And i understand where the casual fans. I don't want to deal with that. I just wanna watch my. It's my favorite player but a lot of athletes especially the younger ones feel this responsibility to speak out and like i said a. I was talking to someone last week about you. Know being a white male in america and so black athlete. And i said i can't imagine what it's like for you to be under this microscope as someone of color in this country. And he said that. When he sees george floyd or when he sees trayvon martin that he feels the need to speak out because maybe he can save someone at some points so i felt what i hear that it's like i. I'm compelled to say that if you're passionate and you really want to make a difference than you should be able to do it. But as a as a someone in the media. I i'm always torn because sometimes i want to do it but i do feel athletes telling me you know. It's not really the best place. I get it so i think what you're saying is that you think that any athletes should have the right to speak. Gotten of course they do by the way like athletes have everyone has the right to speak out. And then i guess fans can vote with their pocketbooks so to speak by not watching watching right but i think what you're saying also that while it might be okay for athletes. People that are reporting sports should probably politics out of it and just report. The sports is in back. It's to say you're really passionate about it and you feel like you can add to the conversation then i was. I would encourage you. But if you're just piling on i i. Don't i think it becomes counter-productive in your message. Gets nali doesn't get misheard or not her but it can get misinterpreted. And then i can hurt. The message can hurt. You sure you have to really know what you're talking about. It's like anything else. you know. Authenticity basically right if it's authentic if it if it's not just like this contrived pile on to be socially relevant or virtuous signaling than they really comes from their heart than you think it has a place i do but most of the time i there is. There are gonna stay names but i i know this whole. That's that do things just because they want to get like this cloud i. It's hard to. It's hard to watch. Yeah i think the problem with that. Is that when people do that. It takes away from the legitimate conversation of people who who really have every reason to speak out because they might have just grown up and seeing things or experience things. I guess the problem is is that like you know you feel. Sometimes i'll be honest. I feel like that. When i what i hear an athlete speaking out most of the time it doesn't bother me like most of them. I get it sometimes. I feel though that it's not authentic. Like sometimes i feel. I think that's the issue you feel like you know. I don't know if it's like there's more of a like a an also because a lot of these athletes are making so much money and they might and it's also what are they saying they talking about like a terrible injustice with someone was like killed and murdered for like no fucking good reason. You know all the talk about like things like where like they say something with their haunting behind their own walls eighteen bodyguards. And saying that you know something is almost everyone else can be. Exposed is a lot more nuanced of a conversation. I think they just say people's should or shouldn't talk. You know what i mean. I one hundred percent and also if you're going to be talking about it then you shouldn't be like in the nba bubble complaining about the meals. You know right. I i remember. When when the bubble happen orlando. There was a lot of pushback a certain players were like. Oh yeah bad food here and then and then maybe they're gonna talk about social justice in that turn fans off and i would ask players like what's the what's the thought process internally among because there's like this fraternity you know everybody. Everybody grew up planning on another date. They know each other really well by the time they get to the nba. And so there is a lot of guys are told me like you know when he goes out it does this. And then he says this there's not credibility but it you're gonna be consistent about the message than that. Let's that's a good thing and one thing i'll say is i was fortunate enough to we we might. We wanted oscar this week for two distant strangers. Which was. I was fortunate enough to eat on that film. It was won the best short Live action film and mike conley. who's also for. The jazz was an ep honor. And i remember when i talked to him about it. He said like you know this is..

George Floyd America Trayvon Martin Mike Conley Last Week This Week Two Distant Strangers Eighteen Bodyguards One Hundred Percent One Thing Much Jordan Oscar Guys Jazz Orlando
Bogdanovic scores 34 as Jazz rally to beat Raptors 106-102

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 4 d ago

Bogdanovic scores 34 as Jazz rally to beat Raptors 106-102

"Boy am Bogdanovich drained six three pointers while scoring thirty four points as the jazz beat the raptors one oh six one oh two would you go there added thirteen points and sixteen rebounds to help Utah win for just the second time in five games those guys were really physical on us and our we instead of you know breaking down and breaking apart B. we came together Jordan Clarkson and Joe Ingles added fifteen points apiece with Ingles collected nine assists after trailing by as many as ten the jazz search they had won a one ninety six with five sixteen left behind an eleven three run Fred vanvleet had thirty points seven assists and six rebounds to lead Toronto I'm the ferry

Bogdanovich Jordan Clarkson Joe Ingles Raptors Utah Ingles Fred Vanvleet Toronto
Fresh update on "jazz" discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP Show

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP Show

00:38 sec | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jazz" discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP Show

"Players out to block Donald Wide open straight down the barrel. Three hitting that play Quin Snyder brought to the MBA about six years ago, and it rarely failed. Don, it's driving, pissing off the window it in. Williams got 19 in the first half on nine shot attempts. 26 point lead for the Jazz 17 on Monday at the half. Where's he been? Great with out Don and Mike. Understanding the world. 97 5. The zone jazz roll over the Spurs won 26 to 94 for the Jazz. There's sixth, one of at least 30 points this season, tied with the Bucks for the most in the NBA, their second most Such wins in a season in franchise history. 30 points for Jordan Clarkson in the wind for the Jazz sons trying to keep pace with Utah. But had a little trouble in Atlanta. Gallo dribbles left, fires.

Jordan Clarkson Quin Snyder Mike Sixth 26 Point Monday 26 94 19 Williams Bucks First Half Atlanta Donald Wide 97 Gallo Spurs DON 17 Three
Suns clinch first postseason berth in 11 years

The Dan Proft Show

00:07 sec | Last week

Suns clinch first postseason berth in 11 years

"Of State one game behind the Western Conference, letting jazz but they clinched their first postseason berth. 11 years.

Fresh update on "jazz" discussed on ESPN Radio

ESPN Radio

00:27 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jazz" discussed on ESPN Radio

"Fanatic and being 34 points, 12 rebounds in 25 minutes as the Sixers Beat the Rockets by 21, 35, 1, 15 and Bead making his many free throws as the Rockets did as a team. 14 for Embiid 14 for the Rockets. Sixers won six straight games. They've outscored their opponents by an average of about 22 over that stretch. Six straight wins longest active streak in the MBA, Philly First in the East two games up on the Nets, three ahead of the Bucks atop the Western Conference. Utah Jazz. Angles works left side penetrates flares out to Bogdanovich Wide open straight down the barrel. Three hidden that play Quin Snyder brought to the MBA about six years ago. And it rarely fails. Bogdanowicz driving, kissing it out the window it in. Boy, Hans got 19 in the first half on nine shot attempts. 26 point lead for the Jazz 17 on Monday at the half boys. He been great without Don and Mike. Understanding the role 97 5. The zone.

Mike DON Quin Snyder Bogdanovich Bogdanowicz 26 Point Embiid Bead Monday 34 Points 25 Minutes Hans Two Games 35 21 19 12 Rebounds 17 Bucks First Half
Bond Denied for Man Charged in the Murder of 7 Year Old

Bob Sirott

00:41 sec | Last week

Bond Denied for Man Charged in the Murder of 7 Year Old

"Has been denied for the man charged in the murder of seven year old jazz Lynne Adams. There was a bond hearing yesterday in Chicago, Mary Ann Lewis was shot and arrested Thursday after leading police on a chase and trying to carjack a family on the Eisenhower Expressway. At that hearing yesterday, the bond was denied. Prosecutors told the court that Lewis was driving the car involved in Adam's shooting. At that McDonald's drive through earlier this month. Yesterday there was a march to remember Adam's baby was innocent babies are being robbed of their innocents. Seven years old, No Chin Lewis. His next court appearance is scheduled for Thursday. Police are looking for two other suspects.

Lynne Adams Mary Ann Lewis Chicago Adam Lewis Mcdonald Chin Lewis
Podcast Microphones: XLR or USB?

Podcasting Q&A

02:36 min | Last week

Podcast Microphones: XLR or USB?

"So When you're shopping around for a new microphone for your podcast you're gonna find a variety of opinions about which one is the best for you. You'll have some people telling you that you really need to get a usb microphone. Like the blue yeti while others say if you really want to be serious about it you should get an xlr microphone like the road pod. Mike so which one is actually the best option for you will in this episode. We're in break. Down the difference between usb microphones and xlr microphones. And help you decide which one is going to be the best decision for your podcast setup. So first let's talk about the difference between an excellent microphone and a usb microphone xl. Our microphones capture your audio recording as an analog signal. Every single concert you've ever been to uses. Xlr microphones to capture the lead singer. The drums all that jess literally in the case of jazz concerts that analog signal is then sent to a mixer or an audio interface or a field recorder and converted into a digital format. Usb microphones record your voice as a digital signal allow you to record directly to your computer saving you the step of having to convert from analog to digital in order to edit your podcast episode both usb. An excellent microphones capture high quality audio. So there's not necessarily an advantage to getting one over the other when it comes to audio quality. The biggest benefit to using a usb microphone is that you can plug it directly into your computer. you don't need some kind of interface or mixer. Im- between your microphone. And you're editing software in order to start working on your podcast episodes. And so that's why microphones like the blue yeti are requested. We aren't necessarily huge. Fans of the blue yeti because it picks up a lot of background noise we think there are some other better options for usb microphones. We're gonna talk about later in this episode but that is one of the big pluses. That's one of the big pros of using a usb microphone. You can plug straight into your computer and start recording. And that's why we think. Usb microphones can be a great solution for solo podcasters. And if you're recording a podcast remotely and you have multiple co hosts or guests in different locations. And you're using remote recording software like zoom squad cast or riverside. Okay so why can't you use. Multiple use microphones in the same place. Computers have a hard time recognizing more than usb microphone at the same time there are some hacks and some work arounds. But they're not very reliable and they will leave you wanting more. So if you're a solo podcast or do all of your interviews remotely. A usb microphone could be a great solution for you

Jess Mike
Durant Scores 33 Points in Return, Nets Beat Suns 128-119

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last week

Durant Scores 33 Points in Return, Nets Beat Suns 128-119

"Kevin Durant poured in thirty three points on twelve of twenty one shooting in twenty eight minutes off the bench helping the nets are to one twenty eight one nineteen win over the sun's directness Brooklyn's previous three games after bruising his left side early in a loss to Miami last Sunday Kyra Irving paced Brooklyn with thirty four points and Blake Griffin added fifteen as the next move one and a half games ahead of the seventy Sixers Devin Booker scored thirty six points in the Andre eight medic twenty with thirteen rebounds for the sons who are tied for second with the clippers in the west and two games behind the jazz I'm Dave Ferrie

Kevin Durant Kyra Irving Brooklyn Nets Devin Booker Blake Griffin Miami Sixers Andre Clippers Dave Ferrie
Jennifer Eggers: The Resilience Framework

Leadership and Loyalty

02:02 min | Last week

Jennifer Eggers: The Resilience Framework

"August today. Is jennifer eggos. Jennifer eggers works with leading organizations at some of the most real recognizable brands in the world to build resilience and to improve that capability and their capacity to adapt so they can emerge from disruption more effectively and faster. She is the founder of leader of leader shift insights and the author of international bestseller resilience. It's not about bouncing back. Ladies and gentlemen please put your hands together and helped me to welcome the author all the best. Thank you so much. I can't say i've ever been just like the thank you. You're very welcome. I'm jazzed good. I'm glad to hear it so where we always liked to start. Is this place which is in this of influences and everybody claiming to be an influence. Who is somebody that we might not think of my not recognize who has been a major influence on you and your leadership. Yeah it's a great question. And i'm glad i get to answer it so my dad I'm sure people don't know who he is. But he was a senior executive for a commercial Tree company actually. And what. I really admired about him is he was able to juggle managing hundreds of man in these hundred hundreds of crews all over the country And then he would go from there to a board. Meeting are negotiating with a really tough union and so you know back then they had one guy that would go from the board to the union to the men what you know today that would be twenty five different people even at all that But he he took a very Employee focused

Jennifer Eggos Jennifer Eggers
Timberwolves Rally to Beat Jazz in Utah for 2nd Time

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | Last week

Timberwolves Rally to Beat Jazz in Utah for 2nd Time

"The Minnesota Timberwolves knocked off the team with the best record in the NBA with a one on one ninety six win over the Utah Jazz the temple's enter the contest twenty eight games below five hundred but rallied from a seventeen point first quarter deficit and held the jazz under one hundred points for the first time since January Karl Anthony towns led Minnesota with twenty four points and twelve rebounds well Anthony Edwards and Angela Russell each scored twenty three points apiece boy bye Donna which topped the jazz with thirty points and Rudy Gobert are pulled down seventeen rebounds I'm Jim Bernard

Utah Jazz The Temple Minnesota Timberwolves Karl Anthony Towns NBA Angela Russell Anthony Edwards Minnesota Rudy Gobert Donna Jim Bernard
Jazz Avenge Loss With 111-97 Win Over Lakers in Rematch

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

Jazz Avenge Loss With 111-97 Win Over Lakers in Rematch

"The jazz let this one start to finish in a one eleven to ninety seven win over the Lakers Utah took a ten point advantage at halftime got it up to twenty five in the fourth quarter center Rudy go bear was scored fourteen points liked his team's inside game where the jets had fifty two points in the paint you know that's what would be nothing so how got this year that we have multiple guys that you know attacks attack pants about insurance and and at the same time we will to not find shooters when the defense collapsed Jordan Clarkson scored a team high twenty two points Utah now with an NBA best forty three wins I am mark Myers

Lakers Utah Rudy Jets Jordan Clarkson NBA Mark Myers
7-Year-Old Fatally Shot in McDonald's Drive-Thru in Chicago

Jimmy Barrett

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

7-Year-Old Fatally Shot in McDonald's Drive-Thru in Chicago

"In Chicago or father wounded attack yesterday, remains under investigation. Chicago police say seven year old jazz Lynne Adams was shot repeatedly and died at a nearby hospital. According to a worker at the restaurant to people in the drive through Lane got out of the car and began firing into a vehicle Jasmine and her father were in. Jonty Adams was shot in the upper body. Police say he's listed in serious condition. The shooter's air not in custody. A motive is not yet been determined. The Chicago Tribune reports the father may have been the target because of gang ties. Mere Lori Lightfoot called the child's killing unthinkable in a tweet gurnal. Scott Fox News. Another probe targeting New York governor Andrew Cuomo was

Lynne Adams Chicago Jonty Adams Lane Lori Lightfoot The Chicago Tribune Scott Fox New York Andrew Cuomo
Lakers Defeat Jazz in OT, Big Win for Playoff Race

Lakers Nation Podcast

00:54 sec | 2 weeks ago

Lakers Defeat Jazz in OT, Big Win for Playoff Race

"Pick up a big overtime win over the Utah Jazz who was a stressful one, but I'm excited to talk about with all of you. Obviously solo show just gave me and all of you is I'm going to be taking all of your questions and comments from YouTube from Facebook and from periscopes. Atossa my way. We're going to give away some lakersnation.com license plate frames as well against Lakers pick up a win. This is this is big though for the Western Conference playoff race for the Lakers to get the win in this one. Obviously, the Jazz are missing a bunch of players Lakers missing a bunch of players this and no way it looks like what this matchup my team look like in the play-offs, but right now it really doesn't matter the Lakers getting the win was the important part in again that jazz battled back actually took the lead for a bit in the fourth quarter. It was not pretty they're for the Lakers for a long while I was stressing. I know a lot of you out there were stressing as well. But in the end, yeah it took over time, but they got the job done. I

Lakers Atossa Utah Jazz Youtube Facebook Jazz
Lakers hold off NBA-leading Jazz 127-115 in OT

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

Lakers hold off NBA-leading Jazz 127-115 in OT

"Dennis Schroder hit the tying basket to force overtime and finished with twenty five points as the Lakers down the jazz one twenty seven one fifteen L. A. carried a fourteen point lead into the fourth quarter but needed triggers layup with three seconds remaining to extend the game cool you know I tried to you know come down have a good shot every single time sometimes it worked out sometimes it just did it but and then the day you know I think I'm part of the group I great drumming added twenty seven points and get TV's Caldwell pope had twenty five for the Lakers who continue to play with that Anthony Davis lebron James the NBA leading jazz were without injured starters Donovan Mitchell my calmly and ruby go there Jordan Clarkson led Utah with twenty seven points against his former team I'm Dave Ferrie

Dennis Schroder L. A. Lakers Caldwell Pope Anthony Davis Donovan Mitchell Lebron James Jordan Clarkson NBA Ruby Utah Dave Ferrie
Minus injured Mitchell, Jazz rally to beat Pacers 119-111

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

Minus injured Mitchell, Jazz rally to beat Pacers 119-111

"Boy on bike dot of each scored twenty four points and Jordan Clarkson added eighteen as the jazz rallied for a one nineteen one eleven win over the Pacers Clarkson led the jazz out of a double digit deficit after Donovan Mitchell sprained his right ankle in the third quarter Bogdanovich says their defense becomes even more important if they have to play multiple games with at Mitchell of course that is going to be different different situation right now if if you want to play by the but on the other hand we gotta we gotta play our our defense and we cannot we don't have a chance against anybody in the league Mitchell left after scoring twenty two points and Rudy go bear added thirteen points twenty three rebounds and four blocks in Utah's second straight win without Mitchell on the floor the jets allowed Indiana to score on only ten total positions over the final fifteen minutes I'm Dave very

Jordan Clarkson Donovan Mitchell Bogdanovich Pacers Mitchell Clarkson Rudy Utah Jets Indiana Dave Very
X-Rays Negative on Jazz Star Mitchell

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:16 sec | 2 weeks ago

X-Rays Negative on Jazz Star Mitchell

"Some games. Utah Jazz star Donovan Mitchell needed to be helped off the floor and into the locker room by teammates during the third quarter of today's win against the Pacers, due to a right ankle injury was rolled pretty badly, but X rays reportedly negative on Mitchell's ankle. That's good news, obviously for Utah, if they're

Donovan Mitchell Utah Jazz Pacers Mitchell Utah
A highlight from Eroticize Daily Interactions: 20 Actionable Tips For Busy Couples

Sex with Dr. Jess

04:54 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Eroticize Daily Interactions: 20 Actionable Tips For Busy Couples

"You can't go from talking about your taxes and your work and your kids whether or not. Your dog had a bowel movement on. Its last walk to just flipping the switch and being ohi tear my clothes off and my joke is when i say this is your daily interactions. I don't mean make everything annoyingly erotic right. I don't wanna be eating a banana and have brennan look over and be like. Oh yeah bowl year. Anti talk is really more about playfulness and flirtation. And i don't know all these different ways to be erotic. It doesn't have to be super sexual or graphic so we're gonna be getting into that. I guess before we do. I should ask you. Do you feel like our interactions are particularly erotic. I don't think that i'm an erotic person. Feels very self-conscious. Whenever i'm trying to do something that i think is erotic whether i've seen it on. Tv movie somewhere. I feel like a goof doing it so when i see people who are genuinely erotic and they just exude the sex appeal. I'm good on you. Because when i try that i feel like i look like a goof. A good hey. No you are naturally charming. Like thirteen is sort of charming. You may not be overtly sexual about it yes. I also wonder if you haven't had to be because people like the way you look so much. Well maybe i don't know perhaps going on you know you've got certainly not the words sir say. I don't think that's entirely true. But i i would say that we've been getting along really well. I would agree. I feel like we laugh a lot and we're playful superfund psyche. Laughing all day. 'cause my jokes are better than yours and then you just repeat my jokes louder. That's the trick everyone listening. Just say the joke louder and be a man. It'd be a white man and then everyone thinks you're hilarious and so yeah. I think this'll be an interesting conversation to go through and see what we do. And don't do because i've made this list for us of twenty ways to keep the flame burning to make your daily interactions more rock not necessarily to lead to sex all the time. So the reason i feel all of these things laid the groundwork so that sex becomes possible like it doesn't make sex automatic. It just means that. Like i can easily get in the mood with you because i like you because i laugh with you because you laugh at my jokes really loudly. Okay before we dive into these twenty ways. I'm actually really excited to shout out a new partner new sponsor with the show the oh my g by ayob toys. So it's this wisber. Quiet internal g-spot massager and it has this little massaging pearl that mimics a come hither motion so it kind of goes up and down and so the little pearl on a curved violator is about the size of the top pad of my thumb. Can you give me a better sense to scripture for that thing. Well maybe about the size of a quarter and he's not that wide but like top to bottom l. Yeah that's right but it's long like it's more oblong. This is the oh my g by obama. And it's curved really nicely so you can access the zone and the pearl works in this come hither emotion and kind of goes up and down to vibe against your jason and of course it's fda approved body silicone all that jazz so highly encourage people to check it out. I actually just posted it on my instagram and got a really big response. I actually made a real. This is my first time. This is how big deal. How old and far behind. I am but Yeah people were very excited by it. And i got some really good feedback so you can check it on my instagram. Or you can head on over to iowa toys or look for the. Oh my g and have a big discount code. Actually i have a thirty percent discount code. That's good right now. So it's judy. Gosh i only repeat the good ones so the discount. Code is dr jests d. r. j. e. s. s. at i obey toys so check out the. Oh my g and i. It's actually designed for internal stimulation should mention for the g. zone area but i was using it externally as well. It's very cool and it was created by folks who were trying to solve the problem of kind of louder toys. So it's really really nice and quiet lake me you just like okay. So let's talk about eroticism and how do weave eroticism throughout your day

Brennan Ayob Toys Dr Jests FDA Jason Barack Obama Iowa
Former 'Bachelor' Star Colton Underwood Comes Out as Gay

Ace and TJ

00:57 sec | 3 weeks ago

Former 'Bachelor' Star Colton Underwood Comes Out as Gay

"Colton underwood. He was the bachelor. He was on good morning america this morning and he said he's gay so i don't think that's ever happened before. Bachelor goes on the show. Find somebody and then years later says no sorry about that which ones colton cole was very good. He's good looking has he thinks oh has he. But he's saying he's always gala. He scammed him He said it's taken him a long. Time to come to grips with the truth. Okay any just had this very explosive public breakup with his last girlfriend who was also on the show but now he is a he has come out so For him he's very good looking. I think he's got tm jay because his job one jazz digger than the other about them talking about in the joint. One of his jaws is bigger than the. It wasn't good for you. Live your life do you. do you think so. He is one of the top trending topics this morning

Colton Underwood Colton Cole America JAY
NBA-leading Jazz deal Thunder seventh straight loss, 106-96

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 3 weeks ago

NBA-leading Jazz deal Thunder seventh straight loss, 106-96

"The Utah Jazz rallied from a big early deficit to post a one oh six ninety six win over the Oklahoma City thunder Rudy Gobert had fourteen rebounds thirteen points plus seven blocked shots as the jetro by seventeen points in the first quarter but stormed back to lead by as many as twenty five in the fourth volume by Donna which led the jazz in scoring with twenty three points while Donovan Mitchell added twenty two George Liang had eighteen points and ten rebounds and Mike Conley passed out fourteen assists against Dordt scored a career high forty two points for the thunder who dropped their seventh straight game I'm Jim Bernard

Rudy Gobert Jetro Utah Jazz Oklahoma City Donovan Mitchell George Liang Donna Dordt Mike Conley Thunder Jim Bernard
"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"That's a new aspect of what the culture is like. Now it's going might goodness quick. Let's stop talking about that and have some terrific music from you and your trio. That would be good. We're going to do to next. That is. A blues fast uptempo one called Goget. That was something what's co go get it. I think you got.

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"And it was really a stroke of luck for me to be around musicians who who kind of didn't really see that as necessarily good thing that I could get a lot of audience response by imitating another musician, and and that encourage me very early on to kind of try to investigate things. Also it. I mean, you imitating him, but now gives later you've done your own research and you've got your own thing. Going researches a word. I like, I mean, you know, whenever somebody gives us a gig or you get to make one more record, just consider it exactly that it's like another point of research into the goal of trying to understand music in a deep way and and you come good player. It's just thinking beside west Montgomery, who has some of your. Players, whether we're three guys that were really huge for me west being the major one, Kenny, bro with somebody that I just loved everything about his sound feeling that he had. And the just everything about Kinney to me was was a real model and and then the guy that that I feel like is the major source for not not just what I do, but sort of all of us that have followed him chronologically. And that's Jim Hall who I think opened up this whole world of potential for what the guitar can offer other musicians and and how the guitar can sort of kind of create this allusion of space and yet size and scale. He just kinda changed the whole balance of what the guitar could be in jazz, I think. And I think John Scofield Bill for Zell and I are kind of all more or less the same age point to Jim, even though we all sound quite different from each other. And to me, that's kind of interesting sign right there that he is somebody that liked the three of us really admire and have learned from. But at the same time, his thing was just so open ended. It inspired us in very different ways, which to me is great means of thing is carrying right on the music is carrying on. Thanks this. Yeah, I've got osc you about your record. I don't know how new it is the way up its veg Matic peace and all these different tones and it gets passionate and loud and bombastic, and then it gets quiet. It's I can listen to that peaceful ever end. It's. That's probably two thinking though, about how the world is today, where you. Well, I mean, you know, I think that the world has really embraced, you know, this sort of almost lowest common denominator approach to aesthetic issues and ineffectually recent will and you know, for me the the kinds of things that I've found to be really worthwhile are not things that happen in in a short period of time. You know, I mean, just to understand music has been a long long road is I think it is for everybody that serious about it, whether they're listener or a player, and it's not something that you can condense into a, you know, five second form, you know, and that's the latest thing is now to to, you know, they have a chart on billboard for ringtones, which is a piece of music that lasts five. Seconds the and we're, we, we sort of went to the complete opposite extreme, which is to have one piece that lasts the entire CD and. Not that long form writing is anything particularly new. I mean, this is a a substantial part of the tradition of music and it sadly has been kind of lost in the past period of time. I mean, you know, there are have been jazz composers that have have done that and certainly classical composers. But my feeling is that there's no reason why the lessons that have been learned throughout all of music's history can should not be brought into play with each new generations and music. So ringtones. It's funny like you have to put your ringtone through cap, something ridiculous, but what's hard to think of it as a form that is, you know, valuable to the degree that it's being monitored by the industry. Three as not just rice light thing, but fairly substantial part of what music is now, you know. And that's just kind of something, I guess..

Jim Hall Kinney Zell Montgomery John Scofield Kenny five second
"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"Boy, that's really wonderful tune. That was what you started out with when you were what about seventy. Eighteen. I mean for me the the whole thing of writing music sort of evolved as a platform for it was out of necessity actually, because there was a way I wanted to play an improviser that I was having a hard time sort of reconciling with playing on standards and playing on blues forms and the kinds of things that I was doing. You know, around Kansas City with musicians always playing with, didn't want to do those. Particularly I did actually, and I and I loved it and I still do. I still love playing, you know, in that way, but there was a certain kind of thing that I felt like I needed to come up with an environment for to support this way improvising. And that tune is kind of still remains a good example. I mean, you know the kind of harmonic things that are going on or more like just simple triads very, almost full, quite kinds of harmonic motions. And to me the that was a very appealing and a very resonant area. Of interest to express what I was doing. Very, you really knew just what you wanted to do right then. And then when did Gary Burton get into your life just well, I was, yeah. I was a big fan of his group from that period in the late sixties, especially they were one of the bands that I felt was really trying to kind of find a place within the the jazz language that had that kind of resonance with the times of what was happening there. He so wonderful. I imagine that. He was very helpful to you that time. Well, getting to join his band at the age of eighteen was sort of like joining the Beatles for me. I mean, that was favorite band and you know the fact that I might get to play with them ever in my entire life was sort of a major goal and to be able to do it. So young was great in itself, but the best part was being around not only Gary, but Steve swallow and Bob, Moses and make good the other guys who were in the band, I think of Steve's follow. He worked with me too great deal. What a funny guy of hot from being a wonderful one of the great people on earth. No, that is well, that must be a great time for you. All these thoughts going through your head all music that you have inside through the to want to get some of an out. Well, I was very kind of determined in a way to follow what I saw as kind of an essential comp-. Phone throughout jazz history, which was musicians who found a way to manifest into sound the things that they found to be true and to be real to them. And you know my case, my story was a little bit different. I came from a country town, the middle of Missouri, and it was not the same as grown up in Philly, like Christian or you know, doing, you know, all the different other avenues that people have found their way into jazz like you too. I mean, you know, I came from a different angle and to me, I always embrace that. I, I never tried to hide from that and to me jazz form that not only accepts other things kind of demands, that kind of honesty, that kind of personal connection to what absolutely. I mean, you cannot play jazz, not be an honest person. You can't be of fake jazz player. Yes. And I think that you know along with that, there's a tendency to emulate people that are your favorites, and my favorite was west Montgomery. He was my hero, but even at a very early age, I was around me. Who kind of took a dim view that whenever I'd whip out my west Montgomery thing, you know, people would kind of, you know, look at me kind of funny they, you know the the audience would always love it doing something that he did. Right..

Gary Burton Steve swallow jazz west Montgomery Kansas City Beatles Gary Missouri Philly Moses Bob
"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"New technology and improvisations kills he certainly one of the brightest stars in the jazz firmament an Icee. So. Third, everybody else. How are you. I'm great. And I'm so glad to be here with you today Miriam. Oh, I'm just so glad to have you. And when I think of when I first met you only about fifty. I think I was actually fourteen one for the first time. Yeah, Decatur Illinois, right. We would doing the sort of guest faculty and believe it your student well, you, you were incredibly inspiring, actually, and you know it was a very big week for me. It was one of the first times I'd ever left home, you know, really, I think it was the first time I was ever away from my parents. You know, really, I had one like a little scholarship from downbeat magazine, which was a shock. I mean, it was something that I had had -ticipant it at all eight hundred this contest by sort of playing all, basically an exact copy of a west Montgomery solo and the the prize was to go to this camp and you were there, and I held will several masterclasses with you and met a few musicians that I've stayed in touch with to this day, but. I mean, it was the first time I'd ever really been around other kids my age that had an interest in an awareness of jazz on high level, and it was very important week for me, and I think I even wrote it tune that that you did, you wrote a, it was a big band piece actually, and it was called charge, and there's a funny reason why it was called charge. Yeah. Why was it? Because my dad had a business in the little town. I'm from Lee's summit, and I noticed that professional arrangers always had like a rubber stamp at the top of the chart that had the name of the chart on it. Right. And the only rubber stamp my dad had was charged. So I use that rubber-stamp and therefore the tune was called charged, think put gray was really country then. Well, it was it was great to have that peace and I've, I've got on earth that thing and Roddy will play well. Well, I mean. I mean, it wasn't the most advanced composition in the world, but it was a thrill to be able to write something, and I appreciate it very much that you enjoyed it and you supported and approved of it and everything. Well, that whole week, whether it was a week or two weeks, I don't know what it was, but it was very enjoyable and and the kids were all very good, especially yourself. And now it just seems like a minute, but it's, I don't know how many is and that would be today is I say, big star in the in jazz. And you brought your group with you, who did you bring? Well, I'm just so happy to have had the opportunity over the last ten or fifteen years to have played often with one of the great bass players of our time. And I just can't say enough about him, but it's not just me. It's everybody that knows him, and that loves him as we all do. And that's the great Christian McBride on the base that IMP. And joining us on the drums is a guy who's also been a member of my regular group, Pat Metheny group for the past few years. And to me, he's one of the most exciting drummers this show up in many, many years. He's from Mexico, and his name is Antonio Sanchez. Well, it's just great to have all of you here and I'm dying here. You play something. So what do you think the first number is likely to be? Well, I thought we'd start from the very beginning, which is the first tune on the first album that I ever made many years ago, and it's still fun to play, especially with Christian and Antonio, and it's called bright size life. Wonderful. Can't wait to you. It..

Roddy Antonio Sanchez downbeat magazine Montgomery Pat Metheny Decatur Illinois Christian McBride Miriam Lee gray Mexico fifteen years two weeks
"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

08:52 min | 2 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"I think it was the second year he had it. I went over there and, oh, I was doing the Verity right Quayum and then it's celebrating came over and he was. He was filming the Spoleto festival his Sunday show. And so. Louis came over with his boys and he got sick. And so I was rehearsing the Verdi requiem and in walked at Sullivan and he said, I have to talk to you and and. Thirty regular and what is he doing? And he said, I know you can sing pop music and he said Lewis sick. So he can't do his number. He said, will you sing us? Will you're saying is well, God, I don't know what I don't have any music, you know? And he said, well, you the guys get together and you'll find out what you want to do. So I I, I did the show and it came up pretty good. So then after I got the next year and was doing another showdown, he was filming down in Las Vegas and Louis down there. So I went down and we did. We did a do it together. Then you actually did. Well, you've done things with with so many people you you. You worked Bernstein many, many times that was that. Shear heaven. He was just wonderful to work with will do like west side story. Oh, no, no, no, no, no, mostly Wagner. Oh, not any of his things. No, no, no, no, no, I did. As a matter of fact, my only my one and only Grammy is from doing the immolation seen with funny, and I think it was always Wagner that I did with him. Just reminded if somebody else talking to somebody the other night. People forget so quickly. Percy faith, of course, I made a record with Percy faith. Now he was so wonderful though. He's, he has passed away so you don't think about him. And he said, no, I record with infant Columbia, Columbia records. He was a great guy to work with. He was wonderful and with Andre Previn I did one with Andre Previn. Yeah. When you're going to write you, you're not gonna write any book. My heavens, I always say, look, I've had a lot of publicity throughout my fifty years of singing, and I've got a lot of publicity and what people don't know. I'm not about to tell them because I don't want anybody to know why see secrets, you know, that's different. Mosul one, I don't want my children to pick up a book into my mother did that my Lord. I wouldn't embarrass them now. You know, I'm having more fun here. I just hardly stand really. It's such a thrill for me to be here Marian. It really isn't a sing with you. And to watch you play, it's unbelievable. It's a, it's a thrill for me. I mean, I don't get to do this very often to accompany anybody much less somebody. Let me tell you not everybody can accompany and you are fabulous. Now you making my giving me a big hit. All right. I'll play something this is believe it or not of I wrote years ago. At the hickory house. I'm not gonna say how long ago that was anyway anyway, tune called. They'll be other times. Fabulous. Did you write any words to that. God somebody did. Yeah, I can hear myself singing that. That's wonderful. It's kind of sad song will I love set songs? It's a new, it's it's just, you know, they'll be other times when one of those things you'll be back one of these days. Futa full. Well, I've have you great pleasure to to give you the sheet music. I'd love to have it. Yes, God, this is you know. You know, we, we've hardly scratched the surface. Go on, go on. Unfortunately, if one cannot. The full piano jazz broadcast tune into your NPR station or stream the program online at piano, jazz dot NPR, dot org. Piano jazz is a production of South Carolina public radio..

Wagner Sullivan Percy faith Louis Andre Previn Marian NPR Quayum Las Vegas Lewis Grammy Bernstein South Carolina hickory house Mosul Columbia fifty years
"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"Hi, I'm Marion mcpartlin. I guess today have PI no jazz. I lead Farrell a celebrated opera singer, and she's turned fantastic, vocal gifts to jazz and blues, and she's impacted in a whole new career. I think it's absolutely wonderful. I lease. Because I love to sing this stuff. It's great the so much wonderful music and see all I wanna do is thing. 'cause I love to sing. That's my problem. Well, that's pretty obvious. Goodness knows how many years, but the thing that interests me is for so many years, even known worldwide, as a great classical soprano singer. How can't somebody who does that all precision in the vocal technique that goes with it switch to doing what you're doing singing hot me. Well, what I do things I'm singing are in a lower key that's more comfortable for me and I don't pay any attention to my voice. I just don't care my voice. I paid strict attention to the words and the story that I'm telling because I'm telling a story whether it's happy or sad or what, and I just concert. Trate on the words that's all. And well, of course, my father started in vaudeville when he was ten years old and so I was brought up on show music. Oh, so you didn't just come to hearing it all lately. I had it all my life all my life. Well, then to do all this, you must have had a teacher to learn classical technique. And I mean, my mother was my first teacher because my mother was a coloratura. Both. My mother and father was singing as my father was a high baritone and my mother taught voice. She taught piano and she was an organist in church in Connecticut, and because you know, your mother doesn't really know anything. Right? What does she know about saying? I had no ambitions to be a singer really, but my mother took me to New York and she got a teacher for me and I stayed. That's all there was to it, and then it was just I had to, I had burn a living. So I started, you know, I was singing at CBS and for seven years I did a half hour show and then sometimes and then also about five or six years. I did the prudential family hour on Sunday afternoon. Goodness. Yeah, what it's amazing. I know this is a silly remark, I lean, but you don't seem like an opera star. I mean, I always think of up. For people as sort of stomach endlessly majestic. And sorry. No, not sort of like this sort of other worldly people with an entourage and well, you know, you can't be that type of person, and there are those types, but I don't happen to be it just don't happen to be that kind of person. You just obviously had a real down to earth, fun person to be around. Well, thank you, I'm, I'm glad that's just the way I am. What was your first opera the first opera I did was, oh, I did a little cavalier and I did that down in Tampa, and I had no stage rehearsal. I made my own costume, oh, dear Lord. When I think about that that took guts, but my really big debut was at San Francisco and in. Sure. No, no, no Trovatore. Oh yes. I Detroit are. And with UC bureau Ling. Right cast. Yeah. How long did it take to prepare? Well, like that. I always took about a year because I learned my words. I, I learned the words as if it were a play and my coach and I am I accomplished and I would talk back and forth, you know, and therefore I got the words in my head in the meaning of everything. And then the music always came easily except when I did when I did what's sick. 'cause that was what did how to pronounce. That's what sec that was the first time I have done anything with the twelve tone scale. My God..

Marion mcpartlin Farrell UC bureau Ling New York Connecticut CBS Tampa San Francisco Detroit seven years six years ten years
"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"I used to do that stuff all the time. You know? That's not to do. Yeah. Yeah. You gotta have a strong left do indeed, but then later on naturally, I didn't realize it at the time, but I also was listening to our Tatum but see he was playing blues piano behind the singers. And I, I didn't realize it was our Tatum how I knew that the guy had marvelous technique and I liked it, you know? And so I was influenced by that to, you know, and then later on in naturally it was Oscar Peterson garner my two favorite. Well, you picked some good bonds. 'cause Askar his his. I don't know what I mean. I run out of supportive with that guy and and Earl two, I proud to have known aero is wonderful guy, but although you do do some things sound light Oscar, you really have your own style off to somebody listens late. No, it's not Oskar. I think I said this before, but you really are a master of these. What? I think I was slow swing things. I mean, how do you. The thing that broke me up, you've got a record out a new doing, you're doing this, tune. Yes. H. radio, the trae, the balance balance. The train is late today. It's really laid back really laid back, but I never know where the where the like the what I think was the push beat is gonna come, you know. That's the thing I'm afraid. I would be a head of a high tournament doing that. I understand, but not in your case or it's just wonderful. Done with that much emphasis on the push be, that's that's why it's all kind of laid back and it just falls right into to the cracks. It's unbelievable. I mean, that's like magic. That's something I think that. Classical players sort of puzzle over when they hear jazz players because the thing is in time and yet it's not, yes, it's an intangible. It's like stretching a rubber band celebration. That's exactly right. It's like being on a wave and just letting it just take you. Yeah. Well, gene, what's coming up for you? What's what's in the future? We'll touring Japan, of course, with concord records. Oh, how wonderful well is, is Mr. concord himself count Jefferson going along a, yes, you'd naturally. I guess we'll be with mill Torme. Oh, how exciting you? You mean you, you'll go to get to play opposite male or with mill with mill. You know, I had Bill as a guest on this show and that man is a genius. Yes, he is. He really. I mean, now there's a guy who really does do all these things does play does save does make arrangements does compose. He's unbelievable. Well, that should be nice. And then what's off to that? Well, then we have for recording to do. We have a new album to put out, and I think we're gonna use on on how many voices, but it's going to be with us. So it's really different. Oh, that's going to be nice. Will now night still, I'm going to bug you now about doing your solo album. One of these. You sound so good. We play sort of thank you and that has to be one of the things in the near future. But meanwhile, the big album is the is the big band. You're going to lot of things going for you. It's just so wonderful to hear somebody that you've known unheard for years. Sounding better better all the time. I think that's the way it's supposed to be. Don't you mean time in, uh, this is tipped is terrible chain Harris. The show is almost over. I'm just having so much fun. I wish it wasn't over. Thank you. I've had such a good time and I hope you have had a wonderful time..

Tatum Oscar Peterson Askar mill Torme Japan Earl Harris Mr. concord Bill Jefferson mill
"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"I'm Marion mid Portland, my guest today, a piano jazz singer. Molly info plank. She's one of the finest interpreters of popular song performing today. Sensitivity and warmth brings a special magic to every song she sings. Hi, Molly, hi, Marian about Well, I I didn't expect such a long introduction, but thank you long. I thought it was shot. I mean, I could. I could go into rhapsodies, go go on about your saying. I was trying for ages to remember where I met you, and it suddenly dawned on me that was with a vocal group, John Sal, and the John LaSalle quartet, and you were working across the street from where we were working. We were at the hickory house. I mean, you were at the hickory house and we were somewhere just across the street. Maybe that hotel or the left Bank, maybe the left Bank? Yeah, how that was. I remember that we kind of met then in you had your great trio there. We often visited each other as I recall that group with John LaSalle was really wonderful. Yes, it was. John is absolutely magnificent singer. One of the best male singers I have ever heard in my life and it's a shame that he is not more well known or doesn't have a higher profile because his charisma on. Stages. Incredible. And I learned so much from him in my starting out, I would guess you would say in the business because I still use things that he taught me and they still work and really, yes. So that was really one of you? Yes. Well, how did you get into actual singing. I was in college majoring in journalism for about over a year, and I said, this isn't going to be it. This isn't. I'm not good at this. Not that good, and I always loved to sing. I just always listen to Sinatra and Ella and all those good people. And I said, that's what I'm going to do. I'm going to sing. I was nineteen years old. So I I was working in a Bank in during the summer holiday and I looked in the yellow pages and there was a a vocal coach in those years, they had vocal coaches, and he was right next door. So I ran over on my lunch hour and I said, Hello, I'm Marlene. I want to sing. I never looked back. I know I've never been out of work since does amazing, and it's wonderful. Also the power of positive thinking if I ever heard. Yeah. Well, how do you search around for song? Oh, I search you remember years ago when they used to. Have about a dozen or more piano bars around New York, and he's like Murray grand and buddy Barnes. And all those ornery is I would go there with pad and pencil and write down everything because they knew every song every verse every word every, oh, they knew everything jobs to forest yet. Charlie forest and all those guys. Yup. But how do you like when you finally picked a couple of songs, how do you choose what he'll do with multi the UN? Well, husband Billy you? Yes. As you know, Billy does all my range moments. My husband Billy Verplank and we work on a song together when I finally say, okay, let's work on this one. Then we'll just sit down and he'll play the piano. He's good enough to rehearse, but he has no confidence on the chop o onto terrible. Well, he, he's the one that says it, I would love, wouldn't it be nice and easy if I could carry my own accompanist all the time, I guess, I guess. So that's one thing. Think about singers to really sort of playing Russian roulette venue playing gigs. Like with me, at least I have the piano in front of me and I know what I'm gonna. Do you do with it even if it's bad, but with with a singer, you to take really well Cianci when you're in different cities in different places and you have to deal with, you know, people that are there..

Billy Verplank John LaSalle hickory house John Molly Charlie forest Marian John LaSalle quartet Portland John Sal UN Sinatra New York Ella buddy Barnes Murray nineteen years
"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

06:42 min | 2 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"And when I went on to Manhattan school, I, I was a classical major and then for grad school, I majored in Jess, didn't you find it in the beginning. Getting away from the classical side and improvising was a little hard, or did you just fall naturally into it? I don't know. Sometimes I think people are who they are from the beginning. Like, you know, I played a lot of classical music, and there was something in it that was really so beautiful for me, especially like playing in Symphony Orchestra. It's like that massive sound like seventy people and your this one person. But somehow when you're playing the temperature, you feel like you're playing like you're creating that massive sound such a beautiful feeling o- when you playing the Tim Tiffany, you have to kind of wait for your spot. Don't you right when you do play? Oh, my goodness. So. I really enjoyed that. But I think deep inside I was always a free spirit. I always wanted the phrase it my own way. It certainly sounds like to me, well, how did you get out of there and start limbers you first gig? One of my first gigs was with max Roach. Well, yeah, that must have been good. Oh, man. That was something else that's that's like buffet. My the thing that I'm most grateful in terms of my career that I've had the chance to really work with some incredible musicians and I've had fantastic mentors. So my introduction into the working world of jazz was in a very open environment and max would always like play your own thing. You don't have to play bebop. You don't have to play any style. The reason I have you here is to find your own voice. So from the beginning, I was encouraged to break the rules and it was fantastic. Well, you such free and easy play on you. Have muster must've both instruments. I would think it would be very. Easy for you to do something. I love to do once in a while, like that's totally free thing where we just go our own way and see what happens. All right. We'll go our own way and hopefully we'll meet somewhere down. Let's try. Let's do it. All right. Boy, that was kind of wild at a couple of little little themes in the went. You know if I were to play that back, I could pick out something. One of the two talking about to know yet a little short phrases. It's definitely met a few times on the road we We did did. then. This is great special special day for me. I really had.

Jess max Roach Manhattan Tim Tiffany Symphony Orchestra
"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"My guest today on piano jazz, vibraphonist and composer Stefan Harris. He's musician of great vitality, brilliance is destined for a long and creative career blazing new trails on the Rimba and vibes and gathering high praise from his peers. As he goes along the way. I think a lot is happening view. Isn't it fun? Thank you. Yeah, things have been really great. I have no complaints whatsoever play. That's nice to hear. Most people do. Have you you've you've been doing a lot of recording? I see like the something new with Jacky terrasson. Yeah. Our latest record is called a kindred. That was a lot of fun. It was very spontaneous. You know, we had very sparse arrangements, but we knew that our goal going in was to hype to highlight communication like very loose, a lot of the soloing on there. It's not like one person taking a featured solo. It's we're trying to have our two minds function as one and not necessarily trading where I play the new play. I played the new play where really, I may play three notes. He might play four and then I might play too. And that total of nine notes would be one freeze as opposed to back and forth. It's very exciting to listen to in in. In fact. Well, how about you folks? We, we parents musical of, I don't really come from a musical family, but my brother did play some trumpet, but we moved into this apartment and someone left an old piano behind and inside the bench of the piano. There were these music books, and they had great pictures of the keys with the little notes written on each key. So when I was in kindergarten or so, I was able to look at the picture and end up learning all the notes on the piano, and I taught myself how to read music like a genius. I don't know about the I have done that. I'm still a terrible Rita. You probably probably a good read of it. Somebody that can teach themselves to read. I don't think I would have been able to read it all if I hadn't studied the violin for a few years. And so at least I can read the top line, right? It's funny. I, I learned differently as a result of teaching myself. I learned through the eyes of of a seven year old kid at six year old kid. So like I knew all of my. Cords like triads except I didn't know them according to well, this in the key of deflect major, you have this flat in that all I did was count the spaces in between the notes. So I knew all of my major triads and any key and all I had to remember for that was three to because in between the first two notes there, three spaces in between the second to notes, stir, too. So all the keys really something. Well, you went to the Manhattan school? Yeah. I started at the Eastman school of music. I've went there for one year, and then I ended up transferring and doing my undergraduate and graduate work at Manhattan school of music. That's my second home in Rochester being Eastman. Yeah, I love it up there. Yeah. And what happened at Eastman? It was I, that was the first time that I heard Charlie Parker. Oh, yeah. And it doesn't take much more than that. There was a great record Colt. Now's the time, and some students sat me down and played me that record and started to explain to me what goes in what's maybe going through the mind of jazz musician, just in terms of understanding the harmony being able to hear every little subtle change and respond to it, respond to the drummer and Charlie Parker, my play a quote for friend who walked in the door and just I was just amazed by how spiritual liberated he was in the music. And after after I heard that, I said, okay, I need to go to New York, so I can be a little bit closer to this music. So that made you pick up and leave and and you went to the Manhattan schooled in. Right. And I was at the time I was a classical major. I had a great foundation in classical music coming from Albany. There's a fantastic organization air called the Empire State youth orchestra tour, which I had phenomenal teachers as an eighth grader. I was studying sonata. Reform Beethoven symphonies, so had phenomenal foundation in music..

Stefan Harris Eastman school of music Manhattan school of music Eastman Charlie Parker Jacky terrasson Manhattan New York Manhattan school Albany Empire State Rochester seven year one year six year
"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"Hi i'm mary mid portland my guest today on piano jazz clarinetist composer don byron and he's a musician many parts he draws the classics early jazz jazz rap rock and everything else in between in short he's really a musical maverick and of course it's really nice to have you here doing panic as gee thanks you know after i heard your record bike music i've never never heard anything like that lately i mean to hear all of its raymond scott tunes and royal garden blues and i've just found that an i still do find that very exciting and and sometimes funny record where'd you get that pano player laurie k he's one of my my old great friends in he's you know a lot of people that are around me have to be willing to like actually learn some stuff that they did didn't know a lot of the ellington parts especially ahead to have somebody who could read them you know and really you know because the cords are just so specific especially stuff like cotton club stomp and addicted glide which is like such a you know i think i cried the first time we rehearsed it it's i never knew that too and the the way you arrange it for the instruments it's terrific where did you i mean those are really pretty literal transcriptions you know and that's you know it's from nineteen twenty whatever i mean it's it's really the way it was i mean we don't really we didn't change it too much i mean some people when they do like stuffed they almost like to do like this kind of post modern david murray thing it's like you start with the shell of what you're doing and then you kind of take it way way further than than they would've taken when i do repertory stuff i just want it to sound right you know i think that's hard and i think that there's not that many people that can really you know get the transcriptions right and then teach ban how to sound in style at they're not familiar with that's hard well you really took on like some kind of a i wouldn't call it a task but i mean it's something that that you want to show people these earlier linked to and arrangements what better way to to highlight them then you did on this on this record exactly the way they were i mean but they're timeless those things i mean that to me as a composer that period of ellington it's not that i don't like the blend webster stuff but that period of ellington just from tuna tune is so inspiring it so wildly diverse and just even the way the rhythm section is set up how to ban is divided up the kind of chords that he uses in the way that he distributes dumb it's such an exciting period of any composer's life i mean there's nothing else like it there's a period of bartok that i think is almost this great there's a you know the neoclassic stravinsky period i think is really great but to me as as someone that studies composition that's like my favorite period of anybody's work well before we go any further i'm dying to a lot more but let's play something let's play let's play for dido knin all right one to one.

portland don byron
"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"Support for this npr podcast and the following message come from the ups store who knows that small business owners can't afford to take days off so they'll be open to on may twenty fifth and twenty six for all your small business needs visit the ups store dot com for details today on jazz we bring you a program from the nineteen eightynine archives when marianne mcpartlin gifts was been citron who is not only nationally respected jazz composer be an instance stylist but also scholar radio tv producer and jazz writer at the time of this session npr listeners often heard his insightful commentary on all things considered as his own program said on record today the tables turn i'm interviewing been sittin welcome to pano jazz as a pleasure to be here in part because synon record as modeled a little bit after your show how do you decide who will be on the show that's interesting it started out when i was thinking about the players that i liked and then i broadened into really to players that i might not know particularly well and i use it as a way to to get to know them better and really use my ignorance to lead the conversation on assuming that there are a lot of people out there who ignorant like i am and then there were areas where i really want to know some things about how the record business was run and so i got some record producers in there so it's kind of all over the place didn't you just go out with the steve miller band i did i was this is interesting the steve miller as i suppose many of your listeners know is a blues artist and has had.

steve miller npr marianne mcpartlin writer twenty fifth
"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"This programme was originally broadcast in 1997 judy on marion mcbride lindh's fianna jasray's showcasing a guest who's been known as the mad ban of latin jazz it epo mary it he is a virtual show piano player composer and bent esti band leader and an expert on latin jazz on this session from 1997 he brought with him what marion called one of the wildest rhythm sections ever on piano jails these rates have your thoughts and now you go to introduce the band with got your whole group here tell me then names will you okay well we'll start with cuffy thunder to really move the captain his name is hosts sick close it okay we'll go then to our base missed two who do nothing from thirty on gone gust dolores we have the fina mr fraud is from puerto rico and our special inviting guest today is mr marking yoenis on bogus did that's wonderful and well i'm really dying to hear this know this is exciting for me because i don't think of myself as somebody that's well versed in this music i love to listen to it but i would really like to hear you play a tune with the whole group well what's this one going to be this was called the on yet daddy daddy is a wonderful spiritual woman that lose in puerto rico and i dedicate this competition to are in rcd of war tech's it's the opening of a dec d and then we feature mr richie fraud is on congress uh earn it starts piano solo.

marion mcbride lindh fraud puerto rico mr richie
"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"Support for this mpr podcast and the following message come from isotope makers of spire studio the portable multitrack recording system that lets you easily capture mix edit and share professional quality recordings wherever and whenever inspiration strikes learn more at spier dot live the following program originally aired in two thousand eight hi i'm marion the cartland today on piano jazz my guest is in engaging young singer pianists in composant tony just he has a straightforward yet infectious delivery with a warm clear melih fluids sound and a lot of chomped match toning ally you i'm just great marion are you i'm doing fine and all the better for having you in the studio while thanks i love ju records i don't know which i like better those to the newest ones they are they're on the first release is until tell it's called want you as is the second it's called last first choson yeah i'm really proud of them both and they both kind of represent a good snapshot of where i was at both those times i think that's terrific and you were in that musical about frank sinatra went to yes a few years ago there is a offbroadway show which is a big hit ran for a number of years called our sinatra he has rhinos attribute not to frank sinatra in his life as much as it was to frank sinatra's musical taste so it was three singers on stage i was the piano player singer and the great thing about it was i wasn't doing a frank sinatra in impersonation it was about.

spier dot marion frank sinatra
"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"Duties guest on piano jazz is the great dizzy gillespie who joined mariam at cartland the 1985 for what was truly one of her favorite programs the name dizzy described the playful personality and adventurous musical style of john burks gillespie what are the most celebrated jazz musicians of the 20th century this time i heard you was a cia still on his place in paris st lucia up towel and he played and he played me that record with alhagar on piano i guess beside the hothouse assault peanuts of both of those things and i was flabbergasted i'd never heard music like that an i'm saying what's the panoply of doing it how does he learn those courts is he what's he doing it it is the most exciting thing that ever happened to me whether you're wherever or new driver we've from whom watson what's new that was newton at plan in uh the music that charlie parker created the style that he created required that from the piano and required new ideas from the drums and also from the base because the the it made guys change the way of new invasion of the way you play and while you play now that require require that people change what they were to where we are hey we that we had you know then we had wanted that what did you have to show any that was piano players like when you first started out did you have to say like gearhead male more your shoulder purebred except malt.

mariam cia assault watson john burks gillespie charlie parker
"jazz" Discussed on The Jazz Scene

The Jazz Scene

11:35 min | 4 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on The Jazz Scene

"Baby, and I'm just going to give the lyrics 'cause they are the lyrics, and I'll let the chips fall where Carl is going to say. Come and trim my Christmas tree Ono with some decorations bought from Tiffany, you know. But when she says, come and trim my tryst Christmas tree, a lot of guys, I'm going to ask you to control yourself. If you have bought your wife brought you wife with right because but the the great song, if you've heard of earth too because of the soul Dublin, Andrea, and you can sort of your she singing one thing, but you're definitely thinking something. Which is a fun thing about Christmas show, but should go from that. I'll be home for Christmas and things like that. I think she's got an original song that she's a premier original holiday song. Our executive director press off worth has been pushing me. 'cause you gotta tell Carly to do goldfinger. And I was like, well, that's not a Christmas song. He's like, she's got to goldfinger thinking. I I'm gonna ask because that'll be our Christmas present rush. That's when she sings really well. So arses present to you should probably do nobody does it better in goldfinger in those will be the only non non Chris non Christmas or holiday, which is a little bit of a tip of the hat. Her other life, she's an actress. She's a movie actress and a sort of Broadway. She's done that show rent. And if you go look it up on YouTube, concedes done a couple nice movies and things like that. And her voice is one that that she's been back with a couple of times. Now. She has such a powerful voice that that I feel like such a wide range of audience can get behind her voice because she can sing in this really sort of contemporary sort of pop sensibility, but then she can just jazz and there's a, there's a version of you'd be so nice to come home to him that I've heard her. She sounds like Ella. It's like, you can do that. She's a great singer and a great, so we want. And I have to be honest, Carly is good to look at. And I don't think should be offended right or think she would be so. And then I just wanted to let you know we have a guy that's not advertises guest, although I think we're pushing for him to sue quickly. Bobby Floyd. It's going to be out with the Basie band. You won't be at this concert, but this is a testament to what jazz ours group is doing. So our guest on piano is gonna be Columbus, youth, jazz, orchestra, alumnus, and he is only at this time. I think he's eighteen or nineteen. He is not twenty. I don't say, and his name is Mike Thomas, and he's going to sit in play the piano chair. You know why? Not because he's young and not because he used to be Columbus youth. Jazz orchestra is because he's one of the best in the country got now the week before he will be with me playing with me as soloist with me in the Atlanta symphony, and he's going to do that concert. He's done that with two other orchestras with me before I heard disguise like he's as good as any pro. So I think we have something to be proud about a jazz arts group in Columbus, jazz orchestras. You don't have to tell you. He told me, I like hot mic. How'd you learn to play like this? Was it from from playing jazz in your school? All the time. He said actually, my only outlet for playing jazz was the Columbus youth. Jazz rise drew, right? We didn't really have a ban where I went to school, so I go home and I practice and I'd every I look forward to Sunday afternoon hearses up at the jazz academy. That's where I got nourished with jazz and it was that we between there, I'd go practice it and listen to it and think about it in love it. And then I got to have my dream for filled by on Sundays once a month, being on stage the same stages, the Columbus jazz should think of of the gift. He gives us, but also we gave him with the building. Now he gets to sit in that pianist cheer and deservedly. So 'cause he is a professional right now. So I'm excited about the audience experience. Absolutely. In one of the amazing things to amazing things about that is that the audience will if they had a blindfold on they were here this guy and think that he. He is. He's a, you know, middle aged, you know, well, seasoned virtuoso at the instrument, but the second thing is that what that's done? You know, Mike was in the band forever and got that opportunity to interface with so many musicians, and then that got him up to New York and got the exposure that sort of helped him continue to grow. But it's also allowed our younger students to see that and to follow that path. So we have this young pianist, beak Mazumdar, who is has already one. Classical, piano were starting to win jazz awards, and he is referenced. You know, being able to see this happen before his is is a younger student and sort of follow that same path. So it really kind of creates this this cycle. Yeah, absolutely. You can really not only see go through it yourself, but then the people see you as upperclassmen do that really helps to fulfill our mission in that way to well, that's something the jazz group in the community. Columbus community should be so proud that we're able to produce people at that, not only those type of people, but I think the character that. At playing music and playing jazz bills, and all these people come in. They practiced one of my former babysitters was Mikolayiv della verse, and she played trumpet and she used to come over. She babysit my kids goes good trumpet lesson. What give her a trumpet lesson. You know what? She still carries that with her today. It's in her soul music and a part of her life. And essentially those people that carry music with him like that and that love like that and carry that love somebody like her will tell you tell you now when you need to feel good self medicate with music, right? So I don't. You know, I don't need Oxy con. I don't need volume. Valium I need volume. Value not only wasn't those other ones that they take all those drugs axe. And all that. Ziobro put on cannonball Adderley restrained Clifford was drink, you know? And in that cools me out, you learn that you learn the gift of what music gives you. And that's what we're giving these young people. When we educate them, they learn discipline. When I was a kid, they used to say, oh, you gotta go to football field, learn respite, play sports. Men is nothing like having that Trump kick your behind as you didn't practice that thing. You're supposed to play jazz band and that director gets on. You're like, man, I got a discipline myself and then carries over every aspect of your, and that's why we're just as happy to see students that graduate from a program that don't go into music. You know, you've got students. I know there was a student that was in the the youth, jazz orchestra, maybe in the mid two thousand two thousand seven or something presented his prototype for a prosthetic to President Obama a couple years back, you know, I it, it's just as a meeting when we see that because we know that somewhere in the values that they have, you know about their life. Music has been a core. Part of that, it's going to inform whether you go into engineering or science, or politics, or whatever it might be. There's something that happened during your time with us. It's going to kill you. Are there I mean mic. Lee who told you about? She's a lawyer, right? You know, and a great one. Nice firm. Right. That's great. So to kind of put a wrap on the holiday component of this conversation, every jazz musician, every popular most popular jazz musicians have pulled out a holiday album, and it's something that you know feels a lot of people do what your favorite holiday jazz album will. There's really two. I one I'd mentioned is believe it or not. I have very few sort of recent big band albums. I li- there's actually a big band record by enemy, Tom Kubis, oh, LA guy. We're gonna play one of his charts on it and on their Jack Sheldon sinks, and he thinks. Couple holidays loans, but he he sings original song about. I can't even quote the words. Look, I can't remember, but it's just a funny story about how we as jazz musicians play all these gigs and they give you sandwiches. We call him bandages, bad band, sandwiches backstage people are talking while you play. That's kind of fun. But I listened to that every hall they season because joy joyous, big band music, and then you've got Jack Sheldon sort of messing with you in a humorous way in my all time favorite Christmas outmost course, the net king Cole album and there he sings the Mel Torme classic the Christmas song, or some people call chestnuts roasting on an open fire and heard that when I was a kid and it speaks to how music can anchor you and your life. The moment I hear that. I see my mother. I see my father. I see the food while that they cooked those feelings and thoughts immediately come back to me and I think that music and that's what I hope people get from our concert, though here it and it'll sort of bring back a Russian memories, but it will also bring up. Some new things, new experiences, new magic moments. You know, hopefully we'll play. I think we're probably gonna close with deck the halls and we'll try to do that real well for you might even have some dancers come out on the in for that, but that'll be a magic moment for you can look back and as part of your life and say, man, got, I felt so good. We saw this holiday concert me. They played joy to the world and they jazzed it up. It wasn't chest, you know, so that that's our goal in goes back to your thing about, you know, some people say, oh, that New Orleans concert was the best concert. Well, I want this holiday concert to be the best rat you ever seen. And when we do our l. show in February wenches they, that's the best thing. And then when we do our big band show with Leno Hampton and Cab, Calloway music, I want that this right? They all have to be otherwise you guys wouldn't come back. And I think that that's something that in the Columbus arts world, that's what pushes us whole thing forward as anything you go to. You know that that whether you're talking about shadow. Or the ballet, the opera, the klumps jazz orchestra. Each show is trying to outdo the previous which is, I think, puts the audience in on the edge of their seat, wondering what's going to happen next. And I mean, I've seen that whenever I've gone events and also the Jezreel destroy, you don't know what to expect and you know it's going to be something that's extremely high level because of that intensity, right? Trying to outdo ourselves, you have to. That's the only way we survive. It's just like any honestly, like any other business, a little sidebar about Christmas music or holiday music. I was playing with the country man when I was in college and we were doing every weekend playing covered songs like eagles lodges and Amvest lodges all over Hieaux and done this for like a year and certain a little worn out on the same songs. Waking me up in the middle of the night. You know, thinking I was on the gig in my pajamas and things like that. And that's when I found the Oscar peers Christmas record. And I'll tell you why that year of that season of driving around Ohio playing those gigs late at night and coming home late, that record pretty much saved me. So I don't know the record someone check it out. It's on teller. It's one wanna his later later record and actually features Jack Schantz trumpeter from Cleveland has appears on three or four tracks on that. See, Jack never would never know it, but Jack Schantz is the, he plays a lot of flu a horn on several the killing all my God. It's all really, really good. Check that out Oscar Peterson, what are some of the song away in a manger they do guide resi, Mary gentlemen, do.

Columbus Columbus youth Carly Jack Sheldon jazz academy Mike Thomas executive director Tiffany Carl YouTube Bobby Floyd Dublin Chris Jack Schantz Atlanta Oscar Peterson Andrea Oscar Tom Kubis
"jazz" Discussed on The Jazz Scene

The Jazz Scene

06:08 min | 4 years ago

"jazz" Discussed on The Jazz Scene

"The. Hey, everyone walk onto the jazz scene giving you an in depth. Look at the music and stories of the musicians performing on our stages here in Columbus. On today's episode of the jazz scene, we are joined by Andrew Paton, who is the main contributor operator for jazz Columbus dot com, which is a website that was designed to support the local jazz scene here in Columbus by providing a calendar of events and interviews and updates on the musicians that are in the scene here in Columbus in all things related to jazz in the city's. So welcome and thanks for joining us. Hi, Zack. Thanks for having me so jazz, Columbus dot com. As I mentioned is a resource really to the community that was started seems like just to become first and foremost calendar so that people could log on and see what's going on in in the city. Is that true? Yeah, it was founded by marsupial and think that domain back even two thousand six. But I think two thousand nine was about when he had content and a website people could visit. And yes, the first primary. Oh, was getting a counter together that people could go to one place and hopefully find out about every show every jazz show in town. And so so Mark started the website in two thousand nine and operated it for a while and then you jumped in. So tell me a little bit about sort of how Mark the website going and how you came into the fold with the website. Well, yeah, he following through on his goal as far as getting countered together and then getting press releases, putting out articles about shows upcoming and different things going on whenever he news items and that sort of thing. As far as my involvement I was, I've done some writing music rating over the last ten years mostly for done waiting dot com, which was a more general Columbus, music and international music website that is now defunct. And then when that ended in two thousand thirteen, I was sort of looking for another project and I had been aware been following jazz Columbus for a while at that point and reached out to Mark and got star. Would slowly, but then that fall of twenty thirteen started writing a weekly column. They went out Wednesday nights in still goes out Wednesday night. So that was my sort of avenue into getting more regularly involved in that sort of grew to writing more articles in the next couple of years. And then when marks time got crunched by life by having a baby and many, many other projects last year he reached out to me about taking it over about if I couldn't do it was going to basically go away. So I certainly enjoyed what I've done and think it's valuable and enjoy doing it. So I want to keep it going. So that's basically where we are now. Yeah, and it's definitely resource. This serves the community in so many different ways as you scroll through the pages of jazz Columbus dot com. Not only do you have the calendar that is sort of the one of the main things that you can see and you can scroll through at any given moment. You really find quickly that there's music almost seven nights a week here in Columbus that would fit the jazz description. But you also see a listening venues. And a listing of current musicians with bios. And so it really kind of is the catchall for anything happening in the jazz scene. But one of the things that you've also started to do more is interview musicians that are on the scene doing creative things or debuting a residency at dickstein, let's say, or somebody or somewhere like that. And so tell me a little bit about the interview process, and was that something that came about when you were on or was it something that already existed in in? What is it kind of evolved to for you in terms of the importance of continuing to do those interviews with musicians? Yeah, it was actually, the interview series was actually marks idea when we working together on the site, and you know, of a way of generating interesting content that all of this stuff takes time and you know, with my own fulltime job and everything else going on, it's it's a hard to spend as much time as I'd like to on some of these things. So this came around as an Email interview series where we had a set group of question. We send them to resist and they would send back their answers, you know, trying to keep going and hopefully get some more of interest. This falls and little quieter over the summer. But yeah, looking to keep that going and find more about our local musicians. Yeah, absolutely. And just looking just on the homepage right now of jazz Columbus dot com. You see a listing of what's gotta be like, I don't know, probably twelve different artists all having on Friday, September ninth here in town, various places like the Lincoln cafe and hot times festival that's coming up dick stand. And so through your experience, you know, specifically working with this project, I know it's probably caused you to go out to more shows and I know that you write some concert reviews and you do some commentary on what's going on gimme sort of your assessment of what the jazz scene is like right now and what you're noticing out in terms of the musicianship and also the different creativity and just kinda give me your overall view of the scene as a whole. You know, I definitely feel good about the jazz scene. I think there's. Plenty of good places to see jazz and many great musicians. And I think lately there's been there'd be a little more expansion towards other parts of the city. I think you know, sometimes it can get centered Dick's Dan is a hub and sort of an Natalie's and brothers Drake's sort of like high street north side of town. Sometimes Meritas lounge and reynoldsburg while they're in currently in transition already, they already moving to a new location, but and then they also own idle awhile bar which is having some jazz on the east side too. And also with jazz ninety eight radio station there, jazz brew concert series bringing jazz mostly to Whitehall now, which is that been a town to see what jazz in historically earliest recently historically, but but now having regular concerts out there and then bring concerts outdoor kinds of western the summer. So I think there's been more of a growth lately and more interest and bring it to the people bringing it to where people are. You can experience. Jazz in your neighborhood,

Columbus Mark Zack Andrew Paton reynoldsburg dickstein Lincoln cafe Dick Natalie Drake Dan ten years