3 Burst results for "Jay College of Criminal Justice"

"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on Basic Brown Nerds

Basic Brown Nerds

06:05 min | 1 year ago

"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on Basic Brown Nerds

"Hey Sean. How are you? Doing, what are you doing? I'm doing well. Thank you so much for hopping on this call with me and talking a little bit more about your journey and participating in Asian, Pacific American. Heritage month. Absolutely it's an honor. Thank you so much. Yes I'm I'm honored. You are the first politician to be on the PODCAST, and it's exciting because we are in a very interesting time right now in terms of like the election cycle and everything so I'm in as someone who is I. consider myself to be very new into beginning to get engaged with politics. I'm excited to hear more about it from someone who's actually like right in the middle of it all. Yeah. It's definitely a crazy time. Elections is right around the corner so many things are just going on right now. Yeah! I can only imagine so. Why don't we start off and tell us a little bit about your storing how you got into politics I mean besides people thinking they want to become president of the United. States I don't think a lot of people think about running for public office. In that regard. I mean you know I think that? What until his political sphere? We need people who are not your everyday politicians. We need just more everyday people running for office and essentially. That's kind of been my journey to Ryan today. I never really thought about running for office in a I was someone who was just your average kid who wanted to live out his dream. As a kid I wanted to be an athlete in our place sports from football to basketball to rugby now and I've always had these aspirations of becoming an athlete, and at the same time I realized that in the world that we're living in growing up as a as a as a Bangladeshi American my parents. They both emigrated here shortly after the Liberation War in seven days, and we have experience of working class being worn. My my father waited tables. My mother cleaned. Who Tell them for living and? and working hard right just like any immigrant family, there are trying to build enough wealth, so we can have a nice home with the white picket fence, and all that, and at always been an obstacle always been hard, and eventually when we when we were able to actually have enough money to get out of a more low income, poor neighborhoods, we still felt like we were in communities where we just weren't accepted because it was predominantly more white in a fluent in after nine eleven been exposed to. Boast racism announced like at a really young age when all that happened on nine years old, and that's when I really started realizing that the world is. It could be black and white and. Gray, and after we lost our home for closure in the financial crisis, that's when I started getting more into about how system itself works in Halifax poor people how fixed people color and honestly wasn't up in so maybe. Three years ago, that got more involved I was heading into my my final year at John Jay College, Criminal Justice here in New, York, degree in sociology, and attending to find a year and I and I needed something to do and I was just coming out the marine, so is it was? Interesting transition period in my life where I'm like all right I'm about to head the marines I'm about to graduate in the Pinnacle System. itself is just crazy, because trump will still early in his administration, and he was doing so many crazy things like you know. Fighting for the Muslim ban trying to keep asylum-seekers out of central South America, so all these things going on, you know. I just felt like I needed to do something at this point and a great opportunity for my school, where actually gun chance to go and work in New York, state assembly in I supposed to be an intern, but what happened was I ended up becoming a fulltime staff I was the only staffer. There pretty much thrown into the wolves, and I immediately went from not just scheduling meetings, but work on legislation, taking meetings in the lobbying groups and I quickly. Quickly learned how you know. Especially as Asian Americans as disconnected as we are politics, it is still important for us to be involved because there's so many things that happen that we don't even know about. And all these policies are affecting us every day so shortly after I left Albany. I got involved in Alexandria. Kasey Cortez's campaign for twenty eighteen start on volunteer, then became a staffer, and then essentially shortly after that campaign I went down to Tijuana in December twenty eighteen organize veterans to help asylum-seekers, and when I came back I was trying to advocate for more immigration, justice and in. My view, the incumbent, who challenging now. He really didn't have a strong stance on immigration justice, considering how the district running in is. Predominantly Black and people of color and a wide variety of immigrants, and I just felt like him. Being there for two plus decades is not really speaking true to the voices of working class people all across the board, so I pretty much got to where I am. That is amazing, and that's also very very intimidating at the same time like what you said being thrown into the wolves right away. Did you feel? How did you feel when you were thrown in? You know I felt like if it wasn't for the Marines I would have been a lot more anxious, but I think that being in the Marines for sixers definitely in..

Sean John Jay College South America Kasey Cortez president Albany Alexandria Ryan trump Tijuana New York Gray intern rugby Halifax York football basketball
"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on The Argument

The Argument

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on The Argument

"People are right. I mean obviously well unless I mean I think there's an open question about police strategy here that we don't fully have a handle on, but it seems like you know at the moment. The heavy police presence is sort of and large masses of protesters, and then you have smaller groups, breaking off and rioting and the police are either not prioritizing that. Successfully dealing with it, so I was working on a column about De. BLASIO and I called Eugene O'Donnell who's a former NYPD officer who is now a lecturer at John? Jay College Criminal Justice and he really just yelled at me for forty five minutes. Right about you know that. New York slogan, Liberal Government and the New York Times. You know they wanted police abolition. Now they've got it and you know. Basically the police are just you know they've. They've endured so much abuse. And now they're just not gonNA do, anything. Now I think there's evidence that the police have taken a pretty aggressive stance towards the protesters. But then, and then you see hints of a kind of hands off stance towards the destruction of the city, and it's understandable. A cop now wanting to put themselves on the line for for macy's I saw at least one one Non New York mayor police chief I think literally give a press conference saying we can't ask our officers to put their lives on the line just to protect property. So that may not be justice, it may not be just a sort of you know. Screw you kind of gesture. It may be sort of you know defensive policy in effect. In the police response seems to have very greatly in different places, one of the things I get concerned about it a moment like this. When passions are running, so high is the way we saved the please as if it's uniform behavior, forgive use of the adjective uniform as if it's uniform behavior coast to coast north to South I have been heartbroken. By the pictures I've seen of an overzealous. Over violent police response, but I've also been heart warned by those images which I think have taken a back seat to those of police. Kneeling with protesters think it was Louisville. Where was that amazing? Short video on twitter of a protest or hugging a police officer of the two of them, falling into a hug that lasted something like thirty seconds. I think if we're GONNA talk about heartwarming images out of Louisville we also have to remember that the police shot a restaurant owner named David Makati. Who used to let the police eat for eat for free, and then I believe. His body was left out unclaimed for a long time. And so I do I, do understand the frustration of. What that I'm seeing from a lot of protesters who? Think that. Those images of the police kneeling that kind of warm, the hearts of. Liberals like me, then just become cover for later acts of brutality I mean that's very very fair. Concern and those images don't lessen the urgency of the 'cause I'm saying that I think one of the dangers of moments like this is when we paint with such a broad brush. I mean I I. See signs that say black lives matter blue lives. Murder I don't WanNa see the blue lives murder sign because I don't want to paint every law enforcement officer in the country with that broader brush..

officer New York Louisville Eugene O'Donnell Murder New York Times John NYPD Jay College macy Liberal Government David Makati lecturer
"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"The highest crime you can charge for versus our philosophy during the holder administration, which was to look at trying to be more fair and look at things and not and not charging the toughest thing. You can charge looking at people with people looking at their circumstances and thinking about which is what you, what you want in prosecutorial discretion is thinking about looking at the person as a person in the circumstances that led them there and what is the best way to deal with what they've done. Because the the problem we have now is we think prison is the. The only way to hold people accountable when they write the law. That's not the only way to hold people accountable. We were you and I were at a breakfast meeting this morning and they talked about the disparities between the US system and other countries that the default in the US is seventy percent of people who've commit crimes, go to jail in other countries, other Germany. I can't remember the Germany and the Netherlands. One was seven percent one ten percent, right? Quite a disparity in terms of and you look at the safety of their countries. They're safer than we are. So jail is not the answer to creating safe communities. Invite. One of the people I I was talking to before the actual breakfast start talked about how Germany was the gold standard in the way they the way they treat their quote unquote prisoners. They have names they're called by their real names. They don't have uniforms. They have street close. GIO said that they don't have their prisons look more like college campuses than than ours do, and that has and treating. People have broken the law that way, and people who are in who are in prison. Helps them for when they get out and go back into the community and they also don't have sentences as long as we do ten year sentence, there is a long sentence, right? She was also talking about how. You know, sometimes just forty eight hours in prison is is enough to like literally scare someone straight into not corrector recidivism recidivism, right? But a person recidivists right ranch means returned to prison, returned right returned to prison. So in terms of, well, not sure which way we'll go on this, but I'm gonna say something I'm gonna follow you. So what we know in terms of people, people who've been in criminal Justice system from going back is education jobs and connection to family and community are the Krief three key factors proven by research that will prevent people from coming back into our criminal Justice system. So the question is, how are we going to invest in people in those systems? And I also think if you invest in those systems on the front end, right, keep people out of the system anyway. Can you elaborate on each one on each of those things? So I am president of John Jay college, criminal Justice. So education to me, and I'm product of generation that that education was what made the difference in my parents live as as black people growing up in the segregated south to upper -tunities. So I always think education is the key to access to jobs and many other things. So for me on the front end, we ought to be educating people, but people who are in a car traded on our criminal Justice system, we ought to be providing them access to education, doing an assessment, the minute people come into the system to figure out where they are, what their needs are, but assuming that people don't have a have literacy issue, teach them to read and write while they're there, then get them on a path to hire to GED in higher education, but don't. But but but figure out what it is they need because we need to quit people to be successful and education is the key. So one of the things we have at John Jay is a prison to college pipeline program which has been hugely successful and early in my tenure at John. Jay, I went out to Otis, fill prison on to meet our students. There. Because that's what they are. There are students and to get in the program you have to be within five years of release. We don't ask what you're what you're in prison for your all our students, and I can tell you the the, the first visit I had five or six men came up to me independently..

Germany John Jay John Jay college US Otis GIO president Netherlands forty eight hours one ten percent seventy percent seven percent five years ten year