7 Burst results for "Jay College of Criminal Justice"

"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on Basic Brown Nerds

Basic Brown Nerds

06:05 min | 1 year ago

"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on Basic Brown Nerds

"Hey Sean. How are you? Doing, what are you doing? I'm doing well. Thank you so much for hopping on this call with me and talking a little bit more about your journey and participating in Asian, Pacific American. Heritage month. Absolutely it's an honor. Thank you so much. Yes I'm I'm honored. You are the first politician to be on the PODCAST, and it's exciting because we are in a very interesting time right now in terms of like the election cycle and everything so I'm in as someone who is I. consider myself to be very new into beginning to get engaged with politics. I'm excited to hear more about it from someone who's actually like right in the middle of it all. Yeah. It's definitely a crazy time. Elections is right around the corner so many things are just going on right now. Yeah! I can only imagine so. Why don't we start off and tell us a little bit about your storing how you got into politics I mean besides people thinking they want to become president of the United. States I don't think a lot of people think about running for public office. In that regard. I mean you know I think that? What until his political sphere? We need people who are not your everyday politicians. We need just more everyday people running for office and essentially. That's kind of been my journey to Ryan today. I never really thought about running for office in a I was someone who was just your average kid who wanted to live out his dream. As a kid I wanted to be an athlete in our place sports from football to basketball to rugby now and I've always had these aspirations of becoming an athlete, and at the same time I realized that in the world that we're living in growing up as a as a as a Bangladeshi American my parents. They both emigrated here shortly after the Liberation War in seven days, and we have experience of working class being worn. My my father waited tables. My mother cleaned. Who Tell them for living and? and working hard right just like any immigrant family, there are trying to build enough wealth, so we can have a nice home with the white picket fence, and all that, and at always been an obstacle always been hard, and eventually when we when we were able to actually have enough money to get out of a more low income, poor neighborhoods, we still felt like we were in communities where we just weren't accepted because it was predominantly more white in a fluent in after nine eleven been exposed to. Boast racism announced like at a really young age when all that happened on nine years old, and that's when I really started realizing that the world is. It could be black and white and. Gray, and after we lost our home for closure in the financial crisis, that's when I started getting more into about how system itself works in Halifax poor people how fixed people color and honestly wasn't up in so maybe. Three years ago, that got more involved I was heading into my my final year at John Jay College, Criminal Justice here in New, York, degree in sociology, and attending to find a year and I and I needed something to do and I was just coming out the marine, so is it was? Interesting transition period in my life where I'm like all right I'm about to head the marines I'm about to graduate in the Pinnacle System. itself is just crazy, because trump will still early in his administration, and he was doing so many crazy things like you know. Fighting for the Muslim ban trying to keep asylum-seekers out of central South America, so all these things going on, you know. I just felt like I needed to do something at this point and a great opportunity for my school, where actually gun chance to go and work in New York, state assembly in I supposed to be an intern, but what happened was I ended up becoming a fulltime staff I was the only staffer. There pretty much thrown into the wolves, and I immediately went from not just scheduling meetings, but work on legislation, taking meetings in the lobbying groups and I quickly. Quickly learned how you know. Especially as Asian Americans as disconnected as we are politics, it is still important for us to be involved because there's so many things that happen that we don't even know about. And all these policies are affecting us every day so shortly after I left Albany. I got involved in Alexandria. Kasey Cortez's campaign for twenty eighteen start on volunteer, then became a staffer, and then essentially shortly after that campaign I went down to Tijuana in December twenty eighteen organize veterans to help asylum-seekers, and when I came back I was trying to advocate for more immigration, justice and in. My view, the incumbent, who challenging now. He really didn't have a strong stance on immigration justice, considering how the district running in is. Predominantly Black and people of color and a wide variety of immigrants, and I just felt like him. Being there for two plus decades is not really speaking true to the voices of working class people all across the board, so I pretty much got to where I am. That is amazing, and that's also very very intimidating at the same time like what you said being thrown into the wolves right away. Did you feel? How did you feel when you were thrown in? You know I felt like if it wasn't for the Marines I would have been a lot more anxious, but I think that being in the Marines for sixers definitely in..

Sean John Jay College South America Kasey Cortez president Albany Alexandria Ryan trump Tijuana New York Gray intern rugby Halifax York football basketball
"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"Has appreciate it. It thank you joining us now. CNN legal coats also Gloria. Brown Marshall Constitutional. Law Professor John Jay. College Criminal Justice and author of Race Law in American. Society six, zero, seven to present Laura. I'm wondering what you made of the memorials that we saw today, and they are just really beginning the funeral actually in Houston is going to be on on Tuesday. It was incredibly powerful. I felt to hear from Reverend Al Sharpton Precisely and the family. Of course precisely, because of the amount of time that reverend Al. Sharpton has been trying to articulate these concerns and the over the course of history we see how released a stem Iq, these problems are, and he made a couple of references about really the general theme from Attorney General Keith Ellison former President Barack Obama to what he is saying today about a holistic approach to justice and current justice reform, talking about every aspect that was very powerful, very compelling, and really you're articulated the overall atmosphere and feelings of the nation. Professor Marshall Win People Talk About Criminal Justice, Reform Police reform, and there's obviously a lot of different ways to go about it. There's a lot of different points of view on it. I'm wondering what for you would be priorities in terms of police reform. Well Enersen you know we've been around this long time. And I said on your show before that the system is rigged, and now we're seeing with this particular instance is officers. Sheldon was training on training day. These other three officers had minimal experience days of experience. He is training them how to abuse authority. He is training them how to harm people in the African American community, and so we see that, although we have policies, if the training and the policy is only supposed to be for certain people that they they will take time to talk and deescalate situations in the white community but Niagara. Niagara saying how despite whatever the standard of law is whatever they're learning in the actual academy, the Individual Officers are straining the younger officers how to be brutal, cruel and break the constitutional rights of other people in in the instance and take their lives, and then get away with it so unfortunately we're seeing behind the scenes in order to stop this from happening. There's got to be criminal liability to the officer and a change in the in the prosecutor's office. The prosecutors have too much power not to bring a case and the officers have too much power. Her African American community. Get Away with. Laura it's so interesting. the professor is saying and when you read the criminal complaint, one of the officers, the officer who I guess was one of the new new officers Is the one who actually raised the point that Mr Floyd? is in distress, and should he perhaps put over on his side, and it's officer show. Who says you know? He's staying exactly where he is. I mean the idea that a rookie essentially would be able to have a have a greater sense of humanity and I'm not calling the treatment or the action, and these officers main humane given that they are now being charged essentially with aiding and abetting second degree murder by officers show then that the idea that a nineteen year veteran did not have. Have the experience or requisite level of humanity to be able to know that somebody was dying underneath him and remember you're talking about a police department who had to write in after the Department of Justice came and looked at the ineffectiveness of its policies and tracking problematic police officers, trying to ensure that there were ways for the community to know who which. which officers were presenting problems, which were not abiding, the even added a thing called the sanctity of life provisions here, Anderson, talking about it should be the cornerstone effective policing and the fundamental thing and training. The press was talking about as well is. Every officer knows that you can only use the level of force to repel the forest. Lethal force can only. Only be used to repel lethal force, not when there is not even active resistance, and somebody is unresponsive below you below the knee that you are placing on the person's net. I mean fundamentally, even if the training was there, that's why officers were fired, and it is such a dereliction of duty as highlighted by the chiefs spiring, and now the criminal prosecution. Professor. The in order to get real reform, all amid you're talking about systematic reform at all levels I mean not just of the criminal justice system, but let's focus on the criminal justice system for for this discussion I mean. Is there the political will the capabilities of I mean it is? It just seems like a Herculean task and I'm wondering how. How does you know I? Guess, it starts with a first step. One first steps. Anderson is criminal liability. One of the first steps is to take the amount of discretion. The prosecutor's office has it's apt when it comes to the civilian crime that's committed by a law enforcement officer, but the prosecutor's office is brilliant when it comes to civilian upon civilian crime, and so the idea that ellison is here because. We can't trust the Mike Freeman the prosecutor to actually do his job efficiently when it comes to a law enforcement officer, so my concern is let's. Secure Acution, let's look at how much power they have this reform, the prosecutor's office and then we have criminal liability. These officers won't feel. They can literally get away with murder Glory Marshall or coats, thank you. I'm sorry Lord. You want to say something. I was GonNa say there are certainly as a form there, but it has to be even more expansive about qualified immunity with Prem- court to review it. It has to be about reinforcing the role bat consent decrees that former Attorney General Jeff sessions pulled back as his last act in office before he was. Let go. Shall we say it's about the idea of human rights? Campaigns cases against the authors that are now in. It's always about as Congress has the power of the purse, Anderson. You know full well that one of the ways in which you can incentivize people to behave appropriately is through these consent decrees is also through simple liability and recourse, and of course, effective police, training and accountability, unfortunately criminal prosecution Keith Ellison. Talking about is going to be one piece of a very large pie necessary, but part of a more holistic approach coach. Thank you Gloria Browne Marshall as well. There could be a memorial services on Saturday and Rafer North Carolina where Mr Floyd, sister lives the funerals. We mention will be held next week in Houston. I spoke about an hour or so ago with Houston's Mayor Sylvester Turner. Turner I'm sure. He watched the memorial service for George.

officer Keith Ellison prosecutor Reform Police reform Anderson African American community Houston Laura CNN Reverend Al Sharpton Professor John Jay professor Individual Officers Professor Marshall Mr Floyd Gloria Browne Marshall Attorney Department of Justice Barack Obama Sylvester Turner
"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on The Argument

The Argument

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on The Argument

"People are right. I mean obviously well unless I mean I think there's an open question about police strategy here that we don't fully have a handle on, but it seems like you know at the moment. The heavy police presence is sort of and large masses of protesters, and then you have smaller groups, breaking off and rioting and the police are either not prioritizing that. Successfully dealing with it, so I was working on a column about De. BLASIO and I called Eugene O'Donnell who's a former NYPD officer who is now a lecturer at John? Jay College Criminal Justice and he really just yelled at me for forty five minutes. Right about you know that. New York slogan, Liberal Government and the New York Times. You know they wanted police abolition. Now they've got it and you know. Basically the police are just you know they've. They've endured so much abuse. And now they're just not gonNA do, anything. Now I think there's evidence that the police have taken a pretty aggressive stance towards the protesters. But then, and then you see hints of a kind of hands off stance towards the destruction of the city, and it's understandable. A cop now wanting to put themselves on the line for for macy's I saw at least one one Non New York mayor police chief I think literally give a press conference saying we can't ask our officers to put their lives on the line just to protect property. So that may not be justice, it may not be just a sort of you know. Screw you kind of gesture. It may be sort of you know defensive policy in effect. In the police response seems to have very greatly in different places, one of the things I get concerned about it a moment like this. When passions are running, so high is the way we saved the please as if it's uniform behavior, forgive use of the adjective uniform as if it's uniform behavior coast to coast north to South I have been heartbroken. By the pictures I've seen of an overzealous. Over violent police response, but I've also been heart warned by those images which I think have taken a back seat to those of police. Kneeling with protesters think it was Louisville. Where was that amazing? Short video on twitter of a protest or hugging a police officer of the two of them, falling into a hug that lasted something like thirty seconds. I think if we're GONNA talk about heartwarming images out of Louisville we also have to remember that the police shot a restaurant owner named David Makati. Who used to let the police eat for eat for free, and then I believe. His body was left out unclaimed for a long time. And so I do I, do understand the frustration of. What that I'm seeing from a lot of protesters who? Think that. Those images of the police kneeling that kind of warm, the hearts of. Liberals like me, then just become cover for later acts of brutality I mean that's very very fair. Concern and those images don't lessen the urgency of the 'cause I'm saying that I think one of the dangers of moments like this is when we paint with such a broad brush. I mean I I. See signs that say black lives matter blue lives. Murder I don't WanNa see the blue lives murder sign because I don't want to paint every law enforcement officer in the country with that broader brush..

officer New York Louisville Eugene O'Donnell Murder New York Times John NYPD Jay College macy Liberal Government David Makati lecturer
"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

08:01 min | 1 year ago

"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"We'll play some of that Miguel. Thank you more now. From Keith Ellison Minnesota's attorney general, he spoke earlier today the quote tremendous sense of weight. He feels at this moment. Attorney General Ellison. What made you decide to upgrade the charges? Second degree murder against ex officer Shelvin. Well, we evaluated all the incoming evidence We evaluated You know a lot of material There's a range of it. medical reports medical examiner reports. Videotape all kinds of information that we felt that the proper charge would be second degree murder. And that it would be proper to charge of the other three with aiding and abetting in that edge. You know the the family of Mr Floyd. His attorney had wanted first degree murder charges that would have required that that that officer chauvinist that it was premeditated than there was premeditation I. Assume you found no evidence of premeditation. Not No we as this time, no the investigation is ongoing. We find evidence which would support that charge. We would charge it. I'm committed to holding. The defendants accountable at the highest ethical charge meaning that the charges have to be supported by the facts have to be supported by the law. But if it's there, we would charge it. We would not hesitate if we found. The information disappointed the other three officers. What should they have done? In the circumstance? I know one of the criminal complaint. One officer raise concerns about about Mr. Floyd asked if asked I guess chauvinist, if he should be turned on his side and show, and said words the effective He's staying right where he lives. Well. The case they continue to sit on his body, which affected his his ability to of. The we consider that aiding the the fact that they've never rendered aid. Their departmental policy to do so and to intervene had responsibility intervene, give aid, and They didn't do so and so in. Affirmatively assisted in the assault which? Resulted ultimately in the death of Mr Floor. Is it clear I mean I? Find it just so stunning that not only did Mr Show Been Sit with his knee on Mr flies neck for more than eight minutes, but that two more than two minutes and forty seconds almost three minutes of that time was after he was non responsive, and after they knew he did not have a pulse or could not find a pulse. If any of the officers had at least at that point tried to assist Mr. Floyd. I'm the fact that nobody tried to assist Mr Floyd after they knew he didn't have a pulse is. Just inexplicable to me. I think many people around the world. Make. They'd say. You've also. Pointing out how difficult it is! To convict a police officer, I believe Minnesota's only happened once and I know the prosecutor. That is appointed to. This was the prosecutor who was able to get that conviction I heard you say earlier. Can you just talk about why it is so difficult? Because obviously for any criminal justice reform accountability is essential and just moving forward for the future. It's good to know why it's so hard to connect plays. Well I mean. Why don't we all raised to believe that? If you have a problem, the people you should call the police. Juries tend to resolve doubts in favor of a police. Where there's a credibility dispute. They have Tennessee to believe the police There are many times when that credibility is not deserved or warranted in individual cases, and so that that is one of the issues the other is is that Many kind of immunity sort of did. The police are legally authorized to use force in circumstances beyond that of citizens. All these things kinda conspire, and then of course in some cases around the country, their police departments have a very cozy relationship with other people who political economic power so you know they look out for them, and so the net effect is that have been very difficult to hold the police accountable, even when there is a violation of law, you think you look at the wall Scott case. You have you? What have you told the family in this case about the chances of getting a conviction? Well! You know what I do and don't really lay odds on that. What I say is that we are going to. Prepare. We're going to organize. We are going to make sure we put on the best case we possibly can. We are going to check every link in the prosecutorial chain to make sure it's tight, and then at the end of the day it's really in the hands of the jury, and so we and we believe that people are fair. If we can help the jury, understand what's really happening here with their duties and obligations are we're confident we will. Get that conviction turning journal. I. Appreciate Your Time, thank you. Thank you sir. More now on making these four cases joining US CNN legal analyst and former federal prosecutor coats also Gloria Browne Marshall. She's a constitutional law professor. John Jay College Criminal Justice here in New York author of Race Law in American Society Sixteen. No seven to present lor your reaction to What the Attorney General did today. the chargers now as they stand. Well. Two thanks I in Minnesota. Maybe people don't realize that the third degree murder charge was not going to be able to stand regardless that would require you to have both and intent the intent on intentional act of killing, but also to act with a depraved indifference meaning that you intended or didn't intend is all very waffly language, but reality in Minnesota. You cannot think about third degree murder without thinking about the. Examples of say shooting into a crowded space or driving down the wrong side of the highway. Those types of crimes are contemplated when you intend to harm maybe someone, but no one in particular in third degree murder charges in Minnesota. Focusing on one particular target, you cannot actually charge that, so it was probably an era to do so in the first place by the attorney by the head of the counting attorney, but second degree murder Minnesota has two different ways to get to it Anderson either intentional, which does not require premeditation or unintentional, which we're actually seeing charge here based on a felony or the attempt to commit a felony. What we're seeing the being is. 'cause of assaulting Mr George Floyd close to dad, causing great bodily harm in fact debts, and so I think this is the right charge to make. The accomplished liability is also commensurate with what we actually are seeing here, and it was necessary and one that could potentially go up higher to premeditated, but what we see right now. He's made the right call. Professor mean there's there's a lot we've seen. What's in the criminal complaint? There's a lot we still don't know about this interaction. Something happened in a police vehicle BECAUSE MR floor was up in the backseat, a police vehicle for a while, before being brought back outside, and and and put on the ground, and killed I assume that will come out in the trial, and who knows which way that will will move any potential juror jury, but I'm wondering what you make of what we saw today of the.

Second degree murder Mr George Floyd attorney officer Minnesota third degree murder Mr. Floyd first degree murder Keith Ellison Minnesota Mr Floor Mr Miguel General Ellison prosecutor abetting assault Professor John Jay College CNN
"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

2 Girls 1 Podcast

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

"Good. Whole the west found out about cloud too. But is that this guy did it to his coworker? But the best part is they work at Salesforce, which is a cloud software company, and their tagline has the word cloud in it and his coworker didn't notice and just thought that the new tagline for Salesforce was a company. Co-workers was true. The only thing I could send behalf English is not as first language, but still it makes no fucking sense by maybe it was like new hip new lingo or something called each other. It's like, it's like a buck computing company. Just like thought that was like new word that they were using now. So he never noticed. And then the original coworker had to tell him after a while he had placed extension in his computer, like months out a prank at that point. If the person doesn't know. Yeah. It's just like when foreigners listen to our podcast, and they're learning English. I once had this guy called me advise, I was at a summer theater program. We were seeing in dormitories, and like my dorm phone rang, which never happens, and it was this Chinese restaurant calling me telling me my order was going to be late. But I didn't want her any food, and they went on and on there like you're gonna to pay for it. Anyway, we'll be there soon, and I did not put it together. I didn't realize I was being pranked. And then later I was like sitting with my friend, and he had to bring down to me that he had met to me. Ceases to be a prank when the person doesn't realize. Right. Well, this is why I'm fascinated. I love that you brought up. Impractical jokers 'cause I enjoy pranks for arts sacred entertainment sake of that prank was to make a TV show, and then to like basically show like, oh, everyone so gullible or like, we Gotcha. And then it's funny versus like, I'm just pulling a prank on my mom and only me, and my mom will get a laugh out of it like that's less appealing. I like I like making stuff at that's more. Interesting to me, there's always like someone in your family. Who's like I put a rubber band on the on the on the waters distinct sprayer in that I went to the sink in its gritted mom in the face. And it's like, okay. Some people get a lot of personal joy out of pranks. Yeah. That is true. I'll just mention one more had an ex boyfriend who used to call one eight hundred flowers lead them through the whole process of making an arrangement for his dead turtle named fluffy. And like really just tell this story. Well, it wasn't on the because it was the same exit a lot of pranks that person was into prank. No, I have not heard this one. This what we did talk about in here. I think is that he also used this service where some service would call your phone, and like based on whatever your area code was. They would send a fake number. That was also in that area codes, you're about to are likely to answer it, and then you could program in anything you wanted. Anyway, totally for personal pleasure in that instance. But what was the payoff on the turtle though, they didn't finish the bouquet. They had them walk through the arrangement. Yeah. They just liked hearing like them. I listened in one time and the woman on the other end like really sympathized with what was going on like, you know, he kind of broke down crying a little bit at one point. And he needs to record push. Yeah. Morning show or something. Yeah. Yeah. L E have you ever pranked anybody? I'm just curious. You know, when I think about myself, I think that I should have a lot of pranks stories, but I don't. Think boys prank. A lot more growing up. I think they brothers always were pranking their college roommates in like epic pranks, and they were amazing. And I kinda loved it in wish that like girls of Brank each other. But I think they just get offended. I hate that. I just did all that gender stereotyping. But I'm also sticking with. As you were saying before it's not a joke when the person's just like. Why did you your target and sling is critical? And I guess I don't know girls trained to like get things read and be practical. So you play a prank, and they're just like what I don't know. By day, and at the risk of saying other sexist things like I don't know girls like hurt each other like very severely. Don't they? I don't know. They're just. Very I don't know. There's a lot of meanness. I think that happens. No, no. Like, you know. Yes. Sword fights. Yeah. I went to a demolition order fought roller derby last weekend. I would like all women roller. Derby, we go and those women did that sounds fucking ears. Yeah. I little Berle's the John Jay college of criminal Justice. Happening. It's not roller. This is the John Jay college criminal Justice attending a roller derby, a worthwhile. Maybe not definitely it was a belated birthday celebration for me. And it was very fun and very unexpected. From the man you're seeing. Yes. Hello, man. He's listening right now. I can't hear you.

John Jay college of criminal J Salesforce Berle Brank
"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on AP News

"Customers who use its website. The concord, California based company has notified the California attorney general's office that someone was able to plant militias computer, code checkout page Bev MO says the code which has been removed was designed to capture information from orders place between August second and September twenty sixth. The company says the hacker potentially could have captured customers names phone numbers and addresses along with credit and debit card numbers and security codes. A lot of people were grooving to all. I want for Christmas is you by Mariah Carey on Christmas Eve on Spotify AP music correspondent margins. Are a lotta says the Christmas classic set a new record on Spotify. Mariah Carey song. All I want for Christmas is you was played ten point eight million times on Monday Christmas Eve, according to music, monitor chart data the previous record holder was sad by x x x ten Tahseen which hit ten point four million. Streams the day after he died in June Spotify declined comment on the record. Carey writes on Instagram. The record is such an amazing Christmas gift. The song was even a pop hit this year if peaked at number six on the billboard hot one hundred chart its highest ranking ever I'm Archie zaraleta? Despite advances made in crimefighting AP's Warren Levinson reports police departments are wrestling with the declining ability to solve it rape cases fifty years ago. Police cleared more than sixty percent of rape cases. Now in me to America. It's barely half that I mean in the age of DNA in forensics and video surveillance in cellphone technology, all the different aspects that we can put people at the crime scene are clearance. Rates are dropping their abysmal. Joseph Jack alone teaches at the John. Jay college. Criminal Justice all statistics around Raper problematic. Since only a small percentage are reported at all with rising consciousness growing number are reported in some investigative agencies are overwhelmed many police departments are also struggling with balancing the desire to be sensitive to victims with the need to get prosecutable evidence. Warren Levinson, New York. Partial shutdown. I'm Tim Maguire within AP newsmen that Kansas Republican Senator Pat Roberts one of a few members of congress still on Capitol Hill is both houses adjourn until Monday without action on ending the partial government shutdown. He says he wants the impasse over President Trump's border wall to end that is, but you know, personal things aside and work together. And let's see if we can't get a tree brought down by strong winds. Last night is killed a woman in Louisiana. Severe thunderstorms. Raced to the southeastern states this evening..

Mariah Carey Spotify Warren Levinson Senator Pat Roberts rape California concord Bev MO Archie zaraleta Raper attorney Joseph Jack America Louisiana Jay college New York Tim Maguire
"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"jay college criminal justice" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"The highest crime you can charge for versus our philosophy during the holder administration, which was to look at trying to be more fair and look at things and not and not charging the toughest thing. You can charge looking at people with people looking at their circumstances and thinking about which is what you, what you want in prosecutorial discretion is thinking about looking at the person as a person in the circumstances that led them there and what is the best way to deal with what they've done. Because the the problem we have now is we think prison is the. The only way to hold people accountable when they write the law. That's not the only way to hold people accountable. We were you and I were at a breakfast meeting this morning and they talked about the disparities between the US system and other countries that the default in the US is seventy percent of people who've commit crimes, go to jail in other countries, other Germany. I can't remember the Germany and the Netherlands. One was seven percent one ten percent, right? Quite a disparity in terms of and you look at the safety of their countries. They're safer than we are. So jail is not the answer to creating safe communities. Invite. One of the people I I was talking to before the actual breakfast start talked about how Germany was the gold standard in the way they the way they treat their quote unquote prisoners. They have names they're called by their real names. They don't have uniforms. They have street close. GIO said that they don't have their prisons look more like college campuses than than ours do, and that has and treating. People have broken the law that way, and people who are in who are in prison. Helps them for when they get out and go back into the community and they also don't have sentences as long as we do ten year sentence, there is a long sentence, right? She was also talking about how. You know, sometimes just forty eight hours in prison is is enough to like literally scare someone straight into not corrector recidivism recidivism, right? But a person recidivists right ranch means returned to prison, returned right returned to prison. So in terms of, well, not sure which way we'll go on this, but I'm gonna say something I'm gonna follow you. So what we know in terms of people, people who've been in criminal Justice system from going back is education jobs and connection to family and community are the Krief three key factors proven by research that will prevent people from coming back into our criminal Justice system. So the question is, how are we going to invest in people in those systems? And I also think if you invest in those systems on the front end, right, keep people out of the system anyway. Can you elaborate on each one on each of those things? So I am president of John Jay college, criminal Justice. So education to me, and I'm product of generation that that education was what made the difference in my parents live as as black people growing up in the segregated south to upper -tunities. So I always think education is the key to access to jobs and many other things. So for me on the front end, we ought to be educating people, but people who are in a car traded on our criminal Justice system, we ought to be providing them access to education, doing an assessment, the minute people come into the system to figure out where they are, what their needs are, but assuming that people don't have a have literacy issue, teach them to read and write while they're there, then get them on a path to hire to GED in higher education, but don't. But but but figure out what it is they need because we need to quit people to be successful and education is the key. So one of the things we have at John Jay is a prison to college pipeline program which has been hugely successful and early in my tenure at John. Jay, I went out to Otis, fill prison on to meet our students. There. Because that's what they are. There are students and to get in the program you have to be within five years of release. We don't ask what you're what you're in prison for your all our students, and I can tell you the the, the first visit I had five or six men came up to me independently..

Germany John Jay John Jay college US Otis GIO president Netherlands forty eight hours one ten percent seventy percent seven percent five years ten year