35 Burst results for "Javascript"

30K Macs are infected with ‘Silver Sparrow’ virus and no one knows why

Cyber Security Headlines

02:55 min | 2 months ago

30K Macs are infected with ‘Silver Sparrow’ virus and no one knows why

"Silver sparrow. Malware found on thirty thousand. Max has security pros stumped. Researchers have yet to observe delivery of any payload from new malware dubbed silver sparrow. Leaving its purpose still unknown. This suggests that it may spring into action once a certain condition is met. Silver comes with a mechanism to completely remove itself. A capability typically reserved for high stealth operations and it runs natively on the new. M one chip. It also uses the mac. os installer javascript. Api execute commands. Which makes it difficult to analyze found in one hundred and fifty three countries with concentrations in the us the uk. Canada france and germany researchers are watching carefully for further developments. Solar winds hackers stole source. Code from microsoft azure exchange and into microsoft on thursday said it concluded its probe into the solar winds hack finding that. The attackers stole some source code but confirmed. There's no evidence that they abused. Its internal systems to target other companies or gain access to production services or customer data it said cases involved downloading component source code related to a small subset of as you're into nine exchange components and that the entire attack is a quote moment of reckoning and furthering the need to proactively embrace a zero. Trust mentality new hack. Let's attackers bypass mastercard pin by using it as a visa card research published by academics from e. t. h. zurich building on an earlier pin bypass attack study shows how to leverage victims stolen or lost a visa. Emv enabled credit card without knowledge of the pin uneven fool the terminal into accepting inauthentic offline card transactions the attack dubbed card brand mix up takes advantage of the fact a contact lists point of sale terminal does not properly authenticated cards application. Id to the payment terminal making it possible to deceive the terminal and simultaneously perform a visa and mastercard transaction with the one card in response. Mastercard has already rolled out. Contra measures sequoia capital one of silicon valley's most notable. Vc firms told investors it has been hacked. Sequoia capital told its investors on friday that some personal and financial information may have access by a third party after one of its employees fell victim to a successful phishing attack although it has not yet seen any evidence of compromised information being traded or exploited on the dark web the company did not provide a date for the attack describing it only as quote recent and quote sequoia capital has more than thirty eight billion dollars in assets under management and in the past has invested in airbnb door dash twenty three and me fire i and carbon black it does not appear that the hack was connected in any way to solar winds

Mastercard Microsoft Sequoia Capital MAX Germany France Zurich Canada UK Vc Firms United States Contra Silicon Valley
"javascript" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

04:54 min | 3 months ago

"javascript" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"What are you most proud of those days. I think the first class functions shines. I think especially since java didn't have it and it was somewhat unusual ski made it in somehow. I people complain because scheme has minimalism. It has six or seven special forms. It has hygienic macro that has call. Cc it has beautiful complete set of forms to make the land calculus pleasant to use in practice and javascript. Is you know kind of multi paradigm our shambolic. Just a small tangent. He mentioned marc andreessen. It sounds like and bill joy. But saying i'm mark it. Sounds like he had an impact on you in that. He sort of believed in what you were doing there you can you. Can you talk about like what role mark had your life. Yeah we would meet at the The peninsula creamery in down palo alto and mark was just fresh out of grad school. Or whatever he was doing and he was big dude and he got fitter later had hair he. He would order giant milk shakes and burgers and we would meet their and brainstorm about what to do and it was very direct because we didn't have much time. The the sort of we didn't talk about the implication was microsoft's coming after us. Mark was saying things. Boldly pre ipo like netscape plus java. Kills windows right this time. Bishops make a browser parable becomes the new run. Time for programs. Meadow asserts the replacement less But he's still saw value jarvis. Yes be even though he was saying that java was the big name hence the trademark license a he saw. Javascript is important and even thought what if we got. I told us another interviews. I can say he thought what if we had. My friend kept hickman. Who'd been at netscape from the beginning. And who was a colonel hacker. Sgi when i joined he started writing his own jvm before we concentrated the sun deal and got our hands on their code and the java compiler java c. which are often written very nice code was all written in java it was self hosted or bootstrap. We could use that as soon as kipps java. Vm could run the bike code from the the sun. Jvm running the the self hosted compiler him at the bike so once we could bootstrapping the kipps vip wouldn't need sun and mark was like well. Maybe we can just you know. Ditch sun keeps java. Vm or job vm. We now we need graphics. Mark was thinking far ahead because he knew you do things with html images but at some point you really want graphics dimensional like even sgi had already started its downfall because the first four to be team there had gone off to do three fx and all these other companies that made the graphics card. You're right doom was was big and quake. So you were. we were all playing quake..

marc andreessen Mark six microsoft netscape javascript first four windows bill joy Javascript seven special forms first class Sgi peninsula creamery java c. ipo palo alto mark Meadow three
"javascript" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

05:40 min | 3 months ago

"javascript" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Called blackbird presumably after the seventy one. I don't know but they're gonna make you know. Dial up service with a custom content language stack and custom rendering. It wasn't the web. They have content partners They have a lot of money. But it still wasn't the scale the web it wasn't to be compelling gates realized this and he turned the company on a dime and they couldn't find that. I'm not sure the timing so they decided to copy it and once we realized that everybody inside netscape felt even more urgency and more of the frenetic mood and so my chances do scheme disappeared when the job deal started brewing. But there was still a chance to do a companion language to job because java was compiled is compiled language. It's evolved improved quite a lot since then too but it was sort of serious advanced programmers. That cost a certain salary. Or hourly rate and people observe bill joy observed i marc andreessen and i observed in mature. Stack like microsoft. You really benefit from having a scripting language like visual basic which became visual basic script. And i three but didn't take on didn't take over. Kill javascript that you need to. Which is one is for. That component writers who are higher price and more expert and the other is for Scriptwriters public accountants designers graphic designers with some programming inclination. Anybody amateurs doesn't matter. There's a much more democratic approach there for procuring components. Together gluing them together. Somebody will say duct tape language. I don't really like but we saw bill joy in mark andreessen and we saw the need for companion language and gleaming are. i was to call javascript. I didn't like it. That was marketing plan. Mark called mocha which i liked and get marketing. I think didn't like that. So they said oh. There's some trademark and some software somewhere. That's so we can't use that. And they tried live script in august and that didn't last and then finally we got the trademark license in december nineteen. But the work. I did to prove that it could be done was important because i came in april and even the netscape was growing so fast they couldn't find open requisition in the client team for me so they hired me into the server team and i worked for a month on server team on what became a one one. So i was actually. I'd done protocol work at silicon graphics with great chessen For beleives intern. Grad student intern. Who knew all the unix founders. And greg was very interested in Protocols the next level with us i thought that. Cpi's wouldn't wouldn't scale it. He he was mistaken. And that unfortunately moore's law more than kept up and you have gigabit ethernet running with commissioner processors. But i worked on protocols at sgi colonel hacking and nfs. And things like that. So i i came into netscape to work on the side for a month but i was. I was thinking the whole time. What's did this language. Should it be easy to use. might at syntax even be more like natural language. Like hyper talk. which is bill. Atkinson's language and hypercard. If you re separate hard on early mac. And i thought well i'd like to do that. But management say make it look like java which looks like see from a distance. What was that mean as a braces. We're talking about visually like Management understand what the hell marketing management did like rick shelby new and we had a plan. Even that was. If you have this companion language you're going to glue things together between java javascript. C. you're going to have commerce in memory in the heap with data..

april august mark andreessen december nineteen rick shelby microsoft mac marc andreessen Mark java bill joy greg unix javascript seventy one Atkinson one money blackbird chessen
"javascript" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

03:49 min | 3 months ago

"javascript" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Heavy golden them to cold meditation but they were awesome calculators and had all the scientific functions. So i was really into that so i aimed toward physics. I was a little late for the the the twenty century golden age and i read a lot of science fiction so i was like. Yeah it's on onto hybrid drives and work drizin. Physics was not going to get there quickly. And i started hacking computers. While i was studying physics as an undergraduate at santa clara university and You know. I dodged fortran bullet. Because i was in the science department instead of the engineering department where they still did. Fortran card decks. They had auto collider but we were using pascal. And i got one of the first portable. C compilers ports to the deck mini-computers. We're using and i fell in love with programming. Just based on procedural abstraction pascal. Just what now. It'd be considered old school. Like structured programming from the seventies The crater pascal was good writer and a good pedagogue right. He always at eight t h with do these courses where it's like build your own computer build your own compiler billion operating systems scratch. Yeah kind of and i know. Some people are grad students. During the said he was he would torture. The students with things like this custom system. That had twenty five word limit and things like that. I unfortunately dodged both pascal. And fortran bullets. Could you may be Linger on the pascal programming language was it what is reminiscent of today because it sounds like you may have had an impact on your trajectory. Yeah it was in the alkyl family. And was you know the big Successful a language design compiler project in the sixties. It had a successor called alice. Sixty eight which is ambitious but not a successful but pascal was kind of wordy procedures and functions language it distinguish between functions was attorney value and procedures. Which don't which doesn't compute. And you could say that whole family went into ada. Pascal had a second life. Thanks to borel with turbo pascal which was hugely successful I think in large part due to anders hejlsberg then went to microsoft and did you know c. Sharp dot done with his team there and done really well doing typescript type javascript. So yeah there's there's a lineage year but i was also interested in seeing unix. By the time. I was an undergrad. Because people were bringing unix up on all sorts of hardware at some friends who are doing their own wire wrap computers sixty eight twenty maybe And i was why wrapping my engineering course sixty nine or something similar computer onboard and i wanted to build a more ambitious one and port unix to it but i picked the wrong processor. I picked the national semiconductor and s. Sixteen zero three two. Which was this amazing. Sisk co complex instruction computer and not the reduced instruction set computers that were just being contemplated into the mid eighties and risk ultimately won out your risk one in some ways it dissolved into the you have both now you have these super scaler. Architectures where like intel kept. Probably too much backward compatibility instruction level. But that's just a there's a front end the parsis that into these these wide internal instructions. So you know the very long instruction word research that was also interesting. The time kind of became the micro architecture inside the backward compatible intel But i picked the national semi chip and it never got made successfully. It was full of bugs in..

anders hejlsberg microsoft santa clara university javascript seventies today sixty sixties twenty century golden age twenty five word second life unix both mid eighties both pascal one Fortran card c. Sharp Pascal intel
'The Programmers Brain' by Felienne Hermans: A Book About Coding and the Human Brain

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

03:11 min | 3 months ago

'The Programmers Brain' by Felienne Hermans: A Book About Coding and the Human Brain

"When i hear the term programmer's brain that that makes me think that is that is that an affliction is that something that needs to be addressed by medical professional. Or what is the programmer's brain. Oh sorry you seem to have a case the programmer's brain do any and his word of the book tries to explain what happens in your brain when you program to most programmers horse a really deep understanding of programs deep understanding of computer but most computer science programs including one where i teach. They don't really for stuff related to cook missions. Just that that comes. A scientist would consider basic things like the difference between long-term ariane short term memory and working memory. That's not something you necessarily learn as a programmer. I maybe some people are like you know you don't really need to know this. But once you start thinking especially of reading code and incorporating understanding code that you haven't written then is sort of important to understand. The difference between this code is hard because my term memories week here and this code is hard because my short memory suffering here and the book tries to explain the basics of science. And how that matter for reading code so i read The first two and a half chapters recently and One of the things. That i found interesting was how easily you made me stop and go down a rabbit hole on the internet and look up how to do something. You chose to give some examples at least in the first couple of chapters in three different programming languages and while i am familiar with several programming languages i had never actually seen the ap l. programming language. And so that. I coating example that you given that i was like What and i had. I had to stop and you know later on in in the second chapter. I believe it is You actually have an exercise for the reader to go and do something with that language. But in the first chapter when i first saw it i i had to stop. I had to go on the internet. I found a website that would actually run the code iran. The co at played with the code. I changed things. I literally couldn't move forward in the book. Until i had to figure it out what that code did and i don't know if you intended that but that was the side effect that i experienced was that part of what you might have been going for or is am. I just weird. No so it wasn't like i meant to send you off. And i the reason that i fix a pl is because i wanted to have a language in which the keywords Everyone would go like what. What the four ride. This and entry hard because the book isn't for owner for java for javascript is generic so if you want something that actual actually real code but also confusing to everyone. Then there's no you can pick from even something all like global or four tron that whereas with abo it's like super super confusing and it's confusing in an interesting way

AP Iran
What You Need to Know About Bitcoin Layer 2s

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

08:49 min | 4 months ago

What You Need to Know About Bitcoin Layer 2s

"Everyone will come to. Our panel layer twos on bitcoin with melting juniors chief strategy officer at coin shares and nick carter general partner at castle island ventures. Welcome milton nick. Hi laura so exciting to be here. And i have to give thanks to nick in advance. I roped tim into sitek around like doing this. I wanna have. I'm risk can with you know. I'm very glad to be here though is a really great remix of of massive attack. Just before the saw's really enjoying that. Yes so was i. So let's start our discussion by just defining what layer one and layer to are for people who don't know just to make sure we're on the same page and also multiple layers are necessary at all. Shirk jonah kick it off nick. I can start. i can start in. Virtually every payments system there they functioned in layers so when we talk about layers and bitcoin or cryptocurrency. It's actually completely in line with how things work in the traditional payments base. So you know it's possible to send a wire as a consumer you know. We have access to fed wire. Want but you know for the most part when you use dollars you're transacting with credit systems or peer to peer payments like bone papon cetera. Those would be considered second or even third layer on top of more fundamental clearing infrastructure. Where you have backed payments which happen less frequently and their larger in size and those payments at the bottom of stack of higher assurances. So and they kind of settled immediately as opposed to higher layer payments which settle on a deferred basis so credit card payments are not final immediately so extend that analogy to Currency just sort of contextualized it a little bit. Bitcoin payments would be considered fast settling high assurance payments. So those are my mind can have utility scale transactions. You can use months. Value can have confidence. they're going to settle. Immediately layer to in. My view is more about deferring settlement getting more skill ability through training off against those settlement. Assurances are getting faster finality By trading off again against assurances so basically opening up the design space and mirroring. Those you know that that layered model that we have in payments itself and i think that's really how payments systems scale as far as we understand them it's unlikely that unite everybody on the bottom layer the that would be like all we ever used for. Transactions was sending wires to each other. So that's kind of my view of it multiple. Know if you've a different diagnosis. I think the way you articulated. Nick is a great starting point You know the analogy. We use often is the bitcoin. Blockchain is more akin to fed wire. And what we've seen you know. A lot of other protocols have moved more quickly to adopt layer twos. I think the ferryman particular is one that from the very early days had a mindset to sort of start moving towards layer two and one of the interesting observations is over the last six Six months pardon really as we've seen the explosion of defy a new financial primitives being implemented on top of the theory. Obviously it's resulted in a lot of challenges in network availability network throughput and rising price in in sending transactions across the network deploying contracts now. Obviously bitcoin doesn't function in the same way. But what. I think is important to note. Is you know. There is an important function here. Whereas bitcoin usage grows and the adoption of bitcoin grows a number of use cases that were utilizing for bitcoin grows. We're going to need different layers. That have these features. That are optimized for the specificity of the use case. And that's something that's talked about a bit more in other protocols that are newer and i've had an opportunity to learn from watching what's happened in bitcoin but i think it's been interesting to observe you know i'm in many people's minds we really don't ever think about the amount of bandwidth we're consuming or the cost of connectivity to the core protocol which were interacting and in many ways the way i think about bitcoin For the first time in human history we have a way to price computing activity. There is a very real price that you have to pay prioritize transactions in the meme pool and so in my view. It's actually like an internet interesting. Crossover pardon between some of the concepts around Computing connectivity and how rodham topologies work with money. Right you're basically punching routing policy using transaction fees and and money effectively that allow you to sort of create specificity in terms of what layer of the stack on operate without compromising the security guarantees of the coin and again is nick described. There are inevitably going to be trade-offs but we've observed so far as we look at. The proliferation of bitcoin is an asset across other chains. Whether that's in the form of rap. Bitcoin or other assets is people really do want to have the security. Guarantees of bitcoin is an asset. But they want to have the ability to adopt some of the parameters around how they're utilizing the network security guarantees of their transactions particularly lower few transactions perhaps being able to deploy smart contracts or a more complex as sort of logic that maybe isn't as easy to deploy bitcoin script. So i think that's very important the other piece. I'll just quickly add that. I think is really important since this conference is about developers developers developers. Tomorrow on cnn. Steve ballmer if you remember. His famous developers developers developers speech is electric capital puts out this great report on and it just came out. It's their state of the developer ecosystem report and one of the interesting observations. They have is there. A low more developers in other protocols than there are in bitcoin because bitcoin is notoriously hard to develop with and building a robust grasp of bitcoin. Core protocol takes much longer than perhaps some of these other protocols which was scripted in more familiar languages and have different types of logic. That's more intuitive to say like javascript developers or other developer communities that are much larger. So what. I think also been interesting to observe. We have this in the legacy financial system. The entire legacy financial system is built on. Something called coble right. Which is this archaic programming language. Like most people know coble really really well are probably over the age of sixty because they were designing corporate systems must seventies so there's actually really interesting technological risk that exists in our core financial system and our poor financial applications in that the group of people who know and really understanding our experts in kabul are gonna be retiring in the next ten years right so it's created this tremendous amount of pressure on the banking sector to replace some of these core banking systems. That were built fifty sixty years ago because there is a real risk of technological obsolescence not having enough talented people to step into those roles. And i started. See the same thing. Happening in in crypto. Right there aren't necessarily tens of thousands of the coin developers out there who can build really robust highly secure layers on top of bitcoin. And so it's been really interesting to see what's been happening in the sack seacoast system and i'm really excited about milan. Tax may not. Because i think one of the really important Designed space constraints that we have to get through is the fact that the bitcoin developer communities just inherently much smaller than other developer communities because the level of knowledge required is very specific amount of time it takes to become really proficient in bitcoin and to understand all of the nuances of y bitcoin. Core way does prior bibs the history of fly. Certain things are good. Ideas are bad. Ideas takes a long time. Like i'm seven years in. And i still know nothing neck. I don't know how you feel about that. But that's where i think. Layer twos can be helpful in improving extensive ability. Because you don't necessarily require a bunch of people to become incredibly proficient. Bitcoin core through layer. Tuesday can now introduce other programming. Language that really broaden the developer ecosystem and allow people from other ecosystems to be able to build on top of bitcoin without necessarily needing to go through that learning curve on that you otherwise would but again. It's just interesting to me that that's also married and legacy finance for like bank search shitting themselves because all their best. Cobo people are leaving and they don't have anyone to replace on so sort of an interesting parallel at least for me. I think it's it's

Coin Shares Castle Island Ventures Milton Nick Shirk Jonah Papon Cetera Nick Nick Carter Bitcoin Laura Electric Capital TIM Coble Rodham Steve Ballmer CNN Kabul Milan Cobo
Jeff Blankenburg On His Skills Twitch Stream

Alexa in Canada

03:11 min | 5 months ago

Jeff Blankenburg On His Skills Twitch Stream

"Shifting to something that. I know that you're very interested in hearing about right now and this ties into your whole student. Got set up. There is that you do regular a tweet streams all about building skills and got a really cool project so tell us about that. I'm really keen to hear more else. Sure yeah you're you're not gonna have any shortage of excitement for me so i stream on twitch every morning ten. Am to noon for the most part. I mean there's flexibility in that but for the most part it's everyday tend to noon eastern time on twitch on my channel i've got a sign right and the thing that i've been building over the last month and a half or so Started as a chat bot. I As i was on twitch i wanted to way to engage audience and so what i did is i built a very small casino and so the way it works every time you posted a message in chat you were given one more coined in the casino. And then you could. You could use commands that i built like exclamation point poker exclamation point slots to actually play video poker game or a slot machine or roulette craps or blackjack and i haven't finished all the games but we're getting there and i realized very quickly that what i was building for the chat bot when not be something that i could use easily to translate forums and i knew that i'd wanna build this for alexa to so i started over. I left the casino as it was still running in in my twitch chat But i started over and completely rebuilt it so that the casino which i call chat zeno is completely standalone and so it runs on database It's just a. It's basically like a javascript library that i import into a project and then i call into it. Make it through the things. I wanted to but i haven't alexa version now and i have a Starting on the new twist version again and then we're gonna move it to slack and discord in all sorts of other places where you can play it and one of the huge benefits of it is that you'll your balance will follow you no matter where you go so if you're on twitch or slack or whatever you can easily link your accounts and then you have the same balance no matter where you are. You don't have to have like a separate game running on each different platform now. The the nuance cool. Part of this is that. I've had a lot of people. Ask me because it drives a ton of engagement. The chad is just flowing by is. You're watching my twit streams and let people ask me. Hey how can i. Could you give me a communist because you run on my channel and one of the things that's going to be happening on. The twits version is if you subscribe to my twitch channel which you can do for free even if you have amazon prime or anything like that. He subscribed to my twitch channel. It'll automatically be available on your channel. I got a lot of mentally install itself so we'll will start listening to your channel. It'll be able to respond to users there but again same bounds because the same username because the same efforting so It's a fun project. there's lots to explore. there's so many rules to craps and blackjack. I love those games. But i didn't realize what it's like to have to code those games A lot that is very very cool. I'm fascinated by this. So people are during your twins. They're sort of watching you build this experience in real time and then that can interact with you and they can learn from you and ask questions in follow along. But if what i'm saying is boring or the lights aren't enough for you then Then you could just sit there and gamble those those coins you've earned by participating in chat Right there.

Zeno Amazon
Shawn Swyx Wang: Engineers and Strategy

Developer Tea

05:14 min | 5 months ago

Shawn Swyx Wang: Engineers and Strategy

"The question that i think is hardest answer for. Let's say a junior or mid level engineer is how do they get to the right place to think about those things we are the are they supposed to invite themselves to a strategy meeting. Where does that happen. What is what is the crossroads where they say okay instead of just picking up a ticket. I'm going to for example. I'm going to push back against it and say oh. I don't think this is the right time to work on this water. Those actual kind of concrete actions the is an engineer can take to move me more into the strategy discussions. Okay so what i was talking about earlier was more like just being aware of what's going on like staying informed but what you're talking about here is how to add more actively in corporate strategy in to your own work and i think that one is that one is more of a self driven approach. I think because no one actually. Does this consciously i mean. Let me let me rephrase that. I don't think many companies you know. Sit there engineers down for for strategy planning session. And i think that you can probably more actively advocate for that in your you know what the discussions your one on one meetings managers and actually have more of an active conversation one of the very effective examples. That i've seen is a friend of mine. Matthew gershman who works at dropbox he actually started a java. scrip- killed so he was a. Here's a software engineer. Just like a you know a lot of others dropbox but he started like an extracurricular or internal within dropbox that focused on important topics within the jobs ecosystem and then he. He ran that in was a well-known in his career for that and it ended up setting some of the javascript strategy for dropbox and nobody ever asked him to do that. He just came up with it on his own accord than once he did. When recognized the value of it in the company supported him financially like they were able to hold internal conferences. where could hold these discussions. So it's a little bit of you. Don't wait you don't ask for permission. You just do it. And then you know because it's valuable because you do what you're doing the right thing people will recognize that in what you and yet. Don't wait to be asked Yeah yeah that makes sense And i think that's it is a challenge because like you said there's there's a difference in becoming aware of this and actually doing something about it There can be a conflict. And i've experienced personally myself. Where i felt like i was. There was an imbalance between my awareness of a need for strategy in my leverage to make that strategy a reality I've been there before. And i think that that is really the hard work comes in right. It's stepping in and saying okay. I'm going to take one step towards making the right decisions. The right strategic decisions and eventually in a theoretically that should bear out in value for the product value for the users value for the company and You assuming that your strategy is right and is that is that your understanding of of how that should can play out with that. I for sure if you don't have that much influence than actually your strategy is more career strategy rather than technology strategy but that's also very valid is something that we should discuss But i i mean. I do think that engineers have more control over strategy than they realized like you. Earned consumers strategy is falling the tech choices that you make are reflections of what you think of other people strategy like it's its strategy old town and you can't. You can't really just like. I don't have a say in this like oh you always do and you should recognize your own agency in your own outcomes and i think that that's an important Recognition but for sure. I think when you're when you feel like you have less influence than bobby. The right focuses career strategy essentially climbing up ladders. And you have a i. I've i've actually surveyed on the public company engineering career ladders out there so You check on my blog for that or have chapter in the book But yeah it's something that's worth talking about where you don't feel like you're that empowered to pursue strategy but Training for it. Because that's know when when when you have when you're in a position to exert some influence over over the company's strategy you better have some

Dropbox Matthew Gershman Bobby
New Features of Safari 14

Mac Power Users

03:13 min | 5 months ago

New Features of Safari 14

"I thought it'd be worth while to kind of dig in because safari got a lot of changes this year. It did work to now version fourteen of safari which is something that when we wrote it out like. Oh i feel really old. I remember once the fire was brand new version fourteen. It has a lot of changes in it and what it's cool like. We said earlier apples good about supporting older. Oh in terms of software update safari is is one of those examples it will run On mohave and catalina in fact came out mid september. So you probably already been using safai fourteen for a little while. But i thought we could talk through some of the features under the hood. There's some changes of flashes. Gone of course get better performance and things like javascript. Page loading apple always talents. That know safari. Superfast senate is. When's the last time you ran flash and safari though. It's been a long long time. I'm guessing me like six years. I mean flashes. Basically gone everywhere. Yeah yeah the The thing i'm most excited about really is this idea of them. Bringing in plug ins. You know an more robust plug in architecture. Yes so the the new extensions. Api we talked about this where a company or developer has an extension available to them. They've already written for chrome or firefox or something else they can bring that in through ex code. Gotta go in the mac app store. There's a new section in the maps or now for these things but they can pour these faraway easier than they used to be able to before this developing is a far extension was like a one off the way apple did it was an unusual than it used the the tool. So that's a ra- standardized or on chrome and firefox cts From a user perspective though because the far east of Based on privacy is that you can really control. The access is extensions. Have to your data so you can allow it on specific sites or all sites. You can say you only have access to this for one day. A lots of of really nice settings to limit what these things can do because a lot of these extensions work by seeing what you're doing in your browser and of course that does have privacy implications yet it gives you that great Ecosystem plug ins without the wild west mentality of like. What did this just due to my computer. 'cause and some other browsers you really don't know The so good on that. I haven't really seen the payoff on that yet. Though i mean there are several apps that i'm or plug ins and following. That aren't there yet. But i feel like that's only a question of time. Now yeah i think so. I think it will take a while. I think those will be more successful than apple's past extension programs. But i don't think we're ever going to see the wide range of things that see in something like chrome i think a lot developers won't bother with safari but for those who do. It'll be a lot less work for them.

Safai Mohave Catalina Apple Mac App Store Senate
What is Elm?

Developer Tea

01:18 min | 7 months ago

What is Elm?

"Let's say that I am a friend and engineer and ninety eight percent of my time is spent. In messing around with a react APP or something. And I. Somebody tells me Hey, you should check out ELM and You know of course I'm thinking this is probably just another job script package Just another thing had to my tool said, why would I be wrong? I don't like to tell people they're wrong. So much as you know maybe if they're missing some information, I like to try and give them the information. So I'd say what's missing from that analysis is the main thing is that is a programming language So it's not a javascript package. It is a different language than Java script altogether and it compiles javascript so you can use it in places where you would otherwise use javascript. But for my money and and for a lot of people in the. Substantially sized elbow community It's a much more delightful experience than using javascript. So if Javascript as the only language you've used for development, I think elm is definitely worth learning because you might find that you enjoy it a lot more. Very good answer concise answer like that. That's I think that's that's probably going to convince me to dive in,

Engineer
Severless: Improving How We Serve up Websites and Applications With Jerome Hardaway

Front End Happy Hour

05:09 min | 7 months ago

Severless: Improving How We Serve up Websites and Applications With Jerome Hardaway

"Is serving a consultant? Please describe what is server list? It's been someone at work start speaking Greek they're like does. Oh Man service is a practice of. Instead of having thank goodness isn't a word. Instead of having like a like hard server that you're putting all your data off you're having something in the cloud another someone else's server. Is the practice of using servers that in API's in cloud signal. Sears yeah. So using API's in cloud technologies to serve data to the wet Ri-, handle all your date in cloud of the NBA API says two times. Really years. I had a long day at work. So this is great like how is that different than I make a website I put those files in the cloud like how would it be different than that? Like the the traditional way we sort of think about deploying a website to the cloud or putting it somewhere mean actually into. What you're saying to the cloud. By is either how people have actually been four score in seven years ago even touched up teepee, right? Like crazy old school so You think of FTP and putting your files way someplace in like a our. Core like situation. Oh. Here is my files and I'm dragging and dropping I'm waiting Dow Upload and then I'll hopefully though cash it takes twenty thirty minutes, right? Well, we'll. You're thinking of services and things that you have. I'll go off the most simple format right on one of my favorites allow the first thing. I. Introduced students to his search right surge dot S. H. so they build their bill their website. And they go on. into the CLI and a US surge of which is. A service that takes their tools, turns it all into a cdn then shoots it the Internet with his own domain name that you can either mass or you can make on the fly. They come up light really craze domain names like everybody else. So that is like the biggest lie it's easier it's faster. It's leaner right I think that's the biggest and it's empowering right I think that's the biggest w for specials coming in fronting game from a modern perspective is just So, much leaner for the new for the newer devs to come in and they're like, Hey, I get actually spend eight bucks on a domain name and use notify and surge and content full, and that's that's it at my blog up and running in like a week right and he's all like services tools that help you know Hitler cms in exact nature they in power the front end kind of makes me excited about them I think your your definitions solid on. So I. I think to make it a little more clear cassava like. Man I'm new the game I have no idea what you're talking about like all that stuff like making it even simpler. It's the idea of like you write a function right function takes input producing output. Right, basic functional programming. So imagine taking that function and being able to upload it somewhere. So that response to Internet requests. So it's not just your machine it's anybody. And that's the basic idea beyond Yeah. You can do that. You just taken input given output except you don't have to worry about any of the in between state it just works and then you can update it quickly over time. So it's pretty powerful stuff what I find fascinating Andrew you're you're touching on it is like Fifteen years ago. To make a web page, you needed to be a front end engineer like you need to engineer needed have skills you need no html css a little bit of javascript that hasn't changed. We have like shop fi and squarespace anybody make website. Now it doesn't take any skills. Okay. So tenure five years ago you wanted to play server to actually do custom stuff beyond like a wordpress site you need to be a friend engineer. You need to know that sort of thing you know how to deploy server all these things. Now at twenty, twenty you any of that. So you can build entire webpage silent how you want all that deploy deploy multiple regions have ends up all that stuff and never know any of the other stuff you'll leave your front engineer as much anymore. I think it's like the tail. Of of several lists. And we'll talk about surrealists why the name but but the tail that is just how it keeps evolving and like if you don't keep your skills fresh, you will give up behind because you're like Oh. Yeah. That's one of those who call themselves a webmaster. Like remember that I remember. That's a good point

Cloud Engineer Consultant NBA United States DOW Andrew Hitler
Rich Harris - Svelte

Full Stack Radio

03:14 min | 10 months ago

Rich Harris - Svelte

"The best place to start though would just be talking about spelt itself and I. think that'll probably lead into a kind of how you think people should be building Steph for the web. Because I'm sure there's a lot. Of, you know things they're related So so what does like the pitch I? Felt these days after you know having time to refine it over the last few years. Still working on the pitch on the it's a little bit of a difficult thing to to summarize and what I found works best is to try and PUT IT in the context of projects that people Germany more familiar with. So little people who've used reacts a lot of people who view. And they used to this idea of building web applications out of self contained components where you have the mockup for a particular piece of you I together with the styles that with that mockup and the behavior that controls how you can interact with that markup, and what it will change into in response to changes in state of Europe. so is that is the thing that allows you to build. Applications components the difference between spelt, and there's the projects is that? It primarily things of itself was a compiler, whereas traditional framework will take your to the author components and then sort of tandem into instructions to the browser at runtime. Spelt tries to do as much as possible at bill time, so you integrate your usual bill stat using web, tackle roller, or whatever module Bundy using, and it will take. The components that you've offered and an literally writer as Vanilla Javascript. And through that, it's able to achieve typically much better performance than traditional framework, and because we don't need to carry around in a virtual bum, defend general any of the stuff that you normally expect to include. Your application will typically be a lot smaller as well which means that it gets to use a faster and it starts up faster. the the final major benefit of a compiler century designed is that we have a lot more control over the Olsen experience when not constrained by having to. Design components in a way the the is. It like it's, it's not. We don't have to be valid jobs rich. And spelled component actually isn't written into a job. Script file is written to a file which is a super set of HTML so you're literally just writing html orienting it with the. Type cutty. Brace job expressions that you need for it to become dynamic, and because of that we can also include styles into component in the same file, and they will be scoped to the mockup. Because the compiler can analyze in the context of the MOCKUP. And you can have local state which you, which you change just by reassigning to triggering, renders in a more granular fashion than than the typical component level mandates, so it's a combination of all of those things it's framework, but it's also a compiler, and it's also a library of the things that you need when you're building an application, and A philosophy of building APPs I. Guess Yeah

Steph Germany Bundy Olsen Writer Europe.
From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 10 months ago

From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end no on the back end and some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Twitter California Michael Story Credit Union Josh Camp Facebook Central Valley Software Engineer Silicon Valley Mita Starbucks Hostile Work Environment Mounsey Google Pakistan End Product
The Voice Layer - Jan Knig, Jovo

The Voice Tech Podcast

04:38 min | 11 months ago

The Voice Layer - Jan Knig, Jovo

"We covered the languages NC said it was type script or the judge. Javascript side, but you have to be a program code to be able to use Java what level of technical skills you need to be able to run the high walls, and then be able to actually deploy an application. Development Framework, so it's definitely built for developers, professional teams of developers, but what we're also seeing settled a lot of the. Beginners are using Joe's while to get started because like it's. Our hellawell example is pretty easy to set up. Just have to install one or two things. He just run the code in. That's it and then you can go from there and so I think for anyone who wants to get started with development. I think it's a good first thing to do because like when you're building a rapper mobile APP for example of many many different things to take care about. The officials. You have a back end fronton all of that. With the voice at least getting started as little easier like you get to your first halo worlds more quickly so I think the swipe. Many development beginners are are using for building by SAS right right well I was sent to simply because of the efficiency that you could just learned one one language and deploy to all the platforms as opposed to think well if I doubt on Alexa, then while by all the good L-, assistant uses, and then what about when he comes along I. Am I gonNa Learn all about as. Just. An individual, so there's definitely inefficiency on a scale element to it. US A rundown of the different components than the things that make up the job. Oh, framework, and the interaction model. Like wasn't a simulator or deep Bugah could give us a rundown to some of the components a lot of people when you think of Jogo. They really think mostly about the cross platform. What you mentioned that deploy ones or built wants to deploy everywhere component. That's one thing that we really focused a lot them to develop proficiency on building tools for professional teams to build great vice experiences so much we offer is a local development environment. For example. You don't have to upload your co to serve all the time to build experience. You can cut it on your computer. Computer, we have a debater which is digital browser based tool where you can test your Alexa Skill Google accidents on without talking to your device all the time than we have what you mentioned. The language model that that's also one thing I don't know how deep every when if you're. Listeners is into like the whole voice APP Alexa Skill Development, and so on, but on Alexa von Interaction model for like the speech recognition into natural language understanding, and for Google assistance use a service like dialogue flow for natural language understanding the problem. There is when you building for different. Platforms also have to maintain a language models in different places. What we offer is we offer the JOE language model which can be maintained. And then translated into, Alexandra tracks model into Donald. Floyd, we also like all analyst services that we support the Swale, and that's how we want to make that part easier while and then other stuff like staging with a unit testing framework, a lot of things stoute's help developers in setting up the right processes and deploying their vice experiences to different providers, and so that's really interesting as a recap. Mind standing because you've got the input. You've got the logic and you've got the response. Response you can handle all of that locally as if you had the Amazon. Says running on your own computer, so you can actually make requests and have a response. If it was Amazon Alexa, and then at the same time you could do the same full assistance you have. All of these phones loco dude have to make making these calls out. You'd have to worry about any kind of fees deployments. All of that kind of stuff that takes time by using these the party platform. Very useful speeds up development massively and you mentioned that the D. Bugger as well, but nowadays these platforms have ap visual interface, some kind of screen multi. Involved! Can you do all of that as well locally? Can you stimulate the response back and forth on the visual side who did so with the old hard to call again before it was like the display interface on Alexa order to render templates, we simulated or emulated these interfaces. The problem was with a p. l. guts Soubra complicated tractors Lebed's right now like even the Alexa developer Konzale. Kendra late trust the AP L. stuff that's displayed their into browser, and so what we typically recommend this to relate. It's painful, but to really test on on every device of. Before you, sit it

Alexa JOE Amazon United States NC Jogo Kendra Google Lebed Donald Trump Floyd Analyst Developer
Tips every Flask developer should know

Talk Python To Me

06:50 min | 1 year ago

Tips every Flask developer should know

"We were talking before at you. Were on episode forty eight overlap. Four years ago we talked about building APPs with flask. And then you're on episode. One hundred twenty one where we were talking about micro services and really with a bit of a flask angle there as well so you've been a fan of ask for a long time. Ya I was a user flask. I and rolley told the story in the first episode but quickly I wrote my blog with flask and then not knowing what to blog about decided to blog about flask. At a time where you say that it was an obscure framework. But you know certainly didn't have the following that has now so my articles for someplace where the first that you know outside of the frameworks own documentation and it started growing at the same time I decided to blog about it. Yeah you just catch the wave at just the right time and exactly but at the same time you know you saw the framework like no. I'm not going do it in Django or whatever else I'm GonNa do it in flask right. So there's some you know picking the right idea. Yes and part of my. I'd like to think that this was a little bit of my doing a showed. Y You know. In many cases flask was the better choice by writing tutorials usually my blog and showing actual examples where you can do things that you know usually considered hard and they're not so hard when you look at them through floss yeah to me. Flask. I'll compared to Django. Because that's its biggest alternative right. There's certainly all these other new things. There's so many new web frameworks coming here thoughts and this actually is. Oh yes. There's there's so many new cool little frameworks we got fast. Api HAVE API star. We have scenic it. Just all these. Do not all necessarily leveraging the new a Cinco stuff but a lot of them seem to be like. Hey these other frameworks didn't really solve my problem because they didn't support as thanks so we're going to create something that maybe leverages type pence plus a sink. That's Kinda like flask. We think about some of those like where do you see the action there? The first of all I'm very excited that the model for all these frameworks is flask. Right they all yes. The kind of like flask as you said. Yeah that is what was really surprising to me. So if you compare flask against Django organs pyramid or against the other frameworks and you look at their popularity like I think flask is. We're talking neck and neck but I think actually if you look at the newer projects that haven't been around for Awhile Flask is pretty clearly Jingo in terms of popularity honest Django. People are still working on. Do you work on Django or flask. It's a lot of times I think it means I work on Jingle opt. It's been around awhile not that there's anything wrong with Django but just in terms of that growth but then if you look at flask as the the idea of it that all these other frameworks seem to think that this flask style. Yes Slight adaptations what they want. Right big reason for that. I think it's the we are moving a lot of the The logic the business logic in applications to the client site right with all these new javascript based for the browser What's left to do in the server is really the database storage related actions and maybe authentication chillier anticipation. That's it so if you look at the framework like Django you can do that really well but it has a lot more components that you really have no use for and at least new frameworks model after it sort of give you just the API portion of your service side of your project right. It's gotTa just enough server side. Es Right now. I will say that it has a little less and then you can pick you know the right extensions to to make it exactly what you want. Yeah right add on yeah. That's a good point. I'm still a fan of having a decent amount done on the server side. I I don't know I just I like the instant Idaho. It drives me crazy to see these pages sort of build up as I interact with them. You know you'll see like you're logged out no way half a second later. I'm logged like that kind of stuff. Yes I'm not a huge fan you. You'll find the right mix between server and client. I think people are too quick to go to bill. Everything a single page reactive. You agree angular. You know those types and they don't think about doing it a right balance sometimes. You don't expect everything to be done in a single page. It feels weird. The whole H. is changing but it's sweet on react for example which slow and weird it messes with the buck button in the browser at prefer to basically use the single. H. Up only when you see clear benefit you really need like an interactive thing. I'm a little dashboard. I'm exploring or something like g mail or something. It's perfect right but it's just see the one hammer. You hit everything within the web. My blog the blog that I wrote six years ago. When I started with flasks it's still a traditional application several centric and just find it acid javascript sprinkle catering there to make a little bit. Nicer. But it's mostly several side and I think for a blog that works really well. Yeah I agree. So you're talking about the front end. Frameworks like I agree. Like don't overuse them whatnot but sometimes they make a lot of sense. What ones do you like right now? My preference this is going to hinder rate generate a little bit of a disappointment in your audience. I think is Vanilla javascript. That is the framework or the no framework that fits my brain the best so I can do whatever we want in Vanilla javascript. If you years ago I will say J. Query as you. You don't really need that. The J. Query was a layer. That will make older browsers sort of uniform and as the pros the buzzer predate. Inform each other. So that's my favorite out of. The real frameworks. React is the one that I've used the most but only four simple apps what I've seen. Is that all these dependencies that are generated between all the older parts of the page. It's very easy to get them. Pretty out of control as the project grows right. At least I personally find having handled like for example when Writing Vanilla javascript. Having handle of what part of the page is related to what other part makes it for a much faster and dynamic

Rolley Vanilla Idaho
Showing off our personal bars - Personal projects

Front End Happy Hour

09:21 min | 1 year ago

Showing off our personal bars - Personal projects

"Welcome to episode one hundred and one of the front unhappy our podcast. It's actually been along milestone tat. Hit episode one hundred. Do you think we will maybe hit the milestone of two hundred at point only if the government bails us out jemmy needs some of that sweet sweet cash out small business bailout money. Yeah but definitely. It's kind of exciting to be released though episode. One hundred ten for this episode. We all focus a lot of our time on engineering work for large companies. But we've always you know there's always been side projects or things that we've worked on throughout our careers and so we thought it'd be in this episode to be really cool to share some details about some of our side projects that we've done in the past before we get started. Let's go around and give introductions of today's panelists Augusta's you want to start off. Sure maims Augusta's software engineer at twitch. Jim Young Senior software engineer at net flicks. And I am Ryan Burgess. I'm a software engineering manager at net flicks. So only the three of us today. So we'll be fine art in each episode the Front End Happier podcast. We love to choose a keyword that if it's mentioned all in the podcast we will all take a drink. What did we decide? Today's keyword is personal personal. Awesome all right so if we say the word personal which I'm sure we will. We will all take a drink to start off. I'm really interested and curious to hear each of your side projects that you've done in the past. I'm sure there's been a few and I'd love to hear some of the things that you've done and I can say. This topic came up with from our previous episode. We did a twitch livestream one of our listeners asked. Hey y'all talk about corporate programming all the time because the corporations do you ever do personal side projects anymore. And here's like jeers took a topic Let's see done a few in the past or if done many in the past obviously Yeah One Shoghi engineer who is pretty senior and like who's never done a side project like it just doesn't happen like I think to get where you are up to some sort of work on the side. It's just the nature of being is offering engineer. I feel like that's how I learned like that's really how I truly learned. It was constantly China. Solve some sort of a problem that I was really excited to do and build and and I felt like I learned a lot by doing that. You can read and learn but I feel like actually applying it. is where I excelled to learn. Really quickly yeah. I agree I find that when you work in just for your job. You're so focused on the problem and just maybe shipping. Like how do you ship it out to users? But the nicely. Cy Projects is he can really focus more on the learning aspect of. Oh this is what I ideally want to build and even if it's even if it doesn't solve anything it's like exciting. Maybe you might choose a random new technology like oh I WANNA learn view this time where something. It's just really nice. You've a lot more freedom and also you can cut corners it. Does you're like whatever it's my project. I'm going to do what I want. Great Test if you want. Combine your coat if you want. You should always comment your code. I've heard him say that. I do MICO because looking at my repo from years ago and my projects. I'm glad my code because I have no idea what I was doing at the time and the comments. I'm like okay. I can make a quick change here if I need to because I commented my code so I'm guilty. I gotTA say on my side projects. I HAVE NOT APPLIED. The Best Practices sometimes and it has that commenting is seriously. It is bit me in the ass a few times. 'cause YOU'RE RIGHT MIGHT. WanNa make a change to something and you're like I'll just quickly go do that. But when you haven't made those comments it becomes really difficult then. It becomes a bigger tour to try and make that change. So I'm with you gem. I should take that advice more often. I'll say this that it's controversial for those listening in the car. At home I would comment my code before I wrote tests. If you're asking me like which one is more valuable for personal projects commenting code like I? Almost I almost never test for my personal projects like I. I don't care I know it's bad practice Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah but that there's stakes so unless is doing something for money but that point it'd be more of a side hustle. Not a personal project cheers cheers. It's funny I feel like a lot of people are really obsessed with test driven development or really. Let's run the tests upfront first. And then you have one hundred percent code coverage or all these things but especially for side projects you know. Just just build what you want to build the damping get me started on the like one hundred percent TESCO. Yeah it's like I don't believe that I mean I don't think you can do it no I don't. I don't think the schools Aaron I don't think there's one hundred percent test coverage like if that's the case then you never have bugs and if that's the case I don't know there's no there's no case for us. No bugs like it doesn't happen before begins. I like the projects we've been working on. I'll say like a failure that I see and I think what discourages a lot of new people is feel like. Oh I wanNA build something. I want to build a quick game website on my own. You ask vice on twitter people like well what you need is react starter kit. You need that you need every was bad. You need Apache. You like your own server. You need like a million things to get started. I'm like no start with an html page at a script tag and like see where you go if you need that sort of thing cool but if you look at most of the work that I've done in the past arise I projects thereby minimum minimum. Like maybe node almost never framework it just like hassle. And if I'm doing that I'm not learning anything it's different if you're trying to react or view or angular something like that but I really think side projects for exploration just like free form like art as you can make it and if you get too hung up on like the precision tests in like the right framework and all these things then you're kind of doing yourself a disservice using the frameworks grader. Using node or some other language that you're like I'm just kinda curious about learning or this will do the job really well absolutely but I used that people get hung up too much on getting all the things like I gotTa make sure web pack is configured of gotTa make sure that all these different tasks are happening. Do your point. I'm like maybe just writing some vanilla javascript in a script tag might actually do. Do just what you need for that project. I think another one that I always hear too is especially when people are trying to learn something. It's like well what can I create? That's already been created. I'm always like go create another facebook. I honestly you'll learn lots like if that's something that you want to do is create another social network or game or something like that. That's a great way to learn as recreating something From scratch yeah plus one thousand two that I felt like I had that kind of same mentality. Where as they own. This sounds like a good idea. That's already done like I guess the world doesn't need it and it's like don't don't think of everything you want to build as something that needs to solve a problem that everyone has barely. I mean those are good problems to solve. I guess just do it. Even for learning for your own sake is like a really beneficial side project. I was like doing projects or something that will make my life better in like or easier like some when I think of building like tool or command line tools script plug in library. Something that I'm creating like. Hey this help me. And just the smallest slightest way to be more productive or just shave off some time. Whatever it is if I throw it up on get hub in like one or two people find it useful. Great if not who cares. It made my life easier. And that's all that matters and and it was cool to create like that's kind of the way I look at it yet. I want to hear the past projects that you've all worked on. I think I know of two that worked on but it's embarrassing as not that big but I I guess I'm proud of the proud of proud of them enough. I would pin them on my of with zero stars or but So one project I worked on was it's called co Co Nami. Commando it's on MPM and literally all it is is. There's this thing called the code and I forgot what game did it. But there's a lot of games they have this secret code. This contrast I'll cut. Yeah so yeah. So there's this codes like up up down down left right left right B. A or something and I saw a lot of game stewart. I thought it'd be cool if it'd be like there's just this cool mpm package they could just install onto your website and then you could just have this very convenient handler that said when this chain of commands was was done then it would just do something as I just published it Npr One day so so the added. It's awesome yeah I love it. Yeah the this was like when I was like super new to MPM in general is like Oh wow. There's a whole package manager and so I just thought it'd be cool thing to do

Augusta Software Engineer Engineer Cy Projects Ryan Burgess Jim Young Engineering Manager Co Co Nami Twitter China Facebook Tesco Aaron
Tom Preston-Werner: Building Full-Stack JS Apps with Redwood.js

Full Stack Radio

05:58 min | 1 year ago

Tom Preston-Werner: Building Full-Stack JS Apps with Redwood.js

"Jaaz is indeed an attempt to build a full stack framework for Java script and to really deploy it in a service way. So that's one of the primary tenants that we have is build it end to end with Javascript and deployed to server list environment. To give you the advantages of the scale that that can bring as well as the global distribution that that can bring so one thing that we say about redwood is that its edges ready and by that we mean all of the different parts of redwood should be able to operate on the edge once technology plays out a little bit more. This is not entirely true today. But really we're building redwood today with an eye to the future so redwood is not yet fully realized but the idea is that if we start today with the idea that some of these technologies will exist in the way that we want them to in say a year. Then we'll be there when the technology is ready instead of technology existing first and then coming in and saying Oh let's take advantage of this and then it takes another year or more to built for it. It's like the way that game. Programmers build their games for the hardware that will exist. Yeah when they release. We're doing the same thing but with web technologies supplying some bets that Some of the tooling that you kind of need to kind of make this thing work the way you you believe has. The potential to work are going to exist You know in the near Ish Future. Yeah absolutely and so I. I can dive into those just real quick to go over them. So as hard as the edge readiness goes so the whole point redwood really is to take advantage of GM stack architecture. And so you start with the client which ends up being a react based javascript client that can be delivered statically so before we even like go even further there. I think it'd be interesting to kind of touch on some of these kind of different layers of the stack because he get through and figure out what the opinions are I think even before he talking about the react client. I'm I think a lot of people have sort of a different definition of Jim Stack or different picture in their head of what it means so when you say stack like how do you define that. And what is what is it. And what is it not in your mind? Yeah so I use the term jam stack. Maybe a little bit more loosely than most people today. But it's a bit on purpose. Purposefully trying to push the boundaries of what would be considered gem stack while still being true to the definition so jam stack javascript. Api's markup that's can cover a lot of territory but it really comes with the deployment strategy as well so a big part of the jam stack is the idea that you can push your code to a git repository and that will trigger deploy. And you're basically done and so that's part of Redwood that same idea the same way that you would build a traditionally considered jam stack application today where it's content faced and maybe you're you have a built step and then you push that aesthetic content to a cdn and with Netla fi and others you can have functions. That'll be spun. Up for you redwood operates in exactly that that space and so by Jim Stack. I mean you have Java script that is your primary it flips a little bit. Maybe the J. M. in in aesthetic content based site you're probably going to have mostly static markup and then you're gonNA sprinkle in Java script to interact with Third Party. Api is or maybe an API that you've written yourself in the redwood version of Jam Stack. Which is really the same tall just jam. Stack. You might have more or less of each one of those components so in Redwood you have more javascript so your your front ends up being all react. So it's page APP and you're mark probably ends up being minimal. Though the idea is that you can do pre rendering and have pages. So let's say you're marketing pages or other content pages that are that are suitable for pre rendering that you have a bill phase to do that and then you can push those out like you would in a more traditional jam stack APP Today and the. Api is baked in as part of this stack in that. You're you're going to write your API it would be. It would be a reason that you would choose to use. Redwood is the full integration throughout the stack to use the all of the fancy stuff really nicely integrated really great developer experience that we're producing four the back end as well and this is. This is another difference from a more of a content related. Jim Koch So in my mind what I'm hearing is it sounds like it's like a Jam Saqi framework designed for People Building Bespoke web applications where they need to write a lot of their own custom backend code and they need a place to do that. That hopefully has some opinions and conventions that let's do it in a more productive way maybe like we typically been used to something like rails. Yeah exactly so. We see it as a rails replacement. Yeah Very Cool. Anything you would normally do with rails. We hope that you'll be able to do with redwood the that's the competitor. Is that really the full end to end? Full stack tightly. Integrated includes everything testing like all like the whole database access. Like the whole thing end to end is just use. This stuff used these sorts of technologies together. We've integrated them beautifully. We've created a deployment paradigm that scales very easily and requires almost no intervention and is Java scripts and

Redwood Jim Stack Jaaz Jim Koch GM Third Party People Building Developer
Michael Chan - React Is Not a Rails Competitor

Full Stack Radio

09:07 min | 1 year ago

Michael Chan - React Is Not a Rails Competitor

"Almost seven years ago I found an opportunity to Work in rails and it was it was. It was kind of like a I. I love closing loops. And so the idea of being able to transition into rails was like a really fun like oh well a guy could actually like come back and do this and learn it and I think at that point had finally had the appreciation to realize like what rails gives you like why having a framework why having an Orem. Why having a kind of these these constraints systems or super valuable especially in like a larger team right. I think that's probably the biggest thing to have. These contracts that are core to the framework like the ideas more than the framework itself. Even is such a good place to start When you have when it's not just you coating up some site in a room but it's like you and you know three five ten one hundred other people sharing code base. Yeah so lots of conventions and stuff that just make it easier for people to sort of communicate and have established patterns for solving problems. And Yeah Yeah I. It's hard for me now so I've been The work that I do now is is shared between like rails and react so we have you know we have like a product that is like thirteen years a Do Front and Architecture at a company called Planning Center we make Church software and we have all of our. Apps are isolated rails APPs. So that's how they do all of the database connection like the the. The data mapping all that kind of stuff. We have eight of them. They're all rails on the back and then they have some amount of react on top of that For things that are like particularly complicated or interactive relationships and each APP is different. You know some of them are like you know the have like a rails router rail stack but like every route just shows a react up but then we have some that are just like you know one little complicated form is in is in mounted with react. Yeah totally yeah and the rest is just rails rendered absolutely. Yeah it's it's kind of fun to see like to see different teams working in this kind of mixed stack And seeing like people's different people's comfort level with that but it is kind of like painfully obvious like how much convention there is in rails that kind of takes you further faster and how little there is an react where you kind of have to kind of make it up as you're going along and I think for me like so much of the way that I think about the development of pages indifferent to framework is formed by like rails. Right that idea of you have like show list Yep Create update new. Destroy like that languages so baked into head at this point that I think about that for like. That's my entry point into like any view like am I doing a show view a creature. Yeah same seems weird to like not have if you're just getting into it right now to not have that right like okay. Well I'M GONNA make a new. I'M GONNA make a new page or new view. What am I gonNA? Where do I start? It's like back to the PHP days again. Right where it's like has now. I'm just making a file and can be. Yeah so the place that you work now is that. Is that the same place that you started working out with rails or did you have a couple different sales jobs. Okay God Yeah No. I've been there for seven years now and it's It's it's been interesting. I've really I've learned a lot because of that split right like so using rails as a productive framework for actually managing an application. Then doing more and more react in kind of like seeing how that transition goes between like kind of something that's may be old and But stable and something that is like new and hot but like the wild wild west So okay where I think. This conversation really gets interesting and where I really wanted to dig in with. You is when I saw some of the replies to this tweet that I I'd beginning episode a couple. People were applying the kind of snarky replies. About like how I just do like crate. React up. Now you know and One of them. Replies that you said that was create racked up is one of many ways to generate a front end up with no connection to date or service and I thought I feel like finally. Somebody's like speaking to be like. This is the thing we're trying to understand because it feels like there's this like it feels like there's a lot of conversations that happen that it's never said explicitly but implicitly. It sounds like people are often looking at tools like react as like an alternative to a tool rails which I can't figure out how that even makes any sense because it feels like they do completely different things so I'm curious to get your perspective on that. Like why is it? Like I'm seeing these conversations where people are where people sort of talk about like react as like a framework for building websites. And I'M GONNA use react instead of rails now I'm whereas clearly you're still using rails react kind of integrated day to day. So what's happening there? I think I think a lot of people. Just like to fully give into the like hype. I don't know if this is like a personal. Branding hang around like an identity thing but like people to jump headlong into like. Oh No I M react developer. Now like just create react up done like that's my framework and then like push to the side or like diminish all of the things that are not in that so it's like you know like yeah you use create reactive but like in order to make anything meaningful like you had to make decisions about how to how to get data and like if you have an existing application like you're still using the framework like you're still using that thing. I think for us. It's like I freely admit that like the the lion share of what we're doing is still rails Kennedy's kind you know. We have these cute views that said on top of it but like the majority of the work is in a different framework. And I think that people maybe aren't intellectually honest about the fact that they are they're their first and major dependency. Is this huge application. That already exists that happens to have an API. That's a lot of these people that are like a lot of people. Doing a lot of worker react you think are mostly talking to existing. Api's that kind of exist before they even made the decision to build like a new front end with reactor to build like a new APP. That talks to that suffered react. I think I think so and I mean I can't talk everybody but I know that that's that's true for us. One of the huge successes of react is that there's a it's so easy to get started with right so like if you have a real. Is that like you know the first component that we built our company. I made just for fun. We had this thing it was like we have a transporter for music. And so you can just click up and down to like kind of Gaucher's the keys or whatever. Yeah Yeah and like at the time that was like the one of three demos that were on the The react dot org website. I'll I already have it in J. Query but like I just try and react lakes this is all about and I just kind of built that one little widget and react like included. You know an unnecessary amount of javascript to do that but it was. It was so it was so easy. 'cause you just include this like you. Md on your page and then like there it is. You're using react to some degree. It gets point. Zero zero zero zero five percent of the application. But we're using react and I think that's like that's the beauty of it is that you don't have to go through and rewrite everything to start using react like and from that point on. I was like a quote unquote like react Alabama. Because that one stupid and I think that's true right. I think that is like what makes things like Reacting views the same way like really interesting exciting as and I think like If you even if you look at facebook dot com right like yes. It's not a single page APP. It's not like a react. I mean I think the new one that I think some people are starting to see now is like a full blown react. Appa grab the hotness right but Traditionally even like where react was born is still like a server rendered. Php APP with a bunch of data. That's there when you go view source and look at like the rights that came back from the server and that server rendered but it's not like server rendered react that'd be talking about wrestling or whatever it's just a no it's just. Html made by a backup

Orem Planning Center Facebook Wrestling Kennedy MD Developer Alabama J. Query
Tim Head Is Trying to Bring Binder to Us All

Talk Python To Me

03:36 min | 1 year ago

Tim Head Is Trying to Bring Binder to Us All

"Him. Welcome to talk by enemy by Mike. It's great to have you on the show and I'm really looking forward to learning more about binder is fantastic to be on the show and the two Tokyo about find a what we do how it came. B. Hopefully how it will continue forever in the future. I have so it's definitely GonNa Continue in some sense in no matter. What in this you know. We're a good hub is taking all of the public repositories in encoding them on tape and putting them in like some vaults in some Nordic country. I can't remember exactly where but it's probably already been archived there for the world so it's definitely gonNA continue but I hope it continues actively as well. Yeah that sounds good. We have contributed. Who lives in no way so maybe we should try to organize a trip to wherever this fold. It's exactly I can't remember where it is which country it's in but yeah it's up there. It's gotta be near Norway. Pretty cool I now. I'm definitely looking forward to talking about binder and learning more and a lot of the behind the scenes stuff but before we get to all that. Let's just start with your story. How'd you get into programming in Python? Slow when I was a teenager? I wanted to do everybody. Twenty years ago wanted to do is build websites and at the time. Might that told me. Oh yeah maybe you should check out on then. They had this fantastic On then I learn how to use that Make Forum software and other lake websites like that and that's how I go into Bison and if you wanted to mean never really learned any other programming languages if you don't have to you you know I think there's value in other programming languages but people who know python are in a bit of a special place because it's so widely used and accepted. You're not forced to go learn something else necessarily other than Java script. Everybody's forced to learn javascript. If you want to do anything on the web at that's right so I know a little bit of Joschka and I was a fitness physics student at university than what the Sun as well as a physicist a aloft C. Plus plus right staring assembly codes is the other thing I do. Yeah so are you still. Are you still working so no I don't? I'm not an academic anymore. You've hung up your tweed jacket and you're not sure if you get those before you become a professor maybe only get maybe full professor. You get the hat at the end. Yeah yeah so I I think three or four years ago a left academia until there was no better thing to do in your life than be unemployed moved to Switzerland on the same day. Nice not Started MINE SMOKE. Consulting company around data science machine mining but kind of stuff and today. I work for a small company in Zurich. That the is code scruple slow. Let you scribble on a piece of paper and we do electronic signatures so if you need to sign documents which require a legal signatures you toss. Okay Yeah Yeah Super Cool. What was it like working at Stern? Oh it was one of the best places of work to my life. There's a reason the competition to what is so crazy.

Professor Tokyo Mike Zurich Norway Stern Switzerland Physicist
Designing Your Website for Google's Perfect World

Accelerate Your Business Growth

09:36 min | 1 year ago

Designing Your Website for Google's Perfect World

"Thanks so much for joining me today. Jeff thank you for having me. Diane appreciate it's Great Speaker. Well it's great to have you here. This is We're GONNA be talking about stuff that I think. Confused with an awful lot of sales people marketing people and small business owners so hopefully so this conversation we can shed some light on a couple of things and I would like to start with having you explain. What is Google perfect world? Yeah While just to start I think It is it does feel like a lot of business owners to allow entrepreneurs like Seo. Is this black box. That sorta impossible to predict. And you know you're at their mercy. We're really trying to Trying to shed light on what they're doing and a lot of that is thinking about you know we spent so much time and money on what the the U. I. U. X.'S. For Human beings are in that's predominantly what we do is marketers But I actually argued that we should focus a lot on the. Ui you ex Google. So you know there's perfect perfect world for users and then there's perfect world for a search fought and they're actually they're somewhat similar but they are a little bit different and so yeah. We focus on Particularly that sort of what schools perfect world so Google's perfect world is Things that have preached for years stuff like really fast page speed for example. I don't know how many times they're gonNA have to shout from the mountaintops how much they care about. Page veep or people start listening but paid speed is so important. It's not just important for the user. It's actually very important for them because of a site slow they can only crawl so much on any given site in an day and they'll move on and they'll miss valuable information that they care about so page speed is sort of that classic example Mobile friendliness is also falls into their perfect world A language called Structure Data Markup which is the preferred. They're sort of preferred language with speak to a website that falls into their perfect world flat. Html so instead of these complicated dynamic front end languages like Java scrip- that make it very hard for them to crawl understand. They like sites like wikipedia. Wikipedia always the one that sorta point out. Is there perfect website flat? Html loads really fast obviously has a ton of user generated content but it's easy for them to understand their perfect situation. They've kind of realized that that isn't really happening. Is Getting more and more complex compounded by the fact that the web is growing at an exponential rate and so Yeah they struggled to understand websites now and And that's sort of what I focused is. What the U. I u exits Google and giving that to our customers but Just making people aware of the fact that Google cares about things that users on that are different than users. That is so interesting so I so it sounds to me. I guess I want a little bit of clarification symphony like there are so many other things out there that Google that we are making it difficult for Google to help us Be Found and seen by implementing some of these things that Google really doesn't like. Is that fair? Yeah if you think of the sort of long laundry list of things that a marketer will want on a website that Google will not want. The classic example is like a chat box set. Chat boxes are almost entirely. You know those chat boxes that show up in the lower right hand corner asking if you need any help for whatever. They almost always powered by third parties. So they're javascript. They don't provide any value to google interns and understanding the page and they usually slow the page down by anywhere from twenty five to seventy five percent making it that much harder for them to understand south and usually marketers still put on this cap. The sort of technical. Seo captain they're thinking about making decisions around the website which you might implement a chat box that increases your conversion rate by one percent but it kills your Seo by thirty percent making it. Useless so yeah. There's a lot of things that we do as marketers that Google can't stand and it's sort of our My goal is to make the Internet simpler place for them to be able to crawl understand websites. There's a example bomb the customer of ours. Sap huge customer data page on SAP DOT COM. That had over a hundred Java scrip- tags on just one page which is tracking pixels and Personalization all you think about all the business demands for the marketing department on a on a page like that and I'm almost makes it impossible for people to figure out what that page is about. So yeah we don't think is much. I'm a marketer. Come from overstock. It's my background of then. Everything from branding to you know conversion optimization everything but people don't think much about Google's experience on a site which really ends up being drives the majority of the visits They don't think about them as I say that they're the most important visitor that comes to your website and the day because they how many humans come and and basically experiences a lot rougher than the human experience. Wow that is crazy a okay. Yeah sort of a mind warp. You have to sort of figure about a lot different way and I think the reason that it happens is that you know marketers. Usually have certain skill set in that skill set is really good at branding messaging and managing budgets and you know picking the highest. Roi Channels when you come to Seo. What I've found any way is that. Seo is actually really technical problems. There's a bunch of other things you need to do. But if Google can't understand your site you know you're good luck doing whatever you're doing content or whatever so it's really kind of a technical problem and that's really a totally different skill set than your normal marketer house so to put on your CTO. Capitals A CMO is difficult. So that's why I think they're often doesn't get done and it gets ignored right. Okay okay so is there a An easy to understand way to look at technical. Seo As opposed to marketing the Honestly I can't say that it's all that easy on the easiest way is to think about it I think structured data is sort of the fastest way to get good at technical SEO structure. Dana is It's a language that structured across websites so their structure data for products. That shows you know the brand and the price reviews instructor data for Human Beings. They're structured data for almost anything. That can you know an event movie almost anything that can be visible on page score. There's this language where you can communicate to Google directly through their language and it's it's getting more complicated but to get going on. It is not all that hard and so you know when Google comes to a site. May you know for years and years? Reliant on crawling. Html on our no if you looked at a lot of HTML Diane but it is not very easy to understand. This is a shortcut to help them understand so not only does it. Help Goule understand. Every single page much more clearly than they did before but it also they use it in lots of meaningful ways within their search results. So you know how now when you search for recipe in that recipe just shows up or almost any query. There's these enhancements to QNA box. Just shows you the sports score. They'll show you the movie times. All of that is being powered by this language. Structured data and so That's sort of I think from technical. Seo Perspective for marketers to start thinking about structure data's away the optimize their seo versus just writing content running continent running content. You layer good structure date on top of of a website and Google just goes nuts. They crowd so fast and they just they understand all of a sudden what you're trying to do

Google Diane Jeff Wikipedia SAP Dana Instructor Goule CTO
All AMD processors since 2011 have had a security vulnerability

Daily Tech Headlines

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

All AMD processors since 2011 have had a security vulnerability

"A new paper from security researchers at Grozny University of Technology in Austria claims all Amdi processors made from twenty eleven to twenty nineteen are vulnerable to a side channel attack that could leak otherwise protected information the researchers reverse engineered AMD's L. Wendy. Cash way predictor resulting in two types of attack collide in which can monitor victims virtual accesses on a timeshare core and load and reload which can obtain highly accurate memory access traces on a physical core. The researchers were able to run the exploit javascript. Run on chrome and firefox browsers and also gain access to eight. Yes encryption keys. Compared to similar architectural vulnerabilities like spectre meltdown. The ones disclosed only leak a few bits of Meta data rather than provide full access the researchers notified. Amd of their findings on August twenty third twenty nineteen and amdy set. Believe there was these. Were not new speculation based attacks

AMD Grozny University Of Technolog L. Wendy Austria Amdi
"javascript" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"javascript" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"Web, using a mobile language. It's a very good question. I, I have done of very, very surface research on web assembly. I can't really speak for. For it. Right. But from what I know hypothetically, yes, from what I know about it, it's. Is this technology that will help will allow other languages to compile sort of into a binary that browsers can execute. It's kind of the promise, right? And hypothetically that will open up web development, like would JavaScript does these days development to SWIFT's to coupling to seep plus passive if you really want. Maybe that is gonna be that, but I'm afraid what's going to happen. Even even that's the case. Let's imagine right down the road in five years, web assemblies everywhere. It's awesome, and he can pick any language to use for web development. I'm afraid it's still we have so many JavaScript deaths and all the newbies when you comers coming their right to to that language to that community, it's still sort of gonna remain the same way where majority of the web development is done using Java script. I think. Unless those people who development for with JavaScript these days, final mature, right? Read books, and then you know, start doing something about it, improving the community or maybe moving onto other language. So he talked also earlier here how he's having a hard time fighting native IOS development jobs, and that's in Toronto in Utah. Pelt, how maybe San Francisco's immune to it can can can we may be addressed that until about what? What can he do? Maybe talk about some of the forces. I would say around this, I don't know, San Francisco's immune. Maybe they're just more like native development jobs here, like I experienced something like that with at my previous job software, right there was a lot of lot of projects there for back native. Right. Oh, by the way, something with forgot to mention about react native. Not everyone likes it. I mean, besides us, there recently will were several articles published by Airbnb who who were big proponents with this was really big in yen. The community because this is Airbnb is respected in in the company, the engineering very respected and so them coming out, especially the thing was like blog post was like five, five, five hearts alone saying, why did not work out for them. So I feel like this was big because this now means you can go to management and say, look, here's this great company. It didn't work out for them. We shouldn't do it right versus before the evidence might have been, we'll Airbnb does it. And actually, actually I've read it that came up in the discussions as part of we have. We don't have a lot of reactive. I think literally we. Like one or two screens and react native that are like super simple, right? But part of the one of the arguments brought up among trying to convince people to get on board as we'll Airbnb has done it successfully. But this was before the the blog post came out. So what would have been our choice before if that blog posts had come out before deciding to use wreck native. Yeah, and it's a sort of a case study to in a way, right. I mean as much as you can from the outside do that right, but they two years ago, I believe they kind of took it and ran with it, but now they say, okay, there he are multiple reasons why we don't so, but of back to back to that right to the question about. Jobs, right? So at thought works, we had a lot of projects, MAC native projects to, and basically I just I was asked if I would wanna do that. I was given an option. The nice said, no, I this, I don't think it's good to college choice. I'd rather not do that. Do something else. Instead, you know, they needed me to do some back and development with Java ruby, whatever. I would rather do that. It's just my personal choice than you know, support the technology that I think is not good. That's that's just my professional ethic. Right? And therefore, if I'm in the markets where they're not that many, I was jobs native hours jobs, a lot of react native..

Airbnb San Francisco Pelt SWIFT Toronto Utah five years two years
"javascript" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"javascript" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"No, I mean, yeah, JavaScript is an interesting sort of phenomenon if you will in in developer communities, although it's very similar in my opinion to today his face similar to what it was like eight years ago. Right? They. There are a lot of them like a lot of JavaScript developers and they every not every, but a lot of new commerce to software development. This is where they start. This is like the the big in their snow, right? And they're tons of libraries out there, towns of tons of frameworks in drowns. Every word is as right seemingly. That all all of this attracts older newcomers, right? Or most of the majority of the newcomers and that what makes the community? The Democrats the community? My Lintas immaturity, it's immaturity exactly right there. They're just proportionately too many people who are not experienced in software development who have not read at least a few books. Right? Maybe non actually, right, right. Because this hack hack the package. Nece encouraged. Let's do a hacker Thon coats stuff together over the weekend. Yeah, from the little I've observed Java script, there's certain communities that. Admire like in even encourage hacking, you know. And I think that's not the right way to do it. And I feel like Java scrip- is maybe one of those that for some for for various reasons. And maybe Alex, you just gave some. Those might be, why that that happens. And so and regards of like culture force of it? Well, I mean, maybe there is a culture force, but how stay Munem will stay away of the community. Right? That's sort of my choice. I intentionally since I think Java script itself is a flawed technology that is not suitable for any kind of development. And again, I can list reasons maybe next time. And the community itself is not encouraging. It's not dressing issues even right. They're not encouraging professionals. I cannot really relate to them like at all. Right. Therefore, I simply stay away. I just don't pay attention to whatever they say because over the years they, in my opinion, have not come up with anything. Good mom have react native life. I'm just talked about it right. That is not. Holy grail. Okay. So next question. Why is there lack of self critique among the Java scrip- community? I think we kinda dressed it. Same thing. You it just immaturity of modules of the developers and the community does not. They Don do that right because they're young, right? The who wants to critique yourself when you're like killing right code in at fast, even though the the consequences of that coating unitive think about. But I think that's why just professionalism a lack of will Weber semblance change things and make the inverse true instead of writing for mobile using web language writing for the.

Don developer Munem Nece Weber Alex eight years
"javascript" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"javascript" Discussed on The Changelog

"So i saw old up progress in the javascript ecosystem in thought this is wonderful and its extra wonderful that we don't have to wait for the browsers to catch up the fact that we have been told the fact that we have whipped package effect that we have this old tool chained allows us to use almost all of the soldier future heading features of jobless group today in existing browsers that people are actually using that was what was so exciting so i basically took that it rationing said all right i've examined both the ecosystem at large and the particular frameworks i don't care so much for the particular frameworks i care for the ecosystem improvements what can we do here can i can i just try to get my sense of progress and enhance men my love of sprinkles into a more cohesive structure that at first it wasn't even about the rest of the world it was just about how we right javascript at base camp it was about reforming that weight because what i had come to dislike was we at such a high standard at base camp for writing dutiful ruby code and then we had a very uneven standard in some ways for writing java trip on the one hand we add our wonderful deep diving javascript explorations with the salmon jim on they've made both tricks sunday may turpal ing's and it's beautiful wonderful code and it's it's really puran wonderful and then we had specific uh supports sprinkles for a feature fear feature there and we had like four different styles of doing that four different ways of attaching event handlers and so forth and someone coming in new two debates can cope base would go like which which paths should i follow again and then usually they're just open some feilded bakley resembled what they were trying to do any kind of fallout which was seen wasn't great right you probably at heaps of coffee script coat at this point to as well to ngo cop script this welt right which was actually i mean qaqish.

one hand
"javascript" Discussed on Elm Town

Elm Town

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"javascript" Discussed on Elm Town

"You've gotten your your model wrong you need to change it because then you go that's everywhere all throughout my code in a in a great example of that actually for the main omni website which is still rated in javascript a respected it folk christmas to use our new api and we changed from having like a a title which was just dot title to the title value because we had some extra meta data about the title incites an object so everywhere needed to do like a final replace of the title in replace it with title value and when we deployed that as like okay i'm not sure if it's gonna break i think it will break inside to spend the whole bunch of time writing these web ui tests because i couldn't ever be sure that i didn't forget it in one place or if in one place it shouldn't have been dot titled up just been title whereas when i need to make those changes in web share i can just do it tributary and just be like okay it works i can go to i don't have to sit here and watch to see if uses that complaining love that one of the most exciting parts of elm i think well that is awesome did you have anything else to add before we wrap up and get to the end about the about the products or about what your experience with them generally i'd say it's been great and they've really really well in the hopefully we'll be introducing elm to mow places.

omni
"javascript" Discussed on Bad Voltage

Bad Voltage

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"javascript" Discussed on Bad Voltage

"It was a guy that understood the javascript world and typing and type systems perhaps at lick you sent you hate coffee scrubbed you have went out and built a better system ford published it and attracted a community but i but i think i think that's the online late there's a number lie leanest still clinics if he could have ya free as gatt could have could have you could use mimics or whatever absolutely uh there is some fairly wasn't actually he could at you cynics can tho though as those gas prenticehall sexually yes yes we're headtoheads building that he thing yes i'm a but i think there's a few stages go through an i'm happy to grant the the mark soft off to die house learned the dea the being output inviting other people to concrete projects to tara thing which is not solely unholy heels is a good thing it does motivated people eddie does produce back to suffer the end of the day that's great but he's still are the that's period so i have one question which is so that at her that would stick rounds eat a week we are active contributors in the hoop community if if not della laughed tomorrow and you got two thousand and two it was steve ballmer park do you think the internal microsoft culture has changed off that it would reject his ideas or would you just aims to lead to back in two thousand to a remark soft.

gatt javascript ford eddie steve ballmer microsoft
"javascript" Discussed on Defensive Security Podcast

Defensive Security Podcast

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"javascript" Discussed on Defensive Security Podcast

"Tax service is locally executed code in some way there is no remote code exploit that we know of there is uh browserbased exploits so if somebody is active on the machine and goes to a malicious website there i believe some active proof of concept javascript code that can that can running its us but there's nothing like it an open port on the machine that a third party can attack to make this happen so correct we have i'm sure we'll tell you about this in terms of the risk of this is you want because it had a logo and because it had a name it because it got coverage in the press odds of emergency oh my god yes but that as big dogs go this is more of a concern i would say on user systems then servers well with because with a couple of exceptions agree with what well i'm just saying there's no there's no remote code execution really against this book and has really it's it's a nasty little bs work don't get me wrong but i guess fundamentally we are we constantly duis we panic over the way this name vulnerability and don't necessarily measure the risk of that won't ability in the thread that vulnerability very well and react appropriately that that's that is iis certainly agree with that and i think that is in large measure what's happening on this one but i i think there are a couple of cases where this actually is pretty uh pretty significant in in the most the most significant area is actually cloud computing.

javascript code cloud computing
"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

How to Program with Java

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

"See see if an even if statements purpose is to skip a certain number of lines a code hence modifying the flow of the code when the condition is is false than that that's exactly what it does this means at the if statement if the if the question asked inside the if statement returns false and the javascript engine will skip all the lines of code that are contained within the scope of that if statement he that's the purpose of scope saying either if this statement is true then go ahead and execute the stuff inside of the scope of the if statement if the if statement of resolves to false evaluates the false then you're going to skip every single line of code inside of the scope of that if statement so that's how the if key word the condition and the scope all sort of work together in tandem to make this a control structure you know flow modification type keyword in the jabal javascript language let's talk a little bit about the syntax of java's flew by that stuff because i'm assuming most people are familiar with the stuff and lodged get to this sin tax so let's assume that you want to modify the previous co that we talked about where we had the five lines a code is such that it will not output the first piece of text in other words you want to omit the first sentence which says i'm the first line of code how do we do this while before we can write our code to determine what our condition is actually going to be right number that's a second part of the three parts of the if statement the second part is the condition so in this case let's keep things simple and base our condition around the bouillon variable called show first line.

javascript engine
"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

How to Program with Java

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

"You think of strings is sort of a catchall almost data type just like the object is what i mean by this is that if the javascript engine can't figure out what data type 2 assigned to your variable is probably just gonna sign as a string data type variable okay unless you using the object notation in which case could be an object in any case strings are also have a wide variety of functions and properties that can make them extremely versatile or versatile could pronounce it and useful inside of the jabal language i'll be diving into the details in the later podcasts was with respect to all the things you can do with a string you know fully fund with strings and and methods to manipulate strings and everything are always fun took to learn and to work within any language so javascript is no exception to that role be talking about all things in and uncuffed coming podcast now here's where i wanna talk a little bit more but the symbol data type that i mentioned in how this is a new addition to the javascript language the symbols are argue neak and immutable taste so immutable you can think of immutable as mean the same thing in the javelin guage with strings because strings are immutable and if you think about the jabal language you can never really you cannot changes string once you've declared at once you've once you've created a string you can't change it which means it's immutable right and you might be saying well hold us second trevor i've dealt i've changed strings before i of modified them i've done sub strings i've done you know trim i've done all these things that have modified strings so what are you talking about of course strings are not immutable i've definitely change them.

javascript engine trevor
"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

How to Program with Java

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

"If you create a variable as call it vare low number or how about vare my age how about that was he vare my age equals and then you could type in whatever you're ages i'm gonna be 34 fourcell 34 what happens in the background like i said that algorithm that the javascript engine uses javascript will know now that that variable called my age should be store and isn't integer in in the back end of whatever it is inside of the the growth of the guts of the of your programming language about not so able store it as an into jer whereas the var my name is equal to quote from page end quote that will store that as a string in the back end so these two are fundamentally different things are fundamentally different types and they will behave differently depending on what type their assigned to in the background so even though you didn't a sign of value to a type 2 those variables they do have types in the background again i'm just going back to what we're talking about with dynamic typing richest out typing but i figured it was important to re cement that concept in your mind so cool if you if you enjoy this episode's a short sweeten to the point one then i would recommend the check out this awesome offer that i'm giving away to the listeners of this podcast you can check it out at coders campus dot com forward slash deal d e l i still don't know how long it i'm going to be offering this deal for when it comes to the podcast i hope that i can offer it forever but you never know he could go away at any moment without notice so this offer is gives you access to all quarters campus dayton this quarter campus membership platform which is a a platform that allows you get access to all of my courses.

javascript engine programming language dayton forward slash
"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

How to Program with Java

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

"So the concept behind how it works in jobs representative fairly straightforward the like i said the javascript engine will choose a type that it feels best describes the data that's contain inside of her variable so essentially when you create a variable and sign a value to it for example if you sign of value of hello there in double quotes the engine at the jobs your engine will realize that this is a string okay and it will assign that as the data type behind the scenes because if you put double quotes in any programme linked law i should say any programming language because who knows but it most modern programming languages that i know of double quotes means a string of case of use other double quotes and say of this variable equals something in double quotes the jobs your engine will say well that's a string so i'm gonna sign it as a string in the back end even though you only have type in vare like i said when you declared that variable you just said vare you didn't say string you said vare the jobs your engine figures out it's a string in its own algorithm in the back end so this means that if the javascript engine has chosen to string the type in the back and you were to add another string to that variable it would know to perform string cat nation and not addition just like we talk of a forceful if you had like a two and quotes and the three and quotes and those were both assigned a different variables so too and quotes was called dunno to t w o as a variable vare two equals to and quotes the number two and then you know t h r e savar dh r e which is three written out equals three the number three in quotes and you added those two together you would get string cat nation even though you didn't ever say there were strings you said vare cool.

javascript engine programming language representative
"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

How to Program with Java

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

"Javascript in that case if it's just a small app might be the better choice adjust use javascript each team out and perhaps something like angular jas perhaps in the podcast we can talk about anger j s at some point who knows depends on sort of what you guys want to hear about all right so let's see how it's our job in jobs for different well one big difference you'll notice between the two languages is how javascript variables work javascript uses something called dynamic typing k and this is the sort topic that were going to cover short in the next podcast i'm sonal teasing you say this is you know what you're going to be hearing about but the quick version of dynamic typing is that you don't do a sign of type 2 your variable and all just like you know in jaffa you have to assign a variable a type that's called static typing requires you to declare what you're type sarlig string integer double those are all things that reuse doing the land of java but javascript uses of you call it a guessing system to choose the data tight on your behalf so you don't need to do so you start feeling to explicitly right about out like i said we'll talk more about that in the next podcast episode all right so to summarize what we just went over today javascript is here's day it's an extremely useful language it's fairly easy to learn especially when you already know java k is especially easy to use so i'm actually predicting like a steady javascript will knock off java as the number one spot or rather old knock jab off its number one spot as the most popular programming language in the coming years who knows when that will happen but i do predict it'll happen because of it's sort of what's the word ubiquity across all the layers of programming and i you know jeb script also is embedded right into your browser so it was designed to easily interact with the amal and it's the perfect language use when you want us her to spice up your boring east timor web page with some dynamic code all right.

programming language web page jeb
"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

How to Program with Java

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

"Cool cool so let's continue our talk on javascript i was going to get into why or when you should actually use javascript so it's a great question the answer is then she will depend on the project that you actually working on so you see java is typically chosen as the go to programming language when you want to build enterprise level applications by enterprise that means you get them want to build an application issues for business purposes and can be fairly large application with hundreds or thousands or millions of users this is this is when javad is probably your to choice for language rape if you're building a smaller application like essentially out no single player game that won't required like concurrent users or if you're building a simple application to handle like the processing forms than javascript might be your goto language right or perhaps he want to build an offline wet application one that can be used with or without internet connection than javascript asional five is definitely a great option day so the big thing to point out here is that this isn't exactly a one or the other type scenario so when i build my web apps use both chavez and japanese script dates not a one or the other use both so i typically used javascript to be my sort of line your presentation layer support for validating any forms and interacting with users and dynamically changing elements on the east you mel page and so and so forth and then on the back end i will use the jabal anguish for the business layer of the application to process the data that was validated and sent from javascript from each team out from the presentation lair.

programming language rape web apps chavez
"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

How to Program with Java

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

"So that's essentially what javascript is all about in in a nutshell now what i will say is javascript is not java okay i'll say it again javascript is not java so although they share the same route word which is jabba these two programming languages are quite different in how they work under the hood okay so the sort of metaphor that i use or whatever the analogy is cherry a gaspowered car and electric car or both cars but the eu's very different means for pollution under the hood so the same concept can be applied with jab in javascript they're both programming languages but they both live in very different worlds so you know namely it's because of the fact that one is client side and want to serve recited explicitly right javascript it was created be client site javer was created to be server side so just in that that is quitting night and day difference between the two of them except for the fact that like i said javascript is now making its debut into the service side with vianno s so that is where things are being shaken up a bit but anyway so it's almost like you can think of wall are no j s in jab at the same language no so that's the same concept of javascript in java are not the same language all right i believe i've beat that dead dead horse well enough so you might ask yourself while working i download javascript like how can i get started with it and this is a common thought that that is actually javad program would have won learning javascript is where do i go to download javascript so i could start using it well the beauty is that you'd actually don't need to download it at all javascript already exists inside of any internet browser you're using.

eu javascript electric car
"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

How to Program with Java

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"javascript" Discussed on How to Program with Java

"That's what we're gonna be diving into for the next four months and i guess today will kick it off with essentially talking about what javascript is and what javascript is not so essentially javascript is objectoriented programming language that was created specifically for the web casal javascript ads functionality and inter activity to websites by centrally allowing your plane only chanelle pages to actually have their own programming language embedded inside of them so if you think of a plain old hemi web page if you wanna make it interactive and dynamic and like when you click on a button something happens that is javascript at work if we didn't have javascript nothing would happen we clicked on our buttons essentially c c h d mel it isn't really a programming language right it's it's it's a markup language that's what the and the el stands for in each tml markup language so it's just it's really use just to describe how to present the stuff in your browsers it's really talking about how the present text and how to show like where should stuff go you know in what order should they appear that kind of thing that's what they see malls all about so jobs group brings to the table is essentially all the common programming elements to your issue more pages okay so this means that you'll be able to do fun things like control structures and david structures and data validation and you know even hasn't in browser database if you feel the need to get that fancy you can actually embedded database right into your browser was an issue mole five stuff and jobs script whatnot so jobs group brings websites to life and essentially makes them more than just a glorified electron a newspaper if you will.

programming language web page markup language four months