35 Burst results for "Java"

S6 E9 - How to identify what you are passionate about

Courage to Fight Again

26:16 min | Last week

S6 E9 - How to identify what you are passionate about

"This is the we served now. What podcast and if you're anything like me you've had a ton of questions after leaving the military and the lack of answers has left you frustrated and probably a little confused. This show is here to help you make sense of the craziness that is post military life so you can turn your post military life into your best life. Money was aaron perkins a. Us army combat veteran husband to a beautiful wife. Daddy to amazing kiddos and on this episode of the show. I want to talk to you about identifying your passion in life and how you do that. That's a big question. I think we all have even if we haven't put into so many words like how do identify my passion in life. It's like well aaron. Who are you to talk about identifying passion. Well number one. I've identified my own number two. I developed a process to do just that net processes called the nine line framework which i put into the book called resolve. That is just a step by step guide for you. The veteran to help you to rediscover purpose meaning and you guessed it. Passion in your post military life before i dive into the episode today. I want to take a few minutes until you a little story. I myself love stories. I love hearing them. And i love telling them and this story is really near and dear to my heart because it's about my son. His name is christopher and you may have heard me talk about him on the show before But this story. I've never actually shared on the show because actually just happened about a week or two ago and my son christopher almost twelve years old. he's a normal kid. Not a huge fan of school. Really good in school gets really good grades Does everything well is i. I don't know if i would say popular. But you know people like him he. He's just a normal kid. And he. And i we have this unique Father son relationship. I mean we joke around a lot. We have a very very similar Sense of humor. So we have memes that will share back and forth and that's actually across our entire family that we can laugh at together and everything but this story about his passion for video games. Now you might be thinking well yeah. He's eleven year old boy. eleven year. Old kid boy girl the one but he's eleven year old kid and he loves video games. Yeah what kid doesn't we're here's the thing. He is not just passionate about video games. He is passionate about tech in school and his technical classes studying python programming language. He studying java script and his his his little techy and he loves the technical aspect of it. Well there's this that he has for one of his platforms. And it's called beets saber. You may have heard of it. It's on playstation four for vr. And it's on oculus quest to In fact every year. we're pretty much every year. We get a family gift at christmas and this past year. The family gift that we all could use was the oculus quest to and that is a a virtual reality gaming system. That's fully wireless but the headset on. Hold the controllers and you could just play play games fun and while he has been absolutely just going nuts over this thing having so much fun with it. Well again. this game beats saber. You can create your own levels if you modify the game and there is no right or wrong i should. There is a right or wrong way to do it but there is no manual that you can look at and say okay. This is how you modify find the game. So he gets on discord. he's he finds Some experts who know about modifying the game he chats with him for hours. Some of some of them are as friends he's he's played games with everything and he's talking to them. Like how do i modify this game. What do i need to do. He figures out the programs. He needs to us figures out how to roll the game back to a previous edition. Now he knows how to launch the game with these modifications so he can play his own levels on the game. Keep in mind. This had nothing to do with school this nothing to do with any requirement. This was just something that he wanted to do something that he is naturally gifted at and naturally naturally passionate about and that is that's what that's one of the things i wanna point out here. Today is your passion in life is most likely going to be something that you are naturally geared toward you are naturally good at and maybe even it may even be something that you have spent a lot of time practicing and preparing at and you've spent a lot of time working on developing that skill. It could be anything from woodworking to the medical field to an to. I'm the the passion ideas for your life are virtually endless. But you heard me referenced. The nine line framework earlier. And as i look at this nine line framework. You know again. It's it's this step by step guide. It is the process that helps you rediscover passion in your life after the military. And i look at these these lines in here. These chapters and the storage is told about my son. I can see him in these chapters. I can see how his passion is coming out just in the things that he is naturally doing now in the last episode i mentioned and talked about quite a bit actually line four. Which is what is my personality type. you know. why does it matter. And it's not even so much. Why does it matter. But how does that. Impact me and my passion and my purpose for life. And so i'm going to touch on line for a little bit today but i want to give you some examples from line five later in the show about discovering that passion in your life but line four again i used sixteen personalities dot com. You can go there right now. You can take this free assessment to figure out to learn what your personality type is and again that is not the only tool you can use you. Can use myers briggs. You can use the disk assessment. There are so many tools you can use to figure out your personality because in the military unless you are you had a way different experience than i did. They really ask you. What your what your passion was or even more specifically. They didn't ask what your personality was. Just said hey here the jobs you can pick from pick a job do your job and then you go your military career and you get out and now you're here listening to this show and saying man. How do identify my passion in life. What is it that i am passionate about. How do i find that. Well you'll hear me say this more than once. Pick up a copy of the resolve book. That is really your first step to figuring out your passion and your purpose and your meaning in your life after the military but again light for just goes over. What is your personality type. It walks you through that process of discovering who you are and who you're meant to be and line five asks another question it says what do i have to offer. And that's very specific to you. What do you have to offer the world. Because i believe that. A life focused on making a difference in the world as a life worth living. I think that's really what we're all after is that we want to make a difference. Maybe it's just in our own personal lives. Maybe it's in the lives of our friends or family or our church or our school whatever it may be or or if your teacher may be your students you want to make that positive impact and so line five walks you through that process of figuring out what it is that you have to offer so coming up after the break. That's what i'm going to talk about. I'm gonna share some examples and walk you through blind five and sharing this for free and you can pick up a copy of the book on amazon or on kerr's to fight again dot com but i'm gonna share the the line five here with you and some examples that can help you figure out what it is you are passionate about in your life. That's after the break. Stay with us. Many americans today. Don't realize the stress and anxiety they feel is most likely because of their finances according to bankrate.com more than six out of ten people couldn't cover a one thousand dollar emergency seven out of ten. Don't budget regularly. An eight out of ten are living paycheck to paycheck to these describe you. Are you ready to live like others. Can't too many make the mistake of budgeting their lifestyle instead of budgeting their basic needs. I my friend. Marco over at mc business lab has a simple process to automate the basic things. You need to live and then never looking at one of those bills again. Head over to live like others can't dot com to get on the wait list for his own line course to learn this automation skill. That will significantly reduce your stress and anxiety. And if you think one on one attention could be the way for you. You can also schedule your free consultation with marco once again that's live like others can't dot com get on the path to your dream life today all right so as we go into these examples. I want you to have an open. Mind here right some of these examples. You may not even thought of. But i i want you to keep in mind that some of these may not apply to you. Some of the may apply to you perfectly but before we get into those examples and went to review. Read you this quote from a retired general martin. Dempsey actually had him on the show. A few seasons ago A great conversation. You can go check that out. He talks about you know continuing to provide leadership in your post military life again. If you don't know years he is the former or the lissi would number was of eighteenth chairman of the joint chiefs of staff and so again great guy. We had a great conversation. Should go check that out. But i want to read you a quote. He said sometimes we wait for thunderclaps drum rolls and clearly on calls to alert us to what's important when actually it's most often the subtle and persistent signals around us. That make the most difference. I want you to think about that for a minute when you think about your passion and life and what. You are naturally geared toward what are those subtle and persistent signals. So in in the book. I talk about the subtle and persistent signal. I got even as a child as a teenager. Really that writing is something i am. Naturally gifted at is something. I'm naturally good at in fact My mother found a poem that i had written She was cleaning. My room was teenagers. Don't ask me why she was cleaning my room and she didn't make me do it but i'm very grateful for her but she was cleaning my room and she comes into the room and she sees this poem that i wrote and when i get home from school she asked me about it. She says hair. Where did you copy this phone for. Almost didn't copy it. I wrote it. And i'm all of a sudden proud of myself because see my mother had always been this voracious reader with a strong command of the english language so hearing her say something like that. Which implied the poem was of this incredibly high quality right. It has stuck with me to this day. That aaron you you're naturally gifted at that and that the poetry. It wasn't anything i had to do. It was something i had in my head and maybe even my heart and just wrote it down. It was something. I felt naturally wrong to do. Just like my son was naturally drawn to develop this modification for this game and figure out all the additional software he needed and how to modify it and how to play the game afterward. I was actually drawn to writing so in that case even though my son and i we get along great and we have great father son relationship were way different as far as our passions. Go and that's okay. It's the thing is my. My writing skills are they. Were constantly improving through my life and the funny thing is even as i wrote the book wonder like am i the most qualified person to to write this book. Maybe maybe i am gifted at writing right. Maybe i am good at this. But am i the most qualified person and so why do i tell you this right. I tell you this. Because i want you to realize something that i'm still learning myself. The skills you have are probably around eighty percents better than you actually think. I want to say that again. The skills that you have are probably around eighty percent better than you actually think. Now what are get the eighty percent number. You know statistically they say what is seventy. Six percent of statistics are made up on the spot. I will say this. Evidence is more inaccessible and nature. But the things you are passionate about. You are geared toward learning more about it it just this natural thing. It's not something that you can really force. Can you learn things and learn more about Passions in your life. of course. you can't can you learn how to take care of the zales in your garden or in your new hangar. The year rose garden right. Is rose garden on. That makes sense but i looked at my window and saw zulia so i i mentioned it so it. Can you learn about that. Scher will you be passionate about it. Maybe you can develop a passion for it but passionate in your life is is this area of your life. That's built in. Its this natural part view. And so where do you go from here right. What are those examples that promised you a before we get into those examples. I want to share with you just a few questions that you can write down to ask yourself and you can kind of fill these out like to help you figure out where you go from here and figure out what it is you have to offer the world so the first question goes right along the lines of my story. I just told about not only about my son but about myself. I have always been good at blank. Fill in the blank there. What is it that you have always been good at something. That seems easy for you for me. It was english and grammar and for my son. Tech is easy for him. Technologies easy for him super easy a he is are basically our systems administrator at the house. he knows so much about For my daughter the things she is naturally good at and she finds easy music. She finds that incredibly easy from wife. She finds the medical field incredibly easy to pick up on. And it's not because it's not challenging to learn it's because we have a passion for those particular things in our lives. Here's a second question you can ask yourself. I don't know why. But i really just enjoy doing the following things and then list those things what things that you do really bring you joy for me. It's writing it's crafting something from nothing. It's looking at this blank page and putting words on it and impacting the world with a those words. And let's see what's the next one number three this. This is kind of long ones. All probably read it a couple of times. I never thought about what. I'm naturally good at and what i enjoy until what so for this question. Think of a time your life in which our knowledge or skills or ability was needed. Think of a time when you were able to use it and you suddenly realized that brought you joy so i to read that one again and explain that a little more. I never thought about what. I'm naturally good at and what i enjoy until this particular event in my life. I never thought about me being really good at writing until my mother when i was fourteen. Fifteen years old picked up that poland in my room and said hey this is really good. Where did you copy this from. I never thought about that. My son may not have ever thought about how good he is attack. Until i pointed it out and said dude that is amazing that you figure that out on your own you contact the experts in and you did everything needs to do on your own and so when you think we think of that like okay. I never thought about what i'm naturally good at. And what i enjoy until a particular event in your life and you think about when your knowledge or your skills or abilities were needed and and then you say okay. I was able to use it at that point in my life and then you suddenly realize man that made me feel really good. That brought me joy. That was dare. I say it fun and a lot of times. We as adults we. We tend to tend to think like well. You know i'm an adult. I don't need to have funding more. I shouldn't be having fun anymore. I'm more focused on business and and making money taking care of my family. Those are all great things but at the end of the day passion following that passion pursuing that passion your life a lot of times what it feels like is fun just a lot of fun number four thing. You can ask yourself. I was able to make a difference in a person's life by using one or more of my unique abilities which not only made a difference but it brought me joy as well and the question is list those skills or abilities that you use to impact someone's life or to make a difference in the world for me. They'll be writing for my son that might be tech my daughter that might be music for my wife that might be the medical field. So there's so many things that again virtually unlimited number of things where you can find passion in your life and it's those things that you are naturally geared toward they. Here's a few examples. I'm going to review these for you just to give you a sense of where you can find passion in your life and don't get caught up on the stories themselves. I want you to imagine yourself. What is it that you personally find your passionate about. Here's example number one. I was a cormon in the navy. And i learned a lot about helping others in times of medical crisis. I found so much joy. In this. I knew my job well and i knew i was making a difference. Pretty simple right pretty direct and so this person says hey. I knew what i was doing was making a difference. And i found joy in it. Here's another really good one along the video games. A video games idea. I love playing video games call of duty fortnight minecraft you name it. I get a sense of joy out of playing them and truth be told. I'm pretty good at it. My unique personality which i found in line for which i now understand. It equips me well as a teacher and so a combined those elements to start a video game players club in my community. We get together. We eat snacks. Play video games. Hold tournaments and get to know each other better. It's such a great time. And i love it. So being a woman in the navy versus playing video games way different right but still these people can find passion in these things see. Here's a here's another one very a very hands on example. I've never really enjoyed school or sitting in the classroom. But one thing i do enjoy working with my hands getting my hands dirty now that i know my unique personality type again that he learned in line for i understand more about wild like this type of work and why i tend to dislike sitting in the classroom. I love solving problems. I distinctly remember one time when my elderly neighbors toilet was leaking. She asked me. If i knew someone who could help and gladly volunteered myself. I checked out the situation figured out what. The problem was unseated. The toilet installed a new wax ring and reseeded the toilet. She was so grateful. And i had fixed a problem for her. I felt really good about myself. That's huge The the the What do you call it. The joy the inner joy that comes from making a positive difference in someone else's life is absolutely huge. Now here's here's the last example share with you because we're running up on time but this one. I really liked this one. Because i have a dog. I love my dog and a lot of you probably have pets as well but this one says. I am a pet whisper. Yes it may sound silly to some. But i have an incredible heart for dogs cats birds and just about any other animal who is suffering or quote unquote down on their luck. In fact i have adopted two dogs and two cats. I've them better lives. This has been so rewarding to me and it is a passion. I continue to pursue. See the thing is there is not one specific passion that we are all going to find fulfilling the passion in your life is going to be your own. Here's the last thing. I want to share with you how we are built as humans. We're designed to live our best life in the context of relationships with other people. I to say that again as humans. We're are designed to live our best lives in the context of relationships with other people. You know chances are we're not all going to be billionaires or a world famous politicians. Are you know billboard topping musicians but we can all make a difference when we find that passion in our lives. We all have a lot of questions but the most important question you can ask yourself is this have. I accepted the forgiveness of sins. That only comes through faith in jesus christ. I hope you enjoyed this episode. Hope it's been helpful for you and that you've learned at least a little bit about identifying that passion in your life again you can pick up a copy of the resolve book at courage to fight again dot com or on amazon and i will share those links in the show notes as i typically do. Leave us a review. I tunes at definitely helps so much. Of course follow social media kurds. Finding in dot com is our website. Thank you so much for listening. We will see you next time.

Aaron Perkins Christopher Aaron Us Army Myers Briggs Zulia Bankrate.Com Joint Chiefs Of Staff Kerr Dempsey Marco Scher Amazon Martin Tech
Indonesia Earthquake Kills at Least 7 People

BBC World Service

00:25 sec | 3 weeks ago

Indonesia Earthquake Kills at Least 7 People

"Main island of Java yesterday. U. S Geological Survey said it had a magnitude of six. Local officials say At least seven people were killed and hundreds of buildings were damaged. This is the second major disaster in Indonesia in a week. Last Sunday, at least 7 170 people died in landslides and flash floods caused by a tropical cyclone. Thousands of people are still out of their

Main Island Of Java Indonesia
6.0-Magnitude Earthquake Strikes off Java in Indonesia

WBZ Morning News

00:20 sec | 3 weeks ago

6.0-Magnitude Earthquake Strikes off Java in Indonesia

"Dire environmental situation. Taking place on Indonesia's main island of Java. At least one death reported following an earthquake measuring magnitude 6.0 No word of any tsunami warnings theme head of Indonesia's earthquake and tsunami centers still urging people to avoid areas where landslides could hit.

Indonesia Earthquake Tsunami
Google's Supreme Court Win Could Actually Benefit the Little Guy

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

00:29 sec | Last month

Google's Supreme Court Win Could Actually Benefit the Little Guy

"For years courts have been trying to hash out whether google stole code from oracle way back when google was creating its android mobile operating system. It decided to use some java code that would make the system compatible with lots of programs but the java code was owned by oracle which then sued. And it's been in the courts ever since this week. The supreme court finally ruled that what google did was allowed in didn't infringe on oracle's

Google Oracle Supreme Court
Supreme Court sides with Google in Oracle’s API copyright case

Cyber Security Headlines

01:57 min | Last month

Supreme Court sides with Google in Oracle’s API copyright case

"Supreme court rules in google's favor on java. Api case the us supreme court ruled six to two in favor of google in its copyright dispute with oracle over twelve thousand lines of code from the java. api used an android originally written by sun microsystems which oracle acquired in two thousand ten the decision perverse decision by the. Us court of appeals for the federal circuit oracle had asked for nine billion dollars in damages. In the majority opinion justice. Steven brier wrote the use of the code was protected under the copyright doctrine of fair use firmware malware on the rise according to microsoft's march twenty twenty one security signals report over eighty percent of enterprises were victims of at least one firmware attack. In the past two years the survey had respondents from one thousand companies from china germany japan the uk and the us reported the majority of security investments or going to security updates vulnerability scanning and advanced threat protection solutions. The report notes that nist national vulnerability database has seen a fivefold increase in firmware attacks. In the last four years the report found that only thirty percent of business invest in hardware based memory encryption forty six percent are investing in hardware based colonel protections while twenty one percent of decision makers said they were not able to monitor firmware at all. Ap ap's exploiting vulnerabilities in s ceasar and the fbi issued a joint advisory that over the past month threat actors have been seen. Exploding three vulnerabilities in fort annette's four two zero s currently the seems limited to scanning of devices on three reports for the s s. Vpn web portal flaw. But the advisory warns this could escalate to more sophisticated diaz or sequel injection attacks or serve to gain access to networks across multiple critical infrastructure sectors to gain access to keep networks as pre-positioning for follow on dead exfiltration or dead encryption attacks patches for the exploits are now available and the advisory recommends applying them immediately as well as disabling unused ports

Oracle Us Court Of Appeals Supreme Court Steven Brier Google Sun Microsystems Ap Ap Fort Annette Microsoft Germany Japan Ceasar China UK FBI
Supreme Court Sides With Google in Copyright Fight With Oracle

WSJ What's News

01:10 min | Last month

Supreme Court Sides With Google in Copyright Fight With Oracle

"The supreme court has sided with google a multibillion dollar copyright battle with oracle throwing out a lower court ruling. The case revolves around google's use of the popular programming language java to build its operating system oracle acquired the language in two thousand ten and alleged that google's actions amounted to an infringement of oracle's copyright by the supreme court said today that google's use of some java code fell under fair use the decade-old case is drawing attention from companies that rely heavily on copyright. Protection's here's our legal affairs reporter brent kendall with more if you're copyright owner. You're not terribly happy with today's decision. I mean even outside of software. The movie industry the music industry publishing industry. Everybody that has copyrights and depends on the strong value of their copyright supported oracle in this case because they all want rules they give copyright is a value as possible and the other side all the people that want do build on programs other software developers. I mean even microsoft Internet companies that create apps and platforms. That are interoperable and and build off other programs. They all supported google in this case so there are going to be a lot happier with the outcome today.

Oracle Google Supreme Court Brent Kendall Microsoft
Google Ultimately Prevails Over Oracle in Java API Case

Techmeme Ride Home

01:32 min | Last month

Google Ultimately Prevails Over Oracle in Java API Case

"The. Us supreme court has ruled in google's favor in that big. Copyright dispute with oracle over the use of java api is basically with a six two two vote the justices overturn what had been a big oracle lawsuit victory coating cnbc. The case concerned about twelve thousand lines of code that google us to build android that were copied from the java. Application programming interface developed by sun microsystems which oracle acquired in two thousand. Ten oracle sued google over the use of its code and one. Its case twice before the specialized. Us court of appeals for the federal circuit the supreme court reversed. the federal. circuit's decision justice steven brier. Who wrote the majority opinion. In the case reason that google's use of the code was protected under the copyright doctrine of fair use quote. We reached the conclusion that in this case where a user interface taking only what was needed to allow users to put their accrued talents to work in a new and transformative program google's copying of the sun java. api was a fair use of that material. As a matter of law brier wrote brier was joined by chief. Justice john roberts and justices sonia yar elena kagan neal gorsuch and brett cavenaugh justices clarence thomas and alito descended and quote so this is huge huge news in terms of software and coding law basically. Api's to some degree are now fair. Use and therefore not copyright -able

Oracle Google Us Supreme Court Us Court Of Appeals Steven Brier Cnbc Sun Microsystems Brier Justice John Roberts Sonia Yar Elena Kagan Neal Gorsuch Brett Cavenaugh Clarence Thomas Alito
High Court Sides With Google in Copyright Fight With Oracle

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last month

High Court Sides With Google in Copyright Fight With Oracle

"The Supreme Court has sided with Google over oracle in a decade long copyright dispute the eight billion dollar dispute involved Google's creation of the android operating system used on most smartphones which relied in part on computer code and organization used on oracle's Java system oracle calls it in it Regis act of plagiarism but Google argues it's long settled common industry practice and there's no copyright protection for code that couldn't be written another way the High Court ruled six to four Google with justice Stephen Bryer writing the copying was fair use in the dissenting justice Clarence Thomas called it anything but fair only eight justices heard the case because it was argued after Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death but before Amy Coney Barrett joined the court Sager mag ani Washington

Oracle Google Supreme Court Stephen Bryer High Court Clarence Thomas Ruth Bader Ginsburg Amy Coney Barrett Ani Washington
Indonesia: 17 missing in cargo ship, fishing boat collision

The Money Pit

00:14 sec | Last month

Indonesia: 17 missing in cargo ship, fishing boat collision

"A cargo ship in a fishing boat has left 17 people missing off the main island of Java that fishing boat with 32 people aboard capsized after striking the entities and bulk carrier it happened late last night. News and analysis of town hall

Town Hall
Indonesia Bus Plummets Into Ravine, Killing 26

BBC World Service

00:09 sec | 2 months ago

Indonesia Bus Plummets Into Ravine, Killing 26

"Have died in a bus crash in Indonesia. Some 40 were injured when the vehicle plunged into a ravine in Western Java. Australia is

Indonesia Western Java Australia
Chicago's Day Laborers Face Increased Difficulties Amid COVID-19

Chicago Tonight

04:59 min | 2 months ago

Chicago's Day Laborers Face Increased Difficulties Amid COVID-19

"We near the anniversary of the first kovic shutdowns in illinois minneap. Chicago's day laborers are finding themselves. In dire straits months of shutdowns and economic devastation have made finding work and already scarce commodity in recent years. More difficult than other than ever and the circumstances of many of their lives make them particularly. Vulnerable to infection and financial devastation. Joining us to talk about the outlook for day. Laborers are rigoberto compost day. Labor organizer for the nonprofit latino. You're of chicago and nick theodore professor at the university of illinois at chicago department of urban planning and policy. Gentlemen thank you both for joining us. Rigoberta compost start with you please. Let's sketch out how the day labor market Typically works kind of work. People find how they find that working normal times it has been affected during the pandemic according to lay out the challenges that the to another they wake up every day with hopes of trying to find work and of whether that means they able to pick something up It really comes down to what happens. one there at the corner hiring site Sometimes they're lucky. Things are now but the reality is is that the pandemic has really made that's attrition. Law were difficult. I mean we're talking about being able to around being able to pay for food your bells your phone on and honestly the challenge. There is that they're having to make financial decisions. That are really hard. And when you add add taking care of yourself with cohen in nixon really challenging. Because you get sick. That's a day we from work And that's money that you need to date right. Now nick theodore what aspects of the lives of day laborers make them especially vulnerable during the pandemic both the financial problems but also infection. Rigo saying i think the issue of having to work often in close contact with other workers on a day-to-day basis. Not always knowing who your coworkers might be. There's a lot of exposure issues. That i think make things very difficult and we're talking about low. Wage work insecure work overall. And so the pressure to return to the day labor hiring site that try to find work day after day the despite hazards that might exist without pressure is very real. Labor's rigoberto your organization. Latino union of chicago offers support day laborers eating them through this difficult time At the moment and we are going out there trying to offer. Td were handing out cash assistance. That we've been able to obtain Sharing information on food pantries offer them a a support group where they can bent and kind of process. How they're feeling at the moment at the reality is is that a lot of the needs will beyond just being able to solve what's happening now out of. It's also just based on a lot of intentional working on policy. Change systemic change and you know just one basic question that comes to mind rigoberto. Are they finding work in these times Honestly it's on and off mostly off of the reality is that it has affected the market and even though it's affected the market. They're waking up every day of really early With hopes that those still find something. A the reality is is that Even want sometimes people come looking for them There are people that are taking advantage of the fact that they are Immigrant workers looking for work at a cornerside. And so they're not paying much at all and have needs to nick. The last year saw an economic downturn in most areas though of course we know some sectors some industries did remain robust. What effect has the economy. This last year had on the labor market for these workers. It prevents attacked. I think both in terms of the slowdown a related to the pandemic of the amount of construction and other work that day laborers are doing. But then there's the bigger question about workers who are being displaced from other industries so is restaurants and bars shutdown as other sectors of the economy. Shutdown do the krona virus pandemic workers were being expelled from those industries. And for many of them they turned up on the street corner looking for day labor work for those day laborers. This is almost employment of last resort. And so they are putting additional pressure on day labor markets which puts pressure on wages in java bail ability so during every downturn whether it's the pandemic or the great recession a decade ago. Every time we see a downturn in the economy the number of people looking for day labor work increases dramatically and grits hardships across this economy

Nick Theodore Rigoberto University Of Illinois Chicago Department Of Urban Pl Rigo Latino Union Of Chicago Illinois Chicago Nixon Cohen Nick
2 Men Killed In Accident At Construction Site On High Street In Boston

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:55 sec | 2 months ago

2 Men Killed In Accident At Construction Site On High Street In Boston

"Section of high Street is still closed tonight after that deadly construction accident this morning that killed two workers. It's not BBC's Karen Regal, a single sculpt hard hat flies on High Street next to an orange evidence marker. Next to the regular Java trench where two men spent their last living moments. Ah Crane had to lift a truck off that trench. Boston Fire says rescuers had to be certain It was safe to go in, does what we would trying to determine if it was safe. We don't wanna wake can't put people in and become victims as well. If I do, it's a possibility of collapse. Boston Mayor Marty Walsh is suspended the only other work site in the city run by Atlantic Coast utilities until this investigation is complete.

Karen Regal BBC Crane Boston Marty Walsh Atlantic Coast
After The Storm

Fix It 101

04:31 min | 2 months ago

After The Storm

"After last week's historic ice storm. Man is not crazy then. Didn't feel like mississippi for a minute there. You might have even learned a few things about your house. Unfortunately a lot of people did whether it be. Just how much weight year roof can hold. That's one thing people learned how not to wrap your pipes and how to wrap your pipes. Those are things people learned. And and and let me tell you. Also that some of the things you might learn are about generators and did you have gas for your generator. Had you started your generator in a while. All of those things came up so you know you can join the conversation with us this morning by calling eight seven seven in pb ring. That's eight seven seven six seven two seven four six four or send an email to fix it what i wanted. Mp be online dot org. We're going to have the guys on. Just a second pam jeff standing by and talking this morning about all of the things that happened this week. It was just amazing If you if you had no problems at all count yourself is blessed this week because it just it was a mess for a lot of people and it still is a lot of folks. Don't have water there in even the places that do have water. There's a lot of people who when the temperatures down that low that was about nothing you could do for those pipes and mississippi is just just not a lot there so We've got a lot going on. We're we got a little Got some emails coming in and a phone call. You know what What i'm gonna do right now. I'm going to go to go to an email. Because i just really wanted to get This outright here okay they Has anyone installed tile flooring and tubs around with zero. Experience is an email. Has anyone installed tile flooring and tubs around with zero experience. This job frightens me. But we're thinking about trying to do it ourselves. What did you use to learn how to do this or Or should we hire it out. Well i've done this before myself. And it is a doable project. I will i will give you a couple of pointers from my point of view is to get When you do this what you wanna do. I read and then watch. Yes on on just about any home improvement project. You'll find that. There is a youtube video out there of someone else. Doing exactly what you're doing. Please watch that. This is what i did not do okay and another thing you want to do is start in a place that everybody in the world can't see and the reason for that is because you know you're going to be trying it for the very first time and working with some of these materials is it takes a little practice. The best thing you can do is to go say outside. Get yourself a like a piece of wood in. If you're going to do any flooring or anything like that put it on top of that piece of wood and try it. See if he could make the little interlocking things work see. See if you can make all that work outside of the environment that it's going to lay and say left. You're going to lay into a bathroom. Which is kind of a small space. It's a it's a hard thing to work inside that space. What you wanna do is set up an area to work outside of that space and try it out there. I get your cuts right and everything outside of the space. So how we doing their java things look any better for us now. We got a few minutes left. Okay this keep going. I'm trying to establish a connection. We had a is there. Here's a question. Can anyone recommend something stronger than drain. Oh you as a last resort. Before i spend a fortune on a plumber or set the bathroom on fire all right. So here's the thing about that. We've talked plumbers on the show before and plumbers say anything past drain. Oh you can buy stuff pastorino. Meaning that a stronger and that is that that will cut through more things but remember those things also cut through pipes if you do it incorrectly.

Pam Jeff Mississippi Youtube
First Malware Designed for Apple M1 Chip Discovered in the Wild

The CyberWire

01:35 min | 2 months ago

First Malware Designed for Apple M1 Chip Discovered in the Wild

"Security firm e. said reports that threat actors have begun to work on. Apple's new m one. Max the ones equipped with apple's in house chips. The m one processors run on arm architecture a departure from cupertino former preference for intel x eighty six chips in the objective. C blog researcher. Patrick wardell summarizes his own analysis as follows quote. So we've succeeded in finding a mac. Os program containing native m one arm. Sixty four code that is detected as militias. This confirms malware adware authors are indeed working to ensure their militias. Creations are natively compatible with apple's latest hardware and quote researchers at red canary earlier. This month noticed some mac. Os malware that established persistence through launch. Agent they write quote our investigation almost immediately revealed that this malware whatever it was did not exhibit the behaviors that we've come to expect from the usual adware that so often targets mac. Os systems the novelty of this download arises primarily from the way it uses java script for execution something we hadn't previously encountered in other mac os malware and the emergence of a related binary compiled for apple's new. M one arm sixty four architecture. Red canary calls the activity. Cluster silver sparrow and says that for now at least it lacks payload they acknowledged work done on the malware by vm. Ware carbon black and malware

Apple Patrick Wardell Cupertino MAX Intel
"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

03:21 min | 2 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"<Speech_Music_Male> It also <Speech_Music_Male> marks the beginning <Speech_Male> of civic health of wisconsin <Speech_Male> initiative <Speech_Male> to mobilize <Speech_Male> this information <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> to strengthen <Speech_Music_Male> and catalyze <Speech_Music_Male> civic engagement <Speech_Music_Male> efforts <SpeakerChange> in wisconsin <Speech_Music_Male> communities <Speech_Music_Male> think <Speech_Music_Male> of <SpeakerChange> civic <Speech_Male> health as <Speech_Male> the way that communities <Speech_Male> are organized <Speech_Male> to define <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> address public <Speech_Music_Male> problems <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> communities <Speech_Male> with strong <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> indicators of cinna <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cal have higher <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> employment rates <Speech_Male> stronger <Speech_Male> schools <Speech_Male> better physical <Speech_Male> health <Speech_Music_Male> and more <Speech_Music_Male> responsive <Speech_Music_Male> governments <Speech_Music_Male> with this <Speech_Music_Male> in mind. <Speech_Music_Male> There's only so much. <Speech_Male> A group of academic <Speech_Male> community institutions <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> can do. <Speech_Music_Male> They're not the experts <Speech_Music_Male> on the ground. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> In order for this data <Speech_Music_Male> hat to have the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> most impact <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it needs <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to be brought to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the local level <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> decline <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this withdraw <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> from public <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> life has been <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> linked to many of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the pressing social <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> problems facing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> individuals <Speech_Male> families <Speech_Music_Male> and communities <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> with the publication <Speech_Male> of the two thousand and <Speech_Music_Male> nineteen wisconsin <Speech_Music_Male> civic health index. <Speech_Music_Male> This past summer. <Speech_Music_Male> Wisconsin <Speech_Music_Male> joined thirty <Speech_Music_Male> other. Us <Speech_Music_Male> states in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> measuring civic <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> health <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> potentially laying <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the groundwork for <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> tracking changes <Speech_Music_Male> and improvements. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> It also <Speech_Music_Male> marks the beginning <Speech_Male> of civic health of wisconsin <Speech_Male> initiative <Speech_Male> to mobilize <Speech_Male> this information <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> to strengthen <Speech_Music_Male> and catalyze <Speech_Music_Male> civic engagement <Speech_Music_Male> efforts <SpeakerChange> in wisconsin <Speech_Music_Male> communities <Speech_Music_Male> think <Speech_Music_Male> of <SpeakerChange> civic <Speech_Male> health as <Speech_Male> the way that communities <Speech_Male> are organized <Speech_Male> to define <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> address public <Speech_Music_Male> problems <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> communities <Speech_Male> with strong <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> indicators of cinna <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cal have higher <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> employment rates <Speech_Male> stronger <Speech_Male> schools <Speech_Male> better physical <Speech_Male> health <Speech_Music_Male> and more <Speech_Music_Male> responsive <Speech_Music_Male> governments <Speech_Music_Male> with this <Speech_Music_Male> in mind. <Speech_Music_Male> There's only so much. <Speech_Male> A group of academic <Speech_Male> community institutions <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> can do. <Speech_Music_Male> They're not the experts <Speech_Music_Male> on the ground. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> In order for this data <Speech_Music_Male> hat to have the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> most impact <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it needs <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to be brought to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the local level <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to individuals <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like <Speech_Music_Male> you <Speech_Male> to help facilitate <Speech_Male> civic movements <Speech_Male> by <Speech_Male> bringing together <Speech_Male> key stakeholders <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in your community <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to identify <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and address the <Speech_Music_Male> issues. You all <Speech_Music_Male> care about <Speech_Music_Male> without <Speech_Music_Male> that community-wide <Speech_Music_Male> follow <Speech_Male> up. It's <Speech_Male> all just a bunch of numbers <Speech_Male> and our neighborhoods <Speech_Male> will continue <Speech_Male> to face the <Speech_Male> same struggles <Speech_Male> year <Speech_Male> after year <Speech_Male> without <Music> much. Change <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> when <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you can download <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a copy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the wisconsin civic health <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> index. You'll <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> find a link in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the show notes to this episode <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or <Speech_Music_Male> simply google <Speech_Music_Male> wisconson <Speech_Music_Male> civic health <Speech_Music_Male> index. <Speech_Music_Male> Check it out <Speech_Music_Male> and take <Speech_Music_Male> it to heart. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I'd like to thank <Speech_Music_Male> beth collins. The <Speech_Music_Male> executive director <Speech_Male> of the center for <Speech_Male> community and nonprofit <Speech_Male> studies at the university <Speech_Music_Male> of wisconsin <Speech_Music_Male> madison. <Speech_Music_Male> I look forward <Speech_Male> to having her back <Speech_Male> on to chat about <Speech_Music_Male> some of the other <SpeakerChange> projects <Speech_Music_Male> she's got going on. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> But in the meantime <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> remember <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to breathe once <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in a while it's been <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a challenging year <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and with more <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to come on <Speech_Male> shore. <Speech_Male> I find that if you <Speech_Male> take a moment to snuggle <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> up to a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> warm cup of something <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> reflect on their good <Speech_Music_Male> that's landed in <Speech_Music_Male> your path. <Speech_Music_Male> It at least makes <Speech_Music_Male> snow. <SpeakerChange> Look a little <Speech_Music_Male> prettier <Speech_Music_Male> aggregrate <Music> week.

beth collins thirty nineteen Wisconsin two thousand madison wisconsin This past summer wisconson
"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

04:55 min | 2 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"To look at. I don't mean to interrupt. But were there any indications of what specifically what some of those might be at this stage in the reporting. I know you wanna do a little deeper dive into that next time around but anything come out of that. Yeah well the thing we had to. We had to actually rely on again. Outside data that because the actual nco see civic health index wasn't able to parse based on demographic indicators in that way but what we did see from external report that was issued. Was that at least looking at twenty sixteen in two thousand eighteen. There did seem to be cases where people basically the the information was that they may have been unsuccessful in voting like they were either turned away or they didn't have the right documentation or polling place. Information so i think those kinds of logistics some of the very obvious areas where we can make sure that people are getting access that they need to to be able to vote and i suspect And i feel comfortable speculating about this. Because i think there's plenty of evidence for it will see that accent information was significantly increased in twenty twenty. Like i don't know about you. But i think the pandemic and the anticipation that people would need to find creative ways to vote because of the pandemic actually had a really interesting effect of the information landscape so much more robust and proactive to reach people about how i know here in milwaukee. There were so many different initiatives about getting out the vote and making sure that people knew especially because we had there were so many questions about changes to voting laws. Because of the pandemic absentee voting. There were there. They just locally here. Really amped up the education initiatives and getting all the information they needed and the resources and to get to the proper places and all of that it it just felt like it was so much more intense this last year this last fall than in the past. So i anticipate we'll probably see more of that accom- yeah so and then i think just continuing to laundry list this question of education level and like how we are you know delivering education to folks about civic. Participation is another big area and then just finally. I just want to emphasize that the report talks a lot about recommendations for the future and not only information but really elevating the work of civil society organizations that are trying to get created about increasing civic participation in civic health. And i think that's really where the promising work is gonna come next. I mean the reporting is a is good. But i think you and i and our positions are well aware that it's all about implementation and there are. There are great great. Great change agents in folks leading this charge on the community level on the grassroots level across wisconsin. What we wanna do is elevate. Their work allow them to share the strategies that they're using it. They've seen success with britain their information to the table. So i'm really excited about this high level statewide report being a what. I've been calling more a springboard for digging in a little bit. More on that beautiful landscape. Really a patchwork. If you will of efforts that are happening. All across the state and connective was just an amazing an amazing wrap up of of the entire idea of civic health initiative and the purpose of it and where we hope to go with it. I know i'm looking forward to the next steps. And and how we might move that needle especially in the rural areas because as we talked about. I do believe there's more than we were able to capture. It's just a matter of figuring out. How do we measure it and does engagement in that. Respect in rural communities have the same dynamic have the same indicators than say more metropolitan areas we just need to figure out how to speak the same language. Basically you and i know is like we can at the university like can convene and coalesce that stuff and then we got to let those folks out there in the front lines and the feel be the ones to kind of direct it right. You can lead the horse to water. That's pretty much right. That's what we try our best to do anyway so with that. I'm going to going to wrap this up. I want to be respectful of your time. Bye thank you so much for joining me. This is really been great. I will make sure that in all of the write ups for the podcast include a link to the report so people can look at it and getting their own hot little hands and like i say i'll be anxious to kind of see what the next steps are with this in the next iteration and i'm sure i will be seeing and talking to you on plenty of other issues in the next couple of months as well but thank you for making time to sit down. Just one on one. This time agree. This is really special. I mean we don't get as much time for this kind of thing as we should and especially in the pandemic so thank you for creating this platform and opportunity. Now that i spent like seventy five percent of this talking about my background. I'd love to come back for a part to that. We can just talk more about the please. I'm not going anywhere. We'll have plenty of time to talk. So yeah we can definitely do.

milwaukee last year twenty sixteen seventy five percent twenty twenty two thousand eighteen wisconsin last fall one next couple of months index
"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

07:32 min | 2 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"So now that we've kind of got you to the comments. I want to talk about a number of different projects over the years. But a very recent project that we've dealt with that i think is is really very interesting and very fascinating as this civic health initiative that that the comments has more or less led the charge on With a lot of different partner members in this initiative including h. b. i where i work to some degree. But i wanted to hit the conversation to talk about civic health in wisconsin. And what we've learned from that whole study and first of all. Just how did that project begin. What let's stop. Let's even go back a step further. You explain civic health. What is it yet. Yes yes so. Civic health is actually kind of a new concept to me. I've learned a lot about it over the last few years as we work on his project. And i've been able to go to a national conference with our national partner on the project and see the national conference on citizenship but civic health is a term that's been defined by scholars and i guess practitioner thought leaders and it it is defined a little differently from person to person or publication publication. But it's basically the idea of the way that individuals in groups in communities engaged with problem solving and the health and wellbeing of their communities often through often with a lens on public institutions but not limited to public institutions so things like getting involved in nonprofit organizations and volunteering are positioned. Dennis concept just the same as voting or engaging with your local government might be so it's sort of looking at the do how do communities come together to solve problems and make their communities well and functioning for the folks that live there. That's that's kind of the big picture concept when it really is like looking at the general health and wellbeing up your society within your both your more local community as well as roughing out a statewide or even national level right. Did i get that right. Yes you did yes you did. I would say that's pretty pretty as you. And i both know. Wisconsin had never really looked into before a number of states around the union have and have regular regular reports that come out about the findings of sort of civic health. Idea is faring. Within the state but wisconsin doesn't. That's right and i'm realizing you know rather than paraphrase i'm gonna if you don't mind just read the definition that we included in the civic health of wisconsin report that we got that out there so it says civic health reflects the degree to which citizens participate in their communities from local and state governance to interactions with friends or family. Civic celts also relates to the overall wellbeing of neighborhoods communities states and the nation. And i would just qualify that a little bit by saying. I think we'll be expanding that definition to refer instead to residents not just citizens because we are actively right now actually looking at the ways that non-citizens also contribute to civic health residents of communities. That may not have that status yet. I do think politics aside. I do think that's an important aspect of look into in any community certainly with a state with as vibrant and of an agricultural section as we do with the idea of my coworkers and kind of how that plays into the overall fabric of society to. I think it's a very important addition ambulatory very important part in ecosystem. Yeah so basically. The the national conference on citizenship is this national organization that has access to federally available. Data that us things about the way that people in the united states in specific states. If you run the state based report how they civically engage in there's surveys and different instruments that feed into that and because of that available resource like you said many many other states had done a civic health of fill in the blank nebraska florida illinois report and many of them had done it for years on end where they were already getting longitudinal information about how their state evolved and changed over. Time and wisconsin was kind of late to the party on this for whatever reason. So you and other collaborators across the state along with my predecessor from the center brian. Kristen's i'd say three years ago. Started asking this question of. hey you know. We've heard of the spaying. Wisconsin hasn't done it. Maybe we should look at doing it. University centers or probably particularly well positioned to help make it happen because we could help analyze the research and the data and get some information out there and so over time. We figured out how to get this inaugural report done in that was just published for the first time in june of twenty twenty which does tell us some baseline things about wisconsin civic health. Although knife thing that i've been saying to people is what it really does is. It should our appetite for learning much much more. Because there's still a lot of things we don't know what did find out what were some like the big three big takeaways or maybe more but the start with three. Yeah so one. Really big takeaway. Is that wisconsin figures as number two in the nation in terms of voter registration and turnout. So we we have a very strong history of are eligible voters showing up at the polls and those percentages. You know when we look at the twenty twenty election only went up in the twenty twenty election so although nationally the percentages went up across the board. I i would expect that. Wisconsin will stay strong in that regard so that we all set. That's interested me. Sorry but yeah because one of the things that just peripherally just as a citizen watching elections over the years. I'm always disappointed by voter turnout. It always feels like what do you mean. Were on at that percentage. There's so much more. Why aren't we at ninety five percent but find out that we're actually among the highest in the nation is a little astounding and sad some ways. I know i'm glad you made that point because whenever i shared this information. I'm always like wanting to give the caveat of like let's not be too celery and the way that we put it in the report so basically looking at the statistics in this report looking at the two thousand sixteen national elections. We had voter turnout at sixty four point six percent which is number two in the country and the average percentage was only fifty three point four percent which again important to note that the two thousand twenty numbers look way higher. That's one thing was encouraging to see a much higher turnout overall. But then i guess sixty sixty two or sixty three sixty two or sixty four. That's that's still pretty good. I guess again if we are second in the nation that's certainly something some degree to be proud of but it just feels like we can do better. Yes the perfectionist in me. I guess it just feels like we've have room to grow absolutely and i think that's where we want this report even with that being like. Oh we're proud to be at the top of the heap. The heat is still not like the gold standard. I would like that to be a takeaway personally. And i think that once we twenty twenty information into a second report we will see an increase in. I think we have some really big questions to ask ourselves about like what are the barriers that people are experiencing to that kind of participation. Like whether that's not trusting the system or whether that's actually having logistic challenges with voting. And i think that's our communal problem or question Unity that we should be looking at. But i'm with you. I mean. I think just because we're at the top of the heap. I think what we wanna do is make the heap. Look a lot different. Where five six percent is what we're seeing furious. And of course.

six percent second sixty ninety five percent Dennis three Kristen wisconsin june of twenty twenty fifty three point three years ago two thousand sixteen national first time two thousand twenty numbers nebraska twenty twenty sixty four point four percent five six percent three big takeaways
"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

07:54 min | 2 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"On bascom et cetera. But that was kind of intimidating and weird factor of coming out of the campus was the like actually love the way you're bringing up the tangible like the tangible challenges of coordinating with across campus because of the size but also the conceptual one. I mean it's so cliche but it's it's there for a reason like the risk of silos is huge factor. And i am very proud of. It's sort of similar to the stuff that i did when i went to casa. But i'm very proud of the fact that i've invested a lot of my energy and my role at the school of human ecology ended the commons in trying really hard to connect with other stakeholders in the same spaces. And making sure that we're talking to each other and trying to be non duplicative in collaborative. And i think for this moment in higher. Ed and in wisconsin that's important on a lot of levels. You may be facing constantly stretched resources. We may be constantly facing the need to sort of justify what we're doing and why and why it has value and so it just seems to make sense to not work in a echo chamber and to make sure that we are talking to each other and learning from each other in road and what we find to kind of working at similar odds similar. Directions is that with a nonprofit sector. There's opportunity for collaboration because the sector covers everything you know every aspect that you would find on a university. Campus is into the sector in some way even if they're building up an mba program. A lot of those. Mba graduates are going to sit on boards and be on understanding of what they're doing so there's so many different ways to approach that kind of collaboration and awareness building. Like i say you almost need a person just to do that. You and i both know neither of our offices really have that luxury. So and it's and in that way. Even being in higher ed often resemble some of the same skill sets of the plates spinning that you do as a nonprofit professional absolutely absolutely it is interesting because you know. I'm sure you can probably relate. But i talked to a lot of defending nonprofit leaders and and i'm yeah i have worked in the sector before moving into higher ed and hbo organization small staff. We have more connective tissue throughout the campus than we actually have in our office. But i tell them all the time. I relate very much how these small nonprofits work because h In itself is just like that we have you know. We have our limitations on resources. We have our limitations on staffing. We have we have outcomes that have to be met from both funders and from administration and education programs and there are so many similarities that just lower me on a daily basis. That's why it's it does feel kind of weird working and neck with nonprofits in some ways reminding me that yes in some ways. I am not one of them anymore right because my my day to day experience is still that yes yes absolutely but you were a casa and we feel like we kind of jumped got off on a tangent there but you are a concept what happened after that. Actually it's very related seems you're talking about. I mean after four years and realizing that i was laying in bed at night thinking about the budget of that organization and thinking about the budget of my household. Because i was concerned that i wasn't really building up the kinds of long term benefits and even just month to month income that i felt like i might need to start thinking about because my kids were getting older. And you know those reason kids in this. Modern era in the united states is pretty expensive. You know. I started thinking like. I think i'm going to need to start looking at a career shift at some point. But what's interesting about that. Is i really had no idea what that would be. And then in the meantime what had happened was you know just like this is not going to be a surprise to you. But just as many of us in the nonprofit sector think to ourselves sometimes as we're getting that street mba as we're learning these skills on the job we start thinking to ourselves like you know. Who the heck's teaching this stuff to people is there. We could've learned it without learning it on the job like this is such a sophisticated set of skills and learning how to run the finances and the board and the programming volunteers and staff management and fundraising. It's like what could i have learned about this stuff. And i didn't know at the time about your program in milwaukee or any of the other stuff that was popping around wisconsin around topics and i was based in madison. So i started just ferreting around at w madison to try to learn more about what was going on there and i knew i hadn't encountered a bunch of stuff about this in my law degree so i was sort of cut. Did i just miss something. Or is there something at the university. And lo and behold at that exact time there was a burgeoning undergraduate program that was being formed at the school human ecology and this was in my early days of casa. And what happened. Was i got introduced to the professor that had been recruited to come and help. Make that program happen. His name was dr bryan. Cranston's he was the first faculty director of the center for community nonprofit studies which i now direct and he was fresh off of the road trip from nashville tennessee where he had gotten his phd at vanderbilt to start his life end professorship in madison and he was just like open to a young lawyer slash executive director lake me. That was like. Hey i'd love to know more about the program. Can i come guest lecture. What can i come. Do to get involved with what you guys are doing. So he basically had me come lecture in his classes every semester. For all four years. That i was at casa. I kinda got to know him and i got to know a teeny tiny bit about what was going on with that program. And i'm not kidding you. This is how basic networking can be. Sometimes what that basically resulted in is when the school of human ecology gotta clean and had a new strategic plan and was going to hire a new position related to research outreach. At that school. I was on the email list because of guests speaking in the one professors class i. I got the so he email. I was added to the list. Somehow and i remember seeing that job posting in thinking you know. I don't really know that much about the university context or this job but i know all the skills were referred to in this job are things. I have parallel experience within by law and nonprofit life. So i'm just going to throw a hand. The ring i mean being at the university of wisconsin would be a beautiful thing. It's a bigger infrastructure for me to go get into and get a little bit more stability. I could learn some things. I always liked the of teaching. I mean that was my original georgia and nothing about the job suggested that i would get the chance to teach but i was sorta like well. At least i'll get closer to what's going on with that. You know if. I were to get the opportunity. I did get the opportunity and so it was painful. It was one of the only times in my life that i remember laying in bed awake at stressed out because i felt such a responsibility for the hand off of my role as the executive director knowing. They didn't have a direct replacement in. I would need to move on to this job. While they sorted that out and ultimately organization has gone through some changes in his doing quite well. it's now under an umbrella organization the The canopy center in gain county. In that i think has been happy positive. Marriage in meanwhile alive volved in my role at uw. In it's it's frankly. I reflect on it a lot. It's really been kind of dreamy. I mean i've worked hard at times. I wasn't sure where it was going. But now i get to be the director of this amazing center. And i'm teaching graduate students in undergraduate students how to prepare to be change agents in the sector and so i couldn't have known it was going to evolve in that way but that is what happened. That's one of the best endings for that kind of a journey. You're talking about before just kind of the paths that people take that wander and so many different directions and then all of a sudden the woods open up and there's something fantastic in front of you. That's very cool.

milwaukee united states nashville tennessee one Ed dr center for community nonprofit both university of wisconsin first faculty school of human ecology madison one professors bryan. them after ecology each vanderbilt georgia
"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

06:35 min | 2 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"Highlight of my time with that organization because we just it was super fun. People felt like it was new and different. Not your traditional cluck. Clap where you're served a chicken breast and you applaud for people you've never met exactly exactly and then we did this cool. I think both of these events have evolved. But they're both still happening. The other one was the gingerbread casa's for casa so the play on the word casa had this baker who made us custom gingerbread large gingerbread houses and then we would get corporate teams in different sponsored groups to come and have this fun holiday season activity where they could decorate a gingerbread house. And ben have a big competition about it in the community who come and see them so that was i think both of our special events were. I didn't come up with those ideas. But i saw them through which was a lot of work i will say. I think those are actually really wonderful. Creative ideas for that sort of friend raising and and building awareness for your organization. But that's kind of cool it. It takes the initial ear of getting asked for money out of it and just helps to bring your community a little closer to the organization. That's very cool. Those things a lot of work. But i do think that they set the tone for awareness-building and some ongoing annual events that that organization could have the most important thing that i'll just say. And i think this is. I wanna make sure that i referenced this through my time at casa i both had amazing stakeholders and staff that i worked with and i learned so much about families that were really caught up in some of these systems that we know need a bigger examination and families that are up against just like every possible part of the things that are ill in our society he and you know trauma and all of these things so i felt in many ways i feel like i was the one that got the education in the benefit from that experience. I had an awesome board. I had awesome staff. But i also will just say that like being an organization that was running on like one point. Seven five f. t. points and had a huge volunteer management role involved with volunteers. Be very sophisticated of working with kids and confidential and risk because there's all kinds of legal hurdles that have to follow through and if you're working with children on top of at all yeah and then the class issue of like we couldn't pay these amazing staff members who wanted to do this work enough so we also dealt with turnover and not really having enough administrative support so we. It was a classic experience in many ways of a small organization. I learned so much. And i'm so grateful for those years star. It's it's kind of amazing they've had number stations with other people to that and in my own experience working in a very small shop at one point. I was in a nonprofit where there were three of us. And you know what we've talked about before when you're you're literally doing a little bit of everything so you really do. Learn the ins outs of how nonprofits college should work. Compared to how it actually does play out a lot of times. But i think that you know. A lot of people are afraid of working in an organization that small or fear of instability. Let's say but i will tell you the rewards you get out of it and the knowledge and experience that you take with you is some of the best training and education. I think you can get in a lot of different areas so absolutely yate a small nonprofits. You know seriously. They're doing the bulk of the work in our state. Certainly it's kind of cool that you had that experience to kind of take with you. It sounds like up until this point in your career you've done a lot of advocacy work and kind of focusing on public policy and legal issues which makes sense but the degree of course and that end at work experience but it sounded like a lot of the work at casa was really focused on awareness and advocacy and engagement. It was it was also making sure that the services that we were providing were In the trainings were solid. But i did have a really talented program manager who also helped a lot with that. I think my bailiwick does tend to be little bit more like the big picture and the the connection between what are the direct services. Are you know things that you're offering from the organization and how does that relate to the bigger ecosystem which is why now being at a center that looks at those issues at university college that looks at human ecology which is about human thriving across all of these different systems from the individual to the family to the community is a really nice place for me to be now. It's cool yeah. I will say when we first met and found out that the comments the center for community and nonprofit studies was located within the school of human ecology in my day. We call that mac. I mean it was a much much more limited view of what that meant. I think back in the day but thinking on it and kind of how you explain it about knows humanistic connections and how we interact with one another. It doesn't make sense that you're center would be right in the middle of all of that. I it at least gives us a chance to be as we've talked about with you being at another you know. The the legacy actually nonprofit leadership and management program in wisconsin. I think what being at the school of human ecology allows us to do is just have like a slightly different angle on some of these things that if we were based in a business school or a public policy school but we also definitely don't wanna be limited to that i want to try to be as collaborative as possible with our colleagues not only across you w system like you and colleagues at other. Uw system campuses but also even on the uw madison campus with the school. Business with whom. I actually had a meeting this morning as well as the la at school for public policy in the school social work in education. I think it's exciting to think about how this sector civil society a nonprofit in community sector kinda crosses into all of those different areas and i was just thinking as you were talking about the different schools and centers that you connect with that in itself has to be a huge job because madison. Uw madison is gigantic. Just physically gigantic. It's like a city within a city. You know and i compare you'll be milwaukee. I mean geographically. we're one of the smallest campuses in the state. Even though we have like the second highest in in student population were cramped into a little place. And you must get a lot of walking in. Yeah currently for better for worse. I'm saving a lot of that. While young.

wisconsin three milwaukee both first this morning second one point madison school of human ecology uw madison campus of human ecology one casa Seven five Uw
"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

03:25 min | 2 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"I had.

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

08:13 min | 2 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"Specific major or degree. But i ended up getting a degree in english education meaning. I got an english degree. But i also got the qualifications and credentials to be a high school. English teacher was a bit of a byproduct of just deciding. I really wanted to continue as literature. Course work when i was in college and then feeling like well i need to at least make sure that this can be a real job and so i did teach english in high school for a hot minute and then shifted gears again after that. I'm sure your parents were very glad that you had a job to go to coming. Out of undergrad especially focusing on english literature. You know yeah that's right. What did you to us. Interestingly i decided to go back to grad school for history. I decided that it was going to be really tough for me to go. Launch my career as a high school english teacher. I had done my student teaching in an initial temporary teaching job in rural appalachia. Where i was living at the time because i was an undergraduate student at appalachian state university while. How did you manage to get out. There was that where the schooling ended up i. This is another winding roads story. But i fled wisconsin. Where i grew up in lacrosse. And i'm a multigenerational lacrosse kid. My parents and grandparents are often that area so like many kids of my generation. I had this extreme urge to get the heck out of there and get out in my case to the west coast. And i did that. I went to san francisco my freshman year of college and then it turned into this wild somewhat bohemian adventure of traveling all around the country and to alaska with a bow and then deciding finally to return to our education and he was from north carolina. We settled in boone north carolina to go to appalachian state university. Which was a place where we could get in state tuition and a great education in live in a fund mountain communities. So that's what we did. Yeah so my starting out teaching was in this rural school where i did a long commute and it was a incredible experience in a wonderful community but i also in the meantime had a newborn baby and a three year old so i realized quickly that these long hours with very inflexible schedules that we ask are public. School teachers to do is going to be really challenging for me. And so i shifted gears and went back to grad school with the idea that it might get me the opportunity to teach in a more flexible environment like a community college environment and meanwhile i had been doing some teaching kind of informally with different populations including english as a second language population. So i got really interested in digging in a little further on some history themes that i was passionate about including latin american studies and so from the history adventure that i went on for a one year. Long masters program. I then pivoted. When i return to wisconsin after being in north carolina to this dual degree program at the university of wisconsin which offered both law and latin american studies as a dual degree and that was once a continuation of renaissance interest. But again decision. That i needed to get a credentialing that was going to get me gainful employment which i thought a law degree would probably get me. You don't like this is a flexible degree where i can probably be employable afterwards. Do something helpful to people. Even though i really didn't know what the heck kind of thing. I would be doing with that. Why degree so. I know this all makes me sound like a really floundering kind of young person juggling a lot of different things. And that's kind of true but you know that's true of all of us always fascinating to be. The different. has that people take end up where they are and how you build that whole life resume that just leads you in a certain direction whether you're aware of it or not i've certainly done my share of floundering as you say you're trying to figure out what i want to be when i grow up. I think i finally figured it out. So i finally get to a point where you say okay. My brain is full now. I just need to stop here and see where it takes me. It's great to hear you say that. Because i think in a way that's the reality of all of and i think in some ways especially those of us that have the privilege of being able to say. We really are satisfied with our work. Because it's natural that if you took the time to evolve an explorer. I think it's likely that you'll get a better result than if you just overly commit early and then stay on track although some people. I think you know what they wanna do. But i wasn't really one of them. I thought i did early on. But i was so wrong and taken several several big arts throughout the last couple of decades anyway to end up where i'm at. It's just kind of cool. So what did you end up doing with your law. Degree and latin american studies focus while the land. American studies focused allowed me to with my small children into semester sight argentina and do some research on judicial reform there which was a very impactful experience i think for all of us and actually was one of my first exposures z depth and breadth of the nonprofit sector because a lot of the organizations that were doing the work of deal reforming argentina ngos that had funding from usa. Id and the world bank and such so. That's something to bookmark for later. Then i knew. I was enough of a realist to know that once that adventure was over i was probably going to have to go into a more traditional law oriented job in wisconsin where i was by then had my kids in school et cetera. An- i needed to kinda just like bear down and do something. That was a little bit more traditional. And i was very lucky to have been able to clerk at the supreme court of wisconsin and then get a job at a relatively large regional law firm where they just had an extreme need in those days for corporate associates. Who could help them with what at the time was a pretty booming merger and acquisition context. So you can imagine. This is a pretty different sort of work that i had envisioned myself doing but it was a great opportunity for learning and making some money out of law school and working with some of the best lawyers in the state. And so i did do that for a little while but as you can imagine from some of the other parts of my profile and being at the time of single mom two small kids bet. High intensity corporate law firm work wasn't to be a long term relationship for me. And so that's when i moved on and really took a pivot into the nonprofit sector and of all things whiter nonprofit sector. Yeah so what was really really wonderful about my law firm. Experience was that a kind of giant in wisconsin. When it comes to nonprofit law. Melissa schultz had been at that same firm before i got there and she had this incredible specialty and amount of knowledge in nonprofit law but then she left the firm to go out on her own and moved to dc for a little bit the with that departure. That firm as you might imagine kind of had this void of like they would get this and that nonprofit question from lawyers of bears serving on boards and needed some help with an issue for their organization. They were helping out working with and there wasn't an named attorney that was specialized in that anymore and so there was like a group of attorneys at the firm that had enough knowledge of that area that they would be sending around emails of like how. How should we address these questions. Now that we don't have melissa in office. And i sort of raise my hand and was like anything about this work. But i've seen the power of the nonprofit sector and i'm interested in learning more about it and i'd love to do some of the grunt work associated with this and learn the ropes a little bit and so thanks to a couple of wonderful colleagues. There i got the opportunity to just try my hand at some of this nonprofit law stuff that was coming our way and i learned a lot in a short amount of time and went got to go to some high level conferences and things about that and then we would be working with a bunch of nonprofit organizations as pro bono clients because of those types of relationships. I described where lawyers would be on their boards. Sure he would get the help from the firm for like this or that issue for that and one such organization. That was a small one that needed some of that kind of help was county casa and i started helping them as a pro bono attorney when they were in the middle of an executive director search and i got so interested in what they were doing and the fact that they were a small organization that was in need of a new director that i just decided to my hat in the ring for that position and lo and behold because it was an election that had a pretty distinct legal focus..

Melissa schultz north carolina san francisco alaska one year both melissa two small kids English university of wisconsin appalachia latin american second language one wisconsin three year old boone north carolina last couple of decades court usa
"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

01:50 min | 2 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"Is the executive director of the commons. Mary beth collins we connect regularly on a number of issues that overlap in both the university administrative and community support arenas including for a recent study into the civic health of wisconsin later. We'll learn more about how civic health is defined why it's important to our communities but i'm also interested in learning more about the path that brought mary beth to lead such a thriving focal point for the nonprofit communities around wisconsin. Being joined here today by mary beth collins who is the executive director.

Mary beth collins mary beth collins mary beth today both wisconsin
A Conversation With Justin Trewitt of Dapper Woodworks about accessory storage.

The Fashion Geeks

04:11 min | 2 months ago

A Conversation With Justin Trewitt of Dapper Woodworks about accessory storage.

"Today we're gonna talk with justin trae would of dapper woodworks love that name who's in texas. We're gonna talk about a category of menswear that the everyday man should have in their arsenal. We're going to talk about assessories storage. Jt in the building. How are you man what you rich. I'm i'm hanging in here. Based on the circumstances holding down here in texas. So yeah yeah. I'm sure you're holding it down at the dfw so before we go into our tobby please tell us. So what do you do what Yeah like you said. I'm just in a run. That road works. And what i do is i make search oriels source solutions and accessories. So basically what that is is the best ways that you can store your men's wear accessories so ties bites worse. Collor stays any sort accessory I've tried to figure out some way to create a sore solution for that Make other items such as a shoe horns lapel pins all sorts of bins. Were inspired woodworking. So it's just a fun side business for me. Got you accoutrements. Yes my grandpa's word. I'm borrowing it. So how has your brand your business been doing during cova. Justin and going crazy really took off last year. Which is insane. Considering the circumstances twenty twenty doubles revenue of what it was in nineteen so this is one of the person being in e commerce. Currently everybody that. I know of this in some sort of commerce. Business has been just the businessmen going crazy this year. I mean but of course everybody's shopping online more people aren't really going stores as much as people are getting everything. Online that includes men's word accessory stores things which i guess. If you're not wearing things much lately like ties in cesary meisel finalist store. So yeah it's a good point. I've got these ties. Debra what works sin. So that's so interesting that you you have been part of that wave and really kudos to you again. It's it's a blessing. Do you primarily. Because obviously you know i did research on you. Do you primarily operate through the shop. Fly collapse so. When i started out of a three years ago i started on I had an account on their sold things on there for a few months. I still have my seo industry in sales every once in a while them through there. But i knew pretty much immediately. I need to get my outweigh inside and so Start looking ecommerce. Platform shop was the best solution for my knees and has been one of the best decisions of may. Thro brand is getting and using java fai something cool absence stuff that i've added to the develop me sell products. Better off more options. So

Justin Trae Dapper Woodworks Collor Texas Justin Debra
What Made the Indonesian Plane Crash? New Report Sheds Light

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

04:02 min | 2 months ago

What Made the Indonesian Plane Crash? New Report Sheds Light

"Let's start with an update a preliminary report on the The indonesian airline crash Boeing seven thirty seven five hundred at jakarta on the ninth of january. Twenty twenty one. You'll remember last height. The impact of the java sea and so on the february twenty twenty one indonesia's k and k t released their preliminary report. They reported at the time of issuing this preliminary report. The memory unit of the cockpit voice recorder has not been recovered and the search is continuing. So they're still looking for that darn thing. The cayenne katie reported. The sequence of events on board of the aircraft has known so far. Let's see on the ninth of january boeing's seven five hundred aircraft registration peak. Ac l. c. was being operated by Pt swabia err on us scheduled passenger flight from Soekarno-hatta international airport jakarta to so by the international airport in pontianak pontianak. I don't know. I guess this alaska. No the flight number was S j y one eight two. According to the flight plan filed the fuel endurance was three hours and fifty minutes at seven. Thirty six Ut see which fourteen thirty six local time in daylight conditions flight one eighty two part to five right of jakarta there are two pilots four flight attendants and fifty six passengers on board the aircraft at fourteen thirty six forty six local time. The one eighty two flight pilot contacted terminal. East controller was instructed I want eight flight. One eight two identified on departure. The the standard instrument departure unrestricted climb level to nine. Oh the instrument instruction was read back by the pilot at fourteen. Thirty six fifty one. The flight data recorder recorded that or flight data recorder reported that the auto pilot system engaged and at an altitude of nineteen hundred and eighty feet was engaged. I guess at fourteen thirty eight forty to the flight data recorder recorded that as the aircraft climbed past eight thousand one hundred and fifty feet. The thrust lever of the left engine started reducing while thrust lever position to the right engine in didn't move. The fdr also recorded the left engine and one was decreasing. The right engine and one remained the same at fourteen. Thirty eight fifty one. The flight one eighty two pilot requested to the terminal east controller for a heading changed two zero seven five degrees to avoid weather and the controller approved the request at fourteen. Thirty nine fifty. Four the controller instructed the flight to climb to an altitude of thirteen thousand feet and the instruction was read back by one of the one eighty two flight one eighty two pilots. This was the last known recorded audio radio transmission by the flight. The flight data recorder flight data recorded recorded. The aircraft altitude was about ten thousand nine hundred feet which was the highest altitude recorded. In the flight. Data recorder before the aircraft started. Its descent the autopilot system then disengaged at that point on heading of zero one six degrees the pitch angle was about four and a half degrees nose up and the aircraft rolled to the left to more than forty five degrees. The thrust lever position. The left engine continued decreasing while the right engine. Thrust lever remained at the same position. At fourteen forty local time the flight data recorder the throttle system disengaged and the pitch angle was more than ten cents. X knows down. No it must be ten degrees download little little Translation issue with the text. I think what we use to snag. These articles

Pontianak Jakarta Cayenne Katie Soekarno Hatta International Airport Boeing Indonesia International Airport Alaska United States
What Made the Indonesian Plane Crash? New Report Sheds Light

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

What Made the Indonesian Plane Crash? New Report Sheds Light

"A possible cause of the crash of an Indonesian jetliner Last month Boeing 7 37 500 went down in the Java Sea on January 9th killing all 2 62 people on board. Preliminary report says the pilot struggled to keep that plane in the air right after takeoff. Investigators say there was an auto throttle problem. In one of the engines. Pilots attempted to increase altitude minutes before the plane dived down. Investigators are now working with Boeing and G, who built the engine to review the information from the flight data recorder. The NTSB and FAA have also joined the investigation. Almost Kelly Koopmans Ah, woman in Seattle

Java Sea Boeing Ntsb FAA Kelly Koopmans Ah Seattle
Investigators: Throttle problem suspected in Indonesia crash

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

Investigators: Throttle problem suspected in Indonesia crash

"Investigators say the suspect a throttle problem to be key in general is Indonesia plane crash experts say a malfunctioning automatic throttle may have cooled the pilots to lose control leading to the Boeing planes plunged into the Java sea just minutes after taking off from Jakarta on January nine killing all sixty two people on board lead investigator says the left engines throttle lever could move back put on its own well altered pundits was engaged would you sing the power output of the engine just before the plunge the experts have issued a preliminary report providing details of the pundits struggle to fly the plane almost as soon as it became airborne I'm Charles de Ledesma

Java Sea Indonesia Boeing Jakarta Charles De Ledesma
"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

06:35 min | 3 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"It. The same way right agree. I'm also place where. I seek out the specific expertise in a very narrow way. Okay expert on this go. Seek out that expertise. I gain that knowledge from that expert in that space but when we're talking about community meetings and interactions a collaborative models and opportunities to connect. I have no tolerance right now or paces pam experts in the room so if someone sells out and expert and they know everything there experience help them all of these different things and they're not budging and they're talking at and talking to people. I have very little patience. For those types of experts and in some cases it can be dealbreakers. Because i was telling someone. I think maybe maybe even do want those interview process talk about my lifetime that i feel like i live a happy light. I will feel like. I have acquired a level of of dizziness in my life. That i'm laying on my guest. David i'm laying on my bed. And i actually. I don't know where. Wow i didn't know that i learned something today. I learned. That's what i'm going for right now. My lights really. That is what i'm going. I'm going to learn and experience and here is no different things and the stack of books unread book on my bookshelf is absolutely daunting. I don't know how the heck i need to take the. Act read everything news. I'm going to read. What about tobacco gonna look like. 'cause i just wanna learn i wanna i wanna absorb so. That's what i'm going for my lifetime. That's part of my passion is learning you others picking things up along the way and trying to apply those to the successes and mistakes that i make is up going forward. I think that's a wonderful. Look and i applaud you. I think that's fantastic. I just realized we're painting running out of time here so i wanna be. Respectful has kind of gone with our days. And you can fix yourself some real hot chocolate. How it's going to be a little nicer today. But still but i appreciate you taking the time to sit down with me and i really feel exactly what you were just talking about about the need to learn from one another and to expand ourselves. I also have a stack of unread books burner. That will ever get to the bottom of thank you. Thank you for joining. Thank you so much price. So the organization that tony overseas the wisconsin philanthropy network is a professional membership association for grant makers all over wisconsin. If you are a community foundation a private foundation an individual giver corporate healthcare higher education foundations. This is an organization that helps to make sure that that giving is as effective and meaningful as possible or provides networking opportunities skills building as well as customized research services and one of the research projects that wpn puts out regularly as a biannual report all wisconsin gifts which looks deeply into the philanthropic trends throughout wisconsin and compares that national trends to see just exactly where the money's going where the focus is are where the shifts are happening and it's pretty fascinating dive into just how philanthropy works was kansin. It becomes evident that it's not simply a checkbook. It is in fact an ear to the ground. That's really listening and paying attention and trying to preempt any challenges in the future and to see where the twists and turns of society are likely to take us and how they might be able to help support in the future. I find it kind of interesting giving trends in. America have been on the rise for years and according to wisconsin gives twenty twenty between two thousand eighteen and two thousand nineteen. There was a four point two percent increase just in that year alone resulting in almost four hundred and fifty billion dollars in charitable giving. And that's kind of a maze. Twenty one billion of that is from a different corporations. As they wrote the report they conducted a survey of all of their members and found that almost sixty five percent of those who responded are specifically increasing grants and gifts for disaster philanthropy due to covid nineteen. that's sixty five percent of the funders in wisconsin. That are pivoting specifically to match the challenges of the pandemic and the resulting nonprofit closures and draw down of services at that's resulted in what i think is most interesting and we talked a little bit about it in our interview. The difference between programming and operational support funders don't necessarily have a long standing history of funding operational support of proceeding almost forty percent increasing the grants to that overall operations funding. That's significant that. Means those organizations are going to be able to keep their lights on keep their staff up and running and be able to deliver the services. What i think is is particularly interesting. Given a lot of the events of twenty twenty that were not covid. Nineteen related sixty percent of the survey respondents are specifically focusing their funding to address racial justice issues. That's pretty significant. There's always been a presence of that in philanthropy but to see that degree of a shift is is very impressive. Could be really interesting to see what that results in how that plays out in the years to come when we talk about all of its covert nineteen funding. The majority of that is going directly for food security and making sure that people have food on the table as a result of an employment issues and being just unable to get out and live their lives. And that's a pretty impressive response as we move forward in industrial be interesting to see how this all plays out in twenty twenty one twenty twenty two to get that report but to see kind of where some of this shift ends up and how much a sustained in the years to come in and where the trends take us and as part of their grant maker survey they found that there were significant increases in the giving

David sixty percent Twenty one billion Nineteen two thousand two percent sixty five percent today eighteen almost sixty five percent nineteen funding twenty twenty one four hundred and fifty billion nineteen twenty twenty one forty percent America two thousand nineteen years
"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

07:58 min | 3 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"Looking for when i'm engaging with people also and so you mentioned that you are passionate and i'm thinking that people can be passionate about a lot of different things and so keeping the last six seven months in mind and kind of how things are working with not working in this virtual world and what do you feel the most passionate about right now on a personal or professional level. I give you a couple of things i think. I'm very passionate right now about the mental health of myself and my mental wellness about myself and the community at large. I think that that is an important component of where we are. You're talking about isolation or you're talking about things are happening that are out of your control that are relative to call maybe some in food insecurity for people maybe a loss of job those kinds of things some worried about all of that inside the space of mental health and wellness. That people are in howard breathing. Who were engaging with our be minimizing triggers in our line goal human and psychological. That are out there. And how we're thinking about that and then you know. I won't be remiss drives if i didn't say that the the journey that we've been on lately as relates to racial and social injustice is something that i'm becoming more passionate about. We can have that conversation about system we can have that conversation about people's attitude and where they are and how you can ultimately change things and the crucial conversation that we need to have. I'm to lead that charge then. Wpn but i think for the first time in my life. I am recognizing my own leadership journey as late to racial equity and social equity within our communities and i am actually having more hard shoot conversations within my own self about where i am in the space. What privileges have i enjoyed. What things have i done over the course of my lifetime that hap- to the system that are affecting our community and then thinking about all of that in the context of what it's like to run an organization life yet where we do have the percy challenges that philanthropy overall i was. Actually you brought that up. And that was my immediate. I thought is what is it like. As a black man. Leading an organization with a constituency that is predominantly white. Yeah so it's an interesting dynamic. Because a lot of things have happened in all of those copy conversations that i've had over the course of my. I'm coming up on my i can't believe it i'll come third year third year anniversary. Wpn which is crazy. Adulation congratulates you very much. Because time is just blown by. But i spent two years in this organization just trying to build trust trying to get out of people's mindset west. Tony gonna take you know. Where's this person's going to take organization when i interviewed for this position and i talked to the selection committee about this job. I didn't talk about being a black man. What i talked about was someone who's born in many different arenas someone who has a diverse network of people that i work with and rely on for a number of conversations on key issues. Someone who understands nonprofits someone who wants to understand. Better philanthropy and help polanski. Tell a better story about the work. They're doing i didn't i didn't show up as a black man job. I i did well. And that's that is the ideal you know. That's how you should have approached by but it was interesting because i one of the very person meetings i went to. Wpn as elite up wpn meaning probably twenty five thirty people. All great people care about community in the next in the trenches getting their hands. Dirty sorenson works looking at nonprofit organisation. Doing all the right things. But i walked into that room and i was the only african american that room and that was like that was the moment for me. Wow you know so you know. I know that there are people of color that are working in the sector working within the space. But there was a time where i can listen to you very easily. I think there's been more expansion that has happened over the three year periods. And i've been here and that's not gonna need to register. Wpn that ship organizations really changing how they look at populated their organization. How look at their hiring practices and our diversity efforts and what they're doing so great strides. The may but a lot of work still needs to be done but to be honest with you right. I'm very sensitive about being an african american man in this space and this work and part of the part of that i've been doing is feeling like we're gonna lead these efforts and we've got equity we. We had a strategic planning process that we engaged in a couple of years ago for three to five year plan and equity is right in one of the key. Strategic components are oriented face. so there's been equity. There's been i but it's been kind of small letter equity kind of just things that you have seen over the last thirty year and there has been a reputation for me leading an organization being a man of color doing this work and thinking about how programming how conversations and how working get done and personally be obsessed with. It's gotta be told. You can't mess this up and i've used workable language by trump so you can't you can't mess this up and my journey over the course of this past year with all of my cold reflection and a lot of sitting by myself and thinking about what to do and what. I want my own personal legacy look for myself my family my community and the work that we're doing tony. You have to get out of the space of perfection. You have to look at community based research principles and evaluation principal understand that the state can be made. Mistakes will be made. Go back to what you've been doing your entire professional career which is tried to testing and doing new things and if they mess up learn from your mistakes and go forward and that's really been a very profound thing for me as i've been going on my own leadership journey. Which is you know tony. You're gonna have to give yourself permission to make mistakes. And that's okay and so i'm not there yet. It's always gonna be adjourning you know always gonna be in but's it's already that i thought on that journey right now and i can't believe that you know thirty years or professional career in the walkie. I thought i was interesting brian. I gave him the same thing. I thought it was supposed to be easier by now. I thought my time in my career and my age. I was gonna know everything was going to be pretty easy. And i'm surprised incurs an exciting about the fact that i'm still learning and i was still willing to take my and that the the professional trajectory and everything that done in my lifetime it's been very lumpy be ride and i'm still audit and i'm cool with that makes it exciting though you know if you've got to settle than to if you just got too comfortable. Where's your word is your motivation. Go right ryan the fact that at our stage in life we have this passion to learn his passion to of just and see what's going on around us and find our place. I think that's in our favor. Do are a lot of people out there. that don't necessarily see it.

two years Tony three thirty years brian trump ryan third year tony Dirty sorenson five year third twenty five thirty people couple of years ago one three year first time african american year last thirty year
"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

07:21 min | 3 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"Doing i think. The biggest challenge with coal. Actually i will call the challenge. Because i don't think i i you know. We're challenged by virtue of kobe. But i think philanthropy has done some really great thing relative to the pandemic especially on the onset of the pandemic so there were a number of familiar with the coats on that was developed here in milwaukee that was led by the greater milwaukee foundation and other family private family foundations well corporate entities that a source bat that particular you know may not get the number on percent right but i think that initial funding source was someone neighbor. To of three million dollars was was raised like within the first week. So what you saw. We're very similar efforts in other markets around the state so be madison. Green bay fox cities other rural spaces lead mostly in part by community foundations throughout the state or the united way organizations where really lead the charge in sourcing that work so from a financial perspective from a resource perspective. There wasn't abusing of dollars that came in to support basic needs so housing food insecurity employment efforts that were released and becomes the result of coding. But i think just as important. And probably i don't know you know acting more than for was philanthropy across the board within wisconsin Decided to in working with their grant. Tease relaxed many of the restrictions around restricted fund and said those nonprofit organizations that you can utilize dollars we may have provided you were direct program and apply that to your basic operations to spain employees within your organization. That was a game changer. I mean you had organizations that had rigorous eighteen months fund development processes in granting that they were doing with their partners who organized their work within their organization reorganize how structured and got board approval and turned eighteen month processes. it's a four week processes in some cases mets impressive. Yeah it's significant. I wanna i wanna take a moment because it occurs to me will probably have a few people listening who don't necessarily quite understand the difference between programmatic funding and general operational funding. There are two different pools or primary approaches. Funders can assist and historically were talking about supporting specific programs that tends to be very restricted. In how the money is allowed to be spelled as the funders. Get a say in that. But what we're talking about is that they kind of those restrictions and said you can use this money to pay your bills to pay the rent to pay the salaries tra- that's exactly right. It's the difference between. I remember when i was at united neighbor citizen walkie. We had a restricted jobs program. Now we worked on and capital aren restrictions capital letters restrictions across the board. And then things like we're bringing in youth to bring them in employment to give them employment opportunities by the grant that you were see can't allow you to provide lunch with those young people and they come in for their training you can't certain things and then the audit included asking us how we were utilizing the windex. He bought to clean up the tables that we were working. What i'll while i would say that. The membership of wisconsin philanthropy network is that there are restriction some funds that are out there from a programming perspective and there was a call or more trust based approaches and The spaces the philanthropy. Ups is working with the whitman out of california what they have developed a model for what is called recipes philanthropy and that is really not only four wisconsin philanthropic organizations to relax those restrictions. But how do you help your your grand tease. Psychologically work through this work. How do you develop a mechanism for the ability for the nonprofit organization to be completely candid and transparent about the challenges venture not proper spacing to be blunt as nonprofit organization. They are not predisposed to talk about the bad things that are happening in their organization. They're predisposed to talk about results to talk about out com talk about impact the great things that they're doing so it's very difficult for them In many cases to feel comfortable enough with their funders to say here's a problem. We're the real challenge that we're going through and so the length of us really working hard at the dolphins mechanism that atmosphere where grand tease. You'll coupable enough to engage in conversations with funders. Were they could talk about the real challenges that they're facing it that and then communicating that so that was another piece of psychology was the land that worked very hard the onset of colon to communicate to their grant teas that we're going to change around our focus at how we're doing things as a response to covid nineteen. What was happening. What is happening in that state. That's really impressive. As kind of thinking about the culture of philanthropy and how that affects people from both sides of the conversation. I think that's you've worked in a broad variety of different careers different tasks that were before you all of that. What do you think you really really. Well what do you do this. Wow well first of all. Thanks for asking that question. I appreciate the opportunity to think on that. So you know you're always and then mindset When you're in a job interview you're asked. What are your weaknesses and your strengths. And we designed. I worked hard. I think too much and make it into something positive. And then you are asked about your shrinks looking for a job. You don't always think about those guys. The exact glen i appreciate. You asked me that question. What does my screen. I think i think my strength is my authenticity. I think my strength is The fact that. I what you see. I mean literally truly what you see what she get that. I'm really trying to while. I'm always going to champion work. The job the needs of an organization what needs to happen for an organization that these successful. I am still going to be. I'm going to be into the list. So i'm going to be transparent and i'm going to be authentic with my work. I think that i take that very seriously to be authentic person to be a truth teller and it's most appropriate forms not to be not throw cold water on things or shut people down but the truth set you free. I think every every opportunity around that. And i think the other thing that i do well is my z. Has them my excitement. My passion and my and my honest desire to be relational really have strong relationships and people and to have them always feel like women. Walk away from it interaction with me that it was worth their time that it was what the energy that they felt like. They got something out of the conversation. Because that's what

milwaukee three million dollars eighteen months eighteen month california first week madison both sides four week Green bay fox two different pools nineteen first spain foundation four united neighbor wisconsin united walkie
"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

08:08 min | 3 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"Years now and i was ready to run an organization because i have been running an organization prior to coming on. Wgn but being ready to do a good job. I question that in some respects that i was ready to do a good job in this role. Probably right at the moment. That i took this position because i had to learn from a number of mistakes and also give myself time to celebrate the successes i had over the course of by professional career routes 'cause there were a lot of success is there are a lot of great things that are but there are distinct moments in my congressional career whereas like you made a mistake that day and this what you learn from that situation and that talk i mean. There's there's always going to be a learning curve you know. You can't be expected to walk in first day and immediately changed the world right You gotta understand the lay of the land. And when you're going to program supervision to all of a sudden working with philanthropies there's a whole different side of the coin bear you're interacting west to understand the needs of that community which is very different than being on the receiving end of funding. You know we're all doing the same work right. Philanthropy is helping the source all those non profit organizations that are out in our community doing great great work helping the take up the scale. Great things that are happening or helping to continue to support things. That are proven. It's ally but it is very different. I mean the difference between nonprofit organizations how the world relative to scarcity of resources and how that greed an atmosphere of competition it breeds an atmosphere. Where collaboration is not the first thing that people are thinking about whereas in philanthropy. But when i would sit around the table with organizations that. I've worked with when i was doing nonprofit collaboration. There was always tense. I mean there was. it was inherent. It was inherent tension. It might have been. Somebody did something to somebody. And somebody's organization somebody that's up to somebody organization three years earlier and they're still hard feelings or people are are checking swing. Relative to munching forward for our need to really collaborate in an offensive way because history philanthropy operates very differently around the table in philanthropy. Everybody's comfortable in their own skin rockwell automation as an example isn't going to be worried about competition from the brewers community foundation because they're both sourcing work been acquired their resources to be able to do their work in very different ways to really breathes opportunity. School our collaboration on a very different level because all that clutter that comes in from the competition. Aspect isn't there. It's completely minimized in that the clutter as you call it. It strikes me that there is this a level of comfort. That's very different. From being a nonprofit looking to receive funds versus being effectively profit has funds and providing it so the clutter. Did you feel like that's a result of competition own. Yeah i do. Yeah that clutter is so there's a number of things not just the competition aspect. A lot of it is alignment of mission and small staff. The absence in many respects of key bench thought leaders inside of nonprofit organizations because the majority and rightfully so People that are working in nonprofit organizations. I really frontline staff. They're executing programming and outreach and work very specific ways so does not a lot of time to think strategically or big picture or around. Who who you could partner with to move forward your own mission and the work that you're doing there is the whole notion around. There's only certain amount of dollars or talent or people that can do the work or the resources needed to be able to do that work so there's always some challenges for people in organizations because this is the number of different dynamics that are out there that nonprofit organizations are working within the sector. It makes it a little bit tougher to come together and collaborate and really authentic ways. When i was at harley davidson are charitable contributions committee would have these married. Now keep in mind. This is a charitable contributions committee that comprised of professionals in manufacturing and. So you've got engineers you've got financial analysts you've got lawyers. You've got some marketing people. You've got manufacturing leaders that are sitting around the table and talking about sourcing projects within the community and they're looking at it a lean manufacturing perspective and so built down and if they see three proposals from three to nonprofit organizations and they're all doing the same work and they're all competing then the next mindset is won't we figure out how to source them all or can they collaborate. Can't they come together and come up with the program. And i would often tell the people in those rooms. Yes we get asked to collaborate. We can bring the leaders of those three organizations to collaborate and tell them we're going to find you and certain kind of way we're going to fund you to do this work that you were all doing and they're gonna now their head and they're gonna agree and they're gonna walk out the door and two months later they're gonna come back with a proposal that is going to meet our requirements but the time for the walking out the door to presenting that proposal to us two months later there will be a bloodbath because these are competitors these are organizations. That aren't necessarily waking up to do this collaborative work and so what were effectively doing forced marriage. We're basically telling the community that we're forcing come together for collaboration when we all know that collaboration is really greeted in what we're doing right now. Brice which is we're connecting on a level then is not started or sparked by. Oh there's money over there let's go pursue it started by relational interpersonal opportunities to come together and then ideas flow. And then you say wow. You're doing this. i'm doing that. But we do this. Let's collaborate and a proposal when as the scarcity issue does not allow that freedom or that time to be able to do that type of collaboration. What going be doing that. Yeah that's that's very cool to hear. I was talking to another in another episode. I was talking with someone that as part of this whole study. that h. b. is doing for kind of the effect of covid nineteen. What we found. Is that in terms of organizational collaboration. Southeastern wisconsin is had shoulders above the rest of the state as you were saying. It's largely been sort of philanthropy driven in our community for a while. It's just kind of interesting that you touch on that and kind of how philanthropists are effectively looking to sort of make sure that efforts are being duplicated and that at least here in milwaukee or or the general area that seems to be working better than another communities at any rate around the state. Yeah and so. I'm curious though in terms of the kind of talk about covert nineteen there for a little bit from your perspective and and kind of engaging with philanthropists. I imagined pretty heavily. Especially in the last six seven months. What's going on in the world of philanthropy related to covid nineteen and kind of the challenges. That nonprofits are facing right. The over arching thing. That i would say is that wisconsin s philanthropy relates to kobe. We're very consistent with what is happening nationally. Which which is you look at the best practices that are happening. Wisconsin is developed some pretty good best practices within

milwaukee three years earlier two months later three first day first thing three proposals both Wisconsin three organizations last six seven months wisconsin Brice harley nineteen davidson Southeastern wisconsin covert nineteen
"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

07:59 min | 3 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"Philanthropy. I think the way that most people get into philanthropy. They kind of dropped in based on their life experience. You know professional experiences you know kinda the ban with all that extent other often leads you in some respects to workings and some level in philanthropy. But i'm originally from chicago. Lived there for the first. You know technically the first twenty one years of my life. So i originally came to milwaukee to attend then cardinal stritch college which is now cardinal stritch university so. I came up to play basketball. What continue my high school career. It's my college career. And in that moment of my life. I wanted to leave the west side of chicago. There was more recuperation gang activity it was becoming a little bit more dangerous for someone who was in their late teens and i was also begin the process of broadening my own horizon so i jumped at the opportunity to in college an hour and a half away from chicago in my own life. Experience that hour and a half of could've been hundred miles. I'd never really been out of chicago than a couple of very quick family vacation. So i literally thought. Wisconsin was a world away. My dream at the time was to work in radio. Possibly be on air. Talent and radio ended up going down to track internships and those kinds of things working more sales more promotions and that went to an opportunity with the milwaukee bucks the lowest lowest ron of iran. That was literally go within the organization. Doing the number of activities and work where i often said to myself So this is pro sports Right just you gotta start somewhere. You gotta start somewhere right. You gotta start somewhere so within my experience box went from ten gopher to sales and marketing season ticket sales program sales up my entire time with the bucks i was on your systems coordinator for gays i was in charge of whenever you walk into the arena for a game. I was responsible for what you hear playing music in doing that. Kind of thing. Picking it progress music but Working i was dealing with. The box was particular program for students who achieved in classrooms through milwaukee public schools and walk shop schools west tie. We were working on developing a tim. A ticketing program for students who had sheep and bright gave me the opportunity to the school. So i would go on all these different schools all of these built environments around schooling and you walk into schools in certain neighborhoods at certain times and certain moments and you realize there is a. There's a gap between school. School environment to environment disciplined might look like at one school versus another. How middle schools look different than highschool some respect and then in some respects. Didn't it all so that began by interest. Because this this was the moment that i was getting my car on a regular basis going out and going into milwaukee and visiting and seeing neighborhoods and so i got a certain amount of energy in doing that and right same time this was around. Nineteen ninety-three the nba. That's basketball association. Was asking all team to have a dedicated community relations department within their organization it so like most. Nba teams the bucks. Were doing a lot of things in the community. The aforementioned program. I was talking about their work with matt fun. Working with youth groups those kind of things partnerships with organizations like the boys and girls clubs. Ymca but it wasn't centralized in the organization and so when they were looking to have someone kind of centralized operation up community relationship. I raised my hand and said you know the school doing stuff in the community already. I would love the opportunity to grow my career by leading our media relations efforts and that led me to for the next seven years as the community relations director of the box. So i was just the doping programs engaging players engaging coaches engaging staff in various partnership spirits activities around community relations so that was my first opportunity to review. Proposals from the community gets no community members. Get to know the people within the community organizations that are doing good work who should be scaled up so that was like my first entry way into that work so after about seven years of doing that i decided to make a hugely going from the corporate sector of the nonprofit sector because i wanted to see what life was like on the other side and i took a voice girls clubs greater milwaukee if they're direct programs throughout the city of milwaukee bad. I am telling you bryce and you're gonna appreciate that. I had done sales and marketing. I had done season ticket sales. I had done Pitches to sponsors to align them community programs that we were working on but going into work with the boys and girls clubs the single hardest sales job. I've ever ridden up sales the belief of sales. You know when you go. From a corporate environment to nonprofit world people automatically assume i remember these conversations with the thai people would say oh my goodness you're going to work with the kids that's wonderful and you're going to do all these great days. You're going to buildings relationships. You're gonna impact young people as you're going up and you go in there and i wouldn't have very easily and didn't have a full grasp Impact revenue generation for a non profit organization to sustain all the good work that people know that now profit organization is doing and quite honestly. I don't even think mentally i was ready for. It was a major culture shock for me and it also grounded me a little bit learning how to be humble learning how to understand that there are people in the room who know more about the community than you do even though you worked in that space going padding pro sports behind each adding pro sports five you was a significant culture shock and so i learned a lot in that space went from that to work a small public relations and marketing burn biggest. Worked i did was what the wisconsin tobacco control born so i was working tobacco cessation efforts and secondhand smoke mitigates to work in communities of color throughout the state of wisconsin. I need to get a feel for the state. When from there to harley davidson managed and lead their community relations for about six years worked on two major motorcycle anniversary hundred bent relationships with us. Just be association. Disabled american veterans and then work dot community relations efforts in the areas where we at corporate facility. I learn more about trending and benchmarking organizations so that was a great opportunity and then from there. I went to united neighbor. To the milwaukee where i was the executive director so again for and for profit back to the nonprofit sector with with uncommon for about eight years managing that organization a membership organization. So they gave me an opportunity to go to figure out how to serve the work with numbers. And then right to where i got dropped in working in philanthropy. That's quite a path. It's always fascinating to me the path that people take through life where you started where you end up almost never the same place in the same seat belt or anything interesting because you know when you look back on and you think about you know what i was like when i was younger. How you think your career is gonna go. You think oh. I'm going to graduate college. And i'm gonna go work someplace now to put on a suit and i'm going to come up with this great idea. And i'm gonna have the zenith career. Take the executive position the executive suite that i rightfully are and what you don't realize what my own professional trajectory taught me was. It takes time. It takes effort. It takes success most important it takes state and it takes learning from those states to develop the foundation that you could have that you are able to run able to lead able to influence and do those things that you wanna do. I mean i've been the presidency. All that works three

Wisconsin harley davidson chicago milwaukee hundred miles cardinal stritch university cardinal stritch college three first twenty one years first united about six years about seven years first opportunity an hour and a half nba about eight years Nba two major first entry
"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

02:29 min | 3 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"President. And ceo of the wisconsin philanthropy network. Wpn is an organization that helps to support the philanthropic efforts around wisconsin. Wpn is an organization that really works to bring those two sides to the table together to have the conversations that are needed to ensure that the work that's getting done is getting funded in the most effective and sustainable ways. After that. we're gonna talk a little bit about a report that wpn has put out recently looking at the philanthropic trends in wisconsin. So it'll be a little bit more than data after the conversation. Welcome tori thank you for joining me for little. Sit down and chat really looking forward to catching up and seeing what's going on in your world and in what you see and your perspective from the organizations you work with thank you. I'm excited to be here as you know. Although i've never been a coffee drinker. I have populated a lot of coffee shop so i always enjoy having an opportunity to have conversations to stop so thanks for the opportunity. Bright do you get t- or what so. Sometimes i get really. I did see. There's just too hot for me to have a conversation of what. I typically do what i started. Utsa was what. I really wrapped up. My coffee shop gave in terms of talking to people. And i started in november so my job started in november. Bu-but winner was doing four or five conversations today out of somewhere. Some coffee situation. And i would always get hot chocolate. And so i would get hot cocoa hot chocolate and then what meaning. I was sitting in june. And i'm drinking cocoa. And i'm just sweating it out right. I'm casual conversation. And i'm just drenched because heat. So cocoa hot cocoa hot chocolate and the winner is it's usually bearing smoothie in the warm weather months then usually get through kind of my my moments inside in coffee shop. You mentioned you. Work at wpn wisconsin philanthropy network. And before we get to that. I want to talk about you. I mean i know you but you know our friends listening. Don't give me of alternative elevator. Pitch about who you are and where you came from and all of the work. You've done which i think is wonderful. So i've got into this work with wisconsin be network and philanthropy.

Wpn wpn two sides wisconsin
"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

08:13 min | 6 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"And i just started asking you know why. Why isn't there more diversity on stage and the answer was i don't know i don't know we need it. And so then. I talked sherry Known for a since my skylight days and with her cheek. Her husband bill jackson and a few others. I was like we had to do something about this. What can we do. We decided to start a theater company. I think started theater. Company is probably one of the hardest things to do. And so you and sherry williams panel that you mentioned who is an icon in the milwaukee theatre and and who else was involved in the initial day she k johnson and yes and then don panella. Sheri's husband aziza bill jackson. Alan ed's we came together and we started a thing and being all performers. you know. There's definitely a learning curve. But we saw that. We were trying to fulfil. We knew that we were trying to fulfill a need for just representation and i felt that we were passionate enough and people listened and people support it. I went onto to do other things but sherry is still running bronxville campbell and brownsville arson. Sample is now a part of black arts k. E. which is the newest eu path number. So yes yes so as a member of brownsville. I i am proud. I am so proud a starting two thousand thirteen and for now Now for us to be a part of you path in that capacity. That's what i was hoping for. And i do feel like it'll be around for a long time. I hope i hope it will just encourage other black performers to to just take that step. Start new things if you are working to strive for those administrative positions or performing. It's great and we need these performers but we also need sound designers and costume designers and lighting design. We need we need all all event in all of the things absolutely. I want to clarify for anybody listening. That doesn't know but you pass is the united performing arts which is this massive fundraising machine for the performing arts in the great milwaukee area. They have a core group organizations they fund so becoming a member is a pretty big deal. That's very cool. And so i'm curious as you're forming jobs drought. What is it like to create something where that thing has never been before. But we weren't the first you did have uprooted theater company and then hands bury sands there a few others. That were maybe early eighties seventies at that point. Uprooted wasn't performing. Not when i moved back. I didn't see them as an example for me. It came from working at congo square theater in chicago. It's a black lab. Black founded theater company chadwick boseman. Who recently passed. He was an artistic associate at that theatre company. A lot of hauer university grads. Who started it and they embraced me while i was in chicago when we lived there and i carried that and even working with st louis black repertory theatre in saint louis when i did. Dreamgirls means the equity house in the big theater. And i was like this can be done. We're not talking about the east coast west coast with this midwest cities. We can do this so for me. I was naive and thinking. This is easy. We got this but in some ways it was. Because it's if you have an idea if you have a conviction or you to right a wrong. Then that's what fuels you. That's what gets you up every day. That's what makes it possible to do the next project. And then the next and i think that's what all of us were living on at that time it was the adrenaline and the the need not just for us. The really our group it was about. Who's coming after us. It was four year raven dockery. It was for demonte local actors. Milwaukee was four crystal drake. Those who need it outlet who needed a step or an introduction. Your tasha mccoy's so many others so many performers. That i think should will. They require certainly and deserve an opportunity but without an outlet for black plays outside of the rep or skylight. Doing that one show a. I h doing that one show and you have to be equity all those things. Where else are they going to get that training. Where else are they're going to get that first gig. We need that. In order to fuel milwaukee's artistic pool and so it's necessary. I think for every major city to have a black theater company or lat next theater company. Whatever that large group is it's absolutely necessary Wonderful to kind of see that need. Just fill it. Just go out and do it when you see that need when you see a you know an injustice a wrong that needs to be right what you just find that purpose in your in your life within yourself and you just you do what you do because you need to not not because somebody need you to. Because you're the one that's creating your own solution to the world that you seem congratulations on that. And how's it going. You're not necessarily involved day-to-day anymore. I i understand it's a you know it's we're all trying to survive All of the theaters. It's right now. It is rough. But with the milwaukee black theatre festival sharee was a one of the founders and so then bronze for arson sample played a big role in making making that happen. And then there's been a few full productions several over the last couple of years black nativity. That was supposed to happen. Brownsville arson sample produces it so this year. They're adjusting just a bit to you. Know adapt to the times. So they're they're tracking along. Yeah they're surviving. So what about the milwaukee bucks Festival the name right. Yes yeah. I got my t shirts so i support just a community member thing. I don't miss jeremy as an arts community member just as milwaukee resident hearing about. That was very exciting to me and partly because connecting the theater to see that kind of outlet. And i talked to brent about this back in episode one. We kind of talked about the fact that this is kind of a wonderful opportunity not just to provide work and provide the opportunity but to also show other arts administrator is what's possible what's out there that there is most definitely bandwagon to jump on into in sort of creating opportunities for more diversity in theater on all levels and so as a community member. I appreciate that. It's out there. And i really look forward to to next year all of that but i kind of put the cart before the horse but how to data will come to be well with the pandemic. Starting back in march i came back to milwaukee to show next act that was march nine and then world changed world change and at that time she k. And the kids we. We felt like it was just safe for them to come to milwaukee and for us to just spend time with family and let new york figure things out because new york siri critical hotspot at that at that time very scary and a lot of a lot of loss. So we were just trying to figure things out and then once may hit with there being protests and Things surfacing with ahmad arbery and then brianna taylor and then george floyd through that or some- somewhere in the middle of that you started to see black artist or black theatre artists starting to point a finger at the theater community and saying hey all this stuff is happening. People are marching around the world. What are you saying about it if you.

sherry Known sherry williams milwaukee theatre don panella aziza bill jackson Alan ed brownsville bronxville campbell united performing arts bill jackson congo square theater milwaukee chadwick boseman hauer university st louis black repertory theat east coast west coast raven dockery crystal drake tasha mccoy Sheri
"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

10:49 min | 7 months ago

"java" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"So you didn't do too much homework into here but it won't have actually been quite wonderful because what happened. Was i really loved the business and and then half way through my sophomore year. But i need to do theater and thankfully they let me switch majors and i i if i would've paid them ten thousand dollars i could have had a double major in in business and theatre them one credit short and ten thousand dollars richer but.

"java" Discussed on How to Program with Java

How to Program with Java

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"java" Discussed on How to Program with Java

"Right pretty cool stuff and then you can put that stops you can say console dot log and that's how we do i don't know if a taco console yet but how do we you know the the equivalent of system dot out in java you're sorry system dot out that we use in java the equivalent to that in javascript is console dot log gay console that log the person dot name gain they'll output whenever was that you signed inside of the person that name property in this case i decide to to it'll just l put trevor page onto my consul said console dot log person dot age hey no output whatever value we assign in the in in this case it was thirty four so you know output 34 console dot log person dutch gender will output male so there you go alternatively you can actually use something called like i said jason which is an acronym for javascript object notation notation j s o n javascript object you can use jason to create an object and javascript so the equivalent person object that we created a sort of before can be created with jason using the following code so instead of using dunk notation we're going to use jason so we're going to save vare person just like me did before vare person equals just like before open curley bracket just like we did before but now instead of closing the curley bracket likely to before we're going to start putting stuff into this these curley brackets since its scope with curly brackets in other words this is where we're going to using jason the javascript object notation what you do is you do its key value pairs that you're putting inside of the curley brackets so just like you do in jaffa with a hash map where you have akina value.

java jason trevor curley