23 Burst results for "Jason Wilson"

"jason wilson" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

07:59 min | Last month

"jason wilson" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

"Have not fear i I lack confidence in maintaining our our finances. Basically i fear seeing what goes in and out and i think this is something i need to look at And i feel. I won't be the type of man that guy wants me to be until i'm able to embrace every area in my life. How can she not receive that right but for me. I want to sign up. Visit check to make sure it's just like the mall. Yeah for sure stack of papers the co this. Besides we made sure it is like how you check another grown woman like the person rather so communication ruling. My motions allows me to communicate better. A lotta time is men. The conflict arise is because i lives. Have the garza. Why 'cause our words hit harder than our fists sometime so woman's not gonna keep getting hit and she's not going to be approachable. Kasese has a vista point. We know as men. We also know how to use our words to hurt right to be sharp. And i've done that with my wife and my kids people. I care other people i care about and i use my words to deliver a punch in and it hurts and so what do you do you card right and now there's no communication and so of nicole. I make sure that allow her to drop her guard. no punches coming from me. You know stan and if a punch comes at you from me is to move you in a direction that leads you in a better position. I would never try to set you up to hurt you. So when i'm able to convey that to say what man bay it hurts that you don't trust me with leading are financed as a man. You know i just. I want to give us a better life and i feel that i can but i need to be in control of this area right some men. Can't you gotta know your strips. Some you better be thankful you gotta wife they can deal would your finances. And that's a blessing. That's not makes you weak but now personally jet the follow your own convictions. And this is something guy was telling me you. I'm providing a lot of provisions to you. You understand because your wife you guys do some great things. I would never go nowhere where she's a reason. We travel and have nice vacations but she would be the reason we have vacation every other month to this your cause she loves it right and if i had the money we will take a vacation every month if i had the money so i. We play to our strengths and weaknesses. She knows minos hers. And now we're able to complement each other before. I'm trying to fight for this. But what how communication when negotiating hostage situation. Imagine having the wrong negotiated would know. You're going to release them right now. Because that's what i said to do. Workout off isn't that but that's what we tend to do because why you're operating in only masculinity negotiator is very precise very comprehensive and communication comes off as a nurse. What do you want. What do you really need from you know craze. Let me see if i can make that happen. You hungry right now cool. That's what we have to become. But then he has his demands with no. We can't budge on that. Yeah that's comprehensiveness that's powerful. Well i love the way that you honor your wife. I see that too small degree course on instagram and social media and the way that you honor her as out very inspiring. Thank you very cool to see that it. It wasn't always that way And i always like man to see the struggle to you. Know i try. I need to post more about the arguing in or the disagreements now that we we said we shall. We had a video about that. 'cause he was doing covert. We have several friends who are lawyers. He and then we studied that nationally. There was unprecedented amount of requests for divorce. Being filed says dependent. Yeah and so that broke our hearts and we did video teaching people how to navigate through the pandemic and my wife is led a lot of it. Because you know most men we don't really express was going on inside now. And the messages. I was getting from men during that time. They weren't terrified of dying from covert they would just fearful of eventually losing it at home Because there was no club they're all spores speed trap and they literally were about to lose it because they didn't know how to express baby just need some space. And so what i had to do and she had to do we would mean. We couldn't go anywhere one point. I would just walk around and take a ride home. Depot became for. Why don't but oh. Wow this is a cool to win me. I was loving. You know there was some but we all need to know that we all operate sometime when you come back. The love is even stronger. Yeah definitely jason. I appreciate your brother. I appreciate taking the time to come over here and do this again. Your message is it resonates deeply with me. It's it's overlaps with what i share but it's different enough that it allows me to see things that or a new ways. I haven't considered before and so that helps me be more comprehensive to helps round me out because i have a tendency of being more. No you do what you need to do to protect provide preside and that's it and everything else is just a distraction from that and so to be able to see. This side is crucial with thank you. I appreciate it and thank you for coming here. How could i not you know. Show up you know. And i really appreciate your heart. Your desire your transparency and. I just hope you continue to do what you do man. 'cause i'm just one person in something that needs many in the movement many to see different sides of everything but if we all can be comprehensive man. This world would change like drastically. So that's what. That's what i hope and pray for and again. I'm so thankful for this time and it really means a lot thank you. Thank you like west guys. Mr jason wilson again. If you are already familiar with him now you are The guys absolutely phenomenal very interesting. Thinker thinks about things in new and different and refreshing way. one that is Contrary to what you see a lot on on the socials and so if you enjoyed our conversation you wanna learn more about what. He's doing. Connect with him on instagram very active. They're also twitter. Wherever you're doing the social media thing and just take a screen shot tag tag me. Shoot him a message. Let them know that you heard it here Just just do whatever you can to let him know what you think about the work. He's doing the great work that he's doing and also share this. You know. I don't ask for a whole lot but if you've ever gotten any value just share it take a screen shot tag me and jason Lebron rating and review. Send the link of the podcast over to a friend or your dad or your colleague or your co worker. Just let's get the word out. Are we need to get this word out. Millions and millions of men are not getting the information they need and we have it. We have it here through the conversations. Were having through the iron counselor exclusive brotherhood and you have access to it so if you have access to something that's gonna be beneficial for people. I feel like we have a moral obligation duty and responsibility to share. It with others are guys. That's all i've gotten makes you subscribe lead. The ratings and reviews kip. And i will be back tomorrow for our ask me anything but until then go out there take action and become the man you are meant to be. Thank you for listening to the order of man podcasts. You're ready to take charge of your life and be more man. You were meant to be we invite. You joined the order. A quarter of man dot com..

Kasese garza minos stan nicole Mr jason wilson jason jason Lebron twitter
"jason wilson" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

05:27 min | Last month

"jason wilson" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

"Yeah that's gonna follow this going to affect how you start your message and so same thing in finding let go blow man. If i'm boxing you and you hit me that's gone. It's done if i stayed here comes your left and right now so because i didn't i didn't let that go right so he does you carry all that nervousness for no reason to that podium and not you're speaking I want to thank all of you. Here's this you know. And that's how you start your message. Instead of living in the moment i think when you're talking about letting go the blow. It's i think the challenge with is that it's human nature to want to remember it so that it doesn't happen again right if you punch me in the ribs for example. I'm going to remember that. I'm gonna favor that i'm gonna guard my ribs but i- expose my head if i do that. So how do you fight against the human nature to want to protect yourself that way while you simultaneously. Expose yourself to other problems again. Rule your emotions master you a motion. Don't let the master you a good example taught my recruits one day. They were tired after school and it was wrong. What you retire. Loan day of school. You know magic. Middle school is this is financing. What you java you had you had a long day tell me about. The data was funny when they say had a long day of like. Wait a minute you you hear on time where you mean long day. I don't mean time. I mean it was hard i say okay cool and i learned a lesson. They were training with doing floor was practicing jabs elbows and kicks. You had to go up and down. The floor nonstop. Imagine being in a school ninety degrees training two floors drenched with your sweat. When i told my structure says how you doing us. Camp tie had a long day dry walling. But i'm making he says good. He made that the hardest day trained in my life. Imagine doing that for an hour and a half street punching kicking non. Stop in a hot room. I was slipping on my own. Swing what he taught me was was that there was no need for me to say. I'm tired when i had to get ready to fight. It can only hurt me and it did. Initially what my boys they said. I'm tired. I worked that day when they got done. You guys tired. No sir say one is the best time to be tired and wanting to recruit said with my home bears but he got the message. So when you're in school don't be sitting at the desk like you can go to sleep. Does not the time. Ford you tell the emotion of laziness or fatigue. There is no time for you here right now. I need to get an a. On this upcoming test so i must pay attention. That is over. We are tired. And i honor this fatigue when i can rest but now i can't so when umass your emotions you let go of the blow. I have a chapter called combat communication and every professional fighter. Does this you down low. Your opponents moves in tendencies so you throw a low jab to see how he responds a leg kick to see how he checks and see what he does is. Okay good as defense this week. In this era or he doesn't feel that he has a good defense defense because he keeps moving on my fake okay in a lot of times. What happens in life because it'd be motions if i'm throwing. This isn't even a job right now. It's not it's just little gadgets. And so if you say. Joe rogan was commentating. What is wilson doing. What kind of blow us. What is that now. This becomes you can categorize it when i do this. And you move your hair. And then i knock you out. My right joe was saying that was awesome. Fake that's what we do in life. We go for the fake blow. Because we don't let go of the one that really hit us before so now all life has to do is present something that looks real. Now we can get hit. And that's why it's important the way you do. That is to learn how to rule your emotions and that comes through of course Training not marshall is is a great tool one of the best. I think for us dealing with emotional stability if you have the right teacher but also in life you know practicing You know the right tone how to be assertive in that aggressive. This two completely different things you know. Ucla boxer whose aggressive each swinging. Wow right see. I won't fight. He's moving moving the boom nam. That's assertiveness is a calculated action that leads to a resort that you desire aggression is just power out of control. You just wasting everything. Basically fear base and really. Yeah sure could you just swing and wow no form. Nothing i've got. I've seen guys who who who here own over here right. Laham out and that's where we teach is to be assertive aggression. You just emotion since running everywhere so the bottom line is two ways that war within and deal with those emotions. Then you'll be able to let go of the blow in live in a moment so you can defend against the one. That's coming as as you're talking and thinking about this i would say. Generally men don't want to express their emotions right. Generally i think most men dole onto because they consider it week. But as you're as you're talking about it.

boxing Middle school Joe rogan Ford wilson Laham joe marshall Ucla dole
"jason wilson" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

06:21 min | Last month

"jason wilson" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

"Quickly when all of these bootcamp started collapsing. That you can't expect to heal a boy when you re traumatizing him right. It doesn't it almost seems like the the goal isn't to heal like i went through basic training. I was in the army for the national guard. And then the for a little bit but It it wasn't designed to heal. It was designed to train to follow orders to follow directions to perform and they the boys master performing soon as they got out they went right back. And it was mr wilson a day everything i had to get out of there. He says but i'm more angry now. it wasn't until i saw that they needed. They didn't eat more discipline. Needed more love and it was crazy. Man is at the time and this is the problem when different ethnic groups only look at the world through their cultural lens. You only think the problem exists amongst people who look like you. And when I video went viral in two thousand sixteen as over one hundred million views worldwide. Now our offices at the union our nonprofit which the cave of adult is under. Iphones wouldn't stop ringing man for two days and it wasn't black men majority black men calling in. It was my brothers from another mother. My white brothers asian australian. I mean crying to women. Saying i wish my coach would gave me that opportunity. Express what. I was feeling now. Because of that i have issues with abuse you know. And so for these men and these o war vets has special ops. Call says may. I've never seen this type of coaching and for me it was natural because for so long i figured it out since two thousand six that was needed but i didn't realize it inside every man is broken. Boy that needs to be healed. In so i sift it. Of course in a cave is still series. You know we don't we don't play around if you got anxiety issues focused issues. We train hard. And that's what takes you to that. We call it a moment on the mat. Where i'm someone is choking you or i'm striking at you with a stick or something and you freeze up and now you hit once or twice a pad stick of course until you get better but still you have that fear failure within a voice voices started talking. You start hearing words at your father told you you never be. You messed up again. You start hearing what your teacher said things like that. So now you freeze and you're done you see it in boxing guy. Take a hit boom. He let it may hurt more so was hit and getting to his pri- amac can't deal with this guy because you won't let go of each blow so we teach in a cave and we apply to life and let go of the blow because if you get hit whether it's a layoff notice or whatever or you get tapped out you roll them with someone you gotta let go because you're going to keep getting tapped out if you keep thinking about it and so we tie life principles to the cave of a dumb. But i couldn't do that man when i was only. Just you know the serious drill sergeant type of coach you know. But when i allow boys and young men to save space they became. They were able to release the trauma. The emotional pain so today can become better men. I think one thing you've done really well is that you're talking about vulnerability a safe space on the other side of the equation. There's individuals that have taken it so far that i think you talked about the line in the land so far towards the lamb that they can't be dangerous that they can't be capable that they can't be strong and so there for lack of better term crying all the time looking for things to be wrong microaggressions against me and they've just become so overly sensitive but i feel like you've done a good job of of finding the ground where people can work best. You hit it right on the head man. I had a conversation with a few guys and it was similar to that. They were saying. You know. we'll wait a minute. You telling us that we should be vulnerable. But then you telling us. We need to be assertive right a. C. you have to be both you know Line in the land philosophy. Even engine jitsu. If i meet your push push jessop one of us going to wait out. Sure i'm meet you push with pool puts me in control when i could dominate an always fight force with force the same thing reality. Sometimes the lamb may look soft but his setting you up for the line but when you're over anything when you're too much of this hyper this. Hyper that desa problem. I want my son. Because i i taught him how to freely express how he feels. I see you do not however you cannot become hypersensitive because in a moment where you need to be vigilant. And you allow that second of that emotion of fear anxiety or saw road overcome so much trying to rob you. You're dead right okay. So you have to learn how sarah was great. You know me as a follower your shoe. Or jesus i the bible says that godly sorrow brings forth change or repentance. A lotta times. You have the other extreme where people don't wanna think on things that are bad or could bring them down. They said it's toxic or negative emotions. If i offended my wife was short with our need to sit with that sorrow in my meditation time soda can change and reconcile what i did. But you're right man. You know good to society if your milk saw sap or soft all the time. No one should be milk south. I'm sorry at anytime. you know. The word nice is really not a good word for it. Borderlines naievty you want to be kind and gentle and then you know i've seen men. Were they embraced. This passive moa talk about in. Battlecry is called purging passivity. Will you think is honorable to digress in a situation where you need to be assertive. But what's really happening is. Is that you being scared or fearful of letting that lyon loose. You know some men. I know especially introduced to a friend of mine zander hainan. He's marcelo garcia. Black bill man. This guy's huge right. I call him. Bruce.

mr wilson national guard army boxing jessop sarah lyon marcelo garcia hainan Bruce
"jason wilson" Discussed on Dad Tired

Dad Tired

05:44 min | 2 months ago

"jason wilson" Discussed on Dad Tired

"Taste we say on. This enough is enough. I was created to be a human being as well and then they have to learn what they get this freedom of expression we have to be very careful on being wise enjoying the right time when we share things that could be heavy with our spouse Solomon says it's time for everything. Okay so when you come home every day everything that you've been dealing with this bad stress you. You can't just bring that home because your team. The family would be discouraged. And i write about huddled principle. If i'm us. Tom brady as an example actually super bowl. Fifty one against atlanta falcons when they were down. It's got the number of points in the first half and no team ever come back from a deficit that great. What if she would went to the huddle said. Hey look guys already got whatever. Think three or four super bowl rings. No team in. Nfl history has ever come back from this type of deficit. I'm getting hit hard. Y'all ain't protect me like y'all should look just called today and you know we tried is next year. The team will elected each other. Like right This is a. This is definitely ale. If tom brady checks out as the husband wearing acquisition we can't come to the huddle Yuki is there in your wife. I just got another layoff notice nat. We are probably won't have a job so now. Should i know that you dig a layoff known as absolute 'cause a lotta times man hold that onto themselves. In their wives. God has given them a solution. Turn it away. They could deal with it. And that's good but this is a key. So how do you determine the right time. Read the temperature of the room. How is your wife today and then when you build a good enough relationship you can come to. I've been taught by my psychotherapist ohio. The mom. My name's nicole haykal. I got something. I wanna share. I wanna make sure this is the right moment for you to give me your undivided attention. And that you have the capacity to hear what heavy on my heart so good in so when that happens they still could cool right now. Got his meeting these other things. Can we circle back at eight s awesome and then you go menu. Both hit attack that with prayers. Well a lot of Especially minimums high. We don't print enough. What i want like my wife. Nicola night we have to pray every day morning and night if not it's speaks that curses real king was her desire to rule me but i will rule over her nest constant war. You have to understand how difficult it is for a woman to submit to a man that she's cursed the foul and so we have to be proactive. Both of us so r marriages will shine a light of christ and not a light of conflict.

Tom brady atlanta falcons Solomon nicole haykal super bowl Yuki Nfl ohio Nicola
"jason wilson" Discussed on Dad Tired

Dad Tired

04:01 min | 2 months ago

"jason wilson" Discussed on Dad Tired

"To the most sinful in the room always loved how jesus around the truth man. I've heard you seem intentional about calling you. Use the words most high yes sure. Where does that come from. Well even in the christian community. That's those aren't phrases. There used a lot. I mean for you. Know for instance his name was not jesus any theologian Right so i don't know. I keep calling him that. It's either something this personal to you. You've grown to it in. It works you in as cool for you. When i found out that his name was closer to yahoo shula we understand what the word means in hebrew and then our father in heaven throughout the bible. He's called the most high david that's all he called them in. Lord is really at an i with the for the lord so when i found out that was his name i wanted to call him by his name and it really opened up a different world for me as far as my walk with the man it was like i really started to know him more. So that's why i use we say alleluia. Say highest praise. Yeah why while we just say hi sprays degi hallelujah translates highly. Liu kun by your. It's always his name has always been the oba die jeremiah. All all their men. And so. That's why i told you i'm not. Jesus will break the commandments. For the sake of tradition ran. I'm not a traditionalist by any stretch of the means. I just wanna know the truth. And i wanna walk in. That's simply why use the nights. I love it. Have you read that book. John mark homer wrote a book called. God has a name. No i'm an so good. It's so good. Let me that kind of write. That down right yeah. God has a name by john. Mark homer so good because it's a lot of what you were saying. They're the premise. Me and my buddy were just talking about this the other day. But we're essentially when you call. God god it's like calling your wife woman right but when you call my wife if even if i call my wife her name. My wife's name is layla. So if i call her. Leyla it still isn't accurately depicting our relationship in fact if by caller leyla her name it feels like why are you. Say my name. Are we in trouble if she says my but i call her babe more. I have all these nicknames for her or these like these really personal names. And the way that the name that i call her is a symbolic of the way that we relate to each other and so if you just say god it's like saying to my wife woman woman when i call her name. Yes you personal name is actually. It's symbolic of that deep intimate relationships. And i think that's a again that it is you can't escape it. It's salvation is in the name the the title. Yeah and so one thing. We have to be careful as well for those who still use these issue not decades. I would prey on his name. If people will get healed and deliver inside. I know god is omniscient as well. I know he knows when at heart is in line with you. He knows we're praying to. However when i found out his name how beautiful it wasn't what it translates million. I'm like oh this is it and then more people are starting to say even at my publisher you know. Even i published with chronic a man. It was beautiful to hear them. Say yes shula yahoo or but guy just for soy was just it was just really beautiful and just to see us break..

Liu kun John mark homer shula Mark homer yahoo jeremiah Leyla leyla Lord david layla john
"jason wilson" Discussed on Dad Tired

Dad Tired

01:58 min | 2 months ago

"jason wilson" Discussed on Dad Tired

"On today's episode of the dad tired. Podcast i sit down with the wildly popular. Jason wilson who's also a bestselling author of the books cry like man and battlecry which is just about to come out. We talk about what it looks like to be comprehensive man before we jump into that though i do want to give you two reminders number. One we have our family leadership program that is opening up in about a week. So if you want to jump into the next cohort go to data dot com slash lead. Come hang out with us over there and learn what it looks like to be the spiritual leader of your home. I also want to thank our friends. Over at samaritan ministries for sponsoring. Today's episode samaritan ministries is not insurance..

"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

Welcome with Karim Kanji

07:14 min | 3 months ago

"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

"Take leaflet echo more calm your boom you show your heart and great we thank you thank you so i have a last question i usually like to ask but the first thing i do want to ask is i remember being at the tooth show few years back and to was you know. Not busting on karl. Rv about being from toronto. But you know really. I'm sure that it was well known. What was it like to work with carl. I got as as a fan boy. Geeking out with goosebumps here. What was i grew up with them. So i grew up with the harveys. So i'll give you the carl's the oldest. And toots in the maytals. But not just toots and maytals. He's done a whole bunch of different things an og. Rupert oh gee gee was front man to messenger is the front man to mention messenger to this day and their youngest brother was my best friend who unfortunately passed away when we were teenagers from two year. Bout with cancer. Richard and Richard and i started our our first ban or my first band. At least when i was twelve. And then as you. I think you alluded to earlier greg. I played my first nightclub with messenger. When i was fourteen cafe on the park on. Eglington they the cra-. Yeah so what was like in on the park not in on the part of the hotel cafe on the park. It was like adding i want to say. It was like avenue road and eglington area. I'm sorry no it's okay. Yeah and it was a message attributed so the usual basis was going to sing all the of bob marley songs which meant saying the base or the keyboard player was going to play bass which meant there was no keyboard player so you can imagine fourteen year old jay in junior high school getting a phone call from agha saying they called me casper casper com player from tonight. And i'm like yeah. Let me ask my mom i guess. And the the coolest thing was. There's some crazy arcade law that allowed me to perform was able to perform. I couldn't be in the club though. Figure that one out. So i could be on stage but the second i finished on stage i had to go sit up in a storage room upstairs outside. I couldn't be in the bar. But legally i could be on stage so yeah. It was a bizarre bizarre incredible. You know you can imagine my monday morning with my friends back at eliah junior high school. You know how was your weekend. Yeah so that was kinda go anyway. Long story short carlton in my life for for for many years he yeah he's incredibly he's just got great years he's got a great in tone and we've we've wanted to work more together but with him being on the road with tooth so much. It was so hard but now we obviously with kobe but also with losing. There's there's more opportunities to do that. And i'm taking them on to some of these place. Burma he's going to bermuda. And i think he's going to do the the second. Uk tour with us. It's nice to be working with him regularly. Very nice very nice so one of the questions that we'd like to ask as we wrap it up is what is in your ear buds lately. What are you listening to that. Other people should be checking. Wow i wish i could say there's some twenty-first-century things i'm listening to. There's a cool album. That just came out recently. Polonius monk live show at a school in california that was recorded by the janitor. And it's it's really cool story. Check it out then. The name is a paolo something. Sorry i'm blanking listened to like yesterday. is it wrong. I don't know if it's wrong to say but landed delray. I like i'm totally right all i. I literally got into her like last month. So her new album. I saw that new video chem trails over the country club. Or whatever. And i was like what is that. I know the name i've never saw i. I bought that album. I love it. But but my life my twenty-first-century jams are joanna newsom. Who is a indie harpist like harpist. Who's married to andy sandberg. Who's on brooklyn nine nine. And she's she's crazy. She's kind of like. I love kate bush. So she's got a kind of a kate bush five but same thing much a very much. A storyteller probably takes months to write her tunes as well. They'll into the history of you know takes and in fact she she. She doesn't tell her fans she kind of. Wait for the blogs to come out to see fans have gotten the actual thing right. So i i did. I like i like artists that make you work a little bit so And then i've been listening to tons of balk lately. So where's the reggae in recent history. It's there it's always there. It just hasn't been on the turntable for for a week. It's great thing is awesome. Jason thank you so much or suspending this evening with us. Really appreciate it thank you. It was a pleasure let you go. Where can people go to check music. Well i'm all over the all the usual places like spotify and apple itunes and band camp. And it's jason wilson. Music is generally the best way. Our jason jason wilson music dot com is our website. So you can check us out there as well awesome. It's been a pleasure. Jason thank you again thank you..

Eglington eglington carl casper casper eliah junior high school Richard Rupert agha karl bob marley Polonius monk toronto greg jay carlton kate bush cancer andy sandberg kobe bermuda
"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

07:11 min | 4 months ago

"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Leaflet ago a move gov your soul you show your heart the and great we thank you thank you so i have a last question i usually like to ask but the first thing i do want to ask is i remember being at the tooth show few years back and to was you know. Not busting on karl. Rv about being from toronto. But you know really. I'm sure that it was well known. What was it like to work with carl. I got as as a fan boy. Geeking out with goosebumps here. What was i grew up with them. So i grew up with the harveys. So i'll give you the carl's the oldest. And toots in the maytals but not just to tomatoes. He's done a whole bunch of different things. An og rupert o. g. g. was front man to messenger. Is the front man to mention messenger to this day and their youngest brother was my best friend who unfortunately passed away when we were teenagers from two year. Bout with cancer. Richard and richard. And i started our our first ban or my first band at least when i was twelve. And then as you. I think you alluded to earlier greg. I played my first nightclub with messenger. When i was fourteen cafe on the park on. Eglington they the cra-. Yeah so what was like in on the park. Not in on the part of the hotel cafe on the park. It was like. I want to say it was like road and eglington area. I'm sorry no it's okay. Yeah and it was a message attributed so the usual basis was going to sing all the of bob marley songs which meant saying the base or the keyboard player was going to play bass which meant there was no keyboard player so you can imagine fourteen year old jay in junior high school getting a phone call from saying they called me casper casper com player from tonight. And i'm like yeah. Let me ask my mom i guess. And the the coolest thing was. There's some crazy arcade law that allowed me to perform. That was totally fine. I was able to perform. I couldn't be in the club. Go figure that one out. So i could be on stage but the second i finished on stage i had to go sit up in a storage room upstairs outside. I couldn't be in the bar. But legally i could be on stage so yeah. It was a bizarre bizarre incredible. You know you can imagine my monday morning with my friends back at eliah junior high school. You know how was your weekend. Yeah so that was kinda go anyway. Long story short carlton in my life for for for many years he yeah he's incredibly he's just got great years he's got a great in tone and we've we've wanted to work more together but with him being on the road with tooth so much. It was so hard but now we obviously with kobe but also with losing. There's there's more opportunities to do that. And i'm taking them on to some of these place. Burma he's going to bermuda. And i think he's going to do the second. Uk tour with. It's nice to be working with him regularly. Very nice very nice so one of the questions that we'd like to ask as we wrap it up is what is in your earbuds lately. What are you listening to that. Other people should be checking. Wow i wish i could say there's some twenty-first-century things i'm listening to. There's a cool album. That just came out recently. Polonius monk live show at a school in california that was recorded by the janitor. And it's been re it's really cool. Story check it out then. The name is a paolo something. Sorry i'm blanking on that. So that's what i listen to you yesterday. Is it wrong. I don't know if it's wrong to say but landed delray. I like i'm totally all i. I literally got into her like last month so her new album. I saw that new video. Chemtrails over the country club. Or whatever and i was like what is that. I know the name i've never i. I bought that album. i love it But but my life my twenty-first-century jams are joanna. Newsom who is a indie harpist. Like harpist. Married to andy sandberg. Who's on brooklyn nine nine. And she's she's crazy. She's kind of like. I love kate bush. So she's got a kind of a kate bush five but same thing much a very much. A storyteller probably takes months to write her tunes as well. they'll into the history of takes and in fact she she. She doesn't tell her fans she kind of. Wait for the blogs to come out to see fans have gotten the actual thing right. So i i did. I like i like artists that make you work a little bit so And then i've been listening to tons of balk lately. So where the reggae in recent history. It's there it's always there. It just hasn't been on the turntable for for a week. It's great thing is awesome. Jason thank you so much or suspending this evening with us. Really appreciate it thank you. It was a pleasure let you go. Where can people go to check music. While i'm all over the all the usual places like spotify and apple itunes and band camp. And it's jason wilson. Music is generally the best way. Our jason jason wilson music dot com is our website. So you can check us out there as well awesome. It's been player jason. Thank you again thank you..

Richard Jason two year bermuda richard toronto california eglington twelve andy sandberg spotify Uk yesterday tonight bob marley fourteen year last month monday morning twenty-first-century first band
"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

02:43 min | 4 months ago

"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Ring ring.

"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

05:32 min | 4 months ago

"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Show up and yeah i think that's what made it special and that's what actually opened. I think it opened up possibilities for reggae and naya's reggae but certainly reggae In the city where you know said bay. St lawyers like well you know. I love that ban. Why don't we have that for our wedding. Because they played at the bamboo right. Those kinds of things and that kind of thing happened all the time at the bamboo were you. There was some sort of metaphysical connections happening between the clientele and the and the people on stage all the time you spend anytime upstairs at the after parties from whatever the whatever the street is behind the ad to go up the stairs and it was the big room I'm not at liberty about down. Because i i remember i remember going up there. One time getting through all the levels of security yup and if i'm not mistaken it was jeff healey and i think rik emmett jamming up all day. Ask yes. I know what you mean like just like mind blowing an all. The bars are shut down. Where we're gonna go upstairs. The bamboo at the back again is coming up with rohit. Fantastic by being those. I mean even upstairs afterwards. Great i mean some fun nights up there Oh yeah no yeah. My i grew up there man. That's that's my education before. I went back to school. So yeah and again. Unfortunately we don't. We don't have that place anymore for regain the city. We have good places hopefully after covid. Some of these places are gonna come back but Yeah the. Bamboo was a very special place. Indeed what do you think the future is going to be like. I know last year you did the the real gabriel safe again. We have up on the mantle in here maya's and she had some some bands come in and it was very social distance. But right what do you think. What do you think the near future. Not the long-term your future. So i've got. I've got a british tour of actually so check this out. I've got nine shows in britain than another three shows in scotland in january. I've got bermuda and i've got the cayman islands. I not have a single canadian show. Yeah so. I don't know what that means. I mean i think. I think there will be some sort of twenty five thirty five percent capacity type thing going on for a little while. 'til people get comfortable. Are we going to have to have you know. I got my. Here's my shoe vaccination sport thing on my phone or whatever like i don't know i don't know how people feel about that or how i feel about that but but clearly. That thing is missing that that live music thing is missing and what i know about people is that they need that and and My hope is that it gets that it will come back sooner than later. Something's coming back soon. You know that's. I think we're all feeling that i think we're all feeling a little okay. This domestic light at the end of this tunnel here. So yeah well. We're we wish you the best on your on that tour and if you need someone to carry your luggage down in the cayman islands. They're pretty sweet gigs. It sounds great. But i'd love. Toronto would be national. You can drive to. That would be good. Well we talked about drake. Just call even get a place in history. I mean tickets to july talk in december. We're crossing our fingers for that one. Nice i'll text drake after this. Yes he gets back to me within the hour. Usually i believe you have a song ready to play. Do i do wondering if you can enter the song us the song about. Yeah so this is off our perennials album from two thousand sixteen. And it's a good ray old good scottish word romo gumption and it basically means having Guts but also smart and So together which is kind of an note to my wife. She was working at the un in new york for a couple of years and it was great for her career but it was hard on us and this is really the song about me going to pick her up and bringing her home and Yeah it was. It was a good moment so It just came out that way and It was It's become a sort of sort of a show ender for us because the crowd really really digs it when we do have a crowd and and we will have a crowd again someday. You know it's sort of a fan favorite so I thought that would be a good one also nice. This is jason wilson and rumble gumption..

jason wilson jeff healey january scotland last year nine shows drake three shows december Toronto new york bermuda two thousand sixteen twenty five thirty five percen cayman islands covid rik emmett gabriel single canadian
"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

07:56 min | 4 months ago

"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Like to go out different places. So that's that's on the musical side. I mean i wanna explore the storytelling. I mean whether it's because your beloved with history and as a historian but again that album sumatra roots in the story of toronto and everything great fire and the the the stories behind it i mean storytelling seems is so much a part of what you do. Yeah absolutely exploit out with you. Yeah i feel it's kind of it can be burdensome sometimes to always be conscious of trying to write something historical for every song but a man when you hit and you feel like okay. I'm i'm distilling this story. And then and then you distill that story and have someone that was involved even tangentially with that story. Tell you that there weeping. Because i never thought you would tell that story about my family or my culture or whatever That's what makes it all worthwhile right. And i if someone listens to my tunes and goes i love that tune. Great melody cool. Whatever awesome sax solo blah blah blah. I'm good with that. That's totally but if someone listens to it and says is he actually talking about. Elizabeth simcoe like governor. Simcoe that leg. What and joseph brant. What right like. I love those moments. Especially you know when someone gets it It makes it makes it all those hours really really. Although i let me let me digress for a second because my most popular song of all time and i've made more money with this tune than anything else was a song i wrote on the keele street bus. It's called keele street. It's been used in a couple of documentaries. Been used in films been used on the show kink in my hair they use. I wrote that in ten minutes and the dream and it's made me more money than pretty much my whole catalog combined and now like songs take me four months to write like takes me that long to research but i do i love. I do love the process. You know I think you have to love the process or or you gotta change your process. That would be my recommendation you you when you write. Write a song in. We've been talking about us. Amac roots are you. Are you type of artists that lead the listener take ownership of that song and and figure out what it means to them or when you write a song is very story to message and you want that to stick. I i would say i don't have a choice. I don't have a choice in that. I think it will always be to the listener. Our most recent song which has just made the top ten reggae charts in canada. Thank you very much With thank you Carl harvey. Who is toots Well was toots than the tells bandleader. Unfortunately we lost during kovic him. And i did this track and It's called ready to be loved and people are hearing the song and enjoying it and thinking it's sort of a love story in a way or or someone that that that feels that they need loved but the actual truth of the matter is it's it's about a human fragment that was found in In the siberian mountains that is a hybrid of neanderthal and the this open humans pre human humans sapiens. I should say that This child this fifteen year old girl they figure and they've nicknamed her denny and it's really a song about her being discovered and how what was her life like i. I'm choosing the to to to make it a love story in a way that she united tribes to people's together and That she was queen of the in betweens. And the and that kind of. But you know carl for instance the guy that i actually produced the song with said what the song's about after he'd he'd heard like for you know a thousand times by this but it's been it's been brilliant it's been featured in a few places and the coolest part. This is my favorite part. Is that the team that discovered denny love it reached out to. They reached out to me and they're like thank you for appreciating what we do and it was doctors fantastic and i was like. Oh you're you're welcome. Dr pavo and then irene up this guy he was like time magazines. Most one hundred influential people and like one of the scientists of the year and like okay. Yeah maybe i should. I should have given him a little props. Oh you're most welcome to enjoy that song interesting that that you spoke about that song after my question because that was exactly the song tao mind is when i heard the song action. Watch the video as well animated short by anquan they did. They did wonderful work. They and i'm watching it with all of the input that we had in canada over this past week in a bit. The am listening to that song and go. Is this about finding the children. Its it's not crazy that those parallels exist in art. And i think that's happened to me a couple of times where i've i've written something and not really fully known what it was about and it kind of gets any kind of gets and i'm not trying to get to terek or airy-fairy with you guys but but there's there's moments where it's like if things are revealed to you after and and And and yeah. It gives me goosebumps. What you're saying there. Because i feel at the very least. It wasn't just about clearly it wasn't about neanderthals or denisovans because they don't exist that such anymore although there in in our jeans it's about us you know Finding each other finding ourselves finding where we meet the the thing that pains me the most is the the timing of this. Is you know and the whole this is. This is my story. Don't you dare look at my story and and this you know. Stay back that that interest me so little. What really interests me is where we meet. Where do we meet and queen street. Back in the seventies and the eighties. Which you know back to your your original questions Was a great place for that. This was a place where everyone met and figured out stuff. so hopefully. hopefully there's more of that there's more of a of discovery and And we know there are far more children than two hundred and fifteen. I mean the numbers already up from there and hopefully hopefully we find them all. Yeah.

Carl harvey canada joseph brant Elizabeth simcoe four months ten minutes seventies Simcoe eighties keele street pavo queen street toronto carl keele street bus fifteen year old to be loved one hundred anquan two hundred and fifteen
"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

08:17 min | 4 months ago

"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Point during the playoffs. Dad was called from his buds to go to the hospital. Because mum was giving birth also. I was only a couple months old one novel the last time and it was interesting because my kids are born in the early nineties so my daughter was we buy one my ex wife and i were pregnant with with our daughter and i thought okay this is. It's next generation. Well that didn't happen and so then the following year it's like okay now by year in a bit we're pregnant with my son and so i'm thinking okay. Go may allston male tilson. I got goosebumps. This is the way it's supposed to be an happen to maven's so i jumped. You know i was on the bandwagon. Then we lived through the ballot years on the bandwagon then jumped off jump back on. What about eight years ago. Whatever it was jump back off and my son for the last couple years. And he's in his mid twenties now or mid twenty s for the last couple of years. He's been saying to me. Dad i swear to you. I promise you this like this is the team. And i'm like brian. I'm just a bitter old lee fan. I don't wanna hear it. Finally this year. I buy sports now. We're up at the cottage and the mana toolan right now hiding out during everything. I grabbed sports. Net heading into the end of the season. Like okay fine. I'm in an so i really. I think that's me and it gets me. I knew well. My wife hates that. I'm usually reich because i knew after game five. There's no coming back after that. And my mom. My mom and i talk after the game every every game. And she's so half a glass half full all the time. She's such an optimist and she says i'll but we played we'll dino would played the wheel and unlike. Yeah not really mum and honestly you know we let them off the map and there's two chances no problem. I'm like you've been watching the same team. I have for a long time avenue you know. Yeah it's rough. it's there's worse things in the world million worse things in the world. And i you know i remind myself of that. There's it's it's hard it's ardine fan that's for so so you wrote that book you wrote turn to bring it back into music here. So he wrote that book. You wrote the lord stanley cup book about that. But lord stanley history with kevin shea. I've always yet. You have a phd a doctorate in history from wealth which is actually funny. Because today my wife. And i were walking. We do our nightly walk and we realize my cousin who's coming up this week. Her son is goes to golf. Just started back. Wealth and his name's griffin and it dawned on us for the first time oh my god griffin's griffin anyway added that aside that aside we've had j. douglas as a guest on this show a number of other people to speak what i'd love to hear from you As the historian is the impact of toronto on rag in the seventies and reggae toronto in the seventies. Can you give you mind going back and talk a bit about that as a historic no not at all i mean it's it's huge and i think toronto's very very unique in the world really arguments could be made about london and birmingham in england. I suppose but you really had a group of people that came to toronto to settle which is not a terribly unusual unto itself. I suppose But the impact that their music had on not just you know nascent. Domestic reggae scene but on music period. There's no drake without rigging toronto in the seventies and eighties right. He would say that too. And i think it's astounding i i actually i quiz my students you know. Ask them. who their their their favorite Canadian bondra artist is or if they've heard of lucia batista and of course there's absolute is role. They have no idea what i'm talking. I said right. You know who. Bob marley is right. And every one of them knows who marley's and there there is a reggae juno category. There's no bondra category and yet there's way more south asians in canada than there are jamaicans. There's no italian you. Contemporary italian category the juniors and yet there's the category that's astounding for an island. That's so small in the caribbean that that shows you how important and impactful that that music is but to get your other point. Toronto definitely affects the way. I don't think reggae is or should be in that's made in canada should be quote unquote jamaican reggae. It isn't it's canadian reggae. It's a different thing. Just as as you forty and oswald and steel pulse england have their own sound distinctly british so yes. Toronto affected the way reggae was played recorded and of course the add mixtures of the different kinds of things that were happening particularly in the early eighties along queen street. There's you know it's a back and forth thing that's ping pong all still ping pong as we speak and It was nice for me. I i mean. I i really. I was born in seventy so i. I really don't hit the scene till the mid eighties. But i witnessed it. I was there and you know I've been very fortunate to play with all of the big names. And in in certainly in canadian regain a lot of jamaican and british ones too. So it's it's unique and it's it's a. It was a beautiful time. It was a beautiful time. It was truly. It was multiculturalism in the very best sense in that it wasn't prescribed. It wasn't some governmental brochure. That was saying you know we all have to hold hands and sing. Kumbaya are whatever. No this was i talk about. This in. the book is that it's a collision. it's collision i The best example. I have is from my own hood. when i was about four or five the jamaican migrants were coming into our neighborhood and the older kids they were at each other's throats like there was heavy street fights in fact i remember one amazing street by went up and down at ball fantastic. I wanted to go and watch them. My mom comeback here you re so. I always talk about these these two. I won't mention their names but they were both arrested in and you know it was. It was bad news. They're younger brothers up. Who were my age became best friends so i show that as an example of like there there. Let's not kid ourselves. Human experiences difficult you know. Collisions with cultures is difficult. It takes time to work through some of that stuff and but on the other side of that you have an authentic coming together of peoples in a in a deeper understanding of each other And i think that's. I think that's what's missing sometimes. Is that there's this fear of not wanting to explore each other Everyone staying in their lane. And i think that's really missing the point. I think that's yeah in a way. Racism in the name of anti racism. That makes any sense to you. I i think those explosions. Those collisions is. What brings people.

kevin shea j. douglas london Bob marley lord stanley today birmingham seventies lucia batista england canada mid eighties brian Toronto canadian both this week two chances early eighties five
"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

07:38 min | 4 months ago

"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"And so i'm thinking okay. Go may allston male tilson. I got goosebumps. This is the way it's supposed to be an happen to maven's so i jumped. You know i was on the bandwagon. Then we lived through the ballot years on the bandwagon then jumped off jump back on. What about eight years ago. Whatever it was jump back off and my son for the last couple years. And he's in his mid twenties now or mid twenty s for the last couple of years. He's been saying to me. Dad i swear to you. I promise you this like this is the team. And i'm like brian. I'm just a bitter old lee fan. I don't wanna hear it. Finally this year. I buy sports now. We're up at the cottage and the mana toolan right now hiding out during everything. I grabbed sports. Net heading into the end of the season. Like okay fine. I'm in an so i really. I think that's me and it gets me. I knew well. My wife hates that. I'm usually reich because i knew after game five. There's no coming back after that. And my mom. My mom and i talk after the game every every game. And she's so half a glass half full all the time. She's such an optimist and she says i'll but we played we'll dino would played the wheel and unlike. Yeah not really mum and honestly you know we let them off the map and there's two chances no problem. I'm like you've been watching the same team. I have for a long time avenue you know. Yeah it's rough. it's there's worse things in the world million worse things in the world. And i you know i remind myself of that. There's it's it's hard it's ardine fan that's for so so you wrote that book you wrote turn to bring it back into music here. So he wrote that book. You wrote the lord stanley cup book about that. But lord stanley history with kevin shea. I've always yet. You have a phd a doctorate in history from wealth which is actually funny. Because today my wife. And i were walking. We do our nightly walk and we realize my cousin who's coming up this week. Her son is goes to golf. Just started back. Wealth and his name's griffin and it dawned on us for the first time oh my god griffin's griffin anyway added that aside that aside we've had j. douglas as a guest on this show a number of other people to speak what i'd love to hear from you As the historian is the impact of toronto on rag in the seventies and reggae toronto in the seventies. Can you give you mind going back and talk a bit about that as a historic no not at all i mean it's it's huge and i think toronto's very very unique in the world really arguments could be made about london and birmingham in england. I suppose but you really had a group of people that came to toronto to settle which is not a terribly unusual unto itself. I suppose But the impact that their music had on not just you know nascent. Domestic reggae scene but on music period. There's no drake without rigging toronto in the seventies and eighties right. He would say that too. And i think it's astounding i i actually i quiz my students you know. Ask them. who their their their favorite Canadian bondra artist is or if they've heard of lucia batista and of course there's absolute is role. They have no idea what i'm talking. I said right. You know who. Bob marley is right. And every one of them knows who marley's and there there is a reggae juno category. There's no bondra category and yet there's way more south asians in canada than there are jamaicans. There's no italian you. Contemporary italian category the juniors and yet there's the category that's astounding for an island. That's so small in the caribbean that that shows you how important and impactful that that music is but to get your other point. Toronto definitely affects the way. I don't think reggae is or should be in that's made in canada should be quote unquote jamaican reggae. It isn't it's canadian reggae. It's a different thing. Just as as you forty and oswald and steel pulse england have their own sound distinctly british so yes. Toronto affected the way reggae was played recorded and of course the add mixtures of the different kinds of things that were happening particularly in the early eighties along queen street. There's you know it's a back and forth thing that's ping pong all still ping pong as we speak and It was nice for me. I i mean. I i really. I was born in seventy so i. I really don't hit the scene till the mid eighties. But i witnessed it. I was there and you know I've been very fortunate to play with all of the big names. And in in certainly in canadian regain a lot of jamaican and british ones too. So it's it's unique and it's it's a. It was a beautiful time. It was a beautiful time. It was truly. It was multiculturalism in the very best sense in that it wasn't prescribed. It wasn't some governmental brochure. That was saying you know we all have to hold hands and sing. Kumbaya are whatever. No this was i talk about. This in. the book is that it's a collision. it's collision i The best example. I have is from my own hood. when i was about four or five the jamaican migrants were coming into our neighborhood and the older kids they were at each other's throats like there was heavy street fights in fact i remember one amazing street by went up and down at ball fantastic. I wanted to go and watch them. My mom comeback here you re so. I always talk about these these two. I won't mention their names but they were both arrested in and you know it was. It was bad news. They're younger brothers up. Who were my age became best friends so i show that as an example of like there there. Let's not kid ourselves. Human experiences difficult you know. Collisions with cultures is difficult. It takes time to work through some of that stuff and but on the other side of that you have an authentic coming together of peoples in a in a deeper understanding of each other And i think that's. I think that's what's missing sometimes. Is that there's this fear of not wanting to explore each other Everyone staying in their lane. And i think that's really missing the point. I think that's yeah in a way. Racism in the name of anti racism. That makes any sense to you. I i think those explosions. Those collisions is. What brings people.

kevin shea london j. douglas Bob marley canada birmingham lord stanley mid eighties today england lucia batista two chances early eighties five four canadian griffin this year lord stanley cup Toronto
"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

02:24 min | 4 months ago

"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Mystery. Welcome to the music..

"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

02:04 min | 4 months ago

"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"The you know. I seem to know what it did for him and again on back on a short some point shooter he does talk about both in the article as well as in comments made on social That there was a massive vertical spike on his spotify music. Digest went through the roof flake. Yup again that but like for us we. We went to thirty six listeners. We'd have that would be a massive spike and it's gone i totally get where you're coming from and Maybe we'll maybe we'll get him back in. Ask him specifics whether he'll show specifics. It's up to him to deduce. I do know seven correctly from roy but he went from. You know just hoping to make some money act from you. The money you outlaid trump's together an album Our project to to to paying off and two and starting to make some great money at all as result of saying. Hey this is pop music. The south things work. It's it's no. You can't bash fans for buying supporting the artists that they love. This is how it works. Yup for sure and nets depre- show and that's the pre show to our guest jason wolfe high. The following. podcast is brought to you by radical road brewery. The best craft beer in the heart of leslie. Bill find him at eleven. Seventy seven queen street east. That's radical road brewery. Hello my name's jason wilson. I am a two time. Juno nominee a canadian reggae music award winner bestselling author and general international man of.

jason wilson thirty six listeners jason wolfe high both trump spotify Seventy seven queen street eas two leslie reggae Bill two time roy canadian seven radical road Juno eleven
"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

07:07 min | 4 months ago

"jason wilson" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Ranks cram welcome to the pre show. Welcome to the show. We are going to get to our guest. Dr jason wilson of before we get to mr wilson. Let's under wilson dr wilson to ask him whether he wants to go by doctor as a social handle. That's true all right. Dr greg what what do what does the eminem song stan. The k pop group b. t. s and four hundred guests and the j. All cheon heaven common. Well yesterday i would have said. I have no idea over you you after multiple times of me not understanding explained it to me so when you explain it to our listeners so the eminem songs fan yes is a song about a A fan a fanatic fan. You know someone who is orderly inchoo eminem totally into the subject of that of that song and So as a result of the popularity of that song the word and term stead has now become part of the monacco. Is the kids like to call it and supported colin vernacular if so greg. You're wearing a mercedes mclaren of yes so you could be all a hamilton stan. Yeah or lewis hamilton. Because this is a signature lewis hamilton. Has he has signed it now. He's sign that he designed it. He signed it. He designed it. Yes yes b. s. army as they're known as the kids like to call them or fans are stands the data that is not something akin uses but bts army being there yet to carry on. Yeah and so. What happened was our previous guest of the podcast all chin. Read an article and in this article me. Pull it up again. It is article. The author was ragging ragging on fans. Yeah conspiring to drive sales. Yeah again soon cool. Yeah and so all pick offense articles saying wait. A second aren't the charts made up of the results of what fans of these musicians right. Yes they dream download and by all their music or the music of whoever. It is the that they like. And that's what that pop music isn't. It is popular music. It's not it's not. Dj's anymore at radio stations deciding who gets played or not get faded. It's it's fans who are for the most part for the most part. There is still the influence of the program rattle station that can make an impact fluid art. It's kids discovering music digital distribution. Yeah and sherry it whether it's on tiktok for snapchat or what. Their parents use facebook and instagram. And so result of paul. Tallying this author off with this article coming to the defense of the us army. The beaches army precedes the support. Paul chin by listening to his music by purchasing his music purchasing his swag stuff off of his band camp as websites. Though it has now turned into Is is just amazing in such a happy story. Come across a do it yourself. Dj in musician like paul chin. Who has kept busy during the pandemic is now in the good graces of one of the most influential groups of music fans out there. It beat us army and I just a a need to sort of give props to my brother. Unease who Made me aware of the story. I don't know if it was last week the week before we. He shared a tweet from From politicians gay check this out the beachie fans are purchasing his music and supporting him. And i thought it was interesting. I did it fully understand. Why or how. Until i saw another I think an instagram os or tweet from paul chin explaining what happened and i thought this is. This is phenomenal. it's really really interesting and such a good story to find out about and to tell everybody. Vote when has no as how much moved the needle for. I'd love that love to have a conversation with him about that at some point. It's like you know making they can drive millions and millions. Millions of listens over..

paul chin yesterday last week millions Paul chin jason wilson wilson instagram paul facebook Millions greg four hundred guests one lewis hamilton snapchat hamilton stan b. s. mercedes mclaren eminem
Heffa Farms on Hemp Farming as a Black Woman in the South

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

06:57 min | 1 year ago

Heffa Farms on Hemp Farming as a Black Woman in the South

"Everybody. Jason Wilson with curious about Canada's podcast. Thanks so much for tuning in once again asset today I am delighted to be joined with pharmacy or see Stanley out of North Carolina, she's a farmer entrepreneur, many things many many things, and we've got lots and lots of talk about today. Thanks so much for everyone to come on the podcast. Absolutely I mean it makes it so that now I feel like I'm cyber stalking. You have a genuine connection now, so yeah, likewise likewise ever since ever since I discovered your your brand and your mission, which will get into all of this all the specifics and your product. There's so many things about what you're doing that. Resonate with me one. You're trying to build a not just a farm, but a learning laboratory learning center to learn about medicinal plants in agriculture, and all these things, so that's six box for me. very very interested in that as a science educator and That's where thing then to your product. You have a tea. That is a combination of two of my favorite plants, which is cannabis and Tulsi Basil. Way We check all those boxes Andrew in the south, which for me having come from the south to finding sort of a kindred spirit like this that your mission, what you're trying to do, the product that you've put out there and the way you carry yourself and present your message to the world I'm all in, so I'm so. Thank. You GotTa get you some tea. You've got try it. Yeah, I'd love to. Rent this ball? I'd love to. I've made my own sort of combinations like that before just playing around in the kitchen. But it's. It's awesome to know that there's actually a a product on the shelves that people can go to tonight I. Talk About Tulsi Basil it's come up in at least a third of my interviews I ended up talking about it just because of how. Powerful of a medicinal plant, it can be and just how good it tastes. Different varieties tastes so good establishes it really is. So, before we get too far into all that, let's backtrack a little bit. And just share with folks there listening Very spoiled a little bit, but what you're doing what your mission is and how you've to where you are now as well as where you're headed. Oh! My Gosh, well! If I tell you how I've gotten here, yeah, this will be a series not. A one time podcast, but guy here Jason the same way I think. I have a rabbit. All my destinations in life. I take a creative paths. If someone says, go right there straight ahead. I am going to go right than left than I may. Even do a circle right eventually. Get to where I'm going, but by the time I arrive. I pick up so many lessons along the way so. With the farm I actually come from a farming background only counting the voluntary farming generations but I would be considered fifth generation so on my maternal side they very much have followed and. In Life, even with my mother and her brothers all college educated, which was a tremendous accomplishment for my grandparents. My Grandmother Charity who I attribute a lot of my upbringing With her, she actually attended college, but they all moved back or found themselves back growing and. I didn't want to do it. I didn't want to have anything at all to deal with farming I wasn't getting paid. There were all these creepy crawly things. It's hot. It's hot I'm Alabama you know growing up. Really Hot yes, so I tell it out there I graduated early at seventeen was a smart kid, but i. also you know was a product of divorce eventually ended up living with my maternal grandparents. wasn't one of those kids that you know when. The adults in my life saw I was having hard time. It was a hey. Maybe we need to give some therapy or counseling. US emotional support in. Old School we're GonNa. Try To whip you into. What we need for you to be, and that did not quite work with me. I will use one of the kinder. Additives that I was called young at a young age, and that was. I was headstrong, but I was smart so. I usually could get out of most weapons, but not all of them so I left I took off and went to college and never. Never really thought about becoming a farmer per se I've always been attracted to growing I've always had a amateur interest in medicinal plants had some recollection of knowledge that my grandmother shared with me, and my mom shared with me. Of course I wasn't really that wasn't my saying so I wasn't necessarily trying to retain all of that knowledge, but some had definitely stuck with me, and so I had a little bit of a green thumb, but you know if I had to pick up and move. I was a military spouse for a while. If I had to leave the plants, I was heartbroken over now today. Totally totally totally different, but so I laughed. Start Living Live You know working on becoming an doll making those wonderful mistakes that if you can live through, you've got a great story to tell hopefully some wisdom to to go along with it and had wet. You know full while I was trying to find myself professionally. Special time being teacher of been the mental health munition actually and eventually graduated got a degree in marketing Oh, and by the way Jason I left out couple of details, I was also time teenage mom, so I'm figuring all of this out in Afghanistan. Little ones that you know while you have to provide some some stability for because apparently, if you don't they go haywire so working on figuring all of that out and ended up going into marketing. And eventually ended up becoming a fundraiser

Jason Wilson Tulsi Basil Stalking Jason I North Carolina Canada Stanley Jason Cannabis Andrew United States Old School Afghanistan Alabama
Andrew DeAngelo on Cannabis Activism

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

07:08 min | 1 year ago

Andrew DeAngelo on Cannabis Activism

"Everybody. This is Jason Wilson with curious about Canvas podcast. Thanks much for tuning in once again So I am beyond delighted today to be able to sit down and talk with Andrew Dangelo at you. Know there's so many ways I could introduce you. Activists you know co founder of Harbourside. You're involved with the last prisoner project now. Which I know you've been bringing lot of tension to but welcome Andrew Dangelo. Thanks so much for being willing to come on the podcast today. Thank you Jason. It's great to be with your community today. Yeah totally. I'm really stoked to see where our conversation goes. I've been following a lot of your press over the past several months. Some of the interviews you've been doing and keeping up with some your work and there's a there are a lot of milestones to go through but then I know there's a lot you've been talking about lately that I don't WanNa make you regurgitate the same stuff that you've been staying over again someone to try to go in some unique directions here but there's all sorts of stuff for us to Go into right now. One of the kind of segue into a lot of things one of the first things I wanted to ask you about. Is you recently took a trip to Barcelona didn't you? I did I was there for. Icbc Barcelona and span of this. Yes yeah and you. You didn't make it out to the hashish and hemp museum. That's out there I did. I had a great time at the museum. That's Ben drunker zones and operates that museum. He also has one in Holland. Amsterdam and Ben's been old friend of the family for decades and so it was great vehicle able to see his newest outposts there in Barcelona. It's a beautiful building. He's done all this wonderful stained glass work and yeah and if you if you haven't been Barcelona the architecture Barcelona's just every single building every single doorway window archway. is just extraordinarily well-crafted. Beautiful beautiful work and the the hemp and Marijuana Museum. There is no exception and they've ban in his team just done a stellar job with that museum. I encourage everyone to make a pilgrimage to check it out. Yeah I saw some of the photos posted on social media and I was fascinated. How beautiful some of you know the way. Everything was presented the design architecture and everything and I wasn't even really familiar with that museum. Can you describe a little bit about what that museum is like? And kind of how things are presented. And what your experience. There was sure. The museum has multiple levels. So it's two or three stories. There's elevators and stairs that you navigate through it and it's part a history lesson of the plant and and specifically Ham You know the two. The two tracks museum really talks. Most about is is as cannabis as medicine and as an intoxicant and ham has a industrial raw material so so that those are the two focuses. I would say of the museum. And Ben's just got an incredible collection of ancient hemp materials and modern hemp wears also that are represented by some of the leading can't cannabis hemp companies of today. Of course UH sense. He seeds is right next door. Okay Marijuana Museum both in Barcelona Amsterdam and and you can purchase CBD products there and genetics and a whole bunch of really cool will art and culture and Swag from both the museum and since he seats and I was just thrilled to be in Barcelona and an experience that you know we we in the United States. We don't we have cannabis with sort of the first cannabis museum or installation in Las Vegas. There we'd maps just did a big installation in Los Angeles. That was a museum. But we don't have permanent cannabis ham. You know that I'm aware of that's that's as large in a serious As bans I'm sure we have lots of small Wonsan and probably millions of small ones in people's homes. I certainly is yeah I got. I got some in mind mile in my altar of course but you know so when it. It's not easy to have a museum. You know museums don't make money. They lose money and they are about building culture and about keeping something alive for future generations to learn about an and that's hard work to do in our movement in our industry is still in the embryonic stages and I look forward to the day and I hope Stephen I get to be a part of it Where there are something like that. The Hemp Museum here in the United States a- every city should have won. Every every community has cannabis story that goes back hundreds of years and and we can all tell our own version of what's happened over the last hundred years so it's part of the cultural work that I think we're moving into sort of a cultural renaissance canvas. We've had you know we had to legalize and that was just brutal. One hundred year war you know and now we have all these little battles to get legalisation right which we have not done and and of course you know. We have a lot of work to do to get legalisation rights. So that's going to be ten thousand battles that we're GONNA have to fight for that. The cultural work is really something that I think our community is going to have a lot more fun within the political work and I I really. Creativity and culture is been one of the strengths of the cannabis movement community for forever. Going back to the jazz age you know going back to the brothels of New Orleans going back to Jamaica going back to India Longtime in this plant has inspired the creativity of men and women all over the world and so we get to come out of the shadows culturally now and into the light and Where are colors loud and proud and and talk about the plant in ways like a museum? There's millions of ways to express cannabis culture but a museum certainly one of them and you know the there's a big wide open cultural world out there that I hope your listeners will will embrace. There's also I know you know. Science on this podcast. There's a big sign this world of cannabis scientists just like just like culture. It's in the embryonic stages in Gosh. I can't I can't I can't think of something more exciting right now. Then to be working with canvas science or cannabis culture.

Cannabis Hemp Museum Hemp And Marijuana Museum Barcelona Marijuana Museum Jason Wilson Ben Drunker Icbc Barcelona Andrew Dangelo United States Co Founder Barcelona Amsterdam Harbourside Holland Wonsan New Orleans Los Angeles Hashish Amsterdam
Linda Klumpers PhD on Cannify, Cannabinoid Pharmacology, Cannabis for Pain

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

08:11 min | 1 year ago

Linda Klumpers PhD on Cannify, Cannabinoid Pharmacology, Cannabis for Pain

"My name is Linda Columbus and I am a clinical pharmacologist. I have a PhD in clinical pharmacology of Cabinets. And I've been studying cannabinoid since two thousand six. You're listening to the curious about Canada's podcasts. Everybody's Jason Wilson with. The curious about cannabis podcast. Thanks so much for tuning in once again so today. I'm really really excited to talk to Dr. Linda. Trumpers clinical pharmacologist. That's been studying can have an AIDS cannabis for quite a while and then we also have a shared interest in education as well So this'll be I think a great conversation. Thanks so much Linda for being willing to take the time to come on the podcast today. Thank you for having me. Jason is really great to talk to you too. Yeah thank you. Yeah so For those that may not be So familiar with your work. I mean one thing. I'll point out is that you are the brain behind. Kfi which which is an online Quiz and also kind of data gathering tool to help point people into The direction of research around certain things related to cannabis in can avenue to try to help steer people away from all the hype and sort of hearsay Which I I like a lot but Beyond that do you mind just describing a little bit about your background and kind of what got you into studying pharmacology. And then specifically what got you into cannabis. Oh sure so. I've always been very interested in so many things. And one of those things is the brain and that's why studied neuroscience and sometimes you make decisions in life based on the things you like And sometimes she choose things based on the things. She don't like and one of the things I did not like about studying neuroscience and it's really a personal thing. I'm not trying to judge but I had a very very hard time. Working with animals The mice rats were were so cute and I said yeah a big problem with working with them. Playing with them whistle fine with mice. 'cause they bite you but rats crawl into your sleeve and stuff so so. I found it so hard to to work with them that I thought I I want to do something else. That is still euroscience related and that is actually how I got into because if you study drugs in you months actually gift consent right. Yeah exactly yes. He don't meet to decapitate them after they're done. So that was a more friendly way of Still being able to study what happens in those brain of braids hours While yeah Leaving the animals alone so that it's always a combination of things and this is just one of the of the. Yeah the topic says really important to me not working with animals and science pharmacology biology medicine. It's also interesting and with pharmacology. Newman says will come together. And Yeah exactly. Yeah and now regarding cannabis in particular. I must honestly say. There are a lot of people in in cannabis that really do this. Because of their passion for the plan their passion for cannabis. And I'm very interested in plums. I'm very interested in a pharmacology of cannabis but there. There is a lot of interesting blondes out there. A lot of interesting compounds in cannabis is one of them. There are a lot of interesting geological systems in the body. The Endo cannabinoid system is one of them. And how I how? I got to work with Cannabis actually was because In amid nolte's pharmaceutical companies were racing against each other to get the first avenue bounds on the market which was actually notes a agonised like Dat for example because that has been in the markets incident one thousand nine hundred eighty s but wasn't antagonised so a impounded binds the same places state seed us for example T T. Sta compounded cannabis. It makes you feel high but then it does the opposite effect and the whole idea behind those compound classes whilst to a fight obesity to treat addiction. And those were to go bounce it. I start working with and if you onto dusty school bugs in healthy volunteer. She will not measure anything. You will only measure something if you I activate the system and then try to block system. It's just WANNA give one single-dose and see what happens. So we activate the system giving THC and is one of the ways. I got involved in cannabis research giving t t innovations later trying to study what? Thc does on your brain how you measure that with Marai. Studying various administration methods with with cannabis so in relation five eight sub lingual oral. That is how I got into cannabis research. Yeah that's so exciting. Pharmacology is such an exciting field. Because it's like this giant puzzle to work out all of these interconnected systems that are working together to produce effects on the body. It's something that has always interested me and on different levels and have you always had a passion for that kind of thing of trying to understand what's going on in the body and I know you said you started out with neurosciences. Trying to understand what's going on with the brain but is that kind of where that comes from like even as a little kid where you kind of interested in trying to understand and. Yeah Oh yes oh definitely I love this question because yeah it is just amazing to me. I see the brain as part of the body. So if something happens in the body changes you can also find it in the brain. A very ex- yeah Good examples for example menstruate menstrual cycle in the in the period before menstruation. People feel different. Why is that now? There's this whole discussion about the the Gut. Brain Axis said the microbial. Yeah exactly so that your intestines have influence on your brain as well. So that's all interconnected behaviors ferry ferry important and interesting to me at high school. I was always fascinated by peer pressure. People also give me if I wanted to do something because everyone did it and I did and do it and they were just surprised but everyone does it now but I don't want to. Why why would I have to do that? Why I also smoke arrived. I also use Moscow our GUT my hair and and and the children for Mike loss would not always listen to me but if someone from a higher lawsuits and I was fascinated by why. Why do you care? What do people are already so influenced by peer pressure by group pressure and I think that a lot of that now has to do with the brains as well and drug skin influence your behavior. A lot of people use L. Goal to socialize because it takes away there a threshold. I do not drink alcohol personally and I've never really had a fear of talking to strangers but I recognize it is very very important in society and therefore brains behavior drugs bodies. It's always fascinated me.

Cannabis Jason Wilson Linda Columbus Canada Dr. Linda Obesity KFI Aids Newman Moscow Marai Mike Loss High School T T. Sta Nolte
Murphy Murri on Cannabis Extraction, Hydrocarbon Safety, Aquatek, Standardized Extracts

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

09:20 min | 1 year ago

Murphy Murri on Cannabis Extraction, Hydrocarbon Safety, Aquatek, Standardized Extracts

"Hey everybody this is Jason Wilson with the curious about cannabis podcast. Thanks so much for tuning in once again so today. I'm joined with Murphy. Murray a fellow cannabis educator and also a cannabis extraction consultant. And today. We're going to be talking about Oh let's see what we get into primarily cannabis extraction. Thanks much murphy for being willing to come on the podcast. Yeah absolutely thank you for having me. Yeah Really Soak. Our paths hadn't crossed Before now So this is kind of been long awaited for me as far as I followed some of your work and senior classes like from a distance. So it's cool to finally connect and and Talk about common interests for those. That aren't familiar with some of your work and your background is kind of diverse Do you mind kind of sharing just a little bit about some of that background. What led you into getting into specifically like the cannabis chemistry and extraction. And all the work that you're kind of focusing on now yes sure. I started in the canvas industry When it was fledgling in Colorado so we had the caregiver structure in two thousand nine and we started seeing retail dispensaries. Open up but there wasn't licensing for it and It still kind of mimicked. What California has going on in at the time in a lot of ways and so You know I got involved on the retail end. I lived in the Vail Valley and we wanted to sell high end cannabis products do those high end medical patients and in two thousand ten licensing started and in Colorado that meant vertical integration so being from a marketing background and working on the retail side of things. I had no preparation for an extraction lab and certainly no preparation for large-scale consult a cultivation and so It was all just something that was kind of thrown us and we had to get involved. I did my best delegate where I could but the lab was one of the hardest ones to To delegate out because they're you know a lot of people had grown for decades but there wasn't much for extraction historically You know like a lot of people were doing bubble ash but that is not even in the same department especially at the time. We were We were just starting to see things like amber glass which was shattered made for methanol. We're starting to see the butane honey oil and we were still really just calling it honey oil at the time and not even really referencing how it was being made because everything was still a big secret for a really long time which is part of the reason why education so important to me because the first three to four years of. I can't miss career especially in the extraction world. There was no where to get good information. There was a couple of hard to navigate forums with a lot of code words and screen and it was really difficult to use that information in a practical way and not having that. Chemistry background was certainly a disadvantage. But at that time we were doing chemistry. We were barely extracting material. We were cannabinoid behind. We are not purifying anything and we have no analytical testing to support it so you know the concentrates that we made we had no potency data on. We had pesticide data. We had no heavy metal testing. We you know I couldn't tell you. How many milligrams of THC or anything else? It was all anecdotal. It was all descriptive and you know I look back that and just get anxious about all of the products that I made and sold that I wouldn't do today because we just didn't have the tools so fast forward a few more years and the Internet makes things a lot easier. You know. Ten years is a long time in terms of Internet development and so more information became accessible which is good and bad. A lot of bad information became accessible. But what is more relevant is that we have the social media aspect of it and so now I could actually network with real humans. Ange as more states became legalized. People were less afraid to actually share what they were doing and Like real consultant jobs started becoming a thing and so we started to talk a lot more and develop methods. And that's where I kind of got into the extraction space You know in a very much more serious way. Because we started to actually have real standards to pursue and I started to meet the type of people who were doing things that I wanted to emulate and from there I got involved on the equipment and things in two thousand fourteen. I started working for extraction tech solutions. Which was one of the only hydrocarbon equipment manufacturers at the time and I started doing private consulting from there. I just became fully immersed in in the world of extractions so from You know just straight up cannabis extraction to also the burgeoning hemp industry. And we've just kind of gone all the way from black oil to white powder right. Yeah the last few years yeah. That's it'd be fascinating to kind of see that laid out on an image timeline. Memories can be scary sometimes. What is it that Particularly about extraction? Now that's really driving your passion to kind of continue that focus in that arm of things I think one of my favorite things about extraction has always been that You know it's it's very objective you know. Once we started bringing out a little testing into it and started actually doing chemistry labs. It was really rewarding because I could perform a process could get results than I could repeat those results Compare that to like cultivation. Where the you know every step you take today. You say the results of that weeks months ahead of Point so there's no instant gratification and cultivation whereas extraction is instant gratification every thirty minutes I get to see the results of what I've achieved and so It feels very productive and it also gives me a lot of room for error which is very exciting for me because I love the experimentation of it with cultivation even just having a table that you try out new nutrients on can affect literally the rest of the garden whereas with extraction. I can have a new idea. I can try new piece of equipment. I can tweak a process I can make these changes. You know minute to minute. Day to day and get to evaluate the efficiency and so the potential for growth is phenomenal Because it's exponential every day. Try something new and you know. Every new test result gives me ten more questions to go chase down the rabbit hole so it is constant change in very fast moving which I find personally rewarding. I'm the type of person that rearranges my furniture. Often extraction is nothing but change. Yeah Yeah I could see that. That'd be really exciting. To be caught up in that accelerated process of refinement. Refinement technologies and process and everything. You really get to see it unfold. In a way that that's unique when you were learning about extraction. What were some of the resources that you found most valuable to kind of understand what you needed to do to take things to that that next level I know skunk farm is obviously one resource that we all probably know pretty well. That's a huge one Or some others that you those online forums were enormous but through those online forums. I actually got to meet really competent people. I think both ten years ago and even today the mentorship for finding someone smarter and better than you is the most valuable lake. I look back on my career to some specific individuals who brought me in and were willing to share. What at the time was like trade secrets? You know The things that we didn't discuss Out Loud in part because it was a legal but also in part to keep our brands. Unique and those people were enormous for me I had a couple of chemists who were involved early on that were really helpful in explaining some of like the basic safety issues that I would never have even thought to ask questions about probably without their help Not to mention just some. You Know Industry Pioneers people like Nick Tana of essential extracts. Who you know was willing to teach me how to make bubble Harrison is kitchen and get involved in this industry when it was still barely an industry. We were barely for profit at the

Cannabis Colorado Consultant Murphy Jason Wilson Nick Tana Murray Vail Valley California Ange Harrison
Ellen Parkin MS on Cannabis Testing, Trouble with Edibles, Working with Labs

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

08:00 min | 1 year ago

Ellen Parkin MS on Cannabis Testing, Trouble with Edibles, Working with Labs

"Everybody. This is Jason Wilson with the curious about canvas podcast. Thanks so much for tuning in once again Today I'm sitting down with a friend of mine and fellow Quality Nerd and Analytical Scientist Ellen. Parkyn Ellen thanks so much for being willing to sit down with me today yeah. I'm very excited about this. This is great. Yeah totally So for some of you. That might not know Ellen. Ellen's been working for the past. I don't know how many years now working in the canvas testing space like five years or four years or so four now yeah and We have somewhat similar experiences in the cannabis testing fields. In that. We've done a little bit of everything as far as we've been the the analytical technicians the analyst quality director we've done every every piece of it So we have a lot in common in that regard worn many Uma exactly Ellen de mind just to get US started here. Kinda describe a little bit about your background and Kind of how? You came to work in the canvas testing space specifically and then where some of your work is Kinda focused as of lately. Yeah of course I actually I started out In the beer industry I have my master's degree in doing science and I was seeing a lot of work on hot chemistry and Started working in the beer industry And just some life changes Hadn't he turned towards cannabis? I found myself working As a lab technician and a little startup laboratory here in Oregon and Ever since it's been a great Change in my career There's so much more opportunity for Research and Career Development and growth and the industry is just so fascinating until news that I think it's been really great Just as a part of my career I've we're kind of looking for what I wanted to do And as I worked my way up from being allowed tech And then doing more call you work and then into a bigger space of Laboratory director and Quality Assurance Officer. I kind of found my niche. I'm really enjoy doing. Also quality specialist where and Kind of helping people understand the regulations and helping people understand what is and what kind of computer people And so that's kind of been a really big part for me as well as trying to with the part of the community as well. The industry that I came from before that your industry had a lot of connections and a lot of Immunity ORIENTED EVENTS AND WITH CANVAS. That wasn't as prevalent and so with the nonprofit profit that I work with Cafe Canvas Association We do a lot of work to bring everybody together Both for like social events like we recently had Nfl where Several local breweries donated. Fear we got together there were trucks. It was super finds And then like next month. We're going to be having like an educational so I think that I think really been Been great for for the face. Yeah answer you doing Some Educational Work. Through that nonprofit. Yeah Yeah so We try to do at least one educational event year Just trying to get people are more interested in the aspect right now but I think as people who are not growers producers get involved in the kind of things They're gonNA want to know more about like. What is this plant? What do what are what is going to have to test for fifty nine pesticides? What are these things So in our attempts to you educational things We try to have like one event a year and Hugh It's Kinda like Ted talks to get different people me and we kinda talk about similar subjects And try to get people involved in that and Get people talking about it. Yeah that's cool trying to spark good conversations and drive The sort of consciousness industry a little further sounds great walkway. Yeah And in some and I know we're sort of taking attention from the camps testing stuff but I'm as an educator also really interested in this too In some of the educational work that you're doing now you said right now it's primarily a lot of industry folks that are involved so do they have was sort of questions are they kind of wanting answers to That you're kind of getting confronted with a lot of data about the regulatory face at Mike. What's allowed yeah? That's always like why do we have this regulation? Could we change it? And so yeah we're political aspects to it right now and I think With with him coming into play as much as it has in the past year I think a lot of people are going to be a lot more interested in Understanding US MINOR CANAVERAL. What we're seeing some and holiday interact with the body and how they can help people As well as You know a lot of people are still just really interested in like. How do I get into the industry and so I hear yeah? Yeah so We're taking with this. Next educational event were taking a deep dive and Talking about genetic. Wow Oh it should be really great. We're going to have a panel. We're GONNA have a couple of cool And actually one of the people that I'm most excited about. He's actually a lawyer here in town and she's GonNa talk about Intellectual Property and genetics. And how those interact but very cool. Yeah that's that's something that's been on my mind a lot lately especially with all the controversy around. Filo in all the different stuff that's been going on as a lot of people hit me with questions about that. That's just a realm of things. I just don't know much about as far as what you can patent which you can't what. The implications are for sharing genetics. All this sort of stuff and it's beyond me. Yeah this is GonNa be interesting to see how all of this plays out. Because I think people are going to try to patent for Internet exchange and then it's like how you as number one of state governing body kind of fat intake and then number like as the person who has that patent or a person who want those medic. How do you interact in that space without being like US remind? You can't have them And I think he's GonNa get a little wild. I think I don't know how to say but it's GONNA be Very different and especially with like how everything else with cannabis industry is Kinda come about. It's like it's a lot of trial and error of like right right. And if they don't then let's go back and figure out what's the next step so there's GonNa be a lot of that I just hope that you know people. Don't get hurt people on you know it's Kinda thing.

Parkyn Ellen Research And Career Developmen Cannabis Laboratory Director And Qualit United States Hugh It Jason Wilson Cafe Canvas Association Scientist Lab Technician Filo Oregon Mike Analyst NFL UMA Director TED
Steve Albarran CEO of Confident Cannabis on Transparency, Lessons from Big Data, Chemotypes, Market Trends

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

06:08 min | 1 year ago

Steve Albarran CEO of Confident Cannabis on Transparency, Lessons from Big Data, Chemotypes, Market Trends

"Everybody this. This is Jason Wilson with the curious about cannabis podcast. Thanks so much for tuning in once again. Today I'm joined with my friend and CEO of confident cannabis. Steve Auberon Ron. Thanks Steve for being willing to chat with me today. Thank you good to be on. Yeah totally so I know by now. There's probably a lot a lot of people in the canvas industry. That are familiar with confident cannabis. But there's still plenty of people out there that are maybe just now starting to hear about the platform and some of the worked. You're trying to do so. Do you mind just briefly. Going into what confident canvases and why he started. And we'll spinoff from there. Sure so we started the company somebody about four years ago to try to help solve what we think. Is the biggest problem in the cannabis industry. which is that businesses? Have a hard time doing business with one another so. Cultivators and retailers have a hard time finding each other assessing each other quality of inventory and actually fulfilling transactions so that the problem is what we set out Saul we started by building a lab testing platform that we gave to labs for free or very cheap to acquire the supply side site of the market And once the inventory information is available we make that available to the buyers on the platform who are licensed retailers distributors or manufacturers. Good analogy might be auto trader plus Carfax for cannabis cool. Okay yeah that's A. That's a really good analogy and and basically what your platform is doing is essentially Bringing a lot more transparency to the industry itself as as well yeah yes the mission or vision that we that we set out to achieve the real reason why it's hard for businesses to trade trade with one another because there's a lack of transparency. There's a lack of information about the inventory quality. What's out there who's making it what it's made up And so bringing green conspiracy to cannabis's sort of our tagline because Without knowing what's being made who makes it and what it's made of nationwide in real time and businesses can transact in operate in transparency. Yeah and what got you interested in trying to provide the service to the industry. Yeah Yeah so When when my co founder Tony and I were thinking about starting a company of the cannabis industry together together? We basically just asked operators what problems they had so rather than rather than come up with an idea and go see if it works We had the opposite. We said we'RE NOT GONNA come up with an idea yet. We're just GONNA ask a lot of questions and find a problem and then we'll solve that problem in if we're successful doing on a business will come out of it and so we basically spent nine months Getting on planes going into retailers cultivation facilities saying what's hard for you. When was the last time that there there was a problem that you wish you could saw? You don't know how And we kind of collect it all that feedback and you know the common things came up. You know payments and banking A- access things like that that we didn't think that we are best suited to solve the other bill. The other problem that came up over and over was that it's really hard to stop my shelves with consistent insistent high-quality supply or it's really hard for me to stand out from the crowd when selling my inventory or as a as a patient. I'm looking for a very specific chemo. Typer you know chemical composition to to address my insomnia anxiety. My pain whatever they might be and I don't know how to find it. I found something that I like once but I can't find it again how I do. I do that so All that together. Let us the realization. While you know cannabis is highly complex. It's highly opaque And it's highly variable all right. It's not a commodity where flowers the same as the other flower. It's very much not a commodity. And so to bring that information to the forefront front. We needed to partner with with testing labs and we saw that you know. There are a handful of labs in the in the country's Info at the time there were about fifty David out two hundred good labs and which is a relatively small market and they're completely underserved. Nobody's building software for them so opportunity to help them out and tapis of software for free and they start using it and then that's what allows us to You know reveal that information to the market Nice. Yeah Yeah Yeah what. What year was it that that all started because I remember when I was in the candidates testing space? We're one of the first labs to try to really the early iterations of of canvas. What year was that? Those two thousand fifteen. Yeah so we we. We formed a company inmate that the team. And then we. We launched our first customer in Oregon in October. And I think I think you are probably customer number five something like wow yeah. Yeah we've come a long way since then. Yeah I know I noticed the very recently You you launched a marketplace feature For confident cannabis. So when I was using confident cannabis it really was just Primarily lab service stuff stuff and trying to figure out how to get consistent data. I think you know into that database and figuring out what to do with it and and now it looks like you're actually connecting buyers and sellers together partnered with that data. So it's been really cool to watch that evolution four years we haven't we haven't committed or or you know it's not sort of a new idea. We kind to be as open about our plans as possible from the very beginning But you know tickets a good solid three years to get to step two of the vision. which is the marketplace side of things And it's because we were talking about. Hey we're in this lab thing because we're going to marketplace one day and three years people didn't believe us but it feels good to finally do what we said we're GONNA do.

Cannabis Steve Auberon Ron Jason Wilson CEO Saul Chemo Insomnia Co Founder Oregon Partner David Tony
"jason wilson" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"jason wilson" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"Welcome back. Everyone of the school of greatness podcast. We have a very inspiring human today. Jason Wilson in the house. Mrs really exciting. Glad you're here. And this is I think I learned about maybe two years ago on social media, probably from one of the videos that went viral or something started falling you your work of shared a bunch of your videos over the past couple days ago. Actually, the did really well, and I think what you're doing is so needed in the world, and you're just a massive inspiration. So I for that. And I appreciate you. Because so many men are suffering and are hurting and are hurting others because of it, and we're in a time right now, we're saying that men are suffering is probably like the thing that women don't want to hear. That's true. They don't want to hear that they want to hear women have been suffering for much longer. And so I think there's a fine line of having a conversation about this. But in Utah. About the other day the statistics are that men are committing more suicide than women men feel like they're prisoners emotionally more than women and many other things. And because of those reasons I think men in general suffer worse, and they cause harm on other people and themselves because of statistics show that is getting more than women, and I like to say that we're both hurting. And so you're right. If we focus on one gender, not the other, you know, medically one side will become defensive, but the reality is that we're both hurting especially in my community African American community. It's we were trauma like a badge of honor because of all that we've gone through. And we'll be go through now. So because of that if you stay at a traumatize mind, you really can't enjoy the blessing of the president. And so your threshold is always here soon as the slightest thing at you snap or you have a traumatic experience will break up. Like, we were just talking about is compounded because you. Haven't released will have been ten to twenty years ago..

Jason Wilson African American community president Utah twenty years two years