17 Burst results for "Jason Reynolds"

"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

01:54 min | 4 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Jobs and we are in service to them. Then they will grow to be in service of the world reynolds iraq. Thank you so much. That's author jason reynolds. He is the national ambassador for young people's literature and he was just chosen to continue.

jason reynolds iraq
"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

01:54 min | 4 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Jobs and we are in service to them. Then they will grow to be in service of the world reynolds iraq. Thank you so much. That's author jason reynolds. He is the national ambassador for young people's literature and he was just chosen to continue.

jason reynolds iraq
"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

01:54 min | 4 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Jobs and we are in service to them. Then they will grow to be in service of the world reynolds iraq. Thank you so much. That's author jason reynolds. He is the national ambassador for young people's literature and he was just chosen to continue.

jason reynolds iraq
"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

09:40 min | 4 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"And mutual funds with a track record of earning consistent income and long-term appreciation successful investors powered their portfolios with private real estate for decades fundraise provides all investors access to diversified portfolios of private real estate with their industry leading easy to use platform go to fundraise dot com slash radio hour to see how one hundred fifty thousand investors have built a better portfolio with private real estate. This message is brought to you by. Npr sponsor talks base. Feeling overwhelmed. Lately you are not alone. We all need a little help. Sometimes and asking for support is a sign of strength talks online therapy matches you with a licensed therapist from the comfort of your device to help you start feeling better with a single message match with a licensed therapist and get one hundred dollars off your first month with code radio hour at talks. Base dot com. It's the ted radio hour from npr. I'm minutia maroteaux today on the show. A conversation with jason reynolds. He's the best selling author of countless books for young people. He's also the national ambassador for young people's literature and we're talking to him as part of the library of congress's national book festival. Can we talk about the kids. The people who you wrote the books for what do they tell you. Because w- gregory. If i'm wrong you have spent the last several years touring around the country whether it's in real life or virtually talking to them. What do they say that they like about you and do they ever tell you. Don't like of course what they say they like. I think First and foremost when. I walk into the building when i walk into the room especially at the beginning of my career. They were always so surprised. By what i i'd like everybody all right good. I am a big guy. Six three you a big man. I've got long hair very long. Lax and i have tattoos everywhere. I always had won t shirt jeans and sneakers right. I mean this is it. I looked like the older brothers. I look like the uncles and older brothers. And that's just who. I am right. I don't i don't. I can't pretend to be anything that i'm not. I just go into school as me. We're gonna talk about something else. We're not going about books. Were second and then when we talk. When i get my lecture when i get my speech representation is like talking to you. You big cousin was my favorite sport. Were playing basketball. And i was lucky to grow up in a time with george. I'm not a formal person. I don't find value in formality especially as it pertains to those are referred to as family. Don't make sense to be formed around family and for me. These young people are my family. What's your favorite thing to do with your mom. You know what so. Like my mom. And i spent a lot of time together when i'm not all over the place and you know we live. We like to do really simple things you know. My mom wasn't needs people who live in cosco and we laugh because when a young person wants to know is that you are who you say he was. I can trust you. But i can't come into his talk about reading some books and he's looking at me like who are you. Let me tell them who i am. Showed them who i am. And then they'll show me who they are and then we can talk about a maybe reading these books. What was your favorite book. Measure one inspire as the most in your writing like. Where'd you go for ideas. We're currently writing our own book. And well what i want to as is. Would you like to come to our book lodge. Alan does it take you to a white books. And the truth is that they go and they read everything because they trust me sit simple. It's a simple concept from the beginning advice. Would you give to feature writers give the feet future writers but they tell me is that they appreciate me speaking to them like humans whether you want to be a writer or whether you want to be anything. Is that excellence is a habit. Never forget this okay. Excellent is the habit is not something you can turn on or turn off you either. Going to be excellent or you're not going to be excellent like human beings have formed things or whatever sort of pejorative coding. We attached to childhood or to being a child. You're you're being childish. You're being kitty. You're being you're being baby of enough. I talk to them like human beings and nine time that end. There's always one who says. May i appreciate you just giving it to a straight to talk with people. We handle it Now there have been moments in my career valuable moments for me when a young person who say you know for instance. When i was the greatest key comes up to me and says you know. I wanted to give you a note on when i was the greatest and this is like a twelve year old and this is good and this. This is where i think. Some of some of us adults. I think this is where we where we lose out is that we. We sometimes forget to humble ourselves in the presence of children and take critique which is valuable it's valuable. Could they know what they feel. They know what they think right in. This kid says you know i read when i was the greatest loved it I wished that you would have given needles the character who has to read syndrome. I wish he would have given him more speaking lines to read syndrome. That doesn't mean that he's mute right. That doesn't mean there's anything wrong with his ability to speech he's in sounds like a good known brand new and it was absolutely right and you know what i said. And he said you do it on purpose because you're gonna ready sequel and in that moment i could've lied to protect my ego could've lied. I could've said yeah man. I thought you know. I'm gonna work with another one. We're just focuses on needles. I could have lied but that that would have in fact been ally in. I don't believe that kids. I the kid the truth. And so i said you know what honestly it was an oversight. It was a blind spot and thank you Another time We brennan and i did all american boys you know i had a young person. Many many young women come up to us and say man you know we wish you the the girls and the book they do everything but you don't give them enough light but the plot of the story. They're the ones who pushed the boys. Do other good stuff but you don't give them enough light you don't give them enough screen time page and in that moment again right and as a man i know i had those lands bats and no it right and we all do you know and and to be able to look young woman in. It's that man again. It was a mistake. It was an oversight and and we the greatest regret that we have of that book is that we wish that we would have done more with it. The the the young women characters. I mean i have no. There's no perfect book. And every time i get those those moments where young Caused me to the matt. I'm grateful i'm not offended. And i'm not broken up insensitive and no. I'm grateful that a young person could say. Hey man i love you. And i know you love me and that's why we're going to have this conversation about what i need you to do going forward in your work. That is meant to serve me. What a gift i mean. It sounds like you're getting as many ideas and Feeling energized by them as much as they are getting something out of your visiting. Oh yeah yeah. I get way more uneven. Trust me way more. I get way more From them. I mean you know everything that i've learned over the last couple of years around our our new and i don't wanna say new new too many of us Ways of of discussing added gender and sex and identity. These viz incredible moment. We're having that's complicated for some But most of the things. I've learned Pertaining to sex and gender and the new ways that we talk about it have come from teenagers. Because i was gonna ask how do you do you stay up. Like language is changing. All the times for kids might again back to my daughter who was like. Oh yeah camp. There was a non binary bunk house. Like whoa okay. And she just kept going telling me about the land you know the craft that they all mean and just did not skip a beat so like you need to be hearing how kids talk right absolutely absolutely you. Can't you can't show what you don't know. And so when when people honestly menagerie when people talk about this work and talk about my career and my life and the awards and whatever all that stuff would i really want people to know is that i actually love children Right this isn't this isn't You know there are occupations but this is vocational. I actually just like to be around them. I enjoy having conversations with them. I like to laugh and joke. I like to be a child. I'd like to be child. Like i don't think we should never lose it. I'm too old to be childish. Even though i am sometimes but you never too old to be childlike right and i think what they do is they remind me over and over again. That actually will be okay that that that the only reason that one can even begin to maintain an inkling of hope is because.

jason reynolds Npr npr gregory congress basketball george Alan brennan
"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

09:40 min | 4 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"And mutual funds with a track record of earning consistent income and long-term appreciation successful investors powered their portfolios with private real estate for decades fundraise provides all investors access to diversified portfolios of private real estate with their industry leading easy to use platform go to fundraise dot com slash radio hour to see how one hundred fifty thousand investors have built a better portfolio with private real estate. This message is brought to you by. Npr sponsor talks base. Feeling overwhelmed. Lately you are not alone. We all need a little help. Sometimes and asking for support is a sign of strength talks online therapy matches you with a licensed therapist from the comfort of your device to help you start feeling better with a single message match with a licensed therapist and get one hundred dollars off your first month with code radio hour at talks. Base dot com. It's the ted radio hour from npr. I'm minutia maroteaux today on the show. A conversation with jason reynolds. He's the best selling author of countless books for young people. He's also the national ambassador for young people's literature and we're talking to him as part of the library of congress's national book festival. Can we talk about the kids. The people who you wrote the books for what do they tell you. Because w- gregory. If i'm wrong you have spent the last several years touring around the country whether it's in real life or virtually talking to them. What do they say that they like about you and do they ever tell you. Don't like of course what they say they like. I think First and foremost when. I walk into the building when i walk into the room especially at the beginning of my career. They were always so surprised by what i like. Lulu everybody all right good. I am a big guy. Six three a big man. I've got long hair very long. Relax and i have tattoos everywhere. I always had won t shirt jeans and sneakers right. I mean this is it. I looked like the older brothers. I look like the uncles and elder brothers. And that's just who. I am right. I don't i don't. I can't pretend to be anything that i'm not. I just go into school as me. We're gonna talk about something else. We're not talking about books. Were second and then when we talk. When i get my lecture when i get my speech representation is like talking to you. You big cousin was my favorite sport. Were playing basketball. And i was lucky to grow up in a time with george. I'm not a formal person. I don't find value in formality especially as it pertains to those are referred to as family. Don't make sense to be formed around family and for me. These young people are my family. What's your favorite thing to do with your mom. You know what so. Like my mom. And i spent a lot of time together when i'm not all over the place and you know we live. We like to do really simple things you know. My mom wasn't needs people who live in cosco and we laugh because when a young person wants to know is that you are who you say he was. I can trust you. But i can't come into his talk about reading some books and he's looking at me like who are you. Let me tell them who i am. Showed them who i am. And then they'll show me who they are and then we can talk about a maybe reading these books. What was your favorite book. Measure one inspire as the most in your writing like. Where'd you go for ideas. We're currently writing our own book. And well what i want to as is would you like to come to our book lodge islanders. It take you to a white books and the truth is that they go and they read everything because they trust me sit simple. It's a simple concept from the beginning vice. Would you give to feature writers give the feet future writers but they tell me is that they appreciate me speaking to them like humans whether you want to be a writer or whether you want to be anything. Is that excellence is a habit. Never forget this okay. Excellent is the habit is not something you can turn on or turn off you either. Going to be excellent or you're not going to be excellent like human beings have formed things or whatever sort of pejorative coding. We attached to childhood or to being a child. You're you're being childish. You're being kitty. You're being you're being baby of enough. I talked to them like human beings and nine time that end. There's always one who says. May i appreciate you just giving it to a straight to talk with people. We handle it Now there have been moments in my career valuable moments for me when a young person who say you know for instance. When i was the greatest key comes up to me and says you know. I wanted to give you a note on when i was the greatest and this is like a twelve year old right and this is good and this. This is where i think. Some of some of us adults. I think this is where we where we lose out is that we. We sometimes forget to humble ourselves in the presence of children and take critique which is valuable it's valuable. Could they know what they feel. They know what they think right in. This kid says you know i read when i was the greatest loved it I wished that you would have given needles the character who has to read syndrome. I wish he would have given him more speaking lines to read syndrome. That doesn't mean that he's mute right. That doesn't mean there's anything wrong with his ability to speech he's in sounds like a good known brand new and it was absolutely right and you know what i said. And he said you do it on purpose because you're gonna ready sequel and in that moment i could've lied to protect my ego could've lied. I could've said yeah man. I thought you know. I'm gonna work with another one. We're just focuses on needles. I could have lied but that that would have in fact been ally in. I don't believe that kids. I the kid the truth. And so i said you know what honestly it was an oversight back and thank you Another time We brennan and i did all american boys you know i had a young person. Many many young women come up to us and say man you know we wish you the the girls and the book they do everything but you don't give them enough light but the plot of the story. They're the ones who pushed the boys. Do other good stuff but you don't give them enough light you don't give them enough screen time page and in that moment again right and as a man i know i had those lands bats and no it right and we all do you know and and to be able to look young woman in. It's that man again. It was a mistake. It was an oversight and and we the greatest regret that we have of that book is that we wish that we would have done more with it. The the the young women characters. I i mean i have no. There's no perfect book. And every time i get those those moments where young Caused me to the matt. I'm grateful i'm not offended. And i'm not broken up insensitive and no. I'm grateful that a young person could say. Hey man i love you. And i know you love me and that's why we're going to have this conversation about what i need you to do going forward in your work. That is meant to serve me. What a gift i mean. It sounds like you're getting as many ideas and Feeling energized by them as much as they are getting something out of your visiting. Oh yeah yeah. I get way more uneven. Trust me way more. I get way more From them. I mean you know everything that i've learned over the last couple of years around our our new and i don't wanna say new new too many of us Ways of of discussing added gender and sex and identity in these viz incredible moment. We're having that's complicated for some But most of the things. I've learned in pertaining to sex and gender and the new ways that we talk about it have come from teenagers. Because i was gonna ask how do you do you stay up. Like language is changing. All the times for kids might again back to my daughter who was like. Oh yeah camp. There was a non binary. Bunk house like offer woke okay and she just kept going telling me about the land you know the craft that they all mean and just did not skip a beat so like you need to be hearing how kids talk right absolutely absolutely you. Can't you can't show what you don't know. And so when so when people honestly menagerie when people talk about this work and talk about my career and my life and the awards and whatever all that stuff would i really want people to know is that i actually love children Right this isn't this isn't You know there are occupations but this is vocational. I actually just like to be around them. I enjoy having conversations with them. I like to laugh and joke. I like to be a child. I'd like to be child. Like i don't think we should never lose it. I'm too old to be childish. Even though i am sometimes but you never too old to be childlike right and i think what they do is they remind me over and over again. That actually will be okay that that that the only reason that one can even begin to maintain an inkling of hope is because.

jason reynolds Npr npr Lulu gregory congress basketball george brennan
"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

09:40 min | 4 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"And mutual funds with a track record of earning consistent income and long-term appreciation successful investors powered their portfolios with private real estate for decades fundraise provides all investors access to diversified portfolios of private real estate with their industry leading easy to use platform go to fundraise dot com slash radio hour to see how one hundred fifty thousand investors have built a better portfolio with private real estate. This message is brought to you by. Npr sponsor talks base. Feeling overwhelmed. Lately you are not alone. We all need a little help. Sometimes and asking for support is a sign of strength talks online therapy matches you with a licensed therapist from the comfort of your device to help you start feeling better with a single message match with a licensed therapist and get one hundred dollars off your first month with code radio hour at talks. Base dot com. It's the ted radio hour from npr. I'm minutia maroteaux today on the show. A conversation with jason reynolds. He's the best selling author of countless books for young people. He's also the national ambassador for young people's literature and we're talking to him as part of the library of congress's national book festival. Can we talk about the kids. The people who you wrote the books for what do they tell you. Because w- gregory. If i'm wrong you have spent the last several years touring around the country whether it's in real life or virtually talking to them. What do they say that they like about you and do they ever tell you. Don't like of course what they say they like. I think First and foremost when. I walk into the building when i walk into the room especially at the beginning of my career. They were always so surprised by what i like. Lulu everybody all right good. I am a big guy. Six three a big man. I've got long hair very long. Relax and i have tattoos everywhere. I always had won t shirt jeans and sneakers right. I mean this is it. I looked like the older brothers. I look like the uncles and elder brothers. And that's just who. I am right. I don't i don't. I can't pretend to be anything that i'm not. I just go into school as me. We're gonna talk about something else. We're not talking about books. Were second and then when we talk. When i get my lecture when i get my speech representation is like talking to you. You big cousin was my favorite sport. Were playing basketball. And i was lucky to grow up in a time with george. I'm not a formal person. I don't find value in formality especially as it pertains to those are referred to as family. Don't make sense to be formed around family and for me. These young people are my family. What's your favorite thing to do with your mom. You know what so. Like my mom. And i spent a lot of time together when i'm not all over the place and you know we live. We like to do really simple things you know. My mom wasn't needs people who live in cosco and we laugh because when a young person wants to know is that you are who you say he was. I can trust you. But i can't come into his talk about reading some books and he's looking at me like who are you. Let me tell them who i am. Showed them who i am. And then they'll show me who they are and then we can talk about a maybe reading these books. What was your favorite book. Measure one inspire as the most in your writing like. Where'd you go for ideas. We're currently writing our own book. And well what i want to as is would you like to come to our book lodge islanders. It take you to a white books and the truth is that they go and they read everything because they trust me sit simple. It's a simple concept from the beginning vice. Would you give to feature writers give the feet future writers but they tell me is that they appreciate me speaking to them like humans whether you want to be a writer or whether you want to be anything. Is that excellence is a habit. Never forget this okay. Excellent is the habit is not something you can turn on or turn off you either. Going to be excellent or you're not going to be excellent like human beings have formed things or whatever sort of pejorative coding. We attached to childhood or to being a child. You're you're being childish. You're being kitty. You're being you're being baby of enough. I talked to them like human beings and nine time that end. There's always one who says. May i appreciate you just giving it to a straight to talk with people. We handle it Now there have been moments in my career valuable moments for me when a young person who say you know for instance. When i was the greatest key comes up to me and says you know. I wanted to give you a note on when i was the greatest and this is like a twelve year old right and this is good and this. This is where i think. Some of some of us adults. I think this is where we where we lose out is that we. We sometimes forget to humble ourselves in the presence of children and take critique which is valuable it's valuable. Could they know what they feel. They know what they think right in. This kid says you know i read when i was the greatest loved it I wished that you would have given needles the character who has to read syndrome. I wish he would have given him more speaking lines to read syndrome. That doesn't mean that he's mute right. That doesn't mean there's anything wrong with his ability to speech he's in sounds like a good known brand new and it was absolutely right and you know what i said. And he said you do it on purpose because you're gonna ready sequel and in that moment i could've lied to protect my ego could've lied. I could've said yeah man. I thought you know. I'm gonna work with another one. We're just focuses on needles. I could have lied but that that would have in fact been ally in. I don't believe that kids. I the kid the truth. And so i said you know what honestly it was an oversight back and thank you Another time We brennan and i did all american boys you know i had a young person. Many many young women come up to us and say man you know we wish you the the girls and the book they do everything but you don't give them enough light but the plot of the story. They're the ones who pushed the boys. Do other good stuff but you don't give them enough light you don't give them enough screen time page and in that moment again right and as a man i know i had those lands bats and no it right and we all do you know and and to be able to look young woman in. It's that man again. It was a mistake. It was an oversight and and we the greatest regret that we have of that book is that we wish that we would have done more with it. The the the young women characters. I i mean i have no. There's no perfect book. And every time i get those those moments where young Caused me to the matt. I'm grateful i'm not offended. And i'm not broken up insensitive and no. I'm grateful that a young person could say. Hey man i love you. And i know you love me and that's why we're going to have this conversation about what i need you to do going forward in your work. That is meant to serve me. What a gift i mean. It sounds like you're getting as many ideas and Feeling energized by them as much as they are getting something out of your visiting. Oh yeah yeah. I get way more uneven. Trust me way more. I get way more From them. I mean you know everything that i've learned over the last couple of years around our our new and i don't wanna say new new too many of us Ways of of discussing added gender and sex and identity in these viz incredible moment. We're having that's complicated for some But most of the things. I've learned in pertaining to sex and gender and the new ways that we talk about it have come from teenagers. Because i was gonna ask how do you do you stay up. Like language is changing. All the times for kids might again back to my daughter who was like. Oh yeah camp. There was a non binary. Bunk house like offer woke okay and she just kept going telling me about the land you know the craft that they all mean and just did not skip a beat so like you need to be hearing how kids talk right absolutely absolutely you. Can't you can't show what you don't know. And so when so when people honestly menagerie when people talk about this work and talk about my career and my life and the awards and whatever all that stuff would i really want people to know is that i actually love children Right this isn't this isn't You know there are occupations but this is vocational. I actually just like to be around them. I enjoy having conversations with them. I like to laugh and joke. I like to be a child. I'd like to be child. Like i don't think we should never lose it. I'm too old to be childish. Even though i am sometimes but you never too old to be childlike right and i think what they do is they remind me over and over again. That actually will be okay that that that the only reason that one can even begin to maintain an inkling of hope is because.

jason reynolds Npr npr Lulu gregory congress basketball george brennan
"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:17 min | 4 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"That's a special thing certainly sounds like something. We adults could use a big dose of these days in particular So we'll come back to talking about young people. And why right for them. But i would love to hear a little bit more about your personal story starting with like. What were you like as a kid. Were you talking about burgers. Were you talking about big ideas. What was life like for you you know. I was a little bit of everything. I was the kind of kid who loved along time. You know that was the kind of young person who get lost in in his room. We'll get lost in i. I love to sit in. The my mother would be in the kitchen. Doing all sorts of things and i would say a little rocking chair. Just an eye shot and just sit there and watch and you know just kind of talk and we have conversations like six five but at the same time i also grew up with a ton of friends. I was a neighborhood kid and they hood kids do neighborhood things right going and you get into trouble then you you learn the world through trial and error bouncing ideas off your peers When no adults are watching. And so i had all those things working for me and i'm grateful for it fourteen. Now you grew up in maryland right outside of dc. And you know one thing. i. I've heard you bring up before That was a source of inspiration for you was your mother and her deep belief and you like she saved all your clothes all year old sneakers everything you ever wrote. It was almost as she was documenting. Your childhood so that people would be able to look back when you achieved greatness. It's it's so strange. Bhagwan wanted on. Now she always knew that there was something the hard part for her was to allow me to go find it to go out with. That was so it's a young person. A kid it was like you can do anything you can do anything you can do it. I mean it was like every single night. You can do anything you can do anything. I you know that was. That was the thing that she laid on. But when it came time for me to fly goop right when it was time. Say hey mom. I'm going to go and be a writer. I think that all of the baggage of growing up in the nineteen fifties sixties the black woman in america that trauma sort of pushes itself to the forefront and her fear of one of her children living a life that may have been unstable financially unstable potentially emotionally unstable was enough to cause a bit of a riff a momentary rip. One thing she she made clear was the hardest part about being a parent. Is that you you raise your children not to be followers but you never take into consideration that that means that one day they won't follow you and in that moment you will have to stand on your word or you'll be made a hypocrite right and that's real and that's who we are who we were back then and what. She raised us to be understand who she was as a parent. So in twenty twenty. Hindsight i mean it all seems to make sense right. You're a bestselling author. You're the national ambassador for young people's literature but talk about that scary moment when you left to become a writer had you've been writing all along as a kid which she like well. This is what my kid is born to do. He's got go do it or was this like whoa wait. What are you going to do mash. She knew i mean. I have been writing since. I was a ten year old. By the time. I was fifteen i was all over. Dc and this is sort of the late nineties and spoken word had exploded. This is still underground thing in black black and brown communities a major cities across the country but it was growing and it was a space for a lot of us to get together. I mean it was a a redo of the nineteen seventies you know it was literally the black arts movement happening again right and we all felt this weird synergy and i was a young boy who was being in the club and who was allowed to sit in the back around all these poets around the young saul williams in a young jill. Scott and there. This kid And so my mother knew that guy was in it. And i was writing and by the time i was sixteen i so published my first book and was selling that book you know out of the trunk of my mother's car you know And at seventeen published. Another one at eight. I was sort of doing my thing. I was all of these coast as a key as a young person. Just doing my thing because she knew it was coming right. She knew that this was something that i was taking seriously and had been taken seriously since i was a ten year old but when it was time to go like i had no plan. I was a mediocre student in college is not like i was brilliant writer. No it wasn't any of that struggled in college. Almost failed out of college my freshman year and i needed to go and see you in a moment how that ambitious teenager became a new york times bestselling author despite almost giving up on writing in his twenties on the show today. My conversation with author jason reynolds. I'm minutia summary. And you're listening to the ted radio hour from npr. Stay with us. This message comes from. npr's sponsored. The john templeton foundation. Harnessing the power of the sciences to explore the deepest and most perplexing questions facing humankind learn about the latest discoveries in the study of hope and optimism intellectual humility and free will at templeton dot org support for this podcast and the following message come from the university of virginia darden school of business through darden signature approach to teaching and learning. You will gain skills to make an impact as a purpose driven leader at darden's facilities and roslyn professionals can earn. Mba or ms ba or take executive education programs while continuing to work learn more about darden's full variety of program offerings visit darden dot. Virginia dot edu slash npr. It's a big time of the year for us at all latino. No we're not celebrating pumpkin spice season. We're celebrating hispanic heritage month all month long. We're taking over the tiny desk with the help of some big name. Latin artists checkout. Npr's latino podcast. Were always celebrating. Let the it's the ted radio hour from npr. I'm newsom rhody on the show today. A conversation with author and national ambassador for young people's literature. Jason reynolds jason's works have sold over six million copies. He has won countless awards. But at the start it was a real hustle. So you were young like early twenties right when you decided to move to new york to become a writer and you had an idea for a book which would eventually be called my name. Is jason mine too. But what was the plan when you got there. The thing about new york. And i went with a friend of mine my dear friend.

Bhagwan maryland darden dc saul williams jason reynolds university of virginia darden america jill npr john templeton foundation Scott new york times roslyn newsom rhody Jason reynolds Virginia Npr jason
"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:17 min | 4 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"That's a special thing certainly sounds like something. We adults could use a big dose of these days in particular So we'll come back to talking about young people. And why right for them. But i would love to hear a little bit more about your personal story starting with like. What were you like as a kid. Were you talking about burgers. Were you talking about big ideas. What was life like for you you know. I was a little bit of everything. I was the kind of kid who loved along time. You know that was the kind of young person who get lost in in his room. We'll get lost in i. I love to sit in. The my mother would be in the kitchen. Doing all sorts of things and i would say a little rocking chair. Just an eye shot and just sit there and watch and you know just kind of talk and we have conversations like six five but at the same time i also grew up with a ton of friends. I was a neighborhood kid and they hood kids do neighborhood things right going and you get into trouble then you you learn the world through trial and error bouncing ideas off your peers When no adults are watching. And so i had all those things working for me and i'm grateful for it fourteen. Now you grew up in maryland right outside of dc. And you know one thing. i. I've heard you bring up before That was a source of inspiration for you was your mother and her deep belief and you like she saved all your clothes all year old sneakers everything you ever wrote. It was almost as was documenting. Your childhood so that people would be able to look back when you achieved greatness. It's it's so strange. Bhagwan wanted on. Now she always knew that there was something the hard part for her was to allow me to go find it to go out with. That was so. It's a young person as a kid. It was like you can do anything. You can do anything you can do it. I mean it was like every single night. You can do anything. You can do anything i you know that was. That was the thing that she laid on. But when it came time for me to fly goop right when it was time. Say hey mom. I'm going to go and be a writer. I think that all of the baggage of growing up in the nineteen fifties and sixties the black woman in america that trauma sort of pushes itself to the forefront and her fear of one of her children living a life that may have been unstable financially unstable potentially emotionally unstable was enough to cause a bit of a riff. A momentary rip. One thing she she made clear was the hardest part about being a parent. Is that you you raise your children not to be followers but you never take into consideration that that means that one day they won't follow you and in that moment you will have to stand on your word or you'll be made a hypocrite right and that's real and that's who we are who we were back then and what. She raised us to be understand who she was as a parent. So in twenty twenty. Hindsight i mean it all seems to make sense right. You're a bestselling author. You're the national ambassador for young people's literature but talk about that scary moment when you left to become a writer had you've been writing all along as a kid which she like well. This is what my kid is born to do. He's gotta go do it or was this like whoa wait. What are you going to do mash. She knew i mean. I have been writing since. I was a ten year old. By the time. I was fifteen i was all over. Dc and this is sort of the late nineties and spoken word had exploded. This is still underground thing in black black and brown communities a major cities across the country but it was growing and it was a space for a lot of us to get together. I mean it was a a redo of the nineteen seventies you know it was literally the black arts movement happening again right and we all felt this weird synergy and i was a young boy who was being in the club and who was allowed to sit in the back around all these poets around the young saul williams in a young jill. Scott and there. This kid And so my mother knew that guy was in it. And i was writing and by the time i was sixteen. I so published my first book and was selling that book. You know out of the chunk of my mother's car you know And at seventeen published. Another one at eight. I was sort of doing my thing. I was all of these coast as a key as a young person. Just doing my thing because she knew it was coming right. She knew that this was something that i was taking seriously and had been taken seriously since i was a ten year old but when it was time to go like i had no plan. I was a mediocre student in college is not like i was brilliant writer. No it wasn't any of that struggled in college. Almost failed out of college my freshman year and i needed to go and see you in a moment how that ambitious teenager became a new york times bestselling author despite almost giving up on writing in his twenties on the show today. My conversation with author jason reynolds. I'm minutia summary. And you're listening to the ted radio hour from npr. Stay with us. This message comes from. npr's sponsored. The john templeton foundation. Harnessing the power of the sciences to explore the deepest and most perplexing questions facing humankind learn about the latest discoveries in the study of hope and optimism intellectual humility and free will at templeton dot org support for this podcast and the following message come from the university of virginia darden school of business through darden signature approach to teaching and learning. You will gain skills to make an impact as a purpose driven leader at darden's facilities and roslyn professionals can earn. Mba or ms ba or take executive education programs while continuing to work learn more about darden's full variety of program offerings visit darden dot. Virginia dot edu slash npr. It's a big time of the year for us at all latino. No we're not celebrating pumpkin spice season. We're celebrating hispanic heritage month all month long. We're taking over the tiny desk with the help of some big name. Latin artists checkout. Npr's latino podcast. Were always celebrating. Let the it's the ted radio hour from npr. I'm newsom rhody on the show today. A conversation with author and national ambassador for young people's literature. Jason reynolds jason's works have sold over six million copies. He has won countless awards. But at the start it was a real hustle. So you were young like early twenties right when you decided to move to new york to become a writer and you had an idea for a book which would eventually be called my name. Is jason mine too. But what was the plan when you got there. The thing about new york. And i went with a friend of mine my dear friend.

Bhagwan maryland darden dc saul williams jason reynolds university of virginia darden america jill npr john templeton foundation Scott new york times roslyn newsom rhody Jason reynolds Virginia Npr jason
"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:47 min | 4 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"And today a very special conversation in honor of npr's partnership with the library of congress's national book festival. We're going to celebrate kids and reading by getting to know a man who is changing the world of children's literature moment. We've been waiting for. Please welcome. Jason reynolds is selling off. Jason rentals jason. Ason reynolds is of a rock star in the literary. You're making all every writer in the world upset right to books out at once. Over the last decade he has written more than a dozen books for kids and young adults including award winners. Like all american boys when i was the greatest and long way down about history like this. I've never read about the now like this out. Everybody reasons it should be in every school and hearing him speak. May be the hottest ticket in town. If you're a kid everybody right here and so many people here and so many not so young people here and i'm trying to you know. Be no speed all for you. Jason is also the national ambassador for young people's literature at the library of congress. It's literary honor that sends him to schools all around the country to connect with kids to spark their imagination and ignite their love of reading and he has just been appointed for an unprecedented third time. Spread your wings those broad wings you been developing spread wide as possible and in every direction and ask if anyone else could use a feather onto maybe maybe even more of us by also have the moment to say we made it and so on the show today. My interview with decent reynolds. Jason mrs minu meet you. Can you hear me cameras about his life. Growing up just outside of washington. Dc his work to bring a new kind of protagonist to life on the page and how he thinks. Young people in this country are coping these days. We asked him to kick off our conversation by reading us. The first page from look both ways. A tale told in ten blocks. These are stories from the perspective of ten different kids as they walk home from school. This story was going to begin like all the best stories with a school bus falling from the sky but no one saw it happened. No one heard anything so instead. This story will begin like all the good ones with booker's if you don't get all of them nasty habit goblins out your nose. i promise. I'm not walking home when you're not playing. Jasmine jordan said this leg. She said most things with her whole body like the words weren't just coming out of her mouth but we're also going down her spine. She said like she meant it. Fed it with the same play with me tone. Her mother us never. She was trying to talk to jasmine about something important for her. Real life and jasmine. Turn the music up in her ears. Real loud to drown her mother out. And scroll on scroll on if you don't take them ear pods ear buds earphones phones or whatever they call it out. Your coconut head is gonna be me turning up the volume and the base and aint talking about no music. That song jason reynolds. How many award winning books using start with a description of bluegrass one for one for one. That's the one that was from your book. Look both ways the very first paragraph. What was it that you want. Wanted your readers to know about you about this book about the characters that they're going to meet Right from the start that they are just like them. you know. i'm i'm constantly thinking about how we can explore the everyday -ness of childhood the mundane idiosyncrasies that. It is to be a young person no matter where you are in the world And then how can we. Can we turn those things on their heads to turn them into something beautiful and magical and elevated without sort of being half luton or weird right but just saying that book is real and book is. Don't ever get old against something that we all have experienced that one point that i thought it was so interesting though. Because you're having this late it's this lighthearted conversation between two friends walking home from school middle school and then you kinda sneak it in the will the reason why one of the girls backpack was so heavy. Why she had so many books and extra homework in there was because she'd been hospitalized with sickle cell. Anemia you of sneak it in there that there's something very serious going on i do and i think to sneak it in. There is the best way to do it. I think i'm always curious. About the way that we portray young people in portray tough stuff for young people. I think we we sometimes lay the burden on the back of the child. We really you know things happen in our lives but children always find time the laugh right. Children always a bogus or talk about potato chips or the crab jokes or the tease each other. Despite some of the heavy things happening in our lives. I think they have a resilience that that actually shines brighter. Sometimes that we give credit to. And and i think i think i'm always curious and i think the reason why right for kids so much is because i think as adults what happens is where we go through times We'll we'll be bummed about it and we'll let it drag on for a moment. It will use the excuse of like responsibility as the thing that forces us to move forward. Young people don't always have the excuse of responsibility. They just have the excuse of life. And there's something about that. That i find absolutely profound that the reason that they continue moving forward isn't that because they got to go to work take eighty or pay bills. It's because.

Jason reynolds Ason reynolds Jason mrs minu Jason Jasmine jordan jason reynolds npr library of congress jason congress reynolds booker school middle school Anemia washington
"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:47 min | 4 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"And today a very special conversation in honor of npr's partnership with the library of congress's national book festival. We're going to celebrate kids and reading by getting to know a man who is changing the world of children's literature moment. We've been waiting for. Please welcome. Jason reynolds is selling off. Jason rentals jason. Ason reynolds is of a rock star in the literary. You're making all every writer in the world upset right to books out at once. Over the last decade he has written more than a dozen books for kids and young adults including award winners. Like all american boys when i was the greatest and long way down about history like this. I've never read about the now like this out. Everybody reasons it should be in every school and hearing him speak. May be the hottest ticket in town. If you're a kid everybody right here and so many people here and so many not so young people here and i'm trying to you know. Be no speed all for you. Jason is also the national ambassador for young people's literature at the library of congress. It's literary honor that sends him to schools all around the country to connect with kids to spark their imagination and ignite their love of reading and he has just been appointed for an unprecedented third time. Spread your wings those broad wings you been developing spread wide as possible and in every direction and ask if anyone else could use a feather onto maybe maybe even more of us by also have the moment to say we made it and so on the show today. My interview with decent reynolds. Jason mrs minu meet you. Can you hear me cameras about his life. Growing up just outside of washington. Dc his work to bring a new kind of protagonist to life on the page and how he thinks. Young people in this country are coping these days. We asked him to kick off our conversation by reading us. The first page from look both ways. A tale told in ten blocks. These are stories from the perspective of ten different kids as they walk home from school. This story was going to begin like all the best stories with a school bus falling from the sky but no one saw it happened. No one heard anything so instead. This story will begin like all the good ones with booker's if you don't get all of them nasty habit goblins out your nose. i promise. I'm not walking home when you're not playing. Jasmine jordan said this leg. She said most things with her whole body like the words weren't just coming out of her mouth but we're also going down her spine. She said like she meant it. Fed it with the same play with me tone. Her mother us never. She was trying to talk to jasmine about something important for her. Real life and jasmine. Turn the music up in her ears. Real loud to drown her mother out. And scroll on scroll on if you don't take them ear pods ear buds earphones phones or whatever they call it out. Your coconut head is gonna be me turning up the volume and the base and aint talking about no music. That song jason reynolds. How many award winning books using start with a description of bluegrass one for one for one. That's the one that was from your book. Look both ways the very first paragraph. What was it that you want. Wanted your readers to know about you about this book about the characters that they're going to meet Right from the start that they are just like them. you know. i'm i'm constantly thinking about how we can explore the everyday -ness of childhood the mundane idiosyncrasies that. It is to be a young person no matter where you are in the world And then how can we. Can we turn those things on their heads to turn them into something beautiful and magical and elevated without sort of being half luton or weird right but just saying that book is real and book is. Don't ever get old against something that we all have experienced that one point that i thought it was so interesting though. Because you're having this late it's this lighthearted conversation between two friends walking home from school middle school and then you kinda sneak it in the will the reason why one of the girls backpack was so heavy. Why she had so many books and extra homework in there was because she'd been hospitalized with sickle cell. Anemia you of sneak it in there that there's something very serious going on i do and i think to sneak it in. There is the best way to do it. I think i'm always curious. About the way that we portray young people in portray tough stuff for young people. I think we we sometimes lay the burden on the back of the child. We really you know things happen in our lives but children always find time the laugh right. Children always a bogus or talk about potato chips or the crab jokes or the tease each other. Despite some of the heavy things happening in our lives. I think they have a resilience that that actually shines brighter. Sometimes that we give credit to. And and i think i think i'm always curious and i think the reason why right for kids so much is because i think as adults what happens is where we go through times We'll we'll be bummed about it and we'll let it drag on for a moment. It will use the excuse of like responsibility as the thing that forces us to move forward. Young people don't always have the excuse of responsibility. They just have the excuse of life. And there's something about that. That i find absolutely profound that the reason that they continue moving forward isn't that because they got to go to work take eighty or pay bills. It's because.

Jason reynolds Ason reynolds Jason mrs minu Jason Jasmine jordan jason reynolds npr library of congress jason congress reynolds booker school middle school Anemia washington
"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:47 min | 4 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"And today a very special conversation in honor of npr's partnership with the library of congress's national book festival we're going to celebrate kids and reading by getting to know a man who is changing the world of children's literature moment. We've been waiting for please. Welcome jason reynolds is selling author. Jason rentals jason. Ason reynolds is of a rock star in the literary. You're making all every writer in the world upset right to books out. at once. Over the last decade he has written more than a dozen books for kids and young adults including award winners. Like all american boys when i was the greatest and long way down. Read about history like this. I've never read about the now like this out. Everybody reasons it should be in every school and hearing him speak. May be the hottest ticket in town. If you're a kid everybody right here and so many people here and so many not so young people here and i'm trying to you know. Be no speed all for you. Jason is also the national ambassador for young people's literature at the library of congress. It's literary honor that sends him to schools all around the country to connect with kids to spark their imagination and ignite their love of reading and he has just been appointed for an unprecedented third time. Spread your wings those broad wings you been developing spread wide as possible and in every direction and ask if anyone else could use a feather onto maybe maybe even more of us by also have the moment to say we made it and so on the show today. My interview with decent reynolds. Jason mrs minu meet you. Can you hear me cameras about his life. Growing up just outside of washington. Dc his work to bring a new kind of protagonist to life on the page and how he thinks. Young people in this country are coping these days. We asked him to kick off our conversation by reading us. The first page from look both ways. A tale told in ten blocks. These are stories from the perspective of ten different kids as they walk home from school. This story was going to begin like all the best stories with a school bus falling from the sky but no one saw it happened. No one heard anything so instead. This story will begin like all the good ones with booker's if you don't get all of them nasty habit goblins out your nose. i promise. I'm not walking home when you're not playing. Jasmine jordan said this leg. She said most things with her whole body like the words weren't just coming out of her mouth but we're also going down her spine. She said like she meant it. Fed it with the same. Don't play with me tone. Her mother us never. She was trying to talk to jasmine about something important for her. Real life and jasmine. Turn the music up in her ears. Real loud to drown her mother out. And scroll on scroll on if you don't take them ear pods ear buds earphones phones or whatever they call it out. Your coconut head is gonna be me turning up the volume and the base and aint talking about no music. That song jason reynolds. How many award winning books using start with a description of bluegrass one for one for one. That's the one that was from your book. Look both ways the very first paragraph. What was it that you want. Wanted your readers to know about you about this book about the characters that they're going to meet Right from the start that they are just like them. you know. i'm i'm constantly thinking about how we can explore the everyday -ness of childhood the mundane idiosyncrasies that. It is to be a young person no matter where you are in the world And then how can we. Can we turn those things on their heads to turn them into something beautiful and magical and elevated without sort of being half luton or weird right but just saying that book is real and book is. Don't ever get old against something that we all have experienced at one point that i thought it was so interesting though. Because you're having this late it's this lighthearted conversation between two friends walking home from school middle school and then you kinda sneak it in the will the reason why one of the girls backpack was so heavy. Why she had so many books and extra homework in there was because she'd been hospitalized with sickle cell. Anemia you of sneak it in there that there's something very serious going on i do and i think to sneak it in. There is the best way to do it. I think i'm always curious. About the way that we portray young people in portray tough stuff for young people. I think we we sometimes lay the burden on the back of the child. We really you know things happen in our lives but children always find time the laugh right. Children always a bogus or talk about potato chips or the crab jokes or the tease each other. Despite some of the heavy things happening in our lives. I think they have a resilience that that actually shines brighter. Sometimes that we give credit to. And and i think i think i'm always curious and i think the reason why right for kids so much is because i think as adults what happens is where we go through tough times We'll we'll be bummed about it and we'll let it drag on for a moment. It will use the excuse of like responsibility as the thing that forces us to move forward. Young people don't always have the excuse of responsibility. They just have the excuse of life. And there's something about that. That i find absolutely profound that the reason that they continue moving forward isn't that because they got to go to work take eighty or pay bills. It's because.

jason reynolds Ason reynolds Jason mrs minu Jason Jasmine jordan npr library of congress jason congress reynolds booker school middle school Anemia washington
"jason reynolds" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:23 min | 7 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"That's great i actually. I'm coming to terms with the fact that this is the thing we have to reckon with right now and become is anti-racist but it's not it can't be the end right that's not so so i'm curious what you think about that but it also to me. It goes together with the question. I wanted to ask you one way to describe all of this reflection in the book in stamped but in all of your work is is just opening up this question of what it means to be human fully human and and seeing that seeing that more fully. So how would you start to talk about what it means to be fully human. How that's evolving in you and what that has new anti-racism rose it means to be to be human. Which is like it's like being asked what's the meaning of life i know. So how would you start to answer right now at morning. No it's a you know what. I think it means to be changing. It means to be evolving right. I think the that's the part about humanity that excites me. The most is that it's malleable. it shifts. It changes the the ways of life can change at any given moment and we can adapt to said way of life It means you know. I always talk about sort of indoctrination. Human beings have been indoctrinated. And so if we've been indoctrinated and that means that we can also make new doctrine and then be indoctrinated. I think you know when it connects to how it connects to anti-racism is is that in and of itself right. We can first and foremost. I have to say this right. No one is actually because my friends my white friends especially gail i'm trying to become anti-racist that's not a thing right so i want to make clear to not be a thing. It's not like that krista. I know the language chip. In when i'm saying is what i'm saying is there's no finish line is what i'm saying. There's no right so there's no finish line. There's this idea that people are going to read this book or they're gonna read all the books right and then all of a sudden they're going to be antiracist then when i'm saying is you know and that's and that's also a very american thing. This idea that they are winners and losers that there's a binary that we live in a bifurcation when it comes to that which is a failure in that which is victorious. The truth of the matter is this is about journeyman right journey folk. Our job is to constantly be pressing toward a thing but that thing is ever elusive right and the reason why it is ever. Elusive is because the world and humanity continues to evolve and because it continues to evolve the things. That complicate our lives evolved with it. And so we have to be vigilant to continue to figure out what the new versions of these elements so that we can continue to tear down that house right. But there's no ingo. There's no there's no and i think that's sort of how humanity and anti-racism connect okay so anti-racism is this muscle. It's a muscle that has to be developed with us every step of the journey and it's simply by the way to get back to your original question. Anti racism is simply the muscle that says that humans are human. That's it yeah right. It's it's the one that says. I love you because you are you period. That's it and if we can figure out how to do that. And it feels so simple and this is why. Racism is such a is has been the greatest hoax of a played on humans. Is the greatest hoax ever right. Because that that element of i love you because you are. You should be the most human thing we we know. It should be a natural thing right to say. I love you because you remind me more of myself than not. I really appreciate you. I'm i'm just really happy that this is how i got to spend this monday morning. Me to thank you so much. Crista jason reynolds was appointed national ambassador for young people's literature by the library of congress in january twenty twenty. His many award winning books include ghost long way down look both ways and most recently stamped racism anti-racism and you. The on being project is located on dakota land are lovely theme. Music is provided and composed by zoe keating and the last voice that you hear singing at the end of our show is cameron. Kinghorn on being is an independent nonprofit production of the on being project. It is distributed to public radio stations by wnyc.

krista gail Crista jason reynolds library of congress zoe keating Kinghorn dakota cameron wnyc
"jason reynolds" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

08:34 min | 7 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I mean why would i read books honestly back. In those days. I think if we're being honest about with the contemporary canaan was in the nineteen ninety pertain to black kids. i can name a few people. But even their books were sort of rooted in the nineteen eighty s and nineteen seventies because that was their sweets. That's when they were young people right in the nineties. When you have you have you have these three major Three major sort of cultural elements converging. You have the the the maturing Like the maturation of hip hop music. Right now. this thing is growing legs. It's more than a fad. Now people are realizing that maybe this is gonna take root. That's happening in the early nineties. You have That the wave the height of the crack epidemic. That's happening in the early late eighties early. Nineties hip hop is hip hop is hip hop is being used as a way to actually fight against it right. It's it's in response to it so much of it and then you have because of you know the the other of that convergence. That triangulation was What we now know his hiv and aids all of. That's happening around me as a child. Right my my neighbor. My neighbor died of aids. My two of my neighbors died of aids I mean on my block right like we have family members who are addicted to crack cocaine during that time. Have another brother who all he was doing with us into rap music. All of this is happening. And there's a ten year old child in the middle of it and there are no books about any of it and so and so reading. Just wasn't my name it wasn't it wasn't for me so i study rap lyrics liner notes. i would open up cassette tapes and i would you know unfold. The liner notes would read with the rappers. Were rat what is poetry poetry. Thank you for saying reading. I was reading and it was an and that's all it took right. I didn't wanna be rapper. I wanted to be a poet. I wanted to write it down And that was sort of the beginning of of all this and so when you combine that with my mother's My mother's sort of pouring into us that like look you can say whatever you want to say it you can feel however you wanna feel you can research and study whatever you wanna research you can believe whatever you want to believe. This gave me the platform to put forth my my young curious ideas that the ten eleven to zero. It's interesting i was Canada kojo nnamdi and his such a great. He's awesome public. Radio hosts in dc interviewed. You actually not that long ago. Maybe what's it this month. Was it all the time. i'm sure he's interview he. Yeah he just did what last week on with kids with your readers and But i don't know if it was in this context or another but there was a librarian in dc. Maybe something written about you talking about how before your books came along. What she was doing with kids in. Her library was analyzing rap lyrics. Right then i just have to To listen to that show or kids called in to name their questions with you You know i'm scared of being a black. What should i do. Why do people still hurt black people. I'm nine years old. My question is i'm scared. How can kids help. Bring change in this country so we're all treated fairly and it doesn't matter what color your skin is. I just wanted to put questions out there and name that that's what you're writing into for you. Know krista it's been I wish i could tell you that. That was the first time. I've heard those questions with the truth. Is that have been doing this work a long time in the at this point i've spoken to probably a million kids around this country in parts of the world and those questions come he now that have had a little girl in philly so sweet and she made me been down so she can whisper in my ear. Do i ever wish that my skin was different. You know because of what she felt when she was dealing with or had young people tell me about their their brothers and sisters being killed by police officers or I mean this is very real In my job is to love them. And if i if i claim to love them because all of us claim to love our kids but i think sometimes we are. Love sometimes gets conflicted with with our fear. And that's okay right. I i understand that fear is real but for me my my own personal opinion that if i love them i have to tell them the truth. Have to figure out how to tell them the truth Because be one because a lot of these kids can handle it. I think we spent so much time trying to protect our children that we see it. They see they see it. They know it in his two of his altogether line on that peop- adults think they're shielding them from within that they know and so if they know and we're not helping them process now it's become more dangerous than you've ever imagined right so we have an opportunity to lean into the discomfort of having to talk to about this in order for them to find language around it And and honestly. I don't want you know always young people i. Racism is nothing to make sense of. That's the complicated part about it right. That's why it's such a strange conversation. It's nothing to make sense of But we do have to lean into having a discussion about how nonsensical it is. Yeah that i think that language of Helping kids process. I think that feels that really. That's the one place he said. You don't write pain for trauma porn and boy. We are addicted to that stuff in society like true crime but the stories you tell have a lot of pain in them and they have a lot of trauma in i just i wonder How would you talk about that line. Like what are the different ingredients that go into bet line between telling the hard true stories. I think for me the traumas. Real pain is real But but it is not omnipresent It isn't something that governs my life and it's it especially govern especially doesn't govern the lives of children right. I think it is disingenuous to write it. I think it's i think it's hack work Because the truth is that if you know children children who are the most human amongst us by the way children always find a way to laugh. Children always find a win right talking to a fourteen year old matter. What's going on a fourteen year. Old is trying to figure out where the joke is trying to figure out when the opportunity comes for the sad part to be over so that they can roast their their best friends so they can write it. This is it's a. I think that the this sort of fervent nature of of finding humor And lightness levity is is a is a remarkable gift of youth honest and so for me. I'm not interested. I write i write that which i believe is real and things that happened when i don't wanna shy away from things that are complicated and tough but i also wanna right whole stories about whole people i think. Sometimes we reduce children and young people to have formed things right and so we wrote. So you're right half formed stories about them. It's the same thing it all and even that ties to the way people talk about children's literature right people talk about children's literature as if it is a category that is full of half formed work. But that's because they too believe that children have formed right and so and so. I think those of us who acknowledge the humanity of young people those of us who acknowledged the complexity in the beauty and sophistication of childhood. Know that. when you're writing all those elements have to be present. It's interesting when you're talking about that. Thinking about that. writing about half formed. Humans can go both directions. I think about some of the books..

aids kojo nnamdi dc krista Canada
"jason reynolds" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:43 min | 7 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"In right because for them. It's it's very much so like. Why are we complicating this conversation right. Like let's figure out whatever the shortest distance between ambi straight lines. So let's do the straight line way and say here's what you could do. Stop being racist right. Now it's on you to figure out what that means but that's the answer. Oliver wendell holmes the simplicity that lies on the other side of complexity. That's what i'm searching for. What i'm trying to to push for. Just step out your neighborhood. Just talk to somebody different because we underestimate with this does for the mind. that's all. We underestimate what it does for the imagination and as long as those imaginations are firing often their libraries will continue to be filled. Somebody told me at that same lecture. It cuts off when you watch them on the internet but at the same lecture when we got to the pipe a woman stood up and she said if you've ever been to senegal and i said no she said do you know any senegalese people i said i do and she said you should ask them about what what they say. Whenever an elder has died in the community. And i said what do they say. They say that a library has burned now. I didn't know this right but isn't that something. Yeah a has burned so in the year. Twenty twenty before twenty twenty became twenty twenty. You publish this book with abram x. Candy called stamped racism anti-racism and you it is a you. Call it a remix of of his book stamped from the beginning. When did this book actually get published. Merging was march. Oh my god really the week of the lockdown in the exact. We were on tour. So i think like following on what we've just been talking about. This book is about ideas. But it's about what has formed our imaginations correct which has formed our lives which has formed are symbols which is formed the way we in granular ways structure and organize our life together. Absolutely i mean this book is it's interesting. No one's ever talked about it that way. Good on you krista. No one's ever talked about it that way. I think i think you know. Usually people talk about well. This is the history of thing right and it is but that history is birth out of the imagination right. It literally was conjured up. We're talking about like this is. This is how imagination is so powerful that it could set forth four hundred five hundred years of something wrong which means that it very well could set forth four hundred or five hundred years of something right. That's the beauty of humanity. James boy famous ball quote and he has a gazillion. Obviously but my favorite bombing quotas the interior life is the real life right. The interior life is the real life and the intangible dreams of a person may have tangible effects on the world right like it basically saying what one can imagine internally one can think about. Nobody knows when nobody's around. One secrets could shift human life. What an amazing thing to think about and my role even with stamping and remixing and the reason we call it a remix because it's not like a why adaptation. Because i actually wrote the entire book i wanted it we we he and i both wanted to figure out how we could tap into the imagination of young people and when it comes to books around ray so when it comes to history books Usually they are presented to students that humans Right right that's a great distinction. And i think we wanted to make something the first of its kind. Something that was literally made thinking about a twelve year old or fourteen year old or sixteen year. Old what they would want to read and how to engage them so that they actually can Store new language new lexicon vocabulary newt new histories. In in their personal libraries after a short break more with jason reynolds support for on being with krista tippett comes from the fetzer institute helping build the spiritual foundation for a loving world veterans new study. What does spirituality mean to us. Reveal spirituality informs our understanding of ourselves and each other and inspires us to take action for.

Oliver wendell holmes senegal abram krista James jason reynolds krista tippett fetzer institute helping build
"jason reynolds" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

09:29 min | 7 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Now it's become more dangerous than you've ever imagined right so we have an opportunity to lean into the discomfort of having talked to about this in order for them to find language around it and honestly i don't want you know always young people. Racism is nothing to make sense of. That's the complicated part about it. All right that's why it's such a strange conversation. It's nothing to make sense of but we do have to lean into having a discussion about how nonsensical it is that i think that language of helping kids process you know one place he said you don't write pain for trauma porn and boy. We are addicted that stuff in this society like true crime but the stories you tell have a lot of pain in them and they have a lot of trauma and i wonder How would you talk about that line. Like what are the different ingredients that go into bat line between telling the hard true stories. I think for me the traumas. Real pain is real but it not omnipresent. It isn't something that governs my life. It especially doesn't govern the lives of children right. I think it is disingenuous to write it. I it's i think it's hack work because the truth is is that if you know children children who are the most human amongst us by the way children always find a way to laugh. Children always find a way right. If you're talking to a fourteen year old no matter what's going on a fourteen year old is trying to figure out where the joke is trying to figure out when the opportunity comes for the sad part to be over so that they can roast their best friends. I think that this sort of fervent nature of finding humor and lightness and levity is a is a remarkable gift of youth honestly and so for me. I'm not interested. I right that. Which i believe is real and things that happened and i when i don't want to shy away from things that are complicated and tough but i also want to write whole stories about whole people i think sometimes we reduce children and young people to have formed things right and so you right half formed stories about them and even that ties to the way people talk about children's literature right people talk about children's literature as if it is a category that is full of half formed work. But that's because they to believe that children have formed right and so and so. I think those of us who acknowledge the humanity of young people those of us who acknowledged the complexity in the beauty and the sophistication of childhood know that. When you're writing all those elements have to be present. You i to talk about some of the ways that you get at this. Because i think these are important tools for all the rest of us and parents and teachers but all of us you know you talk about using synonyms when you're helping kits process and letting them come up within someone that i was so intrigued by that you used as a made up synonym for freedom is this is one word breath. Laughter brooke laughter. Yeah sounds good doesn't it. You know. I think For me like my whole life around figuring out is playing around with the outcome of language. That's my whole jam right. I want to figure what exactly Would of this sort of chemical reactions that take place when you put this word this word you know. That's something that i think about the poet. John ashbery that was his whole thing. Like i don't know what this means but if you put these two words together what does it make you feel right and i. I'm curious about that. So you take something like freedom. What could be sending him for freedom. And i made up the word breath laughter. Because there's something about the idea for me that When i think of breath i think of life but i also think of Make it doesn't stop right. So if you exhale what comes out of your mouth spreads and spreads and spread it goes and goes and goes and go and that's something to think about right. It's something to think about what happens when when we breathe out or even it's also interesting that they were breathing in breathing out which means it's a constant recycling of energy with an amazing thing to think about right just constantly cycling of energy and so what if laughter could also be recycled in that way. What if it could just go right. That is freedom to me if they could just go and go and go and go and go if it could be the ripple in the water i to me that that feels free right now physically free. You know it's a different conversation. Feels like freedom to me so yeah. I'm krista tepid and this is on being today. i'm with jason reynolds. The celebrated young writer of books for middle schoolers and young adults with wisdom for all humans. Something i really appreciate in your work and your philosophy of writing and what you right. Is there reverence. You have for the power of words and ideas. I grew up in the middle of the country. This is not related to race. Like this is very american thing. This anti-intellectualism this this mistrusting of the life the mind and so you know i watched this. What's your title. You are the national ambassador for young people's literature of the library congress fabulous title. I watched you give a speech Was it for the library of congress or librarians and he talked about libraries as sacred spaces and librarians as architects. And what if libraries are warehouses. Where we build human libraries and at the questions kids have get stored on his shelves and passed around and loan down to others. And you talked about the reference desks. We have in our heads and this piece of it that you're calling out it is it's counter cultural in a strange way that we don't reflect on in american culture and feels really essential tonight. Do you know what i'm talking about do i do. I think it's interesting because no one ever talks about that speech. Because i ultimately i think that my rule for as long as i am on this plane and as long as i am doing this work my rule will always be to figure out how to create for two in the minds and bodies and spirits of young people right. I'm trying to fortify them. It's also the reason why. I do so much around imagination. Like this is a big deal. From or why do the whole let's create synonyms. Because at the end of the day ultimately i need young people we ride the collective we need to be able to activate their imagination if they cannot if they don't have if by the time you're out of high school your imagination shot. We're in trouble big time. We're in trouble. But how does one keep an imagination fresh in a world that works double time to suck it away right. How does one keep an imagination firing off when we live in a nation that is constantly vacuuming it from them and i think that the answer is one must live curious life right one. Must have stacks and stacks and stacks of books on the inside of their bodies right in those books. Don't have to be the things that you've read. I mean that's good too but those books could be the conversation that you've had with your friends that are unlike the conversation you were having last week. It could be about this time taking the long way home. And seeing what's around you that you never seen because most of us especially city folk We stay little quadrants right. We stay on the five block radius wherever the coffee shop as in the school in a church and right it's like but what if you were to walk the other way would if you would explore the places around you would if you were to speak to your neighbor and to figure out how to strike a conversation with the person you've never met would if you were to try to walk into a situation free of preconceived notion just once once a day does walk in and say look. I don't know what's going to happen and let's see. Let me give this person. The benefit of the doubt to be a human. Yeah what can i say one thing that i was just thinking really about the word repentance. I just think you might like this because you like words that repentance in the greek and the hebrew it is not about like private conversion. The word is like can medic. The word actually is about stopping in their tracks in walking another way. Which is what you just described is way too. I think in some ways the way you said it is very simple. In the census very manageable like stepping out of our neighborhoods. And isn't that isn't that the thing right isn't that this is also why work with young people while i love young people because they haven't complicated life yet. If you ask a young person would advice would you give. They would have what you give a person right now in the midst of all the things that are happening you know and the young person especially young black person would say oh..

jason reynolds John ashbery brooke congress krista
"jason reynolds" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

07:12 min | 7 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I wish we could do body. Scans of what's happening sale early. In the fifteen seconds it takes a police officer walk to walk from a squad car to the car of a person with a black person to the carbon black person. Right what's happening in our bodies is violent right in and it's coming from From experience from things that that have been seen from from me all sorts of things. And so i just want to make sure we're clear that just because a person that that without dismissing these deaths because these debts are important obviously these you know i am. I am forever going to be saying the names of as many people as possible. I just wanna be clear though. Is that to to the audience that these deaths are are the number of deaths compared to the number of people who are carrying abuse in their bodies. Because they'd been because they've been abused and survived a different conversation to me. It's awesome i mean. Yeah and also you mean you're very astute about how our brains work. I mean there's also a way in which a name and a story right. Pennant can penetrate and make a larger story land. But also i. i want to be really clear. I don't think this is just about the brutality of police officers brutality of our society Absolutely i mean we could. We could take the we're using the police force or the or the law enforcement system in this country as As the particular archetype to dissect and critique but the truth of the matter is is that what's happening in the police forces happening in the educational system it's happening and housing authorities happening in food. Bright where the food lies in certain communities is happening. It's way we structure it's the way we've structured to country. Yeah yeah yeah so so. Yeah i guess so i. I want to ask that question again. Like what was it. Like to be jason growing up. Blake headed this all manifest. What's with you as you think of as you walk through these days about how how you started walking in your body as a child i think. Young jason is always thinking of My mother i think. I i was raised by by the most interesting woman in the world As far as i'm concerned and i'm sure most children you know it. Depending upon your relationship all of us feel like our mothers are the greatest people in the way that our mothers always thought all of us were geniuses and we were infants in. Most of us. Aren't but i i really. I was raised by a fascinating woman and there were certain things that we learned in the house that were very that sort of molded me. for instance. My mom was my mom was obsessed with death and because of her obsession with death she And because she wasn't getting the answers that she wanted in regards to death from what. She was reading in traditional faith that she had grown up in which is which is christian faith because she was a southern black woman in those days. You are baptist methodist right that that's sort of the way that worked and But she wasn't getting the answers that she wanted. And so when she moved to dc she started studying eastern eastern philosophies eastern religious faith systems eastern religions and faiths systems and So we were raised in this house whole. That had a little bit of everything and it opened up my ability children's ability to express themselves. I never knew like words like sin. I never heard it. It just wasn't a. I didn't know it wasn't a thing right. Shame shame and guilt weren't sort of elements of our lives and end our voices and our ability to express ourselves where the utmost important even if it meant disagreeing with the parent right so if my mother said something that we've disagreed with i was totally able to say i disagree. I think you're wrong. I think you're being mean. I don't know i you know. I don't know why i'm being punished with this. You know and as long as i was respectful and had and could say it with confidence and had reasons for the things that i felt. My mother were hear me out. And so when it came time to sort of as i grew and became. Whoever it is that i was becoming there was never any fear of saying i disagree right. There was never any fear of challenging things. Because i had lived in the house. I'd grown up in a home. That challenged everything everything. My mother had no problem saying that if something did not make sense even if it was an ancient belief system that she had no problem saying doesn't make sense so we don't have to. We don't have to believe that right like when you're a kid right your kid you like mom the you know. Everyone is telling me that that my friends who are gay are aren't going to go to heaven. You know your kid and that's scary right and my mom was like well. That's not true for her for her for her. It was like that's not true because it doesn't make sense it doesn't make sense there. I see a thread there because actually like what you do with your writing. Es it's you know it's in this genre. we call. why a writing. It's four kids right so this is actually what you do is cut through. Can't say bullshit on public radio but you say it plain like the absurdity of things. I don't know how else to do it. I think you know the way the way we were brought up it was. It was. Say the thing right. Nope no point in where it's just to say the thing but if you but if you're going to say stand on your square you know we don't there's no time for for you to say your truth With cowardice right you lean into the truth courageously you say now if it is proven to be incorrect then you change it right you you you hope you accept that with humility and you adjust your way of thinking so so as a kid that was. That was all very normal in. My house was secretive. My mom would always say look. Don't tell people what we do in hand like the way i'm doing i'm raising. You might not be you know up to standard ahead to keep it a secret. I had to keep it secret. And so when. I discovered language at the age of ten through rap music because i wasn't a reader that wasn't thing in our house we were it's interesting. My mother has brilliant. She wasn't as progressive as she was She also was a mom reason kid working long hours and doing all the things that a lot of us have to do. And so reading wasn't Something that was modeled in our home. And it wasn't abram x. Candy who you wrote this on stamps with. I'm going to talk about this. But he wrote he said jason reynolds and i avoided books like we avoided police officers growing up in the nineteen nineties. It's true no for me..

Young jason Blake jason jason reynolds abram
"jason reynolds" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:42 min | 7 months ago

"jason reynolds" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And young adult readers include ghost long way down look both ways and most recently stamped racism anti-racism and you. He was born in washington dc in nineteen eighty-three as you may may or may not recall. We got connected on twitter by a guy named dante stewart. A young man who is a plaque seminarian and pastor and preacher and really a wonderful writer and He's a bit younger than us in his twenties. But he you know. He said that he picked up ghost. Just a couple of years ago and was immediately drawn by the way you told stories that intersected themes of race community social change failure insecurity etcetera. He said it was the story of my life. So yeah i guess so. I i want to ask you like what was it like to be jason growing up blake. How did this all manifest. What's with you as you think of as you walk through these days about how how you started walking in your body as a child. I think Young jason is always thinking of My mother i was raised by a fascinating woman and there were certain things that we learned in the house that's sort of molded me For instance my mother had no problem saying that even if it was an ancient belief system that she had no problem saying doesn't make sense so we don't have to believe that like when you're a kid you like everyone is telling me that my friends who are gay are aren't going to go to heaven you know your and that's scary right and my mom was like. Oh that's not true and for her. It was like that's not true because it doesn't make sense so so as a kid that was that was all very normal in my house and it was secretive. My mom would always say look. Don't tell people what we do in hand like the way i'm doing i'm raising. You might not be you know a up to keep it a secret to keep it a secret. And so when. I discovered language at the age of ten through rap music because i wasn't a reader with that wasn't a thing in our house we were it's interesting. My mother has brilliant and she wasn't as progressive as she was She also was a mom reason kid working long hours and doing all the things that a lot of us have to do and so reading just wasn't Something that was modeled in our home and abram x. candy who you wrote this stamped with. I'm going to talk about this. But he wrote he said jason reynolds and i avoided books like we avoided police officers growing up in the nineteen nineties. It's true notebooks for me. I mean why. Would i read books honestly back in those days i think you have. You have the wave. The height of the crack epidemic. That's happening in the early late eighties early nineties hip hop is being used as a way to actually fight against it right i. It's it's in response to it so much of it. You know the the other part of that convergence. That triangulation was what we now know is hiv and aids. To a my neighbors died of aids. I mean on my block right like we had family members who are addicted to crack cocaine during that time. Have another brother who all he was doing with us into rap music. All of this is happening. And there's a ten year old child in the middle of it and there are no books about any of it and so Reading just wasn't my jam. It wasn't it wasn't for me. So i study rap lyrics liner notes. I would open up cassette tapes. And i would unfold in liner notes and i would read with the rappers. Were what is poetry poetry poetry. Thank you for saying reading. I was reading poetry. And that's all it took right. I didn't want to be a rapper. I wanted to be a poet. I wanted to write it down. And that was sort of the beginning of all this and and so when you combine that with my mother's sort of pouring into us that like look you can say whatever you want to say it you can feel however you wanna feel you can research and study. Whatever you wanna research you can believe whatever you want to believe. This gave me the platform to put forth my my young Curious ideas as the ten eleven. Two zero it's interesting. I was looking at a co joe. Nnamdi in his such a great aunt always awesome. Public radio hosts in dc at interviewed. You actually not that long ago all the time. But i'm sure he's interview last week last week with kids with your readers and But i don't know if it was in this context or another there was a librarian in. Dc maybe something written about you talking about how before your books came along. What she was doing with kids in. Her library was analyzing rap lyrics. Right and to listen to that show or kids called in to name their questions with you I'm scared of being a black person. Which did i do. Why do people still hurt black people. I'm nine years old. My question is i'm scared. How can kids help. Bring change in this country so we're all treated fairly and it doesn't matter what color your skin is. I've is wanted to put questions out there. Name that that's what you're writing into hor for krista. It's been I wish i could tell you that. That was the first time. I've heard those questions. But but the truth is that. I've been doing this work a long time at this point i've i've spoken to probably a million kids around this country and parts of the world and those questions come you know. I've had a little girl in philly. So sweet and she made me ben down so she can whisper in my ear. Do i ever wish that my skin was different. You know because of what she felt when she was dealing with or had young people. Tell me about their brothers and sisters being killed by police. Officers or I mean this is very real And my job is to love them. And if i if i claim to love them because all of us claim to love our kids but i think sometimes we are. Love sometimes gets conflicted with with our fear. And that's okay right. I i understand that fear is real but for me my my own personal opinion that if i love them i have to tell them the truth. Have to figure out how to tell them the truth one because a lot of these kids can handle it. I think we spent so much time trying to protect our children that we see it. They see see they know it and assist to of cons- altogether going on adults think they're shielding them from within that they know and so if they know we're not helping them process..

dante stewart Young jason jason reynolds dc aids blake abram jason washington twitter Nnamdi krista philly ben