18 Burst results for "Jason Resign"

"jason resign" Discussed on Where Should We Begin? with Esther Perel

Where Should We Begin? with Esther Perel

02:52 min | 9 months ago

"jason resign" Discussed on Where Should We Begin? with Esther Perel

"Next time, on where should we begin? Like I said, I've looked up to you for so long for a while. I didn't know I had any value. In that in that change. In that chain and I think there was a period where there was definitely the jobs where it was like, oh, I actually don't need you either. You know what? I'm cool. And it was hoping that me doing that would elicit some sort of reaction about. What about us? So many deep, powerful questions that surround this unique relationship called my best friend. You're my favorite person to take on the world with. I realize and recognize it now. When I said I want us to be lifelong friends because I want you to be in my life in my life, not like checking in here and there, but like, you know, be best friends. And that's what these two young men came to explore with me. Actually, that's what they came to explore with each other. They just needed a space where they could talk and realize how much they had shared, but also how much they had never spoken. Next time, on where should we begin? In 2014, I was working for The Washington Post in Iran. One night, some guys with guns showed up at my apartment and took my wife and meet the prison. I knew the war in deep trouble but obviously I was trying to be hopeful that they don't know. I spent a year and a half of the hostage. Everyone from my family to president Obama played a role in getting me out. I'm Jason resigned. All episodes of 544 days are out now. Follow and listen for free. Only on Spotify. Some families, you're born into. Other families you have to find for yourself. But every family, without exception, has a moment. Where it totally totally sucks. I'm Jorge Jess. Host of dysfunctional family story time. A new show from gimlin. Each week I'll play a story about strange families. The strange family deranged families. Families that don't quite fit together. To help you figure out how you fit into yours. These stories are funny and sad. They'll give you something derail again, or maybe to relate to. They'll be your weird little companion and keep you company. During the darkest days of the year. Are the sunniest? Depending on your hemisphere. Dysfunctional family story time is out now. Follow and listen for free, only on Spotify..

Jorge Jess The Washington Post gimlin Iran Jason Obama
"jason resign" Discussed on Keep It!

Keep It!

04:40 min | 11 months ago

"jason resign" Discussed on Keep It!

"How did you heard about this story. Louis oh yeah i mean my my main news source for everything is check as twitter. So yes yeah jack. Hey who had speaker price playing. Paulina price. on days of our lives. Currently doing it excellently. Her out of our lives that she has not been on this podcast and she is a sleigh and every way but i think she writes on twitter. I'm like why are you this funny. It's like so crazy tweet at her was to come on the show. She followed me when i was on twitter. I know she follows you. Yeah no. I met her once and she was like. Oh louis from twitter. So witty and i was like. I can't believe you said that. And it's not been on here jack hairy. It was such a weird story. It's weird it's baffling. And i kind of feel like maybe it wasted lake. You know that black twitter is going to slough the whole situation and figure out everything and they're gonna do it quickly and then like i just like to black twitter's time wasted are what's on. Okay i say are as i'm still on it but you know what twitter has racist darks. Okay okay got women in parks who are harassing black people. We've got cairns to get fired. They work okay that all that black twitter is just the new number one ladies' detective agency. Let's bring back to my friend. Just refresh me on a crazy stories of the weinstein era which is harvey weinstein apparently promised lupita nyongo part on number one ladies' detective agency a show that had been cancelled for years. Anyway that is. There's parts of right the harvey wide steed scandal that truly was a baffling part of the lupita night. Neon goes story like he couldn't think of a show with like black people in it and that was the first thing that came. So i mind boggling. That's evening apart on the wire. You're gonna love this show the jeffersons. I'm being speaker of harvey weinstein. We're watching pataudi is to be reason to thank him there But i was thinking about award speeches. And i was also thinking like damn. Aren't we glad to not be in a awards season era where every speech would be thank you harvey god guy gwyneth. Yeah judy dench. Whomever stop thinking people people who are like agents and producers at manages. I'm like nobody wants to hear that. And i get that. It is a moment for them to be like shouted out but like i like when someone like errands. Avait shouts out like the woman who's managed him since he was a child. You know something like that. I'm like if you're naming random people at eight twenty four. Could you save it for when your backstage right. Oh you mean. They did their job. Great yeah yeah. I don't care no deference i find super baffling anyway. That's a whole conversation. Yes anyway thank you to. Emily asked for being here this week. Thank you to den michelle for joining us in such a pleasure and We'll see you keep. It is a crooked media production. Our senior producer is kendra james. Our producer is caroline restaurant and our associate producer. Is brian semel. Our executive producer is me. Ira madison third. Our editor is bill lance and kyle seguin or sound engineer. Thank you to our digital team. Matt degroot normal conan and milo kim for production support every week and hey stay safe out there in two thousand fourteen. I was working for the washington post in iran. One night some guys with guns showed up at my apartment and took my wife and me to prison. I knew the deep trouble. When obviously i was trying to be hopeful. Let's say no no. I spent a year and a half as a hostage. Everyone from my family to president. Obama played a role in getting the jason resigned host of five hundred forty four days. A spotify original produced by gimblett crooked media. Na twenty four episodes of five hundred forty four days are available right now following. Listen for free only on spot..

twitter jack hairy harvey weinstein lupita nyongo Paulina pataudi guy gwyneth judy dench Avait Louis jack den michelle kendra james caroline restaurant brian semel Ira madison bill lance kyle seguin harvey Matt degroot
"jason resign" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"jason resign" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Programming from Monday. Thank you so much. So I'm going to bring up a doctor on park. But I I want to thank our panel for their lives. Great discussion. And thank all. Coverage from the bipartisan policy center, Gina. Thank you. I want to thank all of you for being here today a very important topic today complex somewhat controversial but very important to the opioid epidemic. I want to thank the attorney general for being here. Thank you for really. Appreciate you being here. Thank you for describing the theory of your case and. Why this is so important to to people in Oklahoma cruciate you being here and about the panel was tremendous. Thank you for all of your insights helps us understand the litigation lands landscape. How we can affectively use these resources and also Matt now what the lessons are from the from the tobacco master settlement. Thank you, Regina. The questions were terrific. So really appreciate all of the audience participation and the questions, this is an important issue. And I think we're going to be tracking it here at the bipartisan policy center and more broadly trying to continue identifying bipartisan solutions to respond to you. If you had up Bill mentioned, we just released a report in March. The first comprehensive transparent analysis looking at all federal funding going to states for two thousand seventeen in two thousand eighteen so please if you didn't get a chance to see that please feel free to take a copy of that report. So thank you again. I want to knowledge Morgan Bailey. Tim Swope JoAnne Donilon and others from the BBC team. Appreciate all of your efforts and putting this event together. Great to see all of you here and looking forward to seeing you next time. Thanks, everybody. Discussion on litigation against opioid manufacturers. Again, this is live from the bipartisan policy center here in a rainy Washington DC on this Monday other events were covering today on the C-SPAN networks include coming up a discussion on political imprisonment hosted by the council on foreign relations that starts in about fifty minutes. One of the speakers will be from the Washington Post their global opinions writer and former Tehran bureau chief Jason resign. He spent five hundred forty.

Tim Swope JoAnne Donilon Washington Post Washington Oklahoma Gina Jason resign Morgan Bailey Tehran Regina Matt Bill attorney bureau chief BBC writer fifty minutes
"jason resign" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"jason resign" Discussed on PRI's The World

"British never delivered the tanks or returned the money. The same thing happened with weapons orders involving US companies the. Lincoln's froze Iranian assets and didn't river anything about how you ended up with these sort of pulse of cash that Iranian money sitting in foreign countries Bank accounts, then in twenty fifteen Iran and the US signed historic nuclear deal author. Laura secord was researching the MS of to all nationals around that time. And she noticed the spike in the number of Iranian Americans detained in Iran. Really starting around the time that US sanctions ramped up, and it was clear that we were moving towards some kind of a negotiation that you prisoners at least and possibly British prisoners as well start to be seen as leverage in a possible negotiation. Among the prisoners, a Christian pastor, a former US moving and Jason resigned at Washington Post journalist Huddy EMMY of center for human rights in amount says as nuclear negotiations to shape a plan for a prisoner. Swap began to emerge booth negotiations were concluded. Pretty much at the same time that the nuclear deal was signed and actually on the day that the nuclear deal came into effect on the very same day a plane left for Iran carrying hundreds of millions of dollars in cash than the same plane. Brought out Jason resign. John and several other Iranian American prisoners five prisoners, the US released seven Irani's it also returned four hundred million dollars of Iman cash when ever the Iranian government is rewarded. It's really worries me Bahari is an Iranian Canadian journalist who spent four months in rounds of in prison..

US Iran Iranian government Laura secord Jason Bahari Washington Post Huddy EMMY Irani Lincoln John four hundred million dollars four months
"jason resign" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"jason resign" Discussed on PRI's The World

"So that he can be very proud to be black and two I want to see all of that in him. In. Schools. So pus Cal your partners. Mexican you've got a young son. Now, how how do you see your future with your new family in Mexico? Is it a story of permanence or is your story still unfolding? Juneau play studies. Port gain media blow the Heiki. Well, I can't answer that question. Because in my book, I say, I'm a citizen of the world. I believe it's the same for everyone in this world people need to go wherever things will be better for them. If I believe the future of my son's education is a short here in Mexico in I can achieve my best year. Then yes, maybe I'll stay. But since I'm someone who likes to travel, of course, I hope to travel a lot too. What don't you? Pasqual who standard we saw speaking there with the world's Marco werman, by the way, his book about his journey from Haiti Tijuana is called sobre Vienna's, which means survivors. I'm Carol hills for Muslim women who wear had jobs getting their hair done is hard. What do you do? Now when you get your haircut by myself. No one stays. I really take it up on the we visit a specialized Salaam ahead on the world. I'm Carol hills. This is the world where co production of the BBC World Service PRI and W H in Boston. Iran's foreign minister Javad Zarif did something unexpected yesterday. He resigned on Instagram three has been considered one of the more. Moderate members of the Iranian government. He's a US educated diplomat who negotiated the 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and world powers, including the US. But as foreign minister, he also justified the imprisonment on Jason resign. The Washington Post journalist who was held by around for a year and a half. Jason what role did surf play in your imprisonment? Well, I think he played the cover, man. Zarif was the foreign minister, and as a near fluent English speaker. He would be the person most called on to give interviews. Mohammad Javad Zarif is here. He has been foreign minister of Iran since two thousand thirteen during my imprisonment. He was often asked about about my case, and how it was possible that a Washington Post journalist would be held in prison without charge without evidence for so long. And he did whatever he could to sow doubt about me. And why I was in prison at a time when I was defenseless voiceless had nobility to answer the accusations that were being made against me. We do not J people for the opinions people commit crimes. Who violate the laws of a country cannot tied mind being good, Jordan. What being a put it to go back to people have to observe them. He did very little to really address the concerns. Whether it was of my colleagues at the Washington Post, rather media outlets or members of the US government that he interface, and what were you told when you arrested? Why were you arrested? Well, I was told that I was the CIA station chief in Tehran, which obviously sounds as ridiculous to somebody being accused of that as it does me saying it on the radio for years later. And what was it like being in prison watching him? Give these explanations for why you were in prison well to see an Iranian official who knew very well that I hadn't done anything wrong who had published op-eds in my newspaper before I was arrested during my imprisonment and after my release to to see him saying that. There's more to this story than you know..

Mohammad Javad Zarif Washington Post Carol hills US Iran Mexico Jason CIA Marco werman BBC Tehran Boston official Haiti Vienna Tijuana
Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif announces resignation on Instagram

PRI's The World

02:25 min | 3 years ago

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif announces resignation on Instagram

"Iran's foreign minister Javad Zarif did something unexpected yesterday. He resigned on Instagram three has been considered one of the more. Moderate members of the Iranian government. He's a US educated diplomat who negotiated the 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and world powers, including the US. But as foreign minister, he also justified the imprisonment on Jason resign. The Washington Post journalist who was held by around for a year and a half. Jason what role did surf play in your imprisonment? Well, I think he played the cover, man. Zarif was the foreign minister, and as a near fluent English speaker. He would be the person most called on to give interviews. Mohammad Javad Zarif is here. He has been foreign minister of Iran since two thousand thirteen during my imprisonment. He was often asked about about my case, and how it was possible that a Washington Post journalist would be held in prison without charge without evidence for so long. And he did whatever he could to sow doubt about me. And why I was in prison at a time when I was defenseless voiceless had nobility to answer the accusations that were being made against me. We do not J people for the opinions people commit crimes. Who violate the laws of a country cannot tied mind being good, Jordan. What being a put it to go back to people have to observe them. He did very little to really address the concerns. Whether it was of my colleagues at the Washington Post, rather media outlets or members of the US government that he interface, and what were you told when you arrested? Why were you arrested? Well, I was told that I was the CIA station chief in Tehran, which obviously sounds as ridiculous to somebody being accused of that as it does me saying it on the radio for years later. And what was it like being in prison watching him? Give these explanations for why you were in prison well to see an Iranian official who knew very well that I hadn't done anything wrong who had published op-eds in my newspaper before I was arrested during my imprisonment and after my release to to see him saying that. There's more to this story than you know.

Mohammad Javad Zarif Washington Post Iran United States Jason CIA Tehran Official
"jason resign" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"jason resign" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"I think for me and for listeners because you know, some people might have heard your story on NPR, whatever, but rarely do they get to hear both sides of this negotiation. So I was hoping to like Ben you could talk about the things that you guys were talking about in the situation room when you're talking about how to get Jason out. And then Jason like how it felt for you. After the fact to learn about all this churn that was happening in Washington while they were sitting there in your cell saying, everyone forgot about you known cares about you. You're going to die. Yeah. Well, I yeah. I mean, I guess I'd just Jason odd teed up by. Maybe describing kind of what was going on our end, and we can chat about it. I mean, you know, the first point here is that this took place during your detention and interrogation, we're in the nuclear negotiations. Right. So kind of two phases. This first phase is during the nuclear negotiation when Jason is still in prison, and we would always raise these cases and try different ways to you know, compel the ratings to release. Jason we we we had previous experience with three hikers who've been detained and tried to find other people who could intervene in the Iranian system to try to get somebody out like Jason. But the challenge we face, right? Is that if we brought you fully into the nuclear negotiation and said, we're not doing this nuclear deal unless Jason resign. And some of the other people who are in prison are kind of part of it. Then you're pawns in a much bigger game. Right. And if we don't get a nuclear deal. We can't get you out or they're leveraging you to keep you know, parts their nuclear infrastructure. So it was a very complicated time, and I'd be curious. I guess before you even get to the actual negotiation. Then led to your release. You know, how does that make you feel to hear that will you resentful that you felt that you might be either separate from the nuclear issue in your case had to kind of wait for that..

Jason NPR Ben Washington
"jason resign" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:29 min | 3 years ago

"jason resign" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's happened time and time and time again, I think that you know, the process that you just explained was one that I've seen unfold in front of me dozens of times it's four and a half years now since I walked the streets of Tehran. You know in relative freedom. I I don't know if that's still happening. I think that just the number of visas living given to people have diminished, you know, substantially for for reporting purposes. I don't know if that's still exactly how they do. It. Or if they've just decided to stop letting people in can this go on. I mean at the time of the revolution people said that this was not a sustainable model and look at how wrong they were. I mean there you are talking about the upcoming fortieth anniversary this manages to hang on even with the internal contradictions even with the yearning of many Iranians to push off some of the strictures that have come with the revolutionary government. I mean is this is this looking good for the long haul? I don't think so I mean, but I don't understand or or or or pretend to have a clue about how it's going to turn into whatever it turns into next. I mean, I think the likelihood that it opens up and becomes a thriving secular democracy. Although I'd love to see that happen is not being fostered right now, we hear a lot from the current administration in the United States. That you know, they want to do everything they can to help the aspirated of the free loving Iranian people. Well, you know, we've also implimented some of the toughest sanctions we ever have after you know, after a deal that was supposed to remove those sanctions permanently because Iran agreed to to certain steps over its nuclear activities at the same time. We've also blocked Iranians from traveling to this country. You know, they're they're the country that's most affected by the travel ban. So, you know, I think that. If we want to be on the side of the Iranian people. We should we should show it in in different sorts of ways and help give them the opportunities and the resources to at least, you know, crack some some holes into into the system and and open up the society bit by bit. But unfortunately, has usual I don't see anybody on the side of the the good people of that country when you were finally released during the waning time of the Obama administration. And since since the change in administration in Washington have a official people tried to pick your brain find out what, you know, get a sense of your point of view of what the country's like what the systems like who's in charge who's approachable on occasional basis. I'll engage in conversations with people at the post, you know, visiting. Delegations from different countries or or American. Diplomats. I talked to people on the hill. Every once in a while, you my main concern, and then my my main offer is you know, I'd like to help. However, I can bring Americans detained in Iran home. And I think that that's where my my insights might be most valuable, but you know, as far as the current administration goes, I I've talked to people at very high levels. I've talked to the secretary of state and talk to people. In his in his team that works on Iran. Not in any official capacities. We run into each other at events, and you know, I tell them what I think they're getting wrong. And I think it's my right to do that as a tax payer, but them seeking me out for my information, and and possible understanding of the place now that really hasn't happened. Was there a point during your captivity when because of outside events, you felt like some of the power was moving to your side of the table. Certainly. I mean, I think that as time wore on as I realized that the nuclear negotiations were coming to a head and and ultimately to an agreement. I I was fairly certain that that would lead to my ultimate release when that didn't happen in July two thousand fifteen when the the JCP was was signed. It was a period of great despair from me because I realized. This could take longer could take much longer. I could see, you know, from the Iranian news reports that I was seeing on on television in my cell that, you know, there was a belief in plan to implement the the the various points of the nuclear deal in January two thousand sixteen and I thought to myself, okay that there's the moment. And if I get out it's going to be that. And if I don't a probably not gonna get out anytime soon, and we've seen that all the people that were that were there at the time of my release and others who've been taken since are all still there. So, you know, I I was sort of on on the dancing on a knife blade for those last few months, and the fact that that culminated in the way that it did. Although this should never happen to me. And I certainly shouldn't have spent a year and a half in prison than and and separated from my family, I'm happy with with how it ended was the United States ready to sign that deal. Whether you got out or not, my understanding of it is that, you know, the secret negotiations for the release of myself another Americans began. About fourteen months before my release four months into my imprisonment. Secretary of State John Kerry, somebody I've spoken with multiple times since I got out. And made it very clear to me that that he had made it clear in his she is that that the sanctions would be lifted and that the Iranians received their money in that prisoners in America would Iranian prisoners in America would be freed, and that, you know, myself and other Americans would be free, and it was a complex set of different negotiations that ultimately played out and was implemented implemented almost simultaneously in a matter of hours. So I think that it was made clear, and it was always the intention that while the the negotiations were separate entities. It was a deal that that was going to require freeing Americans. Could you climb back on that horse and start working in other parts of the world is a correspondent again without this experience? Always in the back of your mind. I don't know yet. And I think that you know, the post has been great about how they've worked me back into into a role. I am a an opinions writer now McCollum almost I write a lot about Iran, and and US Iran relations, which is great because I don't think there's anybody working in the country. That's got more in depth experience than I do in recent years, and I also write a lot about press freedom issues. And I think one thing I would like to do is get out into the world. And and. And right about those issues and in other places because I think that they're they're very critical. It's an a very important time for our our ability as as humans to express ourselves. We have the opportunity to do it more easily. But there are major restrictions in so many different countries. And how those restrictions are implicated implemented is different from one place to the next, and I'd like to be a part of understanding that, but you know, I can't really imagine right now being based in another country for for a long period of time. I'd like to to go out and do reports occasionally from from different countries. But. It feels pretty good to be America. At this point. There is a lot of criticism from officials circles of the American news business are we who work in it being careful enough both in how we do our work. But also in keeping faith with the public are there to your dismay large numbers of Americans who feel like they could take or leave of free and independent press. So this is something that I worry about a lot. And I talk about a lot whenever I get a chance to I think the the the notion that people trust us less and less I've seen the polls. And I hear people say that. And and I I see it on social media and hear people saying it on TV. I also go and speak, you know, in in venues all over the country and have people telling me that that they trust the Washington Post and the New York Times and their local newspapers more than they trust their elected officials. So it's. You know, it's a combative, and and kind of adversarial relationship, and in some ways, that's the way it supposed to be. But you know, what I worry about is that we've become as a people, you know, it's such a made to order society at this point that, you know, we consume the the news and ideas that fortify our own pre existing beliefs, and that doesn't really bode well for for democracy. I think that right now our work is journalists is so important the stuff, we do really matters. It's a critical time where there's so much. Great journalism being produced right now. But in some ways, it's not having as much of his impact as it should. And that's something that I that. I worry about people Jason resign is the author of prisoner. It's a memoir of his time in prison in Iran, Jason resigned. Great to talk to you. Here's a pleasure. Thanks so much. You've been listening to world affairs. The.

Iran United States America Tehran official Obama administration Jason resign Washington American news John Kerry Washington Post writer McCollum New York Times fourteen months four months
"jason resign" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"jason resign" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On world affairs, coming up at two o'clock in July of two thousand fourteen Washington Post Tehran bureau chief Jason resigned was arrested by Iranian police and accused of spying for American. What he initially thought was a political stunt became an eighteen month prison stint with impossibly high diplomatic stakes. Jason resigned joins world affairs co host race Juarez to share his story resigned as the author of prisoner my five hundred forty four days in Iranian prison here more on world affairs coming up too. You're listening to the BBC World Service with me at Butler where today we are going inside the crisis in Venezuela. What's really going on inside? What some call the world's most embattled economy corruption mismanagement, or is it as the government claims all the fault of US meddling will the latest sanctions on Venezuela's oil company proved decisive it's business daily in a couple of minutes. BBC news with David Austin. China says the United States is trying to smear and suppressed the telecom company hallway after America announced criminal charges against the firm and one of its executives. Joe Washington accused by way of violating US sanctions by setting equipment to Iran and of stealing robot technology from an American rival the US has now formally requested the extradition of mango and Joe from Canada. The Chinese delegation has arrived in the United States who talks on the trade war between Washington and Beijing, the American secretary of commerce stressed to the US entitlement against was wholly separate from the trade talks Pakistan supreme court is due to hear a final legal challenge to the equivalent of a Christian woman who'd been sentenced to death for blasphemy us BB spent eight years on death row before her conviction was overturned October a Hindu woman in Pakistan has been appointed. As a judge for the first time Samana Kumari Bhutani said she'd faced resistance from her own community has they had reservations about women working in the legal profession. A Korean woman who was forced into wartime sexual slavery by Japanese troops. And later campaign for peace and women's rights has died at the age of ninety three Kim Dong was abducted from a home by Japanese soldiers in one thousand nine hundred forty when she was fourteen. Apple has warned of a glitch that makes it possible to eavesdrop on uses of typhoid and MAC devices. The problem is linked to the face time. Feature used for video calls the first-ever census on captive elephants in India has found that there are more than two thousand four hundred across the country. The survey reveals that more than two thirds of the elephants are held by individuals, circuses and temples, and that's the latest BBC news. Hello there. I'm Ed Butler and welcome to business daily from the BBC today, a significant development in the Venezuelan crisis. The US announces sanctions on the country's oil industry. We have continued to expose.

US BBC Jason America Washington Venezuela Samana Kumari Bhutani Joe Washington Kim Dong Pakistan bureau chief Ed Butler Tehran typhoid Juarez Apple China India Iran
"jason resign" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:31 min | 3 years ago

"jason resign" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Time is ten. Oh, six. Welcome to forum. I'm Michael Krasny. In two thousand fourteen Washington Post journalist Jason resign and his wife Yogi were arrested at gunpoint by Iranian authorities at their home in Tehran was released after two months for Jason resigned. Who was later accused of being a CIA agent spent the next year and a half in the notoriously oppressive. Evan prison an ordeal. He recounts in his new memoir prisoner in it. He describes his encounters with his jailers and interrogators who calls, quote, the most hardheaded and Lisa fisted people you'd ever known his captivity occurred as the Obama administration was negotiating a nuclear deal with Iran, and he was released on the day that the deal was. Formally announced Jason resign who is now. Global opinions writer for the Washington Post joins us to talk about his experiences and more welcome to the program. It's great to be here. Michael is wonderful to be on the other side of that music after listening to your show since childhood. So thanks for having me here. Well, glad to have you. We should mention you are homeboy to grow up in Marin county is how they spend ten years in run. It's been about seven and a half years living there, but you know, moving back and forth for about fifteen. Well, I'm glad you're back. And I'm glad you're back and free from five hundred forty four days in an infamous prison known for its torturing of prisoners and known for its harsh punishments, and all of that sort of thing, and we have quite a story to tell remarkable story to tell let's begin at the beginning. I mean, you arrested didn't even know why it WAS FG, right. One hundred percent. You know, we were getting ready to go to a party from my mother-in-law surprise birthday party in late June of two thousand fourteen. Leading up to the arrest. There had been some strange activity on our internet accounts on our our Email and social media accounts. We'd been hacked into we were trying to figure out what was going on. But literally the day that we were arrested my wife, and I she's also a journalist both had our accreditations for for working journalists in Iran extended for a full year. So we thought we were on pretty solid ground dual citizen. I am. And as we prepare to to leave for this party a. We left. Our our -partment went down in the elevator to get into a taxi cab that we've called. And there was a man standing with a gun said resign said yes they pride their way into the elevator. He had several agents with them. They took us back up to our apartment ransacked the place. And a couple of hours later we were both in solitary confinement. Frightening terrifying. Terrifying confusing shocking, and ultimately something that I thought that first night that would get resolved. And you know, had no inkling that it would take a year and a half. And and all the twists and turns that had to happen to get us out. Yeah. It's it's really oppressive and terrible story. Although from what I read about that prison, and from what I read about in your memoir mean your ability to kind of put human cast off to things and maybe deal in a journalistic way with people who were very difficult to deal with. Say you got better treatment. But you certainly didn't get the kind of treatment we read about it that prison to the extreme. I mean, I know you were in solitary, and you really suffered a lot and I don't mean to manage that anyway. But. You read this torture stories that are just unbelievable. Well, look, I think that that that opening period of seven weeks in solitary has left a scar. On my psyche that they'll never be able to undo. But yes, I I was spared the worst of the violent treatment that happens to some people held in that prison and probably because there was such a a big spotlight on my case from so early on that just grew and grew until the end, and you have pretty much ferreted out. I think would would strikes me as as quite truthful that in nineteen seventy nine and some of our younger listeners may not recall. This Americans were held hostage in Iran. The American embassy which has Merican sovereignty was taken over by our audience and Americans were held hostage. And you're essentially you realized hostage one hundred percent. It was one of these things where I thought to myself very early on that. No, there's no there's no story here. This is something that's gonna pass very. Quickly. But as the days and weeks and months started to mount it became very clear that I'm a hostage hostage. Really in some ways presumably to get some leverage with the deal that was worked out in Paris the Iranian nuclear deal. Yeah. Well, you know, there was a module released on the day. The deal. Yeah. There were multiple factions at work inside Iran, and I was taken by a group in the in the see the revolutionary guard corps that really didn't want to see this deal come to fruition. So they took me as sort of a as as internal domestic leverage in their own domestic fight against Rwanda against Roy Hodgson's Arief in the nuclear deal, but you know, Ronnie decided that he didn't want to play ball with those guys and they leveraged me as part of this negotiation with with the US and other world powers. I think that they they realized pretty early on. It wasn't good for their public image for this to happen. But ultimately, they just decided to sit on me until they got something out of the deal. Yeah. I couldn't help noticing roof even refer to you as my friend. Yeah. I mean, that's the sort of thing that is the type of jab to your side that that stings for a long time, something you welcome. But she did get conjugal visits, for example, towards the end. Yeah. My wife was such a pro learning how to maneuver the Iranian penal code. You know, it's all based in the Koran, and there are rights and opportunities built into it. For example. My mother was allowed to visit me she's born and raised in Illinois lived most of her life in Marin county, but by virtue of her marriage to my dad, she was Iranian. So she had a right to visit her son in prison that was a right that they didn't wanna give me for for many months. But ultimately they had to concede with my wife. It was the same thing. I mean, you know, she said, hey, look says right here that anybody kept in prison. Has to have the opportunity to be with their their spouse to re up the valves with the physical act every once in a while. And if you don't give me that I'm going to tell the world that you're denying us. Our our our rights that are enshrined in your constitution. You say that you're treating us fairly, but that's not the case. And ultimately, the lawyer that we had who was very skillful at understanding the laws as well said, look your honor judge. This is the hanging judge the judge of death, the the person who's responsible for signing the execution orders of over six hundred people said to him, you know, you realize that this guy hasn't done anything wrong. You realize that you're just holding him loss? Did you know that you're going to let them go at some point make his life just a little bit easier? So that when he gets out, you know, he's not a destroyed human being. So it was those little opportunities to. To feel a little bit more comfortable little bit less isolated that made it possible for me to to walk out of there. And and feel like I had a chance at reclaiming my life that judge was a real hard liner. I mean, not for being hardliner. Yeah. He's he's the worst. But at the end of the day, you realize he's just a piece in this larger puzzle, you know, of this regime. That's that's rooted in this ideology that that doesn't make a lot of sense in two thousand nineteen and will basically do whatever the the revolutionary guard corps compels him to do. Well, they threatened to cut off arms and legs. I know and the whole trial was a sham and like we said earlier you were in solitaire. And you're I didn't have a toilet. It was it was pretty harsh conditions denied medical care when you need it. Yeah. Yeah. For months at a time again until finally my wife, push them to the brink and said, hey, I'm going to go on television and tell them what's going on my brother. Was such a fierce force here in the west. And you know, constantly my captors were saying somebody needs to shut up. This Ali resign. You know, he's he's making this harder for us and all of that public. Attention. I credit with a b you know, my my treatment being improved and be you know, ultimately being released. I mean, I I was kept for a year and a half. I was the the western journalists who spent the most time in prison in Iran, but in the in the sphere of Iranian hostage taking I'm kind of the success case in recent years. And that's a scary thought you can feel lucky compared to kashogi to of course, of course, also with the Washington Post we're talking to Jason Zion. And he's the author Ruko prisoner my five hundred and forty four days in an Iranian prison, solitary confinement, sham trial high stakes diplomacy and the extraordinary efforts. It took to get me out. He's now global opinions writer with Washington Post and also contributed to CNN and. There's some. This a whole I want to talk to you about US Iranian relations. I mean, you've been so much in the in the news on that. But getting back to the point you just made about people coming to your coming to assist you to help spring. You really? I mean, your brother is a key figures you said, and it's a very moving story about that brother love and how much he put forward on that. But you had people like Obama backing you head Mohammed Ali had dome. Chomsky? I mean, it was a remarkable sense of people. Well, really trying to do with every snow. I mean, do what they could spring you. Yeah. And I think that so much of that began with my my mother, and my brother being so vocal the Washington Post sparing, no expense and opportunity to to raise. My case has your back all the time one hundred. I mean a million percent and they hired Washington firm law firm, Wilmer HALE, and the the lead lawyer on that case, Bob, Kim it. Who is an American hero in his own, right? Created this campaign of international pressure on the Iranians. So that everywhere they went in those five hundred and forty four days they had to hear my name when they met with with delegations from from India from France from Germany from Japan there will always hearing about Jason. And and I think when when I want to hear or Caesar reef talking about me when I watched the clips of of that time, you know, he wasn't. He wasn't very happy because he was getting tired of hearing this guy's name over and over again. How does it feel to be free? I mean, it's a question you're often asked, but they've had some time to process it. What do you say? No. I feel. Like, I'm getting back to the guy that I remember being before all this happened the first weeks and months of freedom are so hard because you believe that you should just be elated, and relaxed and the worst is behind you. But you also know that you've lost a lot of time. You're suffering from ailments and symptoms, psychological and physical that you never had before. Nightmares? Thankfully, three years on those are diminishing, but they still come back. Sometimes I'm I'm happy to be free. I also feel like I paid a toll that I never should have had to and my family did as well. So you know, there there's some embittered alliance there. But ultimately, I'm I'm excited about the fact that I can tell my story, I can, you know, walk in in public and freely and do the things that I wanna do eat the things that I wanna eat a lot of the weight that I lost in prison. You know, put back back not all but a good chunk of it. And you know, I'm just looking forward to the rest of my life and the opportunity to do things I want to and your wife was essentially freed with a Swiss diplomat after two months. She no she was freed the our captors decided that for whatever reason it didn't make sense to hold her any longer, but she was essentially on house arrest, and she was forced to go home to her parents..

Iran Washington Post Jason Marin county writer Michael Krasny Jason resign Mohammed Ali CIA Evan Tehran Lisa Obama administration Washington Illinois Rwanda American embassy
"jason resign" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"jason resign" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Here's what's coming up later today on forum in two thousand fourteen Washington Post journals. Jason resigned was arrested at his home in Tehran. He spent a year and a half in an Iranian prison. Accused of being a spy for the American government. He joins us to talk about the ordeal which details in his new memoir prisoner. Join us from nine to eleven AM here on public radio with us. It's coming up in just about forty minutes here on kqed public radio weatherwise, we're looking for mostly cloudy skies today with patchy fog this morning. We'll have high temperatures in the sixties along the southerly winds between five and ten miles per hour. It's expected to be mostly cloudy overnight tonight. We'll have overnight lows from the mid forty s to the low fifties. As our program continues today, we are expecting temperatures as we said in the sixties with San Francisco expecting a high of sixty two Sacramento today. We'll get up to sixty three degrees. Oakland will have a high of sixty three Napa and conquered both expecting sixty four this afternoon. And we're going to have a high of sixty five in Redwood City, Livermore and Fremont. Sixty six is the expected high in Mountain View Santa Rosa, getting up the sixty seven today, San Jose. And Morgan hill both expecting a high of sixty eight degrees. More of morning edition still to come as we said they will have forum coming your way at nine o'clock this morning, followed at eleven by the takeaway as our program continues. The time is now a twenty two. It's morning edition on I'm Brian watt. The Trump administration is literally laying the groundwork to enlarge California's biggest reservoir by raising the height of the iconic Shasta dam north of reading the idea has been around for decades. But it's hugely controversial and this saga could lead to the next showdown between California in Washington K, Q E science editor Craig Miller explains. How?.

Jason Washington Post California Brian watt Tehran kqed American government Shasta dam Mountain View Santa Rosa San Francisco San Jose Redwood City Morgan hill Sacramento Craig Miller Oakland editor Washington Fremont Livermore
"jason resign" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"jason resign" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Down climate change by reducing the supply of oil. But the Trump administration seems headed in the opposite direction. It's preparing a five year plan to encourage offshore drilling in federally controlled waters, including those off the coast of Santa Barbara, John Hamilton NPR This is NPR news and a nineteen minutes past the hour of six Joe McConnell brings us another look at the early ride to work this morning, Joe newest trouble, Matt is on the way to the San Mateo bridge. Just off the Nimitz freeway ninety two westbound past eighty couple of cars into a crash on the shoulder and also westbound five eighty at hop yards crash now for about thirty five minutes, just moved to the shoulder, but it had blocking the left lane for a while. So it's still backed up to Santa Rita road. Five eighty westbound at grant line that might still be breakdown and to a five westbound behind it is backed up almost a Tracy boulevard. Joe McConnell for kqed. Thank you, Joe. His report brought to you by bay alarm. And he'll update us again at the bottom of the hour. Support for K Q D comes from the California academy of sciences where visitors can journey through a rainforest outerspace the deep sea, man. Meet nearly forty thousand live animals all in one day. Tickets available at Calcutta may dot ORG, and by brilliant earth, ethical origin, fine jewelry conflict. Free diamond engagement rings, another fine. Jewelry are available at brilliant earth dot com and in the downtown San Francisco showroom, Brian watt. Who is going to join us with local reporting from K Kuwaiti news in just a moment. That's going to be. Well, it's it's coming up. Stay with us for that. And then coming up later this morning. Here's what's coming up later today on forum in two thousand fourteen Washington Post journalist, Jason resigned was arrested at his home in Tehran. He spent a year and a half in Iranian prison. Accused of being a spy for the American government. He joins us to talk about the ordeal, which he details in his new memoir prisoner. Join us from nine to eleven AM here on K Q E public radio. And then following the forum program today at eleven o'clock, we'll bring the here and now program, I'm Lisa Mullins. More states are legalizing marijuana.

Joe McConnell San Mateo bridge NPR Santa Rita road Santa Barbara Lisa Mullins California academy of sciences San Francisco Brian watt John Hamilton Calcutta marijuana Washington Post K Kuwaiti kqed Jason American government Tehran Matt
"jason resign" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"jason resign" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"It should be pointed out that over the years Ron has paid well over two billion dollars to the United States in similar cases in the in the same courts. But ultimately the money was used only as leverage in the final hours when the Iranian regime was trying to block my wife from leaving the country. So it wasn't money that was intended for my release. But ultimately it played a role in the final moments, and I'm comfortable in the knowledge that the US government wasn't going to let any of these concessions be made to Iran until myself and others came home, and you describe in the book leaving around going to Germany, go from Germany to Bangor Maine on the base os playing and that's the touchdown in the United States. You know, there was a lot of pressure for you to come out. Give interviews the talk and you didn't do that. You took. Time. Tell me about that decision. Because that's about a journalist choosing to avoid the the interview requests from other journalists, including myself. Well, I want to be full disclosure. I asked you about it in person the first time you met, and you you gave me the right to make my own decision. And I always appreciate you for that. I think I might have even said to you that if I were you I would wait to do an interview even though I would love to do it right away. You preface it with don't tell my boss. That's cool. Boss knows now. So I was I was set to do a whole bunch of media appearances about a month after I came out, and I talked to several people one of those people was your friend and mine Anthony bourdain, and he really dissuaded me from from going out and do interviews because he said, look, you're not in in a emotional place right now where you can talk. Coherently about this experience that you've had and also you're gonna learn so much more about what went on. If I was you. I'd I'd seize the reins of your own story. And and write about it. And then go talk about it when when you feel comfortable doing it and Bob Woodward gave me very similar advice around the same time. And I thought to myself if Woodward and and boarding telling me to do this. I should probably listen to them. Lots of other people telling me to do otherwise. But I listen to them and we should mention aboard aim book before board anes death. He created a book imprint and and that's why he's on the cover his names on the cover there. As an Anthony bourdain book, speaking aboard, and you're now with CNN is a CNN analyst. But Jason you mentioned in the book. You don't watch cable news. Well, what I learned to got back about cable news. So I was watching a lot of news from the Iranian perspective while I was in prison. Yeah. That really turned me off to television for a long time. The the final pages of of my book are really an encapsulation of the first few months of my freedom. I watch regularly. Now, I watch your show every Sunday to say that I do I do in our big fans. You don't have to say that. But I appreciate it. I I really think people can learn so much from these two titles can. Learn so much about the as y'all said the octopus gentle hazard of journalism that should not exist. But does thank you both for joining me. And thanks for talking about it. Thanks, brian. Thanks, brian. And again, Jason resigns book is titled prisoner my five hundred forty four days and in Iranian prison, solitary confinement, sham trial high stakes diplomacy and the extrordinary efforts. It took to get me out. That's available. It's on sale now. And so is Joel Simon's book we want to negotiate the secret world of kidnapping, hostages and ransom..

Bob Woodward Jason Anthony bourdain United States brian Ron Bangor Maine Iran CNN Germany Joel Simon kidnapping analyst five hundred forty four days two billion dollars
"jason resign" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:41 min | 3 years ago

"jason resign" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Michelle Hennigan. This is K Q E D in the time is seven of six this is fresh air. I'm Terry gross as the Washington Post Tehran bureau chief and the only American citizen reporting from Iran on a permanent basis. Jason resign had great access to stories, but it also made him a big target on a day in July twenty fourteen resign along with his wife, and their friend left is department. And when they got out of the elevator. Several men were waiting for them one with a gun pointed at resign. He and his wife were arrested. He was accused of being a spy for the Americans the so-called evidence of. His subterfuge was ludicrous. But that doesn't matter when you're being held in Iran's Evan prison, which is notorious for its horrible, conditions, interogations and the torture. Some prisoners are subjected to resigns wife Yogi who is Orion was released after two months, but he was held there for two and a half years including a period in solitary, and he was interrogated over and over again Iran tried to use him as a bargaining chip and getting concessions from the US before implementing the accord limiting Iran's nuclear program, the Washington Post, the Obama administration friends colleagues and his family pressured Iran to release him. He's now suing the Iranian government for taking them hostage and psychologically torturing him. He's written a memoir about the ordeal called prisoner. He now writes for the global opinion section of the Washington Post Jason resign. Welcome to fresh air. It's so great to talk with you. And to know that you're you're. Well, and you've been out of prison. And you know, I followed your story, and it was just very upsetting to read about what was happening. So I want to start with asking you, do you think you are being used by Iran as a pawn in the nuclear negotiations, you know, I don't like the term pawn. I don't think anybody does. I certainly think that I was being used as a. As leverage in a very intense moment of diplomatic engagement between Iran and the US that hadn't happened in almost four decades. And there were so many different. Variables at play and factions involved. But yeah, I think certainly I was being held at as something to use as a bargaining chip in those negotiations. So what do they expect to get for you? You know, I I think it was pretty unclear may have didn't even unclear to them when they took me. I don't think that on July twenty second two thousand fourteen when my wife, and I were detained from our home and taken to prison. They had a clear idea of what they wanted to do. I think the the authorities that took us were ones that were actively trying to get in the way of the nuclear negotiations and a possible deal and our arrest was was one of many things that they did to try to disrupt those negotiations and in the process of writing this book, and and researching it my conversations with people in the US government. It was clear that my arrest change the equation. It changed what they had to talk about every time that they met gave it one more challenge to the entire process. So my understanding is the Obama administration didn't want your release. To be a bargaining chip on the table. They didn't want to have that enter into negotiations. Do you have an opinion on how that was handled because there's arguments on all sides here about what to do. How to best handle it to save the person who's being held hostage and to not give a future incentive for countries or terrorist groups or factions to basically hold Americans hostage, as you know, as a bargaining chip. And basically, that's what happened to you are being held hostage. Yeah. And I think that we need to do much more to work to outlaw. This is a practice. Obviously it's against every international law that exists and has been for decades, but countries including Iran and. Maybe Iran was the country in the last half century that that started this trend are doing it more and more it's happening around the world, and they continue to do it themselves. I don't think we've come up with a good deterrent for yet. And ultimately, I think is a hard one for me to weigh in on. Because ultimately, I'm one of these people that that was lucky and came home. But I don't think that there's an easy answer on how to deal with these situations at all. So you you you were finally released in a trade. Would you just explain the terms of the deal? Yeah. So as I understand that now there were secret negotiations going on between the US and Iran separate from the Nick your negotiations different locations, different groups of people and those were a prisoner. Swap so to speak, and it was it was over Americans that were being held in Iran. And also about information over the fate of the FBI agent. Bob Levinson who disappeared in Iran two thousand seven. In exchange for Iranian citizens being held in American prisons, and ultimately that was agreed upon and the people who were involved were agreed upon I think both sides walked some some of the people back. There's still some Iranians in American prisons that were being discussed at the time and on the day of of the deal. January sixteenth and the nuclear deal of the nuclear deal, but also be released you know, there were some complications. And you know, there were a couple of Iranians in American prisons who are close to the end of their prison terms and said, you know, I don't wanna be pardoned. I didn't do anything wrong. And there were others who, you know, all of them turns out were were people who were either permanent residents or US citizens and not a single one of them returned to Iran. So it wasn't really a prisoner. Swap a bunch of dual nationals. Got released from prison is basically what happened. But there was also money in the deal too. Right. That was a separate deal. And you know, I know that it's a very contentious issue, but anybody that wants to go back and look at the history of it. Iran had a case against the US and international court over funds that the that the Shah of Iran had prepaid to the United States for an arms deal was four hundred million dollars. Iran had been actively pursuing that money for years, and that court was was going to be coming to a decision quite soon, and it would have cost the the United States billions of dollars in fines and interest payments. And I mean, I know that there are people out there. The find this hard to believe, but that was what was happening and in my conversations with with people in the Obama administration who worked on this. And before this was big news about the cash payment on the day of our release. They made it clear to me. That the administration saw this. As an opportunity to to turn a page with Iran and have a new beginning. And the president wanted a very big day on January sixteenth. And obviously as we know now so much of what happened in that deal has been undone. Fortunately, my freedom and the freedom of several other Americans was not undone, and we're all living our lives back here at home. Yes. So you're used as Iran attempted to use you as a bargaining chip in the nuclear negotiations. One of the first things President Trump did was to pull out of the nuclear accord. What was your reaction to that? I mean your ordeal. Was collateral damage from that deal. The Obama administration works so hard to get that deal signed and work so hard to get you released and then President Trump immediately, just like Nixon is the whole thing in terms of America's involvement. What did that feel like to you? Well, I can tell you that with the other prisoners. I was released with we had some text messages back and forth that day. Saying, you know, we're really happy that we were released during the Obama administration because we weren't going to get out. Otherwise, the Trump administration has been able to bring some American hostages home from other countries. But but very frankly Iran is a big dark spot on their record and the same people who have been so passionate about pulling out of the deal were were people who use my imprisonment as a reason that that the Obama administration should not engage with Iran and these negotiations they should make our release a precondition, and I had no problem with that idea. But those very same people were completely silent on the multiple Americans who are still in prison in Iran right now. And I I'm very worried that that Americans who are detained there and suffering there. We'll have few opportunities as long as this administration and their Iran policy remains what is. If you're just joining us from talking to Jason resign. He was the Washington Post Taran bureau chief when he was in prison in Iran and basically held hostage for five hundred forty four days. He's written a new memoir called prisoner. My five hundred and forty four days in Romanian prison solitary confinement, a sham trial high stakes diplomacy and the extraordinary efforts attempt to get me out. We're going to talk about his imprisonment after we take a short break. This is fresh air. This is fresh air. And if you're just joining us, my guest is Jason resign. He's an opinion columnist for the Washington Post when in two thousand fourteen when he was the post on bureau chief he was taken prisoner on trumped up charges and basically held hostage. He has a new memoir called prisoner. My five hundred and forty four days in an Iranian prison solitary confinement, a sham trial high stakes diplomacy and the extraordinary efforts. It took to get me out in your memoir. You write that you move to Iran to start a new life. Your father is an immigrant from Iran was I mean, he passed away your father was an Arabian emigrant in the US, and he had a Persian rug business that went bankrupt after nine eleven you write that when you went to Iran, the world financial markets were collapsing and sticking it out in the Persian rug business, which apparently you were in the time with lead to personal financial and perhaps actual suicide. So just tell us a bit about what your life was like when you were in the Persian rug business before becoming a journalist for the Washington Post. So I had been an aspiring journalists since college. And you know, it was a struggling freelancer without a lot of work under my belt. So take these trips to the Iran, right? A couple of stories hope that they get published return to California and work in my dad's shop, and I did that for several years until finally when I was thirty two he said, you know, starting to grow up and and. You should open your own shop, which I did in a very high rent district of San Francisco just off union square failed. Spectacularly I opened several. Open the spring of two thousand and eight I think may I two thousand eight with my opening day. And by August, you know, there were. Bad clouds Bruin above. So it was tough. And it sort of implanted this seed in my mind that you know, if you don't get out of this. Now, you're gonna be stuck with it forever. And and each month, I was paying thousands of dollars in rent. So I decided to close up shop and move to Iran and just make a go at it. I didn't have any other professional prospects. I was thirty three years old. And I did that and lo and behold, it turned into a a long term career in one that was very productive..

Iran US Obama administration Washington Post Jason Washington Evan prison Obama bureau chief Iranian government Terry gross Michelle Hennigan President Trump California Yogi FBI Bob Levinson San Francisco
"jason resign" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:20 min | 3 years ago

"jason resign" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Away the latest news and analysis from NPR and WNYC on all things considered. This is fresh air. And if you're just joining us, my guest is Jason resign while he was the Washington Post Taran bureau chief in two thousand fourteen he was taken prisoner and put in Iran's most notorious prison called Evine prison, and he was held there for five hundred forty four days. He's written a new memoir about that called prisoner. He's now an opinion writer for the Washington Post and a contributor to CNN. There are some very like surreal moments in your book that would be really funny if they weren't. So if your situation wasn't so horrible. It's okay. To laugh at them, Terry. Okay. Good one of my favorites. As like you're talking to one of the guards. And one of you brings up rose water, the movie about someone else, another journalist who was held prisoner in Iran and John Stewart directed the movie version of the memoir, and so like the guards thank you and the guard start casting like if there were a movie based on your experience as a prisoner who would play the guard and who would play you. And so who did the guard cast as himself Will Smith. Really? This. Feel like here's a guard at in in this horrible prison and you're being interrogated all the time. And now, you're casting the movie version and he wants Will Smith to play him. Well, I think what it did. For me was remind me how far reaching American culture Hollywood. And in our influence reaches in the world. Even these guys who claim to be the purists and the protectors of the Islamic Republican are opposed to American imperialism, and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, go home and watch. You know, independence day Batman and everything else that we watch. I mean, you know, oftentimes, they would bring up the TV show homeland, and I think honestly all of their training in what they probably came from watching homeland. That's not good. So who would you have cast as the guard Denzel Washington, excuse me, Denzel Washington supposed to play me. No. The guard. I mean, come on. I the guard. That's a great question. I you know, I I let them pick himself. You know, it was it's it's our movie. So in writing about adjusting to life outside of prison, you write that your wife, and you misplace things you've each aged you both don't trust anyone anymore. But you trust each other. You become confused in crowded places. You don't like talking on the phone? I want to ask you about not being able to trust anyone anymore. You rely to constantly everything you told was basically ally while you were prisoner. So. What is it like to not feel like you can't trust anyone anymore? And this is across the ward. I mean, how tell me what that's what that's like. It's not across the board. And you know, I think now that I have some distance. January seventeenth was three years since my release and the way that I've structured and written this book, you know, those first few months after my release for is where I see sort of the the ending off point. We've come a long way in the last couple of years, but it's still really hard. And I I am less trusting than I was before more in need of verification. Friends who know me and have known me for a long time. We'll probably report that if we make plans together, I double and triple check them. Now that was not anything that I ever did in the past. It's hard. I mean life is is more complicated. Because there's a voice inside my head. That tells me that I have to question everything. And while that might be beneficial for aspects of my work. It doesn't really help me in getting through my day to day existence because it's not natural for me. I miss being carefree. And when I say carefree, I don't mean, not caring. But I mean, you know, being confident and trusting that he can walk out your front door. And go about your daily business and expect to come home at the end of the night unscathed because I have anecdotal evidence in my own life to tell you that sometimes that's not how things work. Are you being harassed in any way by Iranians? No. Yeah. Of course. I mean, I'll tell you you you asked about a funny moment in the book about about my. My interrogators casting choice of of who planned the movie was Will Smith and that that'll become public knowledge. Now that the book is out now that we've talked about it. And I'm sure I'll talk about it again at some point. But for these past three years, I'd get gotten intermittent messages from social media council in my Washington Post Email here and there with pictures of of Will Smith. I mean, this is my interrogator trolling me on the internet. It it it happened. Just this week. And so that's that's part of my reality now and. I don't know any other way than being open and transparent about it. And that's how I walk through this life. Justin resign. It's great to talk with you. It's great to know that your life has resumed. I wish you well. It's been a pleasure. Jason resigns memoir is called prisoner. He now writes for the global opinion section of the Washington Post tomorrow on fresh air. My guest will be on woods who was a San Quentin inmate when he told his stories and the stories of fellow inmates on the podcast ear hustle after twenty one years in prison. He's now free. His sentence was commuted nearly two months ago by governor Jerry Brown. We'll also be joined by his ear hustle co host and co producer Nigel poor who is not an inmate. I hope you'll join us fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our senior producer today. Sam brigger, our interviews and reviews produced an edited by EMI salad from this Myers..

Will Smith Washington Post Washington Denzel Washington Iran Jason WNYC NPR producer CNN Evine Terry San Quentin writer bureau chief Danny Miller executive producer Hollywood Jerry Brown Sam brigger
"jason resign" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:41 min | 3 years ago

"jason resign" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And if you just joining us, my guest is Jason resign. He was the Washington Post Taran bureau chief when he was taken prisoner and held hostage or captive for five hundred and forty four days starting in two thousand fourteen his family, the Washington Post other journalists and the Obama administration a worked on behalf of his release. And finally got him out. He's written a new memoir called prisoner. He's now an opinion columnist for the Washington Post and a contributor to CNN. While you were in solitary, you weren't allowed any books. But you know, they said, you should pray. So you said, well, if you want me to pray get me a Cora, so they did they got your core on your father was Iranian and immigrated to America, I don't know if he was Muslim or Latin nod, I don't know if you were brought up with any of the teachings of the Koran, but what was it like for you to read the car? And because I think whether you're a Christian or a Jew or a Muslim let the ancient texts are are there fascinating tax, and yet they're very rich tax. And they're all full, no matter what religion you practice. You can find some wisdom and all of us tax. So what was it like for you to read the Koran? What did you find an at that surprised you, you know, for for better or worse? I should say that my father was a very devout Shiah Muslim growing up and came to America. And while he didn't practice in the same ways that you're supposed to in terms of fasting during Ramadan. And praying five times a day. He's still was a great believer his entire life. My mom came from a Catholic background and. They were both raised with religion. They decided to raise my brother, and I and the San Francisco Bay area so take that for what it's worth we. We didn't we didn't spend a lot of time in places worship other than on Christmas. I think reading the Koran. Gave me a new sense of how Iran is organized politically. And legally I mean, there's a lot about laws. It's a it's a system of of law and politics, and it's also there's a lot of venture vengefulness in in the Koran. I'll just say that it it didn't do much for me. In terms of establishing any kind of foundation of faith. This is fresh air. And if you're just joining us, my guest is Jason resign. He was the Washington Post Taran bureau chief when he was taken prisoner and held hostage or captive for five hundred and forty four days starting in two thousand fourteen his family, the Washington Post other journalists and the Obama administration a worked on behalf of his release. And finally got him out. He's written a new memoir called prisoner. He's now an opinion columnist for the Washington Post and a contributor to CNN. While you were in solitary, you weren't allowed any books, but they said, you should pray. So you said, well, if you want me to pray get me a car get out. Exactly, exactly. And you know, originally, they were denying her the right to visit me because they said, well, she's a foreign person actually should not a foreign person by virtue of her marriage to Iranian, man. She's been a citizen of Iran since the early nineteen seventies. So these were little things that we have to push on hard, and they had to handle threats and rejection, but ultimately we're able to push through and we established the ability for my mom to come and see me once a week. And then it turned out that the Koran says that. The marriages are nullified if they're not re- consummated on a regular basis. I found that hard to believe that that was codified into Iranian law. But it is and after many months, they started giving us the opportunity to spend a few hours together periodically, which boggled my mind. But it wasn't something that I was going to say no to so did they give you a room for the conjugal? Visit. Yeah. It was so creepy. It had a room with a mattress on the floor a small dorm refrigerator. A little shower. And you know, we had the opportunity once a week to have a family meeting real with my wife, and my mother like you see in the movies, you know, behind the glass window. With a through a phone, right? But but this conjugal room was right next to that. It's like why are you putting me in a glass? Why can't I have a meeting with my mom and my wife in a room where we're all sitting together. If you're gonna let me a couple of weeks down the road spent several hours with my wife in the most intimate circumstances. It's kind of weird. And it was there was a sign in the in the room that said that, you know, there was no surveillance devices in this room, you know, out of respect, and courtesy, and, you know, Islamic chastity or whatever it said, and that just kinda tipped us off to the fact that there was almost certainly plenty of devices in the room. But it was it was a small morsel of. Of opportunity right to be close to my wife to talk to hold hands to do. What husbands and wives have been doing for Monia? And I think it helped in the later months from helped me from going more insane. Let's take a short break here. And then we'll talk some more. If you're just joining us. My guests is Jason resign. He was held prisoner in Iran for five hundred forty four days while he was the Washington Post around bureau chief he's now an opinion writer for the Washington Post, and he's the author of a new memoir called prisoner. We'll be right back after a short break. This is fresh air..

Washington Post bureau chief Iran Jason Washington CNN Obama America San Francisco Bay Cora writer forty four days five hundred forty four days
"jason resign" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:52 min | 3 years ago

"jason resign" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The US military helicopter exploded off the coast of San Francisco in heavy fog Monday. Eight crewmen are missing one pilot warned about safety risks. But the military still let them fly he saw it happening. And unfortunately, he couldn't do anything to change it. In time navy chopper down on the next reveal tonight at eight on ninety three point nine FM WNYC. This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross as the Washington Post Tehran bureau chief and the only American citizen reporting from Iran on a permanent basis. Jason resign had great access to stories, but it also made him a big target on a day in July twenty fourteen resign along with his wife, and their friend leftist department, and when they got out of the elevator. Several men were waiting for them one with a gun pointed at resign. He and his wife were arrested. He was accused of being a spy for the Americans the so-called evidence of his subterfuge was ludicrous. But that doesn't matter when you're being held in Iran's Evan prison, which is notorious for its horrible conditions, the interogations and the torture. Some prisoners are subjected to resigns wife Yogi who is Orion was released after two months, but he was held there for two and a half years including a period in solitary, and he was interrogated over and over. Over again, Iran tried to use him as a bargaining chip and getting concessions from the US before implementing the accord limiting Iran's nuclear program, the Washington Post, the Obama administration friends colleagues and his family pressured Iran to release him. He's now suing the Iranian government for taking them hostage and psychologically torturing him. He's written a memoir about the ordeal called prisoner. He now writes for the global opinion section of the Washington Post Jason resign. Welcome to fresh air. It's so great to talk with you. And to know that you're you're well, and you've been out of prison. And you know, I followed your story, and it was just very upsetting to read about what was happening. So I want to start with asking you, do you think you are being used by Iran as a pawn in the nuclear negotiations. You know, I don't like the term pawn. I don't think anybody does. I certainly think that I was being used as a. As leverage in a a very intense moment of diplomatic engagement between Iran and the us that hadn't happened in almost four decades. And there were so many different. Variables at play and and factions involved. But yeah, I think certainly I was being held as something to use as a bargaining chip in those negotiations. So what do they expect to get for you? You know, I think it was pretty unclear may have didn't even unclear to them when they took me. I don't think that on July twenty second two thousand fourteen when my wife, and I were detained from our home and taken to prison. They had a clear idea of what they wanted to do. I think the the authorities that took us were ones that were actively trying to get in the way of the nuclear negotiations and possible deal and our arrest was was one of many things that they did to try to disrupt those negotiations and in the process of of writing this book, and and researching it my conversations with people in the US government. It was clear that my arrest change the equation. It changed what they had to talk about every time that they met gave it one more challenge to the entire process. So my understanding is the Obama administration didn't want your release. To be a bargaining chip on table. They didn't want to have that enter into negotiations. Do you have an opinion on how that was handled because there's arguments on all sides here about what to do. How to best handle it to save the person who's being held hostage and to not give a future incentive for countries or terrorist groups or factions to basically hold Americans hostage as know as a bargaining chip. And basically, that's what happened to you. You were being held hostage. Yeah. And I think that we need to do much more to work to outlaw this practice. Obviously it's against every international law that exists and has been for decades, but countries, including Iran, and maybe Iran was the country in the last half century that that started this trend are doing it, more and more. It's happening around the world, and they continue to do with. Themselves. I don't think we've come up with a good deterrent for yet. And ultimately, I think is a hard one for me to weigh in on. Because ultimately, I'm one of these people that that was lucky and came home. But I don't think that there's an easy answer on how to deal with these situations at all. So you were finally released in a trade. Would you just explain the terms of the deal? Yeah. So as I understand that now there were secret negotiations going on between the US and Iran separate from the Nick your negotiations different locations, different groups of people and those were a prisoner. Swap so to speak, and it was it was over Americans that were being held in Iran. And also about information over the fate of the FBI agent. Bob Levinson who disappeared in Iran two thousand seven. In exchange for Iranian citizens being held in American prisons, and ultimately that was agreed upon and the people who were involved were agreed upon I think both sides walked some some of the people back. There's still some Iranians in American prisons that were being discussed at the time and on the day of of the deal January sixteenth of the nuclear deal of the nuclear deal. But also that you're be released. You know, there was some complications. And there were a couple of Iranians in American prisons who are close to the end of their prison terms and said, you know, I don't want to be pardoned. I didn't do anything wrong. And there were others who, you know, all of them turns out were were people who were either permanent residents or US citizens and not a single one of them returned to Iran. So it wasn't really a prisoner. Swap a bunch of dual nationals. Got released from prison is basically what happened. But there was also money in the deal to right that was a separate deal. And you know, I know that it's a very contentious issue, but anybody that wants to go back and look at the history of it. Iran. Had a case against the US and international court over funds that the that the Shah of Iran had prepaid to the United States for an arms deal was four hundred million dollars. Iran had been actively pursuing that money for years, and that court was was going to be coming to a decision quite soon, and it would have cost the the United States billions of dollars in fines and interest payments. And I mean, I know that there are people out there that find this hard to believe, but that was what was happening and in my conversations with with people in the Obama administration who worked on this. And before this was big news about the cash payment on the day of our release. They made it clear to me that the administration saw this. As an opportunity to to turn a page with Iran and have a new beginning. And the president wanted a very big day on January sixteenth. And obviously as we know now so much of what happened in that deal has been undone. Fortunately, my freedom and the freedom of of several other Americans was not undone and were all living our lives back here at home. Yes. So you're used as Iran attempted to use you as a bargaining chip in the nuclear negotiations. And one of the first things President Trump did was to pull out of the nuclear accord. What was your reaction to that? I mean your ordeal. Was collateral damage from that deal. The Obama administration works so hard to get that deal sign and work so hard to get you released and then President Trump immediately, just like Nixon this the whole thing in terms of America's involvement. What does that feel like to you? Well, I can tell you that with the other prisoners. I was released with we had some text messages back and forth that day. Saying, you know, we're really happy that we were released during the Obama administration because we weren't going to get out. Otherwise, the Trump administration has been able to bring some American hostages home from other countries. But but very frankly Iran is a big dark spot on their record and the same people who have been so passionate about pulling out of the deal were were people who use my imprisonment as a reason that that the administration should not engage with Iran and these negotiations they should make our release a precondition, and I have no problem with that idea. But those very same people were completely silent on the multiple Americans who are still in prison in Iran right now. And I I am very worried that the Americans were detained there and suffering there. We'll have few opportunities as long as this administration and their Iran policy remains what it is. If you're just joining us from talking to Jason resign. He was the Washington Post around bureau chief when he was in prison in Iran and basically held hostage for five hundred forty four days. He's written a new memoir called prisoner. My five hundred and forty four days in Iranian prison, solitary confinement, a sham trial high stakes diplomacy and the extraordinary efforts to get me out. We're going to talk about his imprisonment after we take a short break. This is fresh air. Here's.

Iran US Obama administration Jason Washington Post Washington WNYC bureau chief Terry gross Evan prison San Francisco president Obama Iranian government FBI Bob Levinson Yogi Tehran
"jason resign" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"jason resign" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"This is CBS news on the hour. Sponsored by zoom video conferencing, I'm Deborah Rodriguez. This is the nineteenth day of a partial government shutdown and tomorrow federal workers will miss their first paychecks. Correspondent Nancy Cortez says the president is beginning to lose last night. Alaska, Senator Lisa Murkowski became the third Republican Senator to say publicly that we should reopen most of these agencies as negotiations continue. Here's what she had to say. The reality is that thousands of furloughed, federal employees and contractors have no paycheck in. And there's no reason that they should be held hostage to a political dispute. White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders asked this morning, if she's worried I'm concerned about the fact that we have a crisis at the border that we need to solve and we need Democrats to step up do their jobs and work with us to get it done. The president meets with congressional leaders at the White House today. CBS news correspondent Paula Reid. Has learned deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein. Line is ready to step aside after William bar is confirmed as attorney general timing is surprising. And it's unclear what this means for the special counsel's investigation expected at bar would likely inherit oversight of that investigation. But there's no guarantee because his previous very public criticism of that investigation is expected to be a central theme of his confirmation hearing next week, the family of a navy vet from California is pleading with the administration to get involved to get their son released from prison in Iran. Here's CBS is Margaret Brennan, Michael white is the fourth American to be held by Iran. And while CBS news learned that Iran floated the idea of a prisoner exchange last year State Department officials will not say whether the Trump administration is now willing to negotiate contact between the two countries was cut off after President Trump exit the nuclear deal and American journalist held hostage in Iran for year and a half is suing Tehran for damages live to CBS's. Vicki barker. One billion dollars in damages. In addition to forty million in compensation that Washington Post journalist Jason resigned says he's do over the eighteen harrowing months, he spent an honor rainy in jail, it's meant to discourage Iran from engaging in future hostage taking, but Iran, watchers note that terror victims in such cases have been able to collect only a small fraction of the forty six billion dollars in total judgments leveled against Tehran since nineteen Ninety-six. Debra the manager of a polka restaurant in Chicago has been suspended after admitting. He threw a chair at a black customer. I had to fight three people have a restaurant the other day. So. I thought I had to fight some more people freak out video posted to social media has Matthew Fazio apologizing to eighteen year old Kyle Johnson who says he gone inside to say hi to some friends as in p futures up twelve this is CBS news, zoom video conferencing, featuring video and audio clarity with screen sharing. Free. Accounts are available at zoom dot US. That's zoom dot US, zoom video conferencing..

CBS Iran president Senator Lisa Murkowski Tehran Deborah Rodriguez William bar White House Nancy Cortez Sarah Sanders deputy attorney general Alaska Senator Vicki barker rod Rosenstein Chicago Washington Post