27 Burst results for "Jason Palmer"

"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:40 min | 10 months ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"You ever heard of lab grown diamonds if not we've got you after thousands of hours mastering the science light box is here to shed some light here's that works lab grown diamonds are essentially chemically the same as natural ones just made in a lab to make them use plasma reactor to heat tiny pieces of lab grown diamonds up to temperatures almost as hot as the sun in about two weeks those little seeds turned to full carat stones light box has hacked the process to consistently create. gorgeous gems now here's where it gets really interesting light box lab grown diamonds aren't just made the same every time they're also priced the same each carrot is Eight hundred dollars mind blown so there you have it get the facts and see the science behind the sparkle at light box jewelry dot com slash intelligence use code intelligence for twenty five dollars off Hello and welcome to the intelligence economist Radio I'm your host Jason Palmer every weekday be provide fresh perspective on the events shaping your world after negotiations with America Turkey has agreed a ceasefire in northeastern Syria but the deal is nothing but a win for Turkey tens of thousands of Kurds will be displaced and America's role and image in the region will keep declining and it's time we got into psychedelic drugs that least that's the idea researchers who are looking to treat depression anxiety and the like patents are being handed out start ups are starting up it's not a business trip it's a trip business.

Jason Palmer America Turkey Syria depression Eight hundred dollars twenty five dollars two weeks
Dont spend it all at once: Pakistan and the IMF

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:02 min | 1 year ago

Dont spend it all at once: Pakistan and the IMF

"Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist radio. I'm your host. Jason Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. In the west there seems to be a push towards vegetarianism and veganism, but that's just a tiny blip in a bigger upward trend in meeting around the world, that's bad news for the environment. But in a narrower sense, it's good for people. And a century ago. One in eight girls born in France was named Marie now that number is one in one hundred demographers love, these kinds of trends, they reveal much more than census data do about. How France is secularize ING and globalizing. But I. Focused on is poised to accept a hefty bailout from the International Monetary Fund. Again, the over indebted country has just sought it's twenty second loan from the F. In a speech while opening a hospital last week, prime minister, Imran Khan, laid the blame on his predecessors. Maimed Pakistan's economic predicament on the previous government. Fingered the amount of debt at the previous government has racked up. Simon cox. Economists emerging marketer. And he pointed out to Pakistanis that fixing this problem would require some hardship in the short term. And he'll so reassured them that Pakistan was in reality of rich country. And the things would get better eventually, and how have done is responded to news of this loan. So there's some dismay some disgruntlement little bit of surprise Iman Khan doing campaigning for the elections last year said he wouldn't turn to the IMF. Although most economists knew that it would be inevitable. He also made large claims for instituting a new kind of welfare state in Pakistan that would take better care of the poor. So that sits at odds with the austerity that Buxton is now going to have to endure, although when should say that the IMF program is attempting to make some provision for the poor. It's certainly been causing a big stir in parliament and the opposition in particular have been accusing the government of selling Pakistan out accusing Pakistan of allowing dictate terms. One particular point of contention is. From this Imran Khan shook up his economic team of the last couple of weeks. Now, the head of the central Bank is a Pakistan national, but also a former official at the IMF. So some critics feel day with this. Right. So let let's roll back a little bit here. How did Pakistan's economy get into such a mess in the first place so Pakistan's been a regular customer? If you like the IMF, and it took a loan twenty thirteen which actually went quite well. And so around twenty sixteen the economy look to have stabilized, but from then on the previous government ran some unsustainable policies in particular the exchange rate to expensive which the competitiveness of puck stan's exports, and they also ran two large budget deficit. So it's too much spending not enough tax collecting, so the big export import Gant, and as a big revenue and expenditure gap for the government the economy, we should say grew pretty well during that pair. But it had these two unsustainable gaps and eventually investors cease to be willing to finance these gaps and the economists after then live with them Enes. So it sounds like some kind of intervention was was needed, and I know with with Pakistan as a as you say regular customer of the I MEF why are so many Pakistanis opposed to to their presence their their their lending. This is a common problem that the IMF aces countries pursue unsustainable. Economic policies. They live beyond their means. Now, the IMF at that point will offer alone to ease this transition, and so the lending will come with conditions attached. So the lending is misused to just by more time. Now, those conditions often quite painful, they often require a cuts in spending increase in taxes often evaluation of the exchange rate, which makes imports more expensive. So none of that is very popular. The question is whether if the I'm wasn't there with the situation even worse and typically answer's yes. Well, it can't be the case that can only turn to the IMF for money or they're not other lenders. Yes. So what sort of different this time? If you like is there an array of other lenders that the Pakistani authorities have leaned on Saudi Arabia has given quite a lot of money and also allowed Pakistan to defer payments on oil, the United Arab Emirates has stepped in and also China, of course, and for while the government sought a could make do with these friends they wouldn't have to deal with the F as well. But the money came short, basically, fills about half the gap, and if I had to turn to the IMF the other half, and how likely is it then on this sort of twenty second go round as Pakistan to actually stick to what the suggests this time around. So it's somewhat unlikely. No one particular to cut Pakistan off, you know, it's a country. That's in a very unstable geopolitical region is the country that has also of its own internal instability issues country of two hundred million people with nuclear weapons, and you know, one of the friends had in the past. Although friend is a strong word is the United States, which has provided an awful lot to economic and military assistance, and so often in previous deals with the F the IMF requested things that Pakistan has then vodka reluctantly partially agreed to and typically the IMF, let's it off at issues waiver said it says the conditions that we attached alone have been waived, and that's become a sort of a game that gets played between the two sides. Now, this is a new government. It's got a good team in place. Good economic team in place. They have their own reputations at stake. So this probably a higher probability this time that in previous occasion. But I'd be surprised if every item in this agreement gets into, but Pakistan doesn't see the IMF as a sort of lender of last resort just lender wondering the degree to which its existence, and this, you know, giving the money, and you can take the advice if you like kind of practice disincentivize is good fiscal discipline. So the IMF often finds itself in a difficult position. It doesn't want to be held responsible for triggering a crisis. It doesn't want to finally cut a country often send it into the abyss won't come think of other examples like Argentina where the became heavily invested in the success of its program and ended up throwing good money after bad an impact fans case it often turns a blind eye to foot-dragging by the authorities or only partial implementation of the conditions. The IMF has asked for besides because it doesn't want to create instability and cause trouble. And you're right. That does create. Inevitable physical game between the two sides. And we'll see how that plays out again with this latest land Buxton? Thank you very much Simon. Thank you very much. My pleasure.

Pakistan International Monetary Fund Imran Khan Simon Cox Jason Palmer France Buxton Prime Minister Saudi Arabia Enes Marie United Arab Emirates Stan United States China Official Argentina
Buy the bullet: global defence spending

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:59 min | 1 year ago

Buy the bullet: global defence spending

"Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist radio. I'm your host. Jason Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. The first of may brings out protesters all over the globe campaigning for better labor conditions. But in France weekly demonstrations by the so-called issue lay zone have been going on for months. Yesterday's mayday gatherings. Brought out a violent fringe that threatens the Jones message and president of annual Macron's attempts to address it. And we take a look at a new study that tries to measure, which English speaking country produces the most bullshit. But I. Last week. China's navy celebrated its seventieth birthday in grand style. As president Xi Jinping peered through binoculars into rain and mist a flotilla swept through the South China Sea. Nine. Winds there. What this moving you. Rose of white clouds, sailors stood on worships and saluted Mr. g who was aboard a brand new destroyer China has also boasted of its nuclear submarines and says it's building a new aircraft carrier America sees China as a growing rival, not just a military threat, but also economic one and the contest is being felt by America's closest allies in Britain yesterday. Gavin Williamson the Defense Secretary was fired by Prime Minister, Theresa may. He was accused of leaking details of how the country plans to let hallway a Chinese tech firm. Build part of its future five g mobile phone network. In response to that plan. America has threatened to cut back intelligence sharing with Britain. Beyond this America and China are leading the world in rearmament race. As a new report makes clear essentially the will to spending enormous sums of money on defense. Shizhong Joshi is economists defense editor this is the report by the Stockholm International Peace Research institute Cypriots Swedish thing Tang, and what it says this year is that global defense spending in twenty eight teen walls one point eight trillion dollars. Now, obviously that's a loss of money to put it in context of just how much it's the highest amount in real terms since sippy began this exercise in nineteen eighty eight and collecting these figures the end of the Cold War. It is seventy six percent higher than nine hundred ninety eight which was the peak of the post Cold War peace dividend when western countries began slashing on forces slashing spending. So you can see just how far we've come in the last twenty years. Also, just how much things have changed geopolitically and who's spending this one point eight trillion dollars, well essentially to. Countries are spending a leading the charge. That's America and China surprisingly America is heading shoulders above everyone else. It will spend about seven hundred sixteen billion dollars this year. That's significant increase from last year it out spends the next eight or so countries combined which gives you a sense of just how far ahead it is. Now, China is well behind spends a fraction of that. But it's military spending growing very quickly. It grew at an average of ten percent every year between two thousand and 2016 between two thousand fourteen in two thousand eighteen churned out. More ships ships with greater tonnage than the entire Indian Japanese navy. So that gives you a sense of just how rapidly they growing. And is this grew spread also among other nations or only American to the growing. It is great will that's provoking response. Particularly in Asia in Asia, for example, with seeing huge spurts among other countries. India for example, now. Spends more than any country in Europe. And I think Indians very proud of the fact that they are outspending not only countries like France, Germany, but also their old, colonial master Britain. Modern and invincible. Of whom stupefaction? Residency is Joel Indian skies ever own words. But Asia, Shirley, isn't the only place where governments want to to be up their defenses. No on Marshall Europeans. Have also been tooling up in recent years. They're obviously very worried by Russia, particularly after Russia's annexation of Crimea in two thousand fourteen they've been spending substantial amounts of quite quickly. If you're one single country its military spending would be four times that have Russia. In fact, it would be the second biggest military power in the world. So back to China, which has been spending money hand over fist as you say. But the their capabilities are still much much weaker compared to America's is there. Some sense of of when China might sort of outpace America will it'll be many many years before it can actually equal American spending. But I would say China gets to concentrate most of its military forces in its front garden in the western Pacific America has global commitments. So could we have a situation where Chinese forces in Asia? Outmatch American forces. Absolutely. We could have that very soon. Indeed. Depending on what America does depending on how China stretches capabilities so beyond America, China is is there anywhere where this would've frenzy of military spending. We'll kind of change the league table. I think we've seen a few changes taking place to Saudi Arabians in the Middle East have been spending huge amounts in the past ten years to the point where they are. Now, the third biggest spender in the world that obviously is going to have a major impact on the Middle East. If you look at Turkey, I think they've also been on a spending spree, and I think in Europe, one of the most interesting countries in eastern Europe, which of course, it's closer to Russia more about Russia's influence, and that's Poland. Police spending has been rising very quickly. They've been buying lots of American weapons, including an American Ed defense system, and they have been at the vanguard of some of this military spending spree in central and eastern Europe that we've seen in recent years. So looking at all these numbers is it's a global trend is everyone spending more. No, I think there's some pretty interesting places. West bending is is shrinking stagnating. The first example is the Middle East. Having said that Saudi Arabia. It was on this spending spree for the last ten years that slowing down. Sippy says that military spending the Middle East shrank by one point eight percent. In two thousand eighteen Saudi Arabia is planning on cutting spending after a number of years of growth, Iran is planning on cutting spending. Although we we don't have data for a few big countries like the United Arab Emirates and Casio. I think Africa's another good example military spending in Africa in two thousand eighteen shrink for the fourth consecutive year. And of course, as we know they're they're big protests in ALgeria and Sudan the military's under pressure from protesters to give way to civilians that could have an impact on on military budgets. I think finally the one I'd like to mention which is really interesting is Russia. Russia has modernized its armed forces over the last decade invested in lots of shiny new weapons. Sippy now says that his slowing. Down at that that boom in Russia is coming to an end. It's calculation say military spending in Russia shrunk by three and a half percent last year. Okay. Some of that could be to do with the fall of the ruble. This little probably spending a lot in ruble, terms. But I think what we all seeing is that the years of Russia plowing money into its military driven by oil that is slowly coming to an end, and that will have an impact, of course, on the European military balance. I mean, it's it's tempting to imagine that more spending on arms makes conflict more likely. There's just simply more more guns and weapons in more hands. What's your take on the Wilbur one really gave us a strong association between alms racing and conflict? We thought the Germans and the British and others competing supremacy. In your building up ships building up weapons and that played a role in contributing to willed, we'll one I think the political science the sort of social science around. This is a bit more complicated. I don't think there is necessarily clear connection between rapid arms racing. And outright conflict. Some people would say actually countries build up weapons, they feel they can deter their adversaries, they feel more secure. They don't feel the need to be vulnerable into lash out. So the association is complicated. What I would say is. I think there's a kind of cycle relationship between mistrust and building homes, the more countries don't trust each other like the US and China over China's island building and in competition in Asia, the more they build up weapons to prepare for the possibility of a clash the more. They build up weapons the less they trust each other. Thank you very much for coming in. Thank you very much.

China Russia America Asia Sippy Middle East Europe South China Sea President Trump France Jason Palmer Britain Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabians Gavin Williamson Jones Xi Jinping Macron
Putsch comes to shove: Venezuela

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:54 min | 1 year ago

Putsch comes to shove: Venezuela

"And welcome to the intelligence on economist radio. I'm your host. Jason Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. After yesterday's dramatic attempt to oust Venezuela's president. We take a look at coups around the world, what makes them happy. What makes them succeed, and what are the risks for coup-plotters fail? And a surprise raid on North Korea's embassy in Madrid reveals just how difficult and thankless it is to be a dissident against the North Korean regime. But I. In Venezuela yesterday, the opposition leader one Guido made his move to try to overthrow the embattled President Nicolas muddle, he claimed his operation. Liberty would be the final push to depose a man who has retained power only through a sham election. Mr. Guido is supported by millions of Venezuelans or suffering from regime inflicted hunger and hardship. But it's the support of the military. He needs in order to take power. And despite promising early signs not enough of them decided to abandon Mr. Muto. Lobue leniency called Pai tau. In a defiant television address, the president called the attempt of failure lambasting those who handed their souls over to the coup mongering, far, right? I was waking up shortly after six AM by the sound of saucepans being bashed, which is a traditional form of protest in Venezuela. Stephen Gibbs rights for the economist he was among the crowds in the capital Caracas yesterday as events unfolded. And it soon transpired what was going on. And that was the one I do was calling for a military uprising. We went over the us. Lootah bell imprinting gynecology perfume in no fuel inter inter one hundred zero as soon became apparent that. This was by no means a normal day all shops with barricaded opposite. As they usually are when there is a protest, but this was not a typical protest because a Hong wide other was out with soldiers. And they were all standing on this a motorway that overlooks the military basement airbase right in the center of Caracas and those soldiers will wearing blue on bans as a symbol of their defection and the crowds grew and grew. An inside that base. The sort of big question was whether the people inside the soldiers, the conscripts inside would he'd what those outside were saying, which is come and join us rebel against the Madora government. Pretty quick it became apparent that. They weren't going to do that it will far in ice towards the crowns toward us that were just on the other side of the barricade. And then things got even uglier the rebel soldiers. Apparently sort of rattled by something began to fire live rounds into the air. That go to whole lot of people running and it was a precarious situation. And then there was a sort of a standoff that lasted for several hours. One of the more striking things that was was. There was Leopold Lopez. He is Venezuela's most famous political prisoner. He's been in jail or under house arrest since twenty fourteen. So to see him walking the streets. Not balking particularly far was quite extraordinary in in. He managed to release himself by a defection of those people that were guarding him. So it was clear that this wasn't as I say a normal protest. Something unusual was going on that went on for several hours until after the tear gas through gone on bearable. Most of the protesters recapped to the square in out mirror here in eastern Caracas. And there was quite oh and Leopoldo Lopez and several members of the national guard who had defected, and they were being sort of hugged by supporters. They were some of them with. With the family, and this was the image. Of course, the opposition was hoping would be repeated massively across the country. This is what they're trying to do. They're trying to do a sort of fell revolution where the feared security forces. Give up put down their arms and say, you know, we're not going to support Madore or anymore where with this new president and everything's going to change. It didn't happen. It sounds like there was good public supports on the streets anyway for Mr. Guido or the people rallying behind him more widely. The short answer is. Yes, I mean, given that he was a relatively unknown figure last year. And now he is unquestionably the most famous opposition leader in Suada. It is probably were saying that a lot of the support for two is a sort of protest vote against Maduro Midori is not popular. But he given that he is saying that he's leading a popular revolu. Nation that in his last a contested election. The one that you know, Guido and the opposition and much of the international community says was rigged last year in a he's standing for reelection. Or he stood for reelection. In the midst of the deepest recession in the world inflation heading for ten million percent, everyone feeling poor more miserable public services here. Collapsing. So, you know, the idea that he could really come on Syria support seems implausible and what about the military whose allegiance has always been the Lynch pin here. What what support does Mr. Guido have from them? I mean, it might be fair to say not as much support as he hopes since he came on the scene in early January. He has repeatedly said look, I can only do this. If the military come with me, I think there's no question in the lower ranks of the army and the forces people know happy head because they're suffering. Exactly the same way the most. Venezuelan's suffering. The problem is that the high ranking generals and the of Venezuela that notoriously has a top heavy army with with thousands of generals a lot of them on a benefiting from the chaos here from the corruption which Unity's that may afford them a new also the whole forces. This is one of the things that were job is Maderas assisted. Did he politicized that institution? Effectively everyone sort of fouls their allegiance to the socialist, revolution and not just Venezuela. So it is a relatively world controlled institution. As as one guy to is is finding out and what will happen to Mr White. Oh, if this fails altogether. If this fails, which is perfectly probable identing it's necessarily the end of quavo. You know, he will probably continue an hope that the drip-by-drip discontent in the military against Maduro. We'll alternate. Really bear fruit. And I think the other person to watch is there Puerto Lopez. He's now out of house arrest. He's going to be living. It seems in the Spanish embassy. That means he's conceive people. He can meet people he can negotiate and that will be an instinct additional little twist to this long-running saga.

Venezuela Mr. Guido President Trump Caracas Leopoldo Lopez Jason Palmer North Korea Madrid Pai Tau Nicolas Muddle Hong Maduro Midori Mr. Muto United States Stephen Gibbs Mr White Madora Government
The strain in Spain: an election looms

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:22 min | 1 year ago

The strain in Spain: an election looms

"Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist radio. I'm your host. Jason Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. In Japan policies and attitudes. That took hold after the second. World War have repercussions that still affect day to day life this week the government at last apologized to tens of thousands of people who were forcibly sterilized in post-war eugenics. Push our correspondent talks to one of them. And the rebuilding of Japan after the war took on an almost military quality as soldiers swapped uniforms for suits. That's made the country's work ethic. Famous notorious even as a new emperor ascends next week. Japanese employees are getting extra time off work to celebrate. But they're not sure they wanted. First up though. 2017 Spain's wealthy semi autonomous region of Catalonia made a push for independence. And former that sheet or the no. That unconstitutional referendum. It voted to break away from Spain. Madrid soon crushed secession bid. But the on issue was far from over it helped trigger this Sunday's general election, the third in little more than three years Spain's, prime minister. Pedro Sanchez called the snap poll in February that those cleaness. Another econ seem worst after a crushing defeat in parliament all Kombucha that up a lower than yours. Equa- his minority. Socialist government had depended on support from small regional parties, including the Catalan nationalists, but they voted with Mr. Sanchez's right wing opposition to reject his twenty nineteen budget plan. His government was paralyzed. The coming election is supposed to break that impasse. But the political landscape remains a fractured. The simmering cuddle on crisis, looms, large, still and Europe is looking for a stabilizing force in uncertain times. Spang goes to the polls on Sunday, the twenty eighth, and it's a very important election because you have another European country that is plunged into real political crisis. Christopher Lockwood is our editor for the Los Eero Spain's been led by government that any had twenty four percent of parliament's, very weak minority government and the prospect after this election is you still went to have a majority and we've seen this pattern happen quite a lot in Europe in Germany. It took many months to form a coalition Belgium had terrible problems putting together Italy the same. It's a growing problem. The fragmentation of political parties in Europe. And I think we're about to see on Sunday a nasty new case of it in Spain. So what do you expect the outcome of the election to being do think Mr. Sanchez will be able to hold onto power? I think that the socialist party which currently forms the minority government will again emerge as the largest party. But it will be very well short of having a majority and the real problem is that there are no. No, viable poss- to a stable code shouldn't at the moment. And the reason for that is the political spectrum has fragmented with the entry of a couple of new parties until recently Spain essentially had two big parties since left in the center right party. But what you've seen is the entry of radical left party Damus a party more or less than the center called the Donoso the citizens party and now about to enter parliament for the first time a fairly far, right? And he migration party cools. Vox on the problem is when you've got five twenty parties in parliament, none of them can form a coalition very easily because none of them seem to want to work with each other. So the danger is that you'll end up having some very inconclusive coalition negotiations fully by another election. If you have another election this year as many people are predicting that will be the fourth of action in four years. This is not a happy state of affairs. But as you say Spanish politics has not always been this way. What's driven all this fragmentation? Well, a couple of things I think clearly one was financial crisis followed by the year is in crisis and this hit Spain very hard. Indeed that led to a demand for new parties to come and solve the problem. If you like, but then the other thing that changed in Spain was the emergence of Catalonia and separatism there as a political issue. So it brought back onto the table. The problem of nationalism in Spanish politics. This takes you all the way back to Franco, of course, early in the Spanish, civil war body parts of it was precisely for over Catalonia and tempted succession there, and none of this has gone away. There has been a tension between Catalonia and the center founders of years, but it had been hoped that it was sort of put to bed then that all changed with demands by Catalina have an independence referendum and then actually declare independence. Both of those things were not permitted under the current constitution. As a result of which the independence that they unilaterally declared was decreed illegal with. Oppressed by direct rule from Madrid. And the people who promoted it put in jail, they're now being tried and nine of them face the prospect of extremely long jail sentences, which again, but devils the whole political atmosphere and also poisons relationships between a number of the stabbing parties and what about outside Spain. How much do you think this election matters in terms of European stability? Well, it will be engine to see what happens with vox, FOX gets taken into a coalition. I didn't think was very likely, by the way. But it could if that happens that will clearly send a lot of shivers down European spines because it will just to mate taking into power of other right wing parties. I think more likely is that Spain will just continue in this rather unfortunate period of political paralysis that's going through. And I think that's bad for Europe in a different way. The reason is that Europe needs more strong countries. Traditionally Europe was run by sort of Franco German access and one of the great strengths of having Britain in the EU. Is to certain extent balancing third power between those two having something to say to both countries to the Germans to be like Germany and apostle of the free market and sound budgetary principles. But also to the French preserving the importance of national foreign defense policies in particular certain sort of sovereigntists attitude towards the way things were done in Europe. Now Britain's leaving the you'll says it wants to leave the and people would like to know we'll be another power to balance out the Franco-German access and Spain sometimes suggested could have been one of those that seems very unlikely if it remains paralyzed it's the calm bit has terrible problems and now political problems. So I think that instability in Spain, you know, robes Europe of another potentially valuable additional actor, Chris. Thanks very much for coming in my pleasure.

Spain Europe Pedro Sanchez Catalonia Madrid Japan Jason Palmer Germany Los Eero Spain Socialist Party Socialist Government Spang Britain EU Prime Minister Christopher Lockwood
Troubling: a death in Northern Ireland

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:29 min | 1 year ago

Troubling: a death in Northern Ireland

"South This economists podcast is sponsored by linked in jobs. Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economists radio. I'm your host Jason Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. A minority of South African people have steadied formal jobs too many, including a large fraction of the country's youth do piecemeal work or are unemployed altogether. We look at the efforts to bring the young into the workforce. And there's a lot of talk about public figures particularly candidates in America's upcoming presidential race speaking, multiple languages, what's with these polyglot politicians. But I. A funeral will be held today for a young journalist from Northern Ireland who was shot dead last week all for the loss of lira. Our hopes and dreams all of her Mazen potential with snuff type a single Barrick. Lira Mckee had been reporting on violent unrest in the city of Londonderry. We believe this to be a terrorist act. We believe it's been carved violent Republicans yesterday. A group called the new IRA took responsibility for the killing it even apologized. The incident was shocking reminder of the fragility of peace since the end of the Northern Ireland conflict known as the troubles. This was an attack on everybody in northern. It. Doesn't matter if you're Catholic or Protestant. British are this is an attack on democracy? The troubles began in the nineteen sixties and painted mostly Catholic Irish nationalists against the British army Northern Ireland police and mostly Protestant loyalists. For three decades violence and terror was a part of everyday life, the turmoil claimed more than three thousand five hundred lives, but in nineteen ninety eight the Good Friday agreement largely brought an end to the conflict today is about the promise of a bright future. Dave, and behold, a line can be drawn bloody past some low level violence continued, but this latest killing has fear and outrage. The funeral today of Larry Mckee is going to feel in many ways. Like, we'll most states occasion. Tom Wainwright is the economists Britain editor where expecting to see the Irish T show that the prime minister will say the president of island the secretary of the UK as well as low two local politicians from Nova Nyland, of course. And so it's going to feel like a big deal, and it really is a big deal in Northern Ireland. This kind of killing of innocent civilian in what seems to have been a terrorist attack something that really has shocked people. It's by no means the gnome since the peace agreements of twenty one years ago. This kind of thing is much less common than it used to be in people here really really shocked by what happened last week, and Tom what can you tell me about the group responsible for misbehaves death, new IRA and its relation to the other groups with IRA in the name, it's it's a bit confusing. Picture it is it really isn't. I think to understand that you've got to go back to the Good Friday agreement of nineteen ninety eight and. What happened? There was that the IRA and most Republicans agreed to end any kind of struggle and take their fight for the United Ireland to the debating chamber of the streets. But at the time there was some Republicans who disagreed with that to this represented, a capitulation, and these guys who are now widely noted dissident Republicans have continued that struggle on a fairly low level. But nonetheless, they are security worry five the security agency raised the threat in Northern Ireland is severe they have continued trying to police officers, for instance. And so why do the new IRA kill Lear mckie? Well, she seems to have been killed by stray bullets. She was watching a riot taking place in the city of Londonderry Derry as it's known to Republicans, and she was watching from next to police come and she was shot in the head and later died, and this riot was kicked off really after police had been raiding homes in the area shortly beforehand seems that they were concerned on the. The Easter rising some local Republicans might be out to coast trouble. And seems that some cycle dissident Republicans is this as a excuse to get that people on the streets and co some trouble and the new IRA said it was an accident and apologized there's some significance to that. Right. There. Is yet seems that they really feel as if that on the back photo of this that agreed which has said, the it's propensity is violence to said that the Republican coups, but they seem to be well aware that locally these kinds of acts of violence in which older NRI innocent civilians killed or injured go down extremely badly and really risk setting that goes back, and we've seen evidence of this already in dairy, the headquarters of a local political party, which is supported by the IRA people being smearing red painted handprints on their offices a form of protest and lately various Republican murals have been graffiti as well by people saying things like not in my name. Name. And so they think realize that this could set them back in a big way. Police also reporting that moving one hundred people have sent them with information about the killing and in a city like Derry, that's really unusual. This is not a place where people have historically been happy to talk to the police about Republican activists. So we could be seeing Quanta change. So do you get the sense from all that then that there is just simply less tolerance for the kind of violence that was so common during the troubles. I think that's right. I think since the Good Friday agreement which was almost exactly twenty one years ago. Many people in Northern Ireland of come to see the peace that's being achieved is enormously valuable, and the idea of going back to that is something that really worries a lot of people. And I think most observers thing that the chances of returns to scale violence, very slim, but any sign that violences on the rise is obviously a worry, especially at the moment with Brexit going on which is causing all kinds of problems for Northern Ireland. We've also got the problem of the Northern Ireland assembly having been suspended now for more than two years. So there's a feeling Northern Ireland is inevitable position so events like this do concern a lot of people that people worry that things are being destabilized that, but you mentioned Briggs in in passing there. Do you think that all the negotiations and the degree to which Northern Ireland has been such a lynchpin of the negotiations has sort of reignited tensions? It's certainly reignited tensions. Yeah. We haven't yet seen a big kicking off of large scale violence or anything like that. But tensions absolutely have been heightened. And it's not surprising because the peace deal made back in nineteen ninety eight really hinged in many ways on the UK an island shed membership of the European Union that help to enable these countries to have a border, which is not just open. But invisible, I mean, if you go there and drive between Northern Ireland and their public of island, you can do so without even realizing that you've crossed the Boda, and of course, membership of the EU means the two countries of members of the single. Markets, and so no customs checks needed and since nineteen ninety eight people know of Nyland being able to choose whether they take Irish or UK possibles in many ways, they've been allowed to feel as if they are either Irish Oprah show oath if they want and so the UK now leaving the European Union really will subject that to strain. And it's clearly pulling the UK an island upon a way that nobody on typically to twenty one years ago and many people particularly in the Republican community. Most of them voted to remain, by the way, think that Britain is in some way reneging on agreements that were made or hinted that twenty years ago, so it is a time of heightened tension. Yes. Tom. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you.

Northern Ireland IRA Tom Wainwright British Army Northern Ireland Londonderry Larry Mckee Jason Palmer Nova Nyland Britain UK United Ireland America European Union Londonderry Derry Mazen Lear Mckie
The new mediocre: the world economy

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:03 min | 1 year ago

The new mediocre: the world economy

"Hello. And welcome to the intelligence on a communist radio. I'm your host. Jason Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. In the Suhel vast swath of land that stretches across the African continent. There's a worrying trend jihadists of several stripes growing in number and in influence, we tag along with an international training exercise aimed at preparing African forces contained a threat. And you might think that the public's interest in the world's changing climate has been on a steady rise you'd be wrong, a dive into data about online searches reveals that climate concern comes and goes. First up though. Over the past six months, a pessimistic picture of the world economy has been emerging speaking at the US chamber of commerce last week Christine Lagarde, the head of the International Monetary Fund issued a warning the global economy is at a delicate moment. Only two years ago. Seventy five percent of the global economy experienced an upswing. So it was a synchronized growth acceleration for this year. We expect not seventy five but seventy percent of the global economy to experience a slowdown in growth. Exactly the opposite of what we had. The IMF later today. We'll be publishing its forecast for the year. Simon Cox are emerging markets editor based in Hong Kong. We already know little bit about it from a speech Christine Lagarde gave she pointed out that they'll be cutting their forecast. They had expected back in January world economy to grow by about three and a half percent sheer. So it sounds like they're going to shave some off that forecast. However, she did emphasize the left is not expect a recession this year. So it's a slow down and one that should autumn out by about mid year in nephew. And why are we seeing this Loda? So the slowdowns quite broadly based the guard pointed out that a variety of countries have slowed down from last year. China has been trying to slow the growth of credit for some time. Now, there's also been of course, this trade will trade tensions between China in America have damaged sentiment. More broadly earlier in two thousand eighteen we saw the Federal Reserve raising interest rates which caused a of problems for variety of emerging economies and euro-zone to seems. Perennially weak takes very little seems to slow its momentum. So order these things happening together have added up to a slight gloomier outlook the me had props year ago, and is any one of those factors dominant in this lowdown. So the trade war has attracted most of the headlines. I think the feds raising interest rates and China's efforts to curb leverage, probably more important. Although it has to be said the trade war has inflicted greater damage on sentiment than I would have expected. It's not so much the practical concrete effect of the tariffs. It's more this notion that two of the world's biggest economists consi I and no longer working in concert to try and keep the economy going and with this downturn than in prospect, what can policymakers around the world due to to get ready to make his already taken some measures. And most importantly, the fed has signaled that it won't be raising interest rates again anytime soon, I think that pose an interest rates has been quite bawdy welcomed by financial markets. And I think it came just. In time a little bit too late. And also China has also turned attention away from curbing leverage towards shoring up growth, and in the past China's been quite effective in reviving demand when it decides to so those both measures that policymakers have already taken and then looking more broadly with always very much welcome Germany's splurging bit. Why would that be such a singularly helpful factor to mini vans, quite tight public finances? It's obviously the biggest economy in the zone surrounded by much weaker economies that would benefit greatly from the spillovers of higher German spending. So the one Konami that's really in a position to spend more refuses to and that leaves its neighbors who aren't really in a position to spend more having to do so to try and up to mind in their own conham is so euro-zone as a whole exports demand weakness to the rest of the world when it really should be pulling its weight. So you mentioned one of the big factors here is fed sort of pausing in its rate increases is their case for a cut. I think possibly one of the perennial worries about this recovery is the central banks have not yet been able to quote, unquote, normalize monetary policy that they haven't been able to raise interest rates to what historically would have been more normal levels that matters in particular if there's a downturn because impasse recessions central banks had to cut interest rates really quite severely in order to offset recessionary impulses. And they sent me don't have room to do that anymore. Now the best insurance policy against having to cut heavily is to cut a little early. And so there's perhaps a case for the fed to cut even if that results in a little bit too easy. The damage that would do is very little in comparison with the damage of cutting too late that is US might of heat a little bit might have a little bit above target inflation something that really would concern. Nobody very much at all. So there is perhaps a case for the fed to be preemptive. The only nuance is that if the fed now did that would be seen as a bit of a sign of panic. Because they seem to be while the set against doing that absolutely have to so in the the worry with growth forecast that look like this one will is that we're headed for kind of another global recession. How do you see things playing out this time give us give us cause for optimism? So there are few signs that quote has bottomed out actually undulated number from China wasn't too bad German industrial production was okay, the US labor market still looks reasonably robust, although earnings growth has been a bit disappointing. So we have a number of lax from the data just getting numbers for March. Now, the lag in the processes, right? So it'll of prepared this report using data that might now be several weeks old, and as Christina guide said in speech, economic weather is very unsettled. It's changeable, and so it's possible. That's hope that the slowdown has already finished and seeing the first signs of stabilization, perhaps even a modest uptick in growth. So as as you say things are unsettled if things are. Actually on the up, and perhaps we haven't you know, crunched the numbers yet for how much it's on the up what might threaten that other whole variety thinks that could still destabilise growth, we've never really been able to get back to a fully healthy economy that's growing at its full potential without a lot of help from monetary policy. So you can think of I don't know the disruption from Brexit would obviously be obvious danger signed seven Newell of trade tensions. It's remarkable. How Optimus dick snatcher markets are about to deal between China and Trump, and yet we've been hearing that as a deal imminent for quite long while now without it actually happening. So there are a number of risks years ago. Christine Lagarde actually coined this phrase, the new mediocre, it was her take on the more common phrase, the new normal and her point was that you global growth was not as often as it had been Patou still pretty disappointing by historical standards, looking back over ten or twenty years. And I think that's where we're at. You know, the good is never that. Good. Hopefully, the bad won't be awful. Really stuck in this new mediocre right somewhere between cautious optimism and get used to it. That's right. Simon. Thanks very much for your time. It's It's my. my pleasure.

China Christine Lagarde Federal Reserve International Monetary Fund Simon Cox United States Jason Palmer Suhel Us Chamber Of Commerce Konami Hong Kong Markets Editor America Germany Christina Guide
"jason palmer" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"To have more success in that has been the case concerned. There's a certain amount of quickness locker, Malcolm standards. I mean, the results obviously, aren't aren't where we what we want. But I hope there's no quit. I mean. I'm certainly not a guy that's going to quit on anyone. I hope everyone feels the same way. I hope we all have our back. I mean, everyone everyone's gotta play for certain reasons and. We all have to have each other's back. And I certainly hope that no one would do it to me, and I certainly again window into them. Jason Palmer Bill Brian back to you. All right. Interesting words there from Jason Pomodoro. You heard him use the word pride quite a bit. Then quit. He talks about that. A little more coming up. Let's go back to the room. Here's Connor Sherry now live. Especially in the third period. Seemed like you were the only one getting scoring chances. I mean. Yeah, I think you're at three really good opportunities in the third. What are you guys got to do to break this this shutout streak? We're going to do a lot of things I think that starts with getting to that front. Maybe getting a dirty one. I think. A little bit too perimeter and trying to make plays in the outside especially after Russia. I think we're just to try and get inside more and bang home. A rebound or something dirty in front. Why are you guys been kind of inconsistent in doing that? Because you are at your best. When you are, you know for checking and being tough to play against. I think it's a hard thing to do think. You you go take across check you got a battle with the defenseman in front of the net. It's it's hard to get in there and battle like that. So I think we just have to have a little bit more. But by into to doing that. And maybe we'll like I said, well, we'll get a couple of goals here. Are you.

Jason Pomodoro Jason Palmer Connor Sherry Malcolm Russia Bill Brian
The Economist launches 'The Intelligence', a new daily podcast

podnews

02:09 min | 1 year ago

The Economist launches 'The Intelligence', a new daily podcast

"Economist newspaper from London is launching daily podcast. Jason Palmer will host it. It's called the intelligence, and it'll be published at the same time as pod news six in the morning. New York time eleven AM London from January the twenty ninth digital says it has eight staffers it's hosted by Acosta Spotify appears to be testing an import function which will allow you to add podcasts from another app on it appears to look inside your media library. Our technical analysis of recent podcast has been improved under the hood. And his now measuring more podcasts. More offer bit rates Luff's levels and other things you'll find this analysis appearing in selected podcast pages to just search pod news dot net. The BBC sounds app continues to gather bad press, the BBC who's lost a number of radio presenters recently, including Chris Evans. Simon mayo and Charlie sloth has suffered another setback with the announcement that Brent Spencer, formerly digital editor for BBC radio's music channels. Has accepted a new role as digital content director for rival Bauer media, formerly under Bret watch come and mayor's film review. The listen up is a new podcast app that can be operated. One handed for some reason. Hot pod. Focuses on Pinner a kids podcast previously owned by panoply, which is now being spun out as an independent company podium to a hosting analytics platform has announced a slew of new features Rhody is talking pay major firmware update for their pro cast mixer wonder what it is radio days Europe has published its preliminary program, it's a conference in Lausanne in Switzerland at the end of March, and it's the world's meeting point for the world of radio an audio Tom Webster from Edison research and James Kriton pod news editor that's me her among the speakers hand to events for you podcast. Toronto the uncomfortable. Where digital media comes together is February twenty-second to twenty fourth in Toronto in Canada wrap up warm and podcast festival. In Hamburg, Germany is February twenty five to March one featuring German-language podcasters report wall metu, and that's the latest from our newsletter. Pod news dot net.

BBC Jason Palmer Toronto James Kriton London New York Germany Acosta Spotify Chris Evans Brent Spencer Tom Webster Bauer Media Am London Simon Mayo Hamburg Charlie Sloth Canada
The Intelligence: Trailer

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:56 min | 1 year ago

The Intelligence: Trailer

"For one hundred seventy five years. The economist has been looking beyond the headlines cutting through the noise with clear thinking now, we're going to bring you that same sound reasoning in a daily podcast with our editors and correspondents and meet your host. Jason palmer. It's called the intelligence. Every weekday. We'll bring you what you need for the day ahead, clarity and context on the stories shaping your world from politics, they say that militarily flourishing yet clinically in a bit of a funk, the reality is that the longer this continues in the longer the war continues, the more Turkish attitudes toward Syrians will harden. British solutions have been incredibly damaged. The least thing we could do is to ask people. What is your collective will to business? He then became known as the kite zoo killer cuts of being this kind of web of cross shareholdings. In fact, surprisingly for a foreign executive he actually developed quite a kind of following in Japan, the analogy that a lot of people using in China is saying well, this is a bit like Tim cook. Who's the boss of apple suppose, he was arrested in Singapore and extradited to China doubled pulls a huge Inc in the US to science and culture, there's something bones about majoring yourself. Against the universe deeper issue is how every generation makes the art of their time. That's what's happening here. Global network of journalists will take you to the places where news is being made and talk to the people making it. So I met Jamal hoagie at the Oslo Freedom Forum engaging midget economic to us for the Michigan. To myself had a chance to discuss all these problems with Shinzo Ave. Japan's Prime Minister. Funding is one of the most interesting people I've interviewed in my years in China. He is a force of nature in the flesh. And with the incisive analysis, you expect from the economist we'll dig deeply into the biggest news stories and reveal some you're not hearing. Elsewhere in news are the most interesting financial bubble that you've never heard of the whole of Legos are take yearly creative. Traffic the pillow, I roast beef. I think when I write their bit trees, I don't feel any nervousness about the audience. I feel obligation to the person I'm writing about get more than just the facts get the intelligence. Join me for twenty minutes every weekday starting on January twenty ninth. Subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you like to listen.

China Apple Japan Jason Palmer Tim Cook Jamal Hoagie Michigan Prime Minister Oslo United States Executive Singapore Huge Inc One Hundred Seventy Five Years Twenty Minutes
The Intelligence: Trailer

The Economist Radio

02:56 min | 1 year ago

The Intelligence: Trailer

"For one hundred seventy five years. The economist has been looking beyond the headlines cutting through the noise with clear thinking now, we're going to bring you that same sound reasoning in a daily podcast with our editors and correspondents and meet your host. Jason palmer. It's called the intelligence. Every weekday. We'll bring you what you need for the day ahead, clarity and context on the stories shaping your world from politics. They said that is militarily flourishing yet politically in a bit of a funk, the ballot is that the longer this continues in the longer the Syrian war continues, the more Turkish attitudes toward Syrians will harden. British decisions have been incredibly damaged. The least thing we could do is to ask people. What is your collective will to business? He then became known as the kite zoo killer cuts of being this kind of web of cross shareholdings. In fact, surprisingly for a foreign executive he actually developed quite a kind of following in Japan, the analogy that a lot of people using in China is saying well, this is a bit like Tim cook of apple suppose, he was arrested in Singapore and extradited to China doubles, a huge Inc in the US to science and culture. You know, there's something bones about majoring yourself. Against the universe deeper issue is how every generation makes the art of their time. That's what's happening here. Global network of journalists will take you to the places where news is being made and talked to the people making it so I met Jamal cash hoagie at the Oslo Freedom Forum engaging gauging midget phenomena to us for the Michigan. To myself had a chance to discuss all these problems with Shinzo Ave. Japan's Prime Minister. Funding tone is one of the most interesting people I've interviewed in my years in China. He is a force of nature in the flesh. And with the incisive analysis, you expect from the economist we'll dig deeply into the biggest news stories and reveal some you're not hearing. Elsewhere in news are the most interesting financial bubble that you've never heard of the whole of Legos are particularly creative. Traffic is the pillow on roast beef. I think when I write their bit trees, I don't feel any nervousness about the audience. I feel an obligation to the person. I'm writing allowed get more than just the facts get the intelligence. Join me for twenty minutes every weekday starting on January twenty ninth. Subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you like to listen.

China Apple Japan Jason Palmer Tim Cook Jamal Michigan Prime Minister Oslo United States Singapore Executive Huge Inc One Hundred Seventy Five Years Twenty Minutes
"jason palmer" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

14:05 min | 1 year ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Call. Average goal. What else? Do we know him for anything? Did you see the speed on Palmer man, driving wide? They're the old power. That is a young you know, what he looks. I'm not kidding you when I say this. He literally looks as fast as what he did when he was just a young buck keeps himself in great shape. And he's and he's playing absolutely amazing for the sabres right now. And I it's just awesome to see the old the old jersey to the the the red black and white you like those jerseys love I was drafted in that jersey. But I always say that that's kinda like your favorite jersey. Right. Well, it's has a lot of meaning to me. My favorite is. I I have my game shirt on here my game jacket. This is like the raiders jackets like very retro from the seventies. Right. Yeah. That's my jersey that I love is the those colors the Royal Royal yellow I came in when the slug was here, which was like what the nine. I know. I know lug wasn't my certainly wasn't my favorite HAMAs been through. All of them. He came in with the the goat head. He has been through slug while and then he's worn probably the retro jersey in the winter classic way back when I mean, he's thousand gain NHL this, and it's funny. I was talking to Jordan Barbara last night. Works with the sabers. Does the savers dot com? Stephanie we were talking about common Bill, and I've actually you know, because I play with them. But also, you know, I lived with him his first year. Pro I've been asked about him a lot lately, and rightfully so. I mean the thousand games, let's let's be honest. I you played a lot of years you played more years than he did. But you didn't quite get two thousand games with without without the injuries that you had and stuff. You would have hit a thousand games. Yeah. I would have been well over a thousand but the miles that just goes to show. That's my point. That is that's my whole point. Ray of is that I don't think anybody out there understands what a thousand games means. I mean, it's it's a milestone that I shouldn't be given another trophy on top of that. Because of the body that he has it's funny. We've joked about that we that to the famous quote by mail. I'll say that I never thought he would have been able to play this long. He's not a big. He's not a big guy brother would say, he's got shoulders autumn like a brook trout. Get it. Fish don't have shoulders. Like, he's like, I'm not making fun of the guy. I make up teasing. But that's the thing. He's so like like insanely gifted in and smart, and I just I don't know. Like, I I'm kind of. And I also think it's ironic. I don't know. I think it's ironic that the goal that we show is probably the goal that he is most known for in his career, and that's not a bad thing because it's an amazing goal. And I think the importance of it too is is what I think stands because. Fans and everyone focused around goals that have importance in meaning to a team in their success. Right. That was a huge goal. We knocked off the the big bad Ottawa Senators that year. Powerhouse. That is legendary this call that this playoff goal. Rick generate is is literally the greatest ever and the call on this goal is gives you I wasn't even a part of this team. And it gives me chills because I understand what what all you guys were feeling when when this goal went in. But I'm going to tell you this. This is not the goal that. I think of when I think Jason Palmer Bill. Okay. Wow. Interesting. And and you know, what this is only this is a personal thing for me. I already know. Go ahead. No, no, no, tell tell the people tell the people what I what I'm thinking. Well, everybody at the time thought you scored correct? You're right on right on everyone thought you score it and the importance of that game, and he ended up tipping it. And it was the same winter. It was the night of the plane crash. And we did not know if we were going to play that night. I mean, the mood in the room Lindy Ruff, this this big strong dominant man came in almost in tears. You could feel the emotion in not only are dressing room. But obviously around the entire city. And we we all were were like, why are why are we playing hockey is so insignificant to what just happened here today and? We ended up playing that night. Because we thought that it would be the best thing for for. The city of buffalo for us to play that game that night, and it was one of the most emotional games I've ever played in my career playing my former teammate which at the time, I think was the one number one team in the National Hockey League in San Jose Sharks. No. We were down. We were down four nothing. I think we're four one at one point. But we battled back and with with a couple seconds in the game. I took a shot from the point Palmer got his stick on the puck and deflected that past you've getting off and we tied the game with three seconds or two seconds left. And then Derek ROY went and won it for us in the shootout. And you know, what the sausage? It was one of the most memorable moments of my NHL career. And I just remember Palmer. I knew Palmer got that. And. What was actually in our open Craig river, the captain strikes again because you had a goal all wrapped in straits. Or I don't know. Didn't you have a goal already that night? Did you have a goal and assist? You had a big night that night. No. I had two assists that night already outweighs. That was the that was the third and people thought that I did have a big night that night. I thought I thought so. Yeah, you that was three points that night. But you know, for me, I remember that was one of the biggest goals, obviously. Because of the situation the emotion, everything I can't I can't begin to express how how tough it was to play that game each and every guy on both on both sides, San Jose. Obviously, they, you know, a lot of those players were my former teammates and just discussing with them. They were they were sick to their stomach with what had happened and we had to go out and play that night. And it wasn't it certainly wasn't the most fun. But at the same time, you know, once you get into that game in once those fans started to watch that game. You know, there there there was some relief there where they can kind of put a smile on their face for a short period of time. But anyway, that's the Jason Palmer real die. Remember, he was he was just an awesome teammate. Just an amazing guy. He is so well respected, and this is this is an awesome milestone for for Jason. So I it's it's awesome. So the sabres are in Ottawa tonight. It's a seven o'clock park. Dropping catch the pre-game show at six thirty and. I'm I'm not sure if I feel like I've heard that auto might honor Palmdale tonight. I don't know for sure, but you know, that when a player plays a thousand games around the league that it's a milestone league wide. It doesn't matter who you are. And if you've played if you've played a thousand games, you probably have some league wide respect. So odds are that you know, that team would acknowledge it, and I'm sure the I know would they would they play that goal on the on the Jumbotron Palmer Palmer walking Alfie going. Why I don't I don't know. They might they might be still a spot for smart. And they do that they'd be. They'd be quick throw Alfie shopping it to us the next year. Yeah. Game game five here in buffalo. So Palmer Ville tonight. Yeah, you'll hear a lot of a lot of praise over. What is teammates thinking everything? Awesome guy. I share the same sediment says roof told a story last night. With the spectrum. I do a segment with them. And I was talking about how we live together. He used to hide crispy cream donuts on me. He he's. Anyway. So I don't know why. That was listen I wanna. You live with with Palmer, which which is in mazing like when personalities are quite opposite. I don't even know what to say there. I've never seen two more different. People is not as quiet as everybody thinks. That's that's the thing that every nobody knows is that he's he's not as quiet as everybody. You know, what I remember from him is a year, you're hitting it right on the top of the head number one. He is he's he's very controlled when he's out in public. When he is not in public, and he is with his buddies. In the locker. Yeah. He is an absolute hoot, and he loves the jobs and the curly hair. And I'll tell you this about his jobs. You know, how you just said he got he loves to toss the jobs out, doesn't he? But he's cutthroat. Palmer will slice your throat with a jab. He doesn't care how deep cuts like if if you're not a little poke if you're going after him in any way about anything. He just comes right back at you with a with a serious dagger. Yeah. And I just remember he he was you know, I played I played a long time. And I played with a lot of very good players. And I always remember. When when I would be thinking about Jason Palmdale. If someone were to ask me about him. I remember I have never I. I've never seen a lot of players that prepare for a game like him, right? Everything was done the same every single game there. It was code red. It was focus. It was prepare and go out and give everything that you possibly can give on that night. And that's the way that he played. There was never ever games where you're like you saw Jason palm Ville Jason Palmer villes greatest game. And his worst game were very similar the differences. He might have had a hat-trick in the greatest game. And he might have been minus two or something like that in the worst game. But the game play in what he gained gave each and every game where was very similar. He's a very consistent player in the way that he's played throughout his career is, and you know, it's funny living with them at twenty and knowing and you see him playing a thousand games, I would have to imagine that you know, with the success that he had in the minors and the way he lived like he he was a he lived. I joked about crispy cream donuts, but as a as a hockey player, we all have our little our little treats here and there right, but some more than others some more than absolutely somewhere a year one to talk is that the pot calling kettle black everybody. Yeah. You know, exactly what I'm talking about some more than others. Okay. But my point is is that he was very routine in detailed as you just mentioned. That's just I mean, I think that all those things help contribute to longevity. You know, because he found a routine that worked in junior. He he wasn't a party animal. He wasn't a drinker. You know, he you know, he would socialize at team events. But he was a quiet guy. Would go out to dinner on the robot liked to go back to his hotel room right away and get a good night's rest and be prepared for. I mean, like I joked I said yesterday to Jordan, I said, you know, he treats his body like a temple you mean. Like, it's a joke amongst athletes and all like, oh, treat my body like at temple some more than others. But guys that play a thousand games they're seriously taking they're taking their body. Very very seriously. I mean, and no he's not the most physical player, but he has wear and tear on his body. And you wanna know something else about Palmer? That's impressive. Here's a stat. Do you know how many seasons he played eighty two games? You're looking it up. He played five full seasons where he played eighty two games some feat in itself. Yeah. That's that's a lot. I can remember I can remember sitting on the bus in New Jersey and guys talking about getting closer to the end of the season and asking other guys have you ever played all eighty two and a season. Like, I was never into that conversation. But hearing guys like Langenbrunner Pandolfi Rolston all these high profile guys talking. You know, how many eighty two games that he's played in his career who Jason palm five. No more eight. What do you mean? Eight. Two thousand six eighty two two thousand seven eighty two two thousand eight eighty two two thousand nine eighty to two thousand eleven eighty two two thousand thirteen eighty to two thousand fourteen eighty to two thousand seventeen eighty two. Maybe it was five in a row. I thought he had foreigner foreigner. Okay. So even even played my point he has played eight seasons. Of eighty two games, which is in Saint Louis. Very very difficult to do with the with the wear and tear that that you have. I mean, it's it's it's difficult. I mean, you have to be you have to really really take care of yourself. Because now you have to be lucky the way Palmer plays the game too. It's not like he shying away from certain areas the corners, and I'm not gonna go there because I'm going to get hit..

Palmer Palmer Jason Palmer National Hockey League Palmer Jason Palmer Bill sabres hockey Ottawa buffalo Jordan Barbara Palmer Ville raiders HAMAs New Jersey lug Craig river Lindy Ruff Jason palm Derek ROY Palmdale
"jason palmer" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Around a little bit Chicago's the team that comes to mind when I think of Matt Barkley playing in the league two thousand thirteen right prospect. He's the manual draft. USC USC. He might very well be in uniform as the backup quarterback to Nathan Peterman Sunday against the bears bills and bears. Chicago is a ten point favorite on the road. What does their record four three three? They're they're kind of interesting. Colton Schmidt is back the bills put putter Corey orcas on. I are also running back Taiwan Jones who's been out. Josh Allen, still not practicing or throwing at least other NFL notes. AFC's matchup between the dolphins and the jets. We get some injury news there. Ryan tannehill is going to miss a fourth straight game. He's out with a shoulder injury. That means Brock Osweiler get started quarterback for the dolphins. The jets had a couple of receivers Robbie Anderson and Quincy unwind missed practice today with ankle injuries. Elsewhere around the league Vikings. Why does she respond digs didn't practice today? He's got a core injury in the Vikings week eight loss to the saints enteric hill practiced in full for the chiefs. He pulled his groin in Kansas City's win over the Broncos on Sunday. The sabers were on the ice for practice this morning after losing two to one in overtime last night to Calgary. They traveled to Ottawa for the first meeting of the season with the senators tomorrow night, seven thirty puck drop rude, Jake McCabe. Yes. Dick McCabe expected back in the lineup. He participated in practice today and tomorrow will be Jason Palmer bills one thousand NHL game. What is it about Ottawa? That has them thinking seven thirty is better. Like a few teams do that TSN. But aren't all their home games? No. Some teams are holding today at seven thirty teams. I I think might be a team that the home games are seven thirty start terms. Yeah. That's what I'm saying. Like here in the eighties. It was seven. Thirty Sundays were at seven, right. Maybe weeknights were at eight when inserted going to games possible. I don't know. I don't remember. I remember seven seven thirty s you had you had to have time to get dressed up right in the seventies to games might just be simply the arena is where the arena is. And they wanna give people coming from downtown or work the city like two time to get out there because it's a twenty or thirty minute drive. And I guess traffic can be pretty hairy snakes us might just be it. More sports in thirty minutes..

Matt Barkley jets Dick McCabe Chicago Ottawa Kansas City Ryan tannehill USC Vikings Nathan Peterman Brock Osweiler Colton Schmidt bears Jake McCabe Josh Allen Calgary NFL Jason Palmer Taiwan Broncos
"jason palmer" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Point leaders. I with thirteen hundred and twenty six points. Jason Palmer Bill with the point tonight. Bruce himself into. Gareth five hundred nightspot. Your way up. Will bear Phil Housley. Image name, I and fifth. You got enter Chuck Rick Martin and Ramsey. So. In some very good company. They're on the time he spent with the sabres good numbers. Good production. Here's a shot that goes office. Scape? Control letting it go tip back into the corner. The chip at around on the boards, but it's held in there by Calgary scandala knocks down his check. Jammed around to the other side and the flames managed to keep it in again long shot didn't get through. But Calgary is putting the pressure on the buffalo end held in there with Lindholm he slides it over another shot right on Hutton's got bad as Brody. Let it go. Now. There's some good battle by the sabres in front of the net. They're given Carter Hutton plenty of opportunity to see the puck and make the same. And I imagine very appreciative of it. Because Calgary has got some good job down low. You see Larson tying up as man at front. Just peel them off right there. Get stick under stick lipstick twists and turns them and that opens up the rain for Carter Hutton to be able to see the pot come through. There's a shot that doesn't get through. Slides down the ice into the Calgary. Poked around behind the net. Squeezed up on the blue line and flipped on the center. Back the flames again with a shot that misses rolled around into the corner slapped at by crystalline, but kept in by Calgary back to the point held in their by Hannifin Hannifin still got it and takes his shot that would widen the debt covered by buffalo jammed around on the boars, but yet together dollar the Buffalo Sabres kept in by Anderson. Eight fires now buffalo recovery and squeezing it up on the wing bond through center in over the line shut by risked allied, and.

Buffalo Sabres Calgary Carter Hutton Chuck Rick Martin Hannifin Hannifin Jason Palmer Bill Phil Housley Bruce Gareth Lindholm Larson Brody Ramsey Anderson
"jason palmer" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Go onto the ice along with mental status on the left side Eichel Carey's towards that Jones. Good stickwork that I could away. Middle stat reaching for it can't keep it in Dolly now for Skinner park down the boards. He'll get it in across the line sends it download quarter. Couple of looks before Biddle stack gets to it. Since it right back to the middle set. Right. It couple of chances right? Goal. Barrier. Now right circle holds it. Tried to send it along the ice that's blocked by Columbus. Seven seconds to go with the band advantage into to two game. I come again. Lost an Anderson makes the turn up the right side is going to send it down the ice comes out of the box. So we remain tied with five forty four to go. The second everybody back to even strength. Pass ahead of the right side. Too far. Circuses port. I heard high stick called with that whistle was blown. But we're headed the other end of the ice. So what is it? Icy. Call. Jason. I'm just trying to sell something to the rebel that. He might have got clipped a little bit. Jason Palmer Bill. Going to end up getting the post in this. Moves to the front of the net. Get control bag sit on the ice has corporate salvo beat. The angle that it came off on hits the post directly bathos in the second period club ten three shots out shooting up eleven six in the second period. Here. Good since shy of center Broza pass across the Dolly offside does and the sabers..

Jason Palmer Bill Skinner park Eichel Carey Biddle Columbus Anderson Jones Seven seconds
"jason palmer" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"And this is turned to my interest to what game again. The one thing I wanna mental Eichel. I hear people like a lot of negativity about not being a franchise player. But I've noticed a lot of really good qualities about Eichel especially in tonight game early in the first period. Montreal was trying to clear the puck and just around the puck in they're trying desperately to get the puck by him. And they couldn't and another one thing that I noticed towards the end of the game. When I also scored that game winning goal. Powerplay Eichel was on a left wing. And it seems like every player on Montreal kind of wonder sickout toward Heikal not have that passing lane open which gave up also that clear shot the net and to get the goal. So I think into respecting Eichel a little bit for his quality of shot where they just opened up. I felt the replaying all their sticks went over there. And it was just a clear shot to the net. And he was able to put the puck in the goal. Yeah. Yeah. And also Jason Palmer Bill some credit as well. To to further your point where possible screens the goaltender and allows a postal to get the shot off. So he doesn't really have time to react. And I think your first point we're seeing the maturation of Jack Eichel from the start of last season getting the big contract extension. They kicked in this year. That's a lot. That's a lot of burden to play with for a kid who is still in his early. Twenties drafted in his teens and. When you were the second overall pick and a draft the sabres wanted to be as bad as they could to try and get one of the top two players. A lot is expected of you. And I think you are by by fault. Looked at to be one of the leaders sooner rather than later on the team. And as I was growing up he's grown into that leader, certainly worthy of the captaincy. And you're seeing a lot of those early tendencies that he had in his first couple of seasons. Start to go away in trying to lead, by example. Yeah, as we get to our sabers Corcoran feature. Here we talk about I call right away when we talk about the core group, but what I liked about tonight's game. Is that they scored four goals. They're.

Eichel Montreal sabres Jack Eichel Jason Palmer Heikal
Feds say 711 immigrant children couldn't be reunited with parents ahead of deadline

WBT's Morning News w/ Bo Thompson

02:33 min | 2 years ago

Feds say 711 immigrant children couldn't be reunited with parents ahead of deadline

"Talking Seven nine three WBZ And as we come to the bottom of the hour time, to check the headlines here's John police are still searching for the body of a twenty Gatesville Charlotte man who they believe was murdered this week while his. Roommate more from WBZ's Mike oil or expels was reported missing on Wednesday after a search of his home. On south Smallwood place an interviews. With suspects PD, captain Chris dosier says they believe the twenty-eight-year-old Smalls was in fact killed at the home by his. Roommate following an argument so at this point we're still continue to. Look, for his body however, we, are confident that unfortunately based on the evidence we collected at the house, that homicide, did occur, police believe Dwayne Evans killed spouse, and recruited, two friends Jason Palmer inch Yvonne Scott to help dispose the body. Possibly, in your county Mike Doyle WBZ news defense expected to be front and center today in the William McCullough murder. Trial in Cleveland county he's the man, charged with killing three-year-old Jordan Dumont. Of guest and county the, daughter, of, her girlfriend prosecutors Thursday presenting video evidence of what. They describe as, McCulloch, confessing To killing the toddler in which you said he was trying. To give her a spanking bouts lost his temper house speaker Paul Ryan opposes the movement by GOP conservatives. To impeach deputy attorney general rod. Rosenstein likely dooming, the effort in fact North Carolina congressman Mark meadows now saying he is tabling his efforts to impeach. Rosenstein out talking about seeking contempt of congress charges if the Justice. Department, is not turn over, documents, congress has been seeking deadline for the reunification of all illegal immigrant children, with their, parents has, come and gone Jim Ryan in, Texas reports, the feds have almost met the court order goals eighteen hundred children. Separated, at the US Mexico border have been reunited with parents or legal guardians that leaves about seven hundred kids still. In the care of health and human, services some adults have been declared. Ineligible for reunification because of, criminal, convictions, in their home countries or suspicions that they've abused, their kids Now we'll check a WBZ traffic here's Freddie hammer eighty five southbound is still, our problem spot heading down. Past, Belmont abbey and you're gonna find that southbound sides very slow. At exit twenty six and then northbound. Starting to, get busy, I think a little onlooker delays they are working kind of late with that repaving project on the southbound side otherwise. One accident on the west side of Charlotte here, at Wilkinson just west of the Billy Graham Parkway it's actually. Close closer to Boyer watch for an injury accident. Here you'll see emergency crews. Arriving on the scene next update six forty five. Freddie hammer WBZ traffic WBZ news time six thirty it's time to check sports so he I, practice of training camp for the Panthers in Spartanburg happened last night rookie cornerback.

WBZ Mike Doyle Wbz Freddie Hammer Rosenstein Yvonne Scott Congress Mcculloch Smalls Gatesville Charlotte Mike Oil Cleveland County Chris Dosier Dwayne Evans Deputy Attorney General William Mccullough Charlotte John Jason Palmer Boyer Jordan Dumont
"jason palmer" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Eric spells Dwayne Evans is charged with murder Jason Palmer and. Chevron Scott had been charged with accessories after. The fact charges cops say the, murder took place in a house on south small place the three were picked up in Concorde authorities say the trio. Disposal spells body which has yet. To be found NewsTalk. Eleven ten ninety nine. Three WBZ with traffic brought. To you by huntersville Ford I seventy seven exit twenty three, here's boomer voncannon good Mark. Evanescent it reported I forty five south Mecklenburg this is on the inner loop before eighty-five near exit fifty nine railroad, collision Wilkinson boulevard I for eighty-five and to the north states railroad road near Sam, road boomer voncannon w BT traffic your WBZ weather those storms that have been around the. Past few days are gone from our area but we're still. Going to, have that seasonal chance for a. Pop-up storm through this evening today's high of ninety one tonight lows in the lower seven And to wrap up the workweek. Will have pop up storms and a high of ninety two. And on Wall Street it's being, reported that Facebook's one hundred billion plus route is the biggest loss in stock. Market history right now the Dow Jones industrial average is up one thirty. Two the SNP is off seven and the. NASDAQ is off seventy four points, at seventy eight fifty seven I'm Mark Thomas NewsTalk eleven ten ninety nine three WBZ t listen I went in skeptical. I've had a dead right ear. For thirty some odd. Years but miracle ear. Changed that for me and. The technology Mesa listening easier and speech isolation and delivers a, high def digital sound quality. And it reduces unwanted noise eight enriches music I think that's a due in part to this genius two point oh, technology it reduces echoes in difficult to hear environments that eliminated so wind noise when, you're outside it makes talking on the phone simple because I can actually feel phone calls. On the hearing aids. I can take through bluetooth control vol Of the television in the hearing aids doesn't matter what the volume is in the.

murder Mark Thomas WBZ NewsTalk Chevron Scott Jason Palmer Dwayne Evans Mecklenburg SNP Facebook Eric
"jason palmer" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Right well they had fairly tight constraints right they have a launch window seconds in width and they missed it on monday but it is now happily on its way halfway halfway to the moon in fact extraordinarily british going on it is sort of like a figure of eight around around the moon and then back around the earth and so on and that what you call a stable orbit costs you know energy so it can be doing it's business for some time and it's going to be looking for planets around stars the close ones the close ones there other missions to watch out for yes there's t up's coming up later this year another planet hunter and then the big daddy one call the james webb space telescope that's just been delayed until may twenty twenty so we'll have some time okay and i've time just to remind you that you're listening to the songs from the bbc world service with me rolling piece there are links to more on anything in this edition and to our catalog of passport costs at bbc will serve his dot com still to come and i know that jason is really excited about this i feed in search of shortest cat the one that's symbol tiny sleep dead and alive my studio guest jason palmer from the economist is also into this kind of thing in a big way i think jason i am yes i hope you'll give me something of a quantum of solace about the future of this bit of james bond to note furry four legged felines though in my report but i did meet some bacteria that were two things at once and this science writer is in two minds about one of the most influential science books of the past decades on the upside you really get a sense of what it was like to make this discovery to be racing towards it to not know if you would get there will not and in that sense it's brilliant on the other hand it sexist patronizing rude scholars and a great rate james watson's the double helix fifty is on.

bbc jason palmer writer james watson james webb space telescope james bond
"jason palmer" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Hello i'm rollin pisa and welcome to the south from the bbc the podcast where we offer you the highlights in science health and technology this week the southeast asian free divers whose remarkable physiology has captured the news agenda this week what's actually extraordinary as that in an eight hour working day they're spending about sixty percent of their time underwater so that's on the order of animals like sea otters rather than humans we've the genetics of how they manage it also the crisis in malaria the number of cases had harmed in previous years but the decline has halted our goal is to cut the cases in half again so to get back on that dramatic reduction curve that we were on for a long time my studio guests today is jason palmer from the economist magazine but jason you can't stay away from your old home here at the bbc co is true always a pleasure to be back but it's always good to have you you've got lots of tell us this program and we'll start with some plastics eat my plast sounds like a crazy command but plastics are made of long carbon based molecules just as the starches in a potato or a grain of rice are and are in it's evolved a gut load of enzymes that ideally suited to breaking down those polymers into simply units so the press was go this week at the discovery of a bacterial enzyme that could do the same to polyethylene terrified pat to you will me actually the bacteria had already been discovered a couple of years ago chomping on plastics in japanese recycling center what john mcginn colleagues had done at portsmouth university was to look at the atomic details of the enzyme which let it break down and also at his genetics which fascinated adam rutherford so you may have seen pet on the side of your plastic drinks also that stands for polyethylene tariff elliott it's just too molecules that you put together they're normally come from oil and you stick them together and you make long chains that gives you plan.

pisa bbc jason palmer portsmouth university adam rutherford john mcginn sixty percent eight hour
"jason palmer" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Michigan department of technology management and budget show michigan's january jobless rate was six tenths of a percentage point above the national rate of four point one percent but threetenths of a percentage point below the state's january 2016 rate of five point zero percent the agency says total employment declined by three thousand while the number of unemployed michiganders' rose by one thousand for a net impact of a minor reduction in the state's january workforce bureau of labor market information instrument gic initiatives director jason palmer says newly revised data from the annual revision process for michigan show that the state's jobless rate was unchanged at four point seven percent from september through january defendants in michigan would be compelled to listen to victim impact statements under legislation that has moved through the house the house passed the bill 105 to to thursday in honor of the late rebecca blanche a 36yearold who was murdered in 2014 and michigan's reshaped football coaching staff now includes moving ed warriner to lead the offensive line jim harbaugh announced the move thursday effectively filling tim draft knows spot on the staff harbaugh hired former florida coach jim mcilwaine to coach wide receiver and that seem to lead dr knows departure wam radar weather some snow showers today temperatures nearly steady in the low to mid thirty's partly cloudy tonight low around twenty and then for tomorrow getting into the weekend saturday the 10th partly cloudy high of about thirty eight that's why i am news now eyeing gang and martin whether you're moving across town.

Michigan jason palmer football jim harbaugh jim mcilwaine director rebecca blanche tim florida martin seven percent zero percent one percent
"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Hello you're listening to a special episode of babich a festive roundup of some of the science and technology highlights from this year's shows i'm jason palmer editor of espresso the economists daily briefing up coming up a better way to sail into the stores now as the kroft is spinning the wire the tether itself also spins around so he creates a sort of it sweeps out a circle and creates food virtual sale why birds are weaving cigarette butts into their homes the birds no i mean it strongly suggests anyway the birds know that when you've got life chicks as cigarette butts make a difference and what the future of electric driving might look like waldo holy grail that the technologists are working on is managing to charge a vehicle while it's moving but first this year saw a lot of extreme weather events in the latter half of the year hurricane harvey struck flooding raged across america and severe heatwaves across europe i invited our environment correspondent gone petrosky onto the show to explain why it was all happening there has been a lots of would try to attribute blame four events such as very heavy rain fold and heatwaves this began in in two thousand three with a suggestion by an oxford professor miles allen who suggested that if the changing climate doubled the probability of an event occurring that could in effect be interpreted as manmade climate change being responsible for half of that event as it were and since then the socalled event attribution literature has grown as people have begun analyzing specific events and global trends and trying to apportion blame.

editor holy grail harvey america climate change jason palmer europe professor allen
"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Hello you're listening to a special episode of babich a festive roundup of some of the science and technology highlights from this year's shows i'm jason palmer editor of espresso the economists daily briefing up coming up a better way to sail into the stores now as the kroft is spinning the wire the tether itself also spins around so he creates a sort of it sweeps out a circle and creates food virtual sale why birds are weaving cigarette butts into their homes the birds no i mean it strongly suggests anyway the birds know that when you've got life chicks as cigarette butts make a difference and what the future of electric driving might look like waldo holy grail that the technologists are working on is managing to charge a vehicle while it's moving but first this year saw a lot of extreme weather events in the latter half of the year hurricane harvey struck flooding raged across america and severe heatwaves across europe i invited our environment correspondent gone petrosky onto the show to explain why it was all happening there has been a lots of would try to attribute blame four events such as very heavy rain fold and heatwaves this began in in two thousand three with a suggestion by an oxford professor miles allen who suggested that if the changing climate doubled the probability of an event occurring that could in effect be interpreted as manmade climate change being responsible for half of that event as it were and since then the socalled event attribution literature has grown as people have begun analyzing specific events and global trends and trying to apportion blame.

editor holy grail harvey america climate change jason palmer europe professor allen
"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"Hello you're listening to a special episode of babich a festive roundup of some of the science and technology highlights from this year's shows i'm jason palmer editor of espresso the economists daily briefing up coming up a better way to sail into the stores now as the kroft is spinning the wire the tether itself also spins around so he creates a sort of it sweeps out a circle and creates food virtual sale why birds are weaving cigarette butts into their homes the birds no i mean it strongly suggests anyway the birds know that when you've got life chicks as cigarette butts make a difference and what the future of electric driving might look like waldo holy grail that the technologists are working on is managing to charge a vehicle while it's moving but first this year saw a lot of extreme weather events in the latter half of the year hurricane harvey struck flooding raged across america and severe heatwaves across europe i invited our environment correspondent gone petrosky onto the show to explain why it was all happening there has been a lots of would try to attribute blame four events such as very heavy rain fold and heatwaves this began in in two thousand three with a suggestion by an oxford professor miles allen who suggested that if the changing climate doubled the probability of an event occurring that could in effect be interpreted as manmade climate change being responsible for half of that event as it were and since then the socalled event attribution literature has grown as people have begun analyzing specific events and global trends and trying to apportion blame.

editor holy grail harvey america climate change jason palmer europe professor allen
"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"What are the keys to making better decisions in work and life one of the most successful entrepreneurs and investors of our time ray dalia has written down his recipes for doing so in his new book principles to learn more visit principlescom hello i'm jason palmer an editor of espresso the economists morning briefing app and you're listening to babich our weekly podcast on science and technology coming up today researchers have engineered an organism that those things rather differently one that uses a six letter genetic alphabet in its dna rather than usual four ideally what we'd like to do is to make some kind of synthetic hogan that can chin out synthetic proteins also on the show electric cars or the way of the future but what about electric planes will they take off we have a smooth jet engine running very efficiently in the back of the aircraft which runs a generator that generated can either drive the electric friends directly or it could top up the factory and how digital technology is transforming speakers headsets and other audio devices you may have read about the amazon echo and an alexa you can tell her turn of the light or to play music that has taken off more than than many people in the industry expected so to start life it seems is not a fourletter word it had been thought that all life on earth use a chemical alphabet of four letters known as bases to store information in the form of dna but earlier this year researchers at the scripts research institute in california unveiled in engineered organism that does things a little differently this bacterium stores information using a six letter genetic alphabet comprising the four bases that are normally present plus two completely artificial ones i'm joined by our science correspondent on a bhattacharya either let's wind back a little bit just remind me briefly dna four basis how do we get from there to protein full basis and three of these letters form what's called a code on and each code on represents one of twenty amino acids that naturally occurring now to get from that code to the amino acid until a chain of amino acids all you have to do is translate that message.

ray dalia jason palmer editor other audio devices alexa amino acid amazon california
"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"What are the keys to making better decisions in work and life one of the most successful entrepreneurs and investors of our time ray dalia has written down his recipes for doing so in his new book principles to learn more visit principlescom hello i'm jason palmer an editor of espresso the economists morning briefing app and you're listening to babich our weekly podcast on science and technology coming up today researchers have engineered an organism that those things rather differently one that uses a six letter genetic alphabet in its dna rather than usual four ideally what we'd like to do is to make some kind of synthetic hogan that can chin out synthetic proteins also on the show electric cars or the way of the future but what about electric planes will they take off we have a smooth jet engine running very efficiently in the back of the aircraft which runs a generator that generated can either drive the electric friends directly or it could top up the factory and how digital technology is transforming speakers headsets and other audio devices you may have read about the amazon echo and an alexa you can tell her turn of the light or to play music that has taken off more than than many people in the industry expected so to start life it seems is not a fourletter word it had been thought that all life on earth use a chemical alphabet of four letters known as bases to store information in the form of dna but earlier this year researchers at the scripts research institute in california unveiled in engineered organism that does things a little differently this bacterium stores information using a six letter genetic alphabet comprising the four bases that are normally present plus two completely artificial ones i'm joined by our science correspondent on a bhattacharya either let's wind back a little bit just remind me briefly dna four basis how do we get from there to protein full basis and three of these letters form what's called a code on and each code on represents one of twenty amino acids that naturally occurring now to get from that code to the amino acid until a chain of amino acids all you have to do is translate that message.

ray dalia jason palmer editor other audio devices alexa amino acid amazon california
"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Hello and thanks for downloading baggage from the economist our weekly look at science and technology i'm jason palmer and editor of our daily briefing app espresso coming up on today's show a new generation of surgical robots is about to enter the operating theatre you begin to expand their body a market two microsurgery ara terachi surgery then you can expand really explaination and why does some birds and have such colorful bodies you may also be the color of the efficiency of your digestive system and if if you're digestive system is not real efficient then you're not going to be as brightly colored as someone who has a very efficient digestive system but first up two years ago in paris countries around the world agreed to keep global temperatures to well below two degrees compared with those of the preindustrial era but many models that could lead to that goal assume not just that emissions of greenhouse gases from human activity must drop and sharply but also that some carbon dioxide already in the atmosphere must be sucked out something scientists coal negative emissions many of these models assume largescale implementation of the idea in the latter half of the century but very few of them are actually being pursued now and fewer still on a commercial basis one of them is climb works a firm trying to make a business out of sequestering carbon that last week web seven conference in lisbon our environment correspondent y'all petrovsky spoke to kristoff doubled the company's cofounder to find out a little more about what the company is doing so beginning of october weeds started operation of a planned in iceland next to henry society cheer thermal power plant at this power plant.

jason palmer editor global temperatures greenhouse gases carbon dioxide lisbon iceland paris petrovsky kristoff henry two degrees two years