26 Burst results for "Jason Palmer"

"jason palmer" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

01:43 min | 4 months ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Found that thirty third assyrians in the north now new drug use. That's not from just seven percent two years ago on speaking to social worker in soweto. That's city which is close to the border. With jordan it was kinda traditionally kind of felony conservative place it was kind of drew stronghold where you had tribal elders have really controlling habits and customs in the area and that kind of old order is just very condemned by the extent of the vulnerability of drugs in the city as they pass through the country on the way to jordan and perhaps most wearing his warlords night becoming nocco lords and perpetuating series agony so for those left in syria drugs are really threatening to destroy what little remains of society after more than a decade of civil war. economists middle east correspondent. Nicholas pelham in conversation with jason palmer jason. Thanks so much for bringing us. This story on series rise and trafficking of the drug. Captagon sounds troubling more. Thanks very much jason palmer. The intelligence podcast from our partners at the economist. Remember the debates over huge spending plans for pandemic recovery the nations that said. This is a chance to build greener future for the economy. We gave those efforts just ahead on the show. You're listening to the world. i'm marco werman. This is the world less spring is the world was still in the grips of the first wave of co vid a now familiar. Refrain emerged among world leaders economy from the coffee. Nine hundred endemic is a chance to set the world on a cleaner greener more sustainable path. This is a huge opportunity to do transformational changes. We can do better by building back green today on the big fix. We look at whether building back greener.

jordan Nicholas pelham soweto jason palmer jason jason palmer drew syria marco werman
"jason palmer" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:11 min | 7 months ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on PRI's The World

"President biden's address to congress wednesday night. You heard him work through things immigration china and this need not tell anyone this machine gun. Violence has become an epidemic in america. The flag at the white house was still fine at half mass for the victims of the mass shooting in georgia when ten more lives were taken to the mass shooting in colorado and the weekend between those two events a two hundred and fifty other americans were shot dead in the streets american here on the world. We've often tried to compare america's stance toward guns with other countries. It's not easy because the us is such an outlier when it comes to firearms gun culture in brazil and in the us there are some similarities there but the leaders of both nations are addressing. Guns differently brazil's current attitudes toward firearms is explored in a recent edition of the intelligence of podcast from our partners. Economists radio marianas stim- also writes about brazil for the economist. in this excerpt she speaks with host. Jason palmer jameson. Sonatas the former army captain. And since he was elected president he's been waiting for looser gun laws in brazil. He has the speech that has been going on since he took office. That good families should be able to protect themselves to and so how much success has he had in trying to loosen the laws. Both of his tried to make several changes but he has actually not been very successful. He tried for example to expand the number of professions whose employees are legally permitted to own guns but earlier this month. The supreme court struck in other proposed changes down what bolsonaro has really done is just sort of introduced. This idea that people should be able to protect themselves. People should have the right to bear arms. Propagating a gun culture. In what way is there a better deeper water gun. Culture since sonata came into the presidency. You've been seeing a rise in the number of gun clubs. For instance people see photos of him online at shooting ranges with his family with his funds who also politicians. The number of registered firearms in circulation has surged by two-thirds. Since two thousand seventeen to just over million or one for every two hundred brazilians but still the ownership increase had been particularly pronounced among sporting shooters and collectors in other words not people who are using them for their job but the the stated aim here of just allowing good people to protect themselves. Is that really all going on here. Is that really. What mr bolsonaro. Once for the people of brazil. He's pro gun. Stance is very political. It wins points with his supporters where he might lose support on healthcare or his handling of the pandemic others fear darker motives. The president has been rallying up his supporters to back him in more authoritarian measures. He has spoken for example of using the army to prevent state governments from enforcing lockdowns but at the same time many political analysts who have been speaking to fear that both who has been trying to rally his supporters in into potentially armed movement to back him. Should he not win the election next year. Reporter mariana simos in an excerpt from the intelligence she was speaking podcast host. Jason palmer the intelligence comes us from our partners at economists radio. You can find it wherever you get your podcasts. We end the week with the latest from movement our series about music and migration with our guide. Singer mclean hadera today. Mclean says down with pakistani composer musician. I rouge aftab. Who has a new album out this week. Here's mclean on her latest record. Our rooch aftab works with lyrics from an order to poet who lived hundreds of years ago. You know miserable guy his country. It's difficult or do and it's ordered. Lake is very hard for me to actually understand as.

Jason palmer america brazil colorado Mclean mariana simos georgia congress mclean wednesday night china Jason palmer jameson bolsonaro two events two-thirds today one Stance this week two hundred
"jason palmer" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:09 min | 10 months ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on PRI's The World

"They also initiates in human rights cases. So-called international jurisdiction when eve the case candidates take place within the country for political reasons for example than some countries in europe they are able to start criminal proceedings in their own countries. Even though they're trying you charge and prosecute people for different citizenship. What about alexander lukashenko himself. He said that he will work. On constitutional reforms. Anything happens so far. Last week here conducted the so cold old belarussian assembly. There was a resolution saying that we should expect a referendum on the constitutional amendment sometime in december late december calendar. But this is very much a delaying tactic. Lukashenka clearly does not want to leave. He feels more confident now. Has suppressed big protests. He thinks that he still has the support of the kremlin on therefore what he's looking for. He's really looking forward. How to continue to retain power a law depends on how crab in bolivia does when no that. The risk pass another animal Through senate on lukashenka and the kremlin would like lukashenko to step down because he's not really very predictable but on the other hand they only have so mania leverages over him So they're full. Lucretia quite confident. Kevin to support cutty. Applaud is a political analyst with cpa the centre for european policy analysis. She's been talking with us about the latest developments and belarus. Thank you so much. Thank you for kevin. May comedy is subjective. What may be funny to me may not be funny to you. In china stand up comedian. Young lee has found that a lot of men. Don't find her funny. In fact some men go so far as to say there's nothing funny about the fact that female. Comedians are on the rise in china. Stephanie studer rights for the economist. She talked about the controversy over female comedians. In china with jason palmer of the intelligence a podcast from our partners at economist radio. Here's a portion of their conversation with of of number at home than that you know. Once he was telling her audience the fallen. Jake men are adorable but mysterious after all they can look so average and yet. Be so full of confidence. Now that may not seem so risque to western is used to stand up comedy with far more insulting humor. But in this case many chinese men took offense and indeed greek of them in december reported michigan to china's broadcast regulator for sexism. And so who is young. Lee is a twenty eight year olds. Canadian last year earned teisal of punchline queen on rock and roast which is fantastically popular competitive. Stand up comedy. Show where a panel and the audience get to vote for their favourite comedian and a loss of female. Comedians have been appearing on this show which is giving them a new real prominence in china and a loss of them are turning thi this form of comedy because it is freer than traditional types of chinese comedy and allows them to express themselves in lots of new ways and they're also bringing up subjects that often seen in china being indecent for a woman to be discussing that male audiences a now unhappy about becoming the bus of the jake about this backlash against his yang. What effect do you think that'll have on. The miss young for her part has been inspired by the a around her gag to create a new one or the other young children in this one. She relates an exchange with a male. Comedian you rather approvingly notes that she is testing men's.

europe Kevin jason palmer kevin bolivia Lucretia Last week Lee china last year december twenty eight year lukashenko december late december alexander lukashenko Stephanie studer chinese Young lee Canadian Lukashenka
"jason palmer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"S cases of covert see another spike one on one with the head of the Dr Francis Collins. That's Friday on the PBS NewsHour this afternoon at three o'clock here on Marco Woman you're with the world. Every Friday. We check in with our friends at economist radio to hear about what they've been working on. The intelligence podcast aired a special edition this week about the displacement of persecution of the weaker people in northwestern China. Members of the Muslim minority are not only facing oppression in China, their fears extend to many parts of the globe. Jason Palmer is the host of the intelligence S O. This is in depth reporting about Uighurs that had been started as a cover story. For the Economist magazine. Give us an overview. Jason. What did your colleagues at the magazine fund yet? This is a mammoth bit of reporting involving stacks of government documents talking with dozens of were exiles work with academics and Some sources not to be named and was clear on the basis of this, and plenty of other reporting is that Chinese authorities are carrying out what were at pains to call crimes against humanity. It fits every criterion of the International Criminal Court's definition forceable transfer of population imprisonment and forced sterilization. Persecution on ethnic or religious grounds. Now, the Chinese government says they're de radicalizing a population prone to separatism in Xinjiang province, where many workers live. They say there's no torture, and that's simply not what people are telling us. Some of what the magazine reported is part of your podcast. Where did you take the reporting? What are we going to hear? Well, it's ah 22 minutes show their three different segments kind of tackling this from from three different angles. In the first I speak to God Epstein, the economists China affairs that it's her who spoke with a weaker woman who's actually spent time in one of the detention camps in Xinjiang. And remember, it's it's all but impossible to get these kinds of first hand accounts. Here's a bit of her story places full linen resume document and her three Children, Fridays were probably the most terrifying day of the week. That was the day when officials with questions students and schools around the interrogators were looking for clues about the students lives at home. They wanted to know whether parents prayed or used Islamic readings or talk to the Children about Prophet Muhammed. If the answers weren't satisfactory, they could result in a family member of being sent to what they call of occasional training center. Or the camps in a gulag. That one baloney specter as Mr I would put me our Children would be nervous that they would answer wrong on get her sent back to the camps where she spent two months in 2000 is the bid. That Zuma Dawood, risking her life to speak with gaudy Epstein of the economist Jason Palmer. In the intelligence podcast. He spoke with God, They have seen a bit more about Zoom right story. And the plight of weaker is like her in China. I mean, her story is not uncommon, is it? That's right. Over the past few years, we've heard more about the camps that the gulag in Xinjiang but in reality got he describes the whole province is a kind of surveillance state's within what is already a surveillance state. Every move is watched their high tech tracking APS people were forced to use low tech networks of neighbors forced to report on neighbors. China's government justifies all this by saying they're making Xinjiang safer there doing it in the interest of the weaker people, making them happier. But the camps the surveillance isn't even the worst of it knows. Umrah mentioned her three Children, and yet she was still detained. I know an important part of this reporting by your colleagues was a separation of parents from their Children. Yeah, The reporting indicates that around a quarter million of the region's nearly three million Uighurs under the age of 15 have had at least one parent detained that there's even a vocabulary. The authorities have developed for it word for single hardship or double hardship, depending on whether one or both parents were in the camps. The end of last year, almost a million weaker kids from from young adults down, two infants have been placed in these boarding facilities where only Mandarin Chinese spoken. There's cultural indoctrination..

Jason Palmer China Economist magazine Xinjiang Epstein Dr Francis Collins PBS Chinese government International Criminal Court Zuma Dawood
"jason palmer" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Zumra Dow risking her life to speak with gossip seen the economist. Jason Palmer in the intelligence podcasts he spoke with got a bit more about Zumra story and the plight of wheat in China I mean, her story is not uncommon as that's right over the past few years we've heard more about the camps, the Gulag Incheon John, but in reality, gutty describes the whole province kind of surveillance states within what is already surveillance state. Every move is watched their high-tech tracking APPs people were forced to use low tech networks of of neighbors forced to report on neighbors. China's government justifies all this by saying they're making Xinjiang safer. They're doing it in the interest of the week or people making them happier. But the the camps, the surveillance isn't even the worst of it. No Zumra mentioned her three children and yet she was still detained a I know an important part of this reporting by your colleagues was the separation of parents from children. Yeah the the reporting indicates that around a quarter million of the region's nearly three million workers under the age of fifteen had had at least one parent detained that there's even a vocabulary. The authorities have developed for it words for single hardship or double hardship depending on whether one or both parents were in the camps at the end of last year almost a million weaker kids from adults down to infants have been placed in these boarding facilities where only mandarin, Chinese is spoken. There's cultural indoctrination. The whole thing looks like a way to to chip away at everything that makes these people leaguers that religion culture, the language. It is flabbergasting. Jason. I want to play another portion of from your podcasts intelligence. You touched upon this earlier how the Chinese government is playing big brother in how the warriors are under constant surveillance. This surveillance goes beyond Xinjiang, doesn't it? It does another segment in the show takes us to London. The remote surveillance is happening right here where I am and indeed all over the world it's estimated. There's about four hundred workers in London and I spoke to John Phipps who spent about a year getting to know some of them they all know each other and and yet there's fear there are spies even within their community John Describes, a vivid sign of going to a restaurant with some of them..

Zumra Dow Jason Palmer Xinjiang China London Chinese government John Phipps John Describes gutty
"jason palmer" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on PRI's The World

"World every Friday we check in with our friends at economists radio to hear about what they've been working on the intelligence podcast aired a special edition this week about the displacement persecution of the weaker people in northwestern. China. Members of the Muslim minority are not only facing oppression. In China, their fears extend to many parts of the globe. Jason Palmer is a host of the intelligence. So this is indepth reporting about leaguers that had been started as a cover story for the. Give us an overview. Jason what did your colleagues at the magazine find? This is a a mammoth bit of reporting involving stocks have government documents talking with dozens of exiles work with academics, some sources not to be named and clear on the basis of this and plenty of other reporting is that Chinese authorities are carrying out what were at pains to coke crimes against humanity it fits every criteria of the international criminal courts definition forcible transfer of population imprisonment enforced sterilization persecution on ethnic or religious grounds. Now, the Chinese government says they're de radicalizing population prone to separatism in Xinjiang province where many workers live they say there's no torture and that's simply not what people are telling us. Some of what the magazine reported is part of Your podcast, where did you take the reporting? What are we gonNA hear? Well, it's a twenty two minute show their three different segments kind of tackling this from from three different angles in the I I speak to Gotti Epstein the economists, China Affairs. It's who spoke with a week or woman who's actually spent time in one of the detention camps in Xinjiang and remember it's all but impossible to get these kinds of firsthand accounts. Here's a bit of her story..

Jason Palmer China Xinjiang Gotti Epstein China Affairs Chinese government
"jason palmer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is Lady public radio. I'm Michelle Hannigan. Look at how North Korea is handling the pandemic is coming up next on the world after a traffic updates, starting with polio, happy Friday, Julie Death Michelle We made it happy Friday. We do have trouble eastbound 80 at the car. Kenya's Bridge Toll Plaza to vehicle records The two left lanes, take it away and back up to the Crockett exit Pomona Street. Fairfield. We've gotta stall the SUV highway 12 eastbound before Chad Born road blocking the left lane trance. Still putting out the car fire of the Altamont Pass East 5 80 before the stone cut overpass. They're in the right lane. Awful delay from Portola Julie, Deputy Security traffic support comes from Lucky and Lucky. California I'm Judy Woodruff on the next news hour, the best health care We conclude our series on where the U. S stands on medical treatment. That's Friday on the PBS NewsHour. The news hour comes on this afternoon at three o'clock. I'm Carol Hills. You're with the world for months. North Korea's leader Kim Jong UN claimed that there were no cases of the Corona virus in his country. But that might not be true anymore. Last month, Kim himself admitted things were not going well. This was a startling admission, but there were few details. North Korea is a subject tackled by our friends at the intelligence podcast. It's produced by economist Radio in London. Jason Palmer is the host. Jason. Who did you speak to about this rare admission.

North Korea Kim Jong UN Jason Palmer Michelle Hannigan Portola Julie Julie Death Bridge Toll Plaza polio Judy Woodruff Kenya Carol Hills Fairfield London PBS California
"jason palmer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Who does? Art belongs to that story is coming up in the final segment of the world is to 49. I'm Michelle Hannigan. Julie did officially back with traffic in about 10 minutes and then the PBS NewsHour starts at three. What people and businesses are and are not buying says a whole lot about how this economy is doing one window into the behavior of the state of American Trucking. Next time on market marketplace comes on this afternoon at four o'clock here on public radio. I'm Carol Hills. You're with the world who does art belong to. That's a centuries old debate and also a recent topic on the intelligence podcast. It comes to us from economist Radio in London. Jason Palmer is the host. Interesting topic. Jason, Who did you speak to? It's a fascinating topic. I spoke to feel after Rocco, who's the economists? Culture correspondent and she told me a story about an activist and some of his friends who visited the Musee du Ke Ba hali in Paris in June. Andi. He simply took a statue originally from South Sudan and said he was there to to restituto stolen goods from Africa. They were arrested and are now awaiting trial. This isn't as you say. A new debate on Fiammetta said that the pressure Really started in the 19 seventies, when museums started to be petitioned to return objects from from where they were stolen, are seized. Overall, Most museums have been hesitant. There's been legal challenges brought against this effort, but the pressure is getting louder, isn't it? Yeah, it is, And it's it's coming from different directions. I mean, museums are our institutions that move slowly. They're they're conservative. They're careful. They're in the business of conservation. And in the past, it was the country's were artifacts were stolen from that have lead the charge. African countries places like Greece. Famously, there's this debate about the Elgin Marbles in the British Museum here in London. But as FEMA has said that the calls for change are really starting to come from elsewhere, and here's a bit of that conversation. What we're seeing now is a new generation of curator Sze law advocates, activists and The calls for restitution off coming from the inside from this small group of curator's who are coming towards the top of their institutions. What is it that's driving that change? Then? Why're curator is having this evident change of heart, So the real game changer was a report. The president Emmanuel Macron, France, commissioned at the end of 2017. For the first time You had academics and curator calling for real change. They described it. As a change in relational effects by which they meant there should be a much, much more egalitarian discussion between the countries that objects came from on the countries where these objects have ended up. And so where do these activist characters fit into the story? So this is a generation off operators who Really started working in the early two thousand's, when the trend off world museums was at its height. These were the places where you could compare countries from all over the world where you could see objects that had universal connections that within The argument in favor of world museums. Waas a selfish attitude. What one was invented to describe to me is what's mine is mine, and what's yours is mine. This new generation of off operators, who are now in their late forties and early fifties into coming to the top of their institutions have also being driven by what they've seen over the last five years. The roads must full movement in South Africa and in Oxford, and, of course, black lives matter. That's Fiammetta Rocco, culture correspondent for the Economist. She was speaking to Jason Palmer of the intelligence podcast. Jason did FEMA to mention who are where some of these leading activist museum curator czar Well. The most prominent is probably Dan Hicks at the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford, which has half a million objects, and he's been looking in great detail into where they actually came from. Just one example. There's there's a big collection from Benin in West Africa, and he dug into this this brutal history of how AH British garrison just raised the palace of opinions, Ruler and And gathered up all the treasures. Basically, I mean, there's there's so many of these stories, not just the history of the objects, but also the histories of their travels, and the whole debate is is an extremely nuanced won so much disputed ownership. Revisionist history Zin. It's not often clear what's what's best for the objects for the museums for for the countries of origin. I guess to get a better sense of it. I would point to the podcast. Really interesting, Jason so much more to hear on the intelligence podcast. Jason Palmer is the show's host. The intelligence is a podcast of economist radio in London, Jason Thanks and we look forward to having you back again. It'll be a pleasure. When means that they are going going gone. It's one of the biggest street parties in Europe, the annual Notting Hill Carnival. For three days. At the end of summer, more than a million people descend on London's Notting Hill neighborhood. It's a celebration rooted in Caribbean culture. They don't streets filled with sounds of reggae,.

Jason Palmer Fiammetta Rocco London FEMA Oxford Michelle Hannigan Carol Hills Musee du Ke Ba American Trucking Julie PBS Notting Hill Carnival Europe Pitt Rivers Museum South Sudan Notting Hill Sze Africa Greece South Africa
"jason palmer" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Me as what's mine is mine and what's yours is mile. This new generation of of curator's now in their late forties early fifties in coming to the top of their institutions have also been driven by what they've seen the last five years. The roads, must fall movement in South Africa and in Oxford and of course, black lives matter. That's Meta Rocco Culture correspondent for the economist she was speaking to Jason Palmer of the intelligence podcast Jason did feel not to mention who or where some of these leading activists museum curator's are. Well the most prominent is probably Dan Hicks at Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford as half a million objects and he's been looking in great detail into. Came from just one example there's there's a big collection from Benin in West Africa and he dug into this this brutal history of how a British garrison just raised the palace of opinions rule in and gathered up all the treasures. Basically I mean there's there's so many of these stories, not just the history of the objects, but also the the histories of their travels and and the whole debate is is extremely nuanced. One so much disputed ownership revisionist histories and and it's not often clear. What's what's best for the objects for the museums for for the countries of origin I guess to get a better sense of it. I I would point to the podcast. It's really interesting Jason such more to here on the intelligence podcast. Jason. Palmer is the show's host. The intelligence is a podcast of economist. Radio in London Jason thanks and we look forward to having you back again it'll be a player. That Be. It's one of the biggest street parties in Europe. The annual Notting Hill Carnival for three days at the end of summer more than a million people descend on London's notting. Hill neighborhood is a celebration rooted in Caribbean culture. Jumping. Lean. Still. With sounds of reggae hip hop and Sokha as music that originated in Trinidad and Tobago in the early seventies, the music you're hearing now is the genre dub basically reggae with some echo reverb and other sound effects of thrown into the mix. I young. Black you'll come. Notting Hill Carnival was created by Black Londoners in the sixties they wanted to express themselves in the face of racism in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, a series of racially motivated attacks.

Jason Palmer Notting Hill Carnival Oxford London Meta Rocco Culture Pitt Rivers Museum South Africa Dan Hicks Trinidad Europe Benin Sokha West Africa
"jason palmer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"An apartment building on commercial Street in Braintree. His lawyers say no physical evidence has ever been tied to wide shoal and a warning from Boston police this morning. Be on alert in the north end in particular. And if you're a woman, Ah, woman says she was walking along Prince Street and North Square overnight Sunday when a man tried to sexually attacker she screamed. He ran Couple of tips from police to ensure your personal safety. Simple things, but helpful reminders always know your surroundings. Look around. Be watchful. Be aware. Don't get distracted by your cell phone or your iPod Pay attention. Walk in pairs Don't walk alone, especially late at night where sneakers or shoes that allow you to run. If you need to run If you think someone is following you home, you change direction you call for help. All right, and acclaim. Jazz trumpeter who was at the faculty of Berklee College of Music creates a musical tribute to Briana Taylor. She is the black Mt. Was shot and killed in her bet by Louisville police. This was a no knock warrant. Couple of disease. Carl Stevens, with more Jason Palmer, playing the trumpet is an assistant professor at Berkeley is released more than a dozen tracks on YouTube. In honor of Briana Taylor. In each piece. He's accompanied by another musician. People he knew and admired and.

Briana Taylor Jason Palmer Braintree Berklee College of Music North Square Boston Louisville YouTube assistant professor Carl Stevens Berkeley
"jason palmer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of course, they were not. His soldiers slaughtered more than 7000 Muslim men and boys who tried to flee. It was not really supposed toe happen. There were Considerable efforts to reach a negotiated settlement between the Bosnian Serbs and the Bosnian Muslims and so having suddenly a huge, genocidal event. On the one hand, it was horrific, and on the other hand, he was such a shock to the system and galvanized the West to finally do's military power to bring the war to an end. Who was responsible for these atrocities. In trouble needs. It was the Bosnian Serbs. And, of course, there was complicity on the part of the Serbian government, and that has been proved on the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia with the convictions of general cursed itch. General melodic and president courage at the time, and did you have a role in getting any of these men prosecuted? Well, yes, there's ambassador at large for war crimes issues In the late nineties, I was responsible for helping bring as much evidence as possible to the Yugoslav tribunal in The Hague that would implicate senior leaders. I want to jump to today, and unfortunately, war crimes and crimes against humanity are still happening across the globe, often in conflict zones in places like Yemen and Syria. What's being done about these crimes today? Well, not enough is being done. But I think there are very brave and committed individuals and even governments around the world. They're doing the best they can. It's a reality, for example, with Syria that the United States and France and the United Kingdom on the Security Council have sought To have the whole Syrian situation referred to the International Criminal Court for investigation and Prosecutions, but that referral has been vetoed. By Russia, which, of course, is aligned with the Assad government in Syria, Frankly, why there has not been a referral of the Yemen situation to the International Criminal Court. Pretty much boggles my mind, although I can understand the politics of it in the case of Yemen, who or what entity would be the one to bring that? To court to make that an issue well, because Yemen is not a state party to the Rome statute of the International Criminal Court. You have to get a referral by the Security Council to the court case of Yemen, Of course, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates are Prominent parties, you know, in the conflict in Yemen, and I can imagine that politically, the Trump administration would not necessarily be the one to refer Yemen or bring it up in the Security Council, given its relationships with Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. But at the end of the day, you would have to get out for all five votes of the prominent members of the Security Council. But that's extremely difficulty with Yemen because of the politics concerned. David Scheffer was the U. S ambassador at large for war crimes issues from 1997 to 2001. Thanks a lot, David. Thank you. According to the latest tally, covered, 19 has claimed more than 550,000 lives worldwide. Compare that with the 33 million people who have died from AIDS. The numbers are vastly different. An AIDS has been around much much longer, but scientists and health care workers believe they're important parallels between the two diseases. Here's Macedo's Amati, director of the World Health Organization's Africa region. I think the similarity with two pandemics. Certainly stigma is one of the things that they have in common. Which, of course, was very, very powerful in the early days off HIV pandemic. Doctor somebody is on today's edition of the podcast. The intelligence from the Economist Radio in London podcast host Jason Palmer joins us now. Jason Dr Morty has been at the forefront of both pandemics. Tell us more about who she is. Well back in the 19 nineties, she was working in the Ministry of Health in Botswana. When when HIV was really taking hold there and remember, it was quite terrible in boats one by the end of the decade, it had the highest HIV infection rates in the world. More than 1/4 of the people there between 15 and 49 had it and she was on the front line. Then as now, but she was done testing kind of recording. The tragedy as it unfolded is Dr Morrissey's experience with the HIV AIDS pandemic. Ah, constant reference point for her in terms of how she's thinking about the current pandemic. Absolutely, and I think that's true For a lot of people working in the region. The comparisons between the two are kind of hard to avoid. Doctor. My lady told me that that used to note down the names of new infection cases every day and then at felt she had to kind of lock it up in her desk drawer to keep those names secret because the stigma against infected people were so high. Of course, after a wild a single notebook wasn't nearly enough. But But she said that when she sees the case numbers for Coben, 19 rising, she still thinks of those notebooks. Let's hear a bit more from your conversation with Dr Morty. I've actually been very surprised by the stigma around Cove in 19. I think because of the fear that is a highly Infections and fatal disease Andi did on contact families being attacked. The first testing centers also being attacked, and there was a slightly similar reticence, particularly in the beginning in sharing information about covert 19 And to some extent those of them getting information as you know about the context off people. Do you think from your work with HIV and AIDS? Do you think it offers any lessons for the pandemic? What have you learned in dealing with HIV and AIDS that you think might apply, took over 19? It was very soon understood in HIV that controlling the virus went way beyond the health sector. I remember going to speak to village elders about this virus and then talking to them about The various aspects of HIV, which need a multifaceted response not only from the public health people but from the society because this was very much around tryingto influence and change social norms. One of the things that we've learned very much in the HIV response was the importance of communities, then for covert 19 is one thing to say, Well, you know you need toe toe wear mask when you go out in public, and it's another for people to be enabled to do that, sometimes under the circumstances in which they live, so people really need toe have this information from people with whom they trust. We learned this a lot in HIV. It's Dr Massey Dissimilarity, director of the Africa region, speaking to Jason Palmer of the Intelligence podcast, Jason. She's certainly in a position to draw parallels between HIV AIDS and covered 19. What else did she say? Well, she said, it's not just the sort of response to the pandemic that has that societal element. It's the virus. Itself. These viruses themselves have different societal impacts. We don't hit different sectors of society equally, and certainly we see that in covert 19 with the way that it hits people of color disproportionately the way it hits Industries, for instance, like meat packing I spoke to our Chief Africa correspondent John McDermott. He put it in the simplest terms. Pandemics don't readily disappear, not not just in the sense of infections dropping and viruses being tamed. But the inequalities that pandemics can magnify having effects long after a disease itself is actually tamed. Pandemics have really wide and in many cases very long lasting effect. So much more to hear on the intelligence podcast. Jason Palmer is the show's host. The intelligence is a podcast of economist radio in London. Jason Thanks and we look forward to having you back on again..

HIV Yemen AIDS Jason Palmer Jason Dr Morty Security Council Syria International Criminal Court Jason Bosnian Muslims Africa David Scheffer Yugoslav tribunal Saudi Arabia director International Criminal Tribuna United Arab Emirates Ministry of Health Infections Serbian government
"jason palmer" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Jason Palmer joins us now. Jason Dr Multi has been at the forefront of both pandemics. Tell us more about who she is. Back in the nineteen ninety S, she was working in the Ministry of Health in Botswana win. HIV was really taking hold their and remember it was quite terrible in Botswana. By the end of the decade, the the highest HIV infection rate in the world more than a quarter of the people there between fifteen and forty nine had it, and she was on the front line then as now but she's been testing kind of recording the tragedy as it unfolded, is Dr? Mortiz experience with HIV AIDS pandemic, a constant reference point for her in terms of how she's thinking about the current. Current pandemic absolutely and I think that's true for a lot of people working in the region, the comparisons between the two kind of hard to avoid Dr Mileti. He told me that she used to note down the names of new infection cases every day, and then at till she had to kind of locked in her desk drawer to keep those names secret, because the stigma against infected people were so high of course after a while, the single notebook wasn't nearly enough, but but she said that when she sees the case numbers for Kobe nineteen rising she, she still thinks of those notebooks. Let's hear a bit more from your conversation with Dr. Muddy I've actually been very surprised by the stigma around covid nineteen I think because of the fear that is a highly infectious than fatal disease, and we did unconscious families being attacked the first testing Santa's also being attacked, and there was the slightest Milan reticence, particularly the beginning in sharing information about covert nineteen and some examples, those then getting information about context of people. People. Do you think from your work with HIV? And AIDS, do you think it offers any lessons for the pandemic? What have you learned in dealing with? HIV and age? You think might apply to Kobe nineteen. It was very soon understood in HIV controlling. The virus went way beyond the health sector I remember going to to village elders about this violence, and then talking to them about the various aspects of HIV which need. MONTEFUSCO response, not only from the public health people from the society, because this was very much around trying to influence and change social norms. One of the things that we've learned very much in the HIV response was the importance of communities. Then for Covid, nineteen is one thing to say well. You know you need to to wear masks when you go out in public and another for people to be unable to do that sometimes under the circumstances in which they live, so people really need to have this information from people with whom they trust. We learned a lot in HIV. That's Dr Muss CD so MOITY director. Director of the WHO Africa region speaking to Jason Palmer of the intelligence podcast Jason She's certainly in a position to draw parallels between HIV AIDS and Covid nineteen. What else did she say? Well? She said it's not just sort of response to the pandemic. That has that societal element the the the virus itself these viruses themselves have different societal impacts. They don't hit different sectors. Sectors of society equally, and certainly we see that in Covid nineteen with the way that it hits people of color disproportionately way it hits industries for instance like meat packing. When I spoke to our chief correspondent John McDermott. He put it in the simplest terms. Pandemics don't readily disappear not not just in the sense of infections, dropping and viruses being tamed, but the inequalities that. That pandemic can magnify having effects long after a disease itself is is actually tamed, pandemics have really wide, and in many cases very long lasting effect so much more to here on the intelligence podcast Jason Palmer is the show's host. The intelligence is a podcast of economist Radio in London. Jason thanks and we look forward to having you back on again. Thank you very much. With people stuck at home across the globe, Tiktok has exploded in popularity. That's an APP where people can create and share short videos. The kids love it harmless fun for the most part, but also controversial. It's owned by a Chinese company India, Bandit Australia and are considering that to here's the world's Lydia Amman Alito. Earlier this week. US Secretary of State Mike pompeo made an appearance on Fox News, and finally Mister Secretary, the huge Chinese APP TIKTOK has about thirty million users in the United States whose Laura Ingraham listed a bunch of allegations that have been leveled against Tiktok. It's a tool for mass surveillance and propaganda, and that gives the Chinese Communist. Party direct access to American teams in their personal data kind of obvious question. If all, that's the case, shouldn't we be considering right now tonight? A ban on Chinese social media APPS especially TIKTOK. Taking this very seriously. We're certainly looking at it. This threat that the trump administration was looking into potentially banning tiktok. A lot of people who use the APP some responded with parody videos and fellow. Americans tonight I went to speak to you in our country about a new threat that's breached our shores now it's not the China about or Govan nineteen. It's a virus that already exist on your phones Tiktok. If you scroll through talks homepage, you'll find tons. These reactions on wait. Don't scroll right now that I've got your attention. You might know something going on Tiktok right now. Talk my kids in the US? China's going your permission. I JUST WANNA know why China would want to kill this. Many people tiktok isn't just a hobby or a way to kill quarantine time. It's actually how they make a living. Fans are followers can give tiktok creators money directly through the APP and if creators get a big enough following, they can land lucrative sponsorship and brand deals, and really all kinds of gigs so when countries banned tiktok creators have a lot to lose guys. I don't know what I'm GONNA. Do without toxin. Make sure you follow my instagram and my to.

HIV Tiktok Jason Palmer Jason Dr Multi Covid China AIDS Botswana United States Jason She Kobe Dr Mileti Ministry of Health Jason Dr Muss Dr. Muddy Africa
"jason palmer" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Bring film written by mark Maxwell who's a returning guest here on double deals here senator Jason Palmer just give me the backstory they were going to get to gonna get to March second Senate Republicans we have a intraparty skillful Senate Republicans in Springfield are closely monitoring the Moline over minority leader bill Brady's reaction to a recent rift that is open up between him and state senator Jason former my understanding is that mark went to a lumber store in Edwardsville to talk with the senator Palmer former is a Republican he ran the same ticket would Brady in the twenty ten is accused of radio first offering him an appointment to a joint ethics commission on the condition that Palmer would not file a measure to ban lawmakers from profiting on gamble lane certain legislators are making a lot of money from industries where they have a tremendous amount of influence and I think that the more the average voter and only pay attention the more shocked than me about what's going on is fragile so here we go again quid pro ball was a judge is to blame senator Palmer what was crystal clear was his intention and his intention was this legislation could be filed and his intention was that I couldn't public please speak publicly about this legislation and those conditions in those terms were placed on the other people who are being appointed to the commission those terms and conditions were placed on other.

mark Maxwell Jason Palmer Springfield Moline senator Jason Edwardsville senator Senate bill Brady senator Palmer
Dont spend it all at once: Pakistan and the IMF

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:02 min | 2 years ago

Dont spend it all at once: Pakistan and the IMF

"Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist radio. I'm your host. Jason Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. In the west there seems to be a push towards vegetarianism and veganism, but that's just a tiny blip in a bigger upward trend in meeting around the world, that's bad news for the environment. But in a narrower sense, it's good for people. And a century ago. One in eight girls born in France was named Marie now that number is one in one hundred demographers love, these kinds of trends, they reveal much more than census data do about. How France is secularize ING and globalizing. But I. Focused on is poised to accept a hefty bailout from the International Monetary Fund. Again, the over indebted country has just sought it's twenty second loan from the F. In a speech while opening a hospital last week, prime minister, Imran Khan, laid the blame on his predecessors. Maimed Pakistan's economic predicament on the previous government. Fingered the amount of debt at the previous government has racked up. Simon cox. Economists emerging marketer. And he pointed out to Pakistanis that fixing this problem would require some hardship in the short term. And he'll so reassured them that Pakistan was in reality of rich country. And the things would get better eventually, and how have done is responded to news of this loan. So there's some dismay some disgruntlement little bit of surprise Iman Khan doing campaigning for the elections last year said he wouldn't turn to the IMF. Although most economists knew that it would be inevitable. He also made large claims for instituting a new kind of welfare state in Pakistan that would take better care of the poor. So that sits at odds with the austerity that Buxton is now going to have to endure, although when should say that the IMF program is attempting to make some provision for the poor. It's certainly been causing a big stir in parliament and the opposition in particular have been accusing the government of selling Pakistan out accusing Pakistan of allowing dictate terms. One particular point of contention is. From this Imran Khan shook up his economic team of the last couple of weeks. Now, the head of the central Bank is a Pakistan national, but also a former official at the IMF. So some critics feel day with this. Right. So let let's roll back a little bit here. How did Pakistan's economy get into such a mess in the first place so Pakistan's been a regular customer? If you like the IMF, and it took a loan twenty thirteen which actually went quite well. And so around twenty sixteen the economy look to have stabilized, but from then on the previous government ran some unsustainable policies in particular the exchange rate to expensive which the competitiveness of puck stan's exports, and they also ran two large budget deficit. So it's too much spending not enough tax collecting, so the big export import Gant, and as a big revenue and expenditure gap for the government the economy, we should say grew pretty well during that pair. But it had these two unsustainable gaps and eventually investors cease to be willing to finance these gaps and the economists after then live with them Enes. So it sounds like some kind of intervention was was needed, and I know with with Pakistan as a as you say regular customer of the I MEF why are so many Pakistanis opposed to to their presence their their their lending. This is a common problem that the IMF aces countries pursue unsustainable. Economic policies. They live beyond their means. Now, the IMF at that point will offer alone to ease this transition, and so the lending will come with conditions attached. So the lending is misused to just by more time. Now, those conditions often quite painful, they often require a cuts in spending increase in taxes often evaluation of the exchange rate, which makes imports more expensive. So none of that is very popular. The question is whether if the I'm wasn't there with the situation even worse and typically answer's yes. Well, it can't be the case that can only turn to the IMF for money or they're not other lenders. Yes. So what sort of different this time? If you like is there an array of other lenders that the Pakistani authorities have leaned on Saudi Arabia has given quite a lot of money and also allowed Pakistan to defer payments on oil, the United Arab Emirates has stepped in and also China, of course, and for while the government sought a could make do with these friends they wouldn't have to deal with the F as well. But the money came short, basically, fills about half the gap, and if I had to turn to the IMF the other half, and how likely is it then on this sort of twenty second go round as Pakistan to actually stick to what the suggests this time around. So it's somewhat unlikely. No one particular to cut Pakistan off, you know, it's a country. That's in a very unstable geopolitical region is the country that has also of its own internal instability issues country of two hundred million people with nuclear weapons, and you know, one of the friends had in the past. Although friend is a strong word is the United States, which has provided an awful lot to economic and military assistance, and so often in previous deals with the F the IMF requested things that Pakistan has then vodka reluctantly partially agreed to and typically the IMF, let's it off at issues waiver said it says the conditions that we attached alone have been waived, and that's become a sort of a game that gets played between the two sides. Now, this is a new government. It's got a good team in place. Good economic team in place. They have their own reputations at stake. So this probably a higher probability this time that in previous occasion. But I'd be surprised if every item in this agreement gets into, but Pakistan doesn't see the IMF as a sort of lender of last resort just lender wondering the degree to which its existence, and this, you know, giving the money, and you can take the advice if you like kind of practice disincentivize is good fiscal discipline. So the IMF often finds itself in a difficult position. It doesn't want to be held responsible for triggering a crisis. It doesn't want to finally cut a country often send it into the abyss won't come think of other examples like Argentina where the became heavily invested in the success of its program and ended up throwing good money after bad an impact fans case it often turns a blind eye to foot-dragging by the authorities or only partial implementation of the conditions. The IMF has asked for besides because it doesn't want to create instability and cause trouble. And you're right. That does create. Inevitable physical game between the two sides. And we'll see how that plays out again with this latest land Buxton? Thank you very much Simon. Thank you very much. My pleasure.

Pakistan International Monetary Fund Imran Khan Simon Cox Jason Palmer France Buxton Prime Minister Saudi Arabia Enes Marie United Arab Emirates Stan United States China Official Argentina
Buy the bullet: global defence spending

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:59 min | 2 years ago

Buy the bullet: global defence spending

"Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist radio. I'm your host. Jason Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. The first of may brings out protesters all over the globe campaigning for better labor conditions. But in France weekly demonstrations by the so-called issue lay zone have been going on for months. Yesterday's mayday gatherings. Brought out a violent fringe that threatens the Jones message and president of annual Macron's attempts to address it. And we take a look at a new study that tries to measure, which English speaking country produces the most bullshit. But I. Last week. China's navy celebrated its seventieth birthday in grand style. As president Xi Jinping peered through binoculars into rain and mist a flotilla swept through the South China Sea. Nine. Winds there. What this moving you. Rose of white clouds, sailors stood on worships and saluted Mr. g who was aboard a brand new destroyer China has also boasted of its nuclear submarines and says it's building a new aircraft carrier America sees China as a growing rival, not just a military threat, but also economic one and the contest is being felt by America's closest allies in Britain yesterday. Gavin Williamson the Defense Secretary was fired by Prime Minister, Theresa may. He was accused of leaking details of how the country plans to let hallway a Chinese tech firm. Build part of its future five g mobile phone network. In response to that plan. America has threatened to cut back intelligence sharing with Britain. Beyond this America and China are leading the world in rearmament race. As a new report makes clear essentially the will to spending enormous sums of money on defense. Shizhong Joshi is economists defense editor this is the report by the Stockholm International Peace Research institute Cypriots Swedish thing Tang, and what it says this year is that global defense spending in twenty eight teen walls one point eight trillion dollars. Now, obviously that's a loss of money to put it in context of just how much it's the highest amount in real terms since sippy began this exercise in nineteen eighty eight and collecting these figures the end of the Cold War. It is seventy six percent higher than nine hundred ninety eight which was the peak of the post Cold War peace dividend when western countries began slashing on forces slashing spending. So you can see just how far we've come in the last twenty years. Also, just how much things have changed geopolitically and who's spending this one point eight trillion dollars, well essentially to. Countries are spending a leading the charge. That's America and China surprisingly America is heading shoulders above everyone else. It will spend about seven hundred sixteen billion dollars this year. That's significant increase from last year it out spends the next eight or so countries combined which gives you a sense of just how far ahead it is. Now, China is well behind spends a fraction of that. But it's military spending growing very quickly. It grew at an average of ten percent every year between two thousand and 2016 between two thousand fourteen in two thousand eighteen churned out. More ships ships with greater tonnage than the entire Indian Japanese navy. So that gives you a sense of just how rapidly they growing. And is this grew spread also among other nations or only American to the growing. It is great will that's provoking response. Particularly in Asia in Asia, for example, with seeing huge spurts among other countries. India for example, now. Spends more than any country in Europe. And I think Indians very proud of the fact that they are outspending not only countries like France, Germany, but also their old, colonial master Britain. Modern and invincible. Of whom stupefaction? Residency is Joel Indian skies ever own words. But Asia, Shirley, isn't the only place where governments want to to be up their defenses. No on Marshall Europeans. Have also been tooling up in recent years. They're obviously very worried by Russia, particularly after Russia's annexation of Crimea in two thousand fourteen they've been spending substantial amounts of quite quickly. If you're one single country its military spending would be four times that have Russia. In fact, it would be the second biggest military power in the world. So back to China, which has been spending money hand over fist as you say. But the their capabilities are still much much weaker compared to America's is there. Some sense of of when China might sort of outpace America will it'll be many many years before it can actually equal American spending. But I would say China gets to concentrate most of its military forces in its front garden in the western Pacific America has global commitments. So could we have a situation where Chinese forces in Asia? Outmatch American forces. Absolutely. We could have that very soon. Indeed. Depending on what America does depending on how China stretches capabilities so beyond America, China is is there anywhere where this would've frenzy of military spending. We'll kind of change the league table. I think we've seen a few changes taking place to Saudi Arabians in the Middle East have been spending huge amounts in the past ten years to the point where they are. Now, the third biggest spender in the world that obviously is going to have a major impact on the Middle East. If you look at Turkey, I think they've also been on a spending spree, and I think in Europe, one of the most interesting countries in eastern Europe, which of course, it's closer to Russia more about Russia's influence, and that's Poland. Police spending has been rising very quickly. They've been buying lots of American weapons, including an American Ed defense system, and they have been at the vanguard of some of this military spending spree in central and eastern Europe that we've seen in recent years. So looking at all these numbers is it's a global trend is everyone spending more. No, I think there's some pretty interesting places. West bending is is shrinking stagnating. The first example is the Middle East. Having said that Saudi Arabia. It was on this spending spree for the last ten years that slowing down. Sippy says that military spending the Middle East shrank by one point eight percent. In two thousand eighteen Saudi Arabia is planning on cutting spending after a number of years of growth, Iran is planning on cutting spending. Although we we don't have data for a few big countries like the United Arab Emirates and Casio. I think Africa's another good example military spending in Africa in two thousand eighteen shrink for the fourth consecutive year. And of course, as we know they're they're big protests in ALgeria and Sudan the military's under pressure from protesters to give way to civilians that could have an impact on on military budgets. I think finally the one I'd like to mention which is really interesting is Russia. Russia has modernized its armed forces over the last decade invested in lots of shiny new weapons. Sippy now says that his slowing. Down at that that boom in Russia is coming to an end. It's calculation say military spending in Russia shrunk by three and a half percent last year. Okay. Some of that could be to do with the fall of the ruble. This little probably spending a lot in ruble, terms. But I think what we all seeing is that the years of Russia plowing money into its military driven by oil that is slowly coming to an end, and that will have an impact, of course, on the European military balance. I mean, it's it's tempting to imagine that more spending on arms makes conflict more likely. There's just simply more more guns and weapons in more hands. What's your take on the Wilbur one really gave us a strong association between alms racing and conflict? We thought the Germans and the British and others competing supremacy. In your building up ships building up weapons and that played a role in contributing to willed, we'll one I think the political science the sort of social science around. This is a bit more complicated. I don't think there is necessarily clear connection between rapid arms racing. And outright conflict. Some people would say actually countries build up weapons, they feel they can deter their adversaries, they feel more secure. They don't feel the need to be vulnerable into lash out. So the association is complicated. What I would say is. I think there's a kind of cycle relationship between mistrust and building homes, the more countries don't trust each other like the US and China over China's island building and in competition in Asia, the more they build up weapons to prepare for the possibility of a clash the more. They build up weapons the less they trust each other. Thank you very much for coming in. Thank you very much.

China Russia America Asia Sippy Middle East Europe South China Sea President Trump France Jason Palmer Britain Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabians Gavin Williamson Jones Xi Jinping Macron
Putsch comes to shove: Venezuela

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:54 min | 2 years ago

Putsch comes to shove: Venezuela

"And welcome to the intelligence on economist radio. I'm your host. Jason Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. After yesterday's dramatic attempt to oust Venezuela's president. We take a look at coups around the world, what makes them happy. What makes them succeed, and what are the risks for coup-plotters fail? And a surprise raid on North Korea's embassy in Madrid reveals just how difficult and thankless it is to be a dissident against the North Korean regime. But I. In Venezuela yesterday, the opposition leader one Guido made his move to try to overthrow the embattled President Nicolas muddle, he claimed his operation. Liberty would be the final push to depose a man who has retained power only through a sham election. Mr. Guido is supported by millions of Venezuelans or suffering from regime inflicted hunger and hardship. But it's the support of the military. He needs in order to take power. And despite promising early signs not enough of them decided to abandon Mr. Muto. Lobue leniency called Pai tau. In a defiant television address, the president called the attempt of failure lambasting those who handed their souls over to the coup mongering, far, right? I was waking up shortly after six AM by the sound of saucepans being bashed, which is a traditional form of protest in Venezuela. Stephen Gibbs rights for the economist he was among the crowds in the capital Caracas yesterday as events unfolded. And it soon transpired what was going on. And that was the one I do was calling for a military uprising. We went over the us. Lootah bell imprinting gynecology perfume in no fuel inter inter one hundred zero as soon became apparent that. This was by no means a normal day all shops with barricaded opposite. As they usually are when there is a protest, but this was not a typical protest because a Hong wide other was out with soldiers. And they were all standing on this a motorway that overlooks the military basement airbase right in the center of Caracas and those soldiers will wearing blue on bans as a symbol of their defection and the crowds grew and grew. An inside that base. The sort of big question was whether the people inside the soldiers, the conscripts inside would he'd what those outside were saying, which is come and join us rebel against the Madora government. Pretty quick it became apparent that. They weren't going to do that it will far in ice towards the crowns toward us that were just on the other side of the barricade. And then things got even uglier the rebel soldiers. Apparently sort of rattled by something began to fire live rounds into the air. That go to whole lot of people running and it was a precarious situation. And then there was a sort of a standoff that lasted for several hours. One of the more striking things that was was. There was Leopold Lopez. He is Venezuela's most famous political prisoner. He's been in jail or under house arrest since twenty fourteen. So to see him walking the streets. Not balking particularly far was quite extraordinary in in. He managed to release himself by a defection of those people that were guarding him. So it was clear that this wasn't as I say a normal protest. Something unusual was going on that went on for several hours until after the tear gas through gone on bearable. Most of the protesters recapped to the square in out mirror here in eastern Caracas. And there was quite oh and Leopoldo Lopez and several members of the national guard who had defected, and they were being sort of hugged by supporters. They were some of them with. With the family, and this was the image. Of course, the opposition was hoping would be repeated massively across the country. This is what they're trying to do. They're trying to do a sort of fell revolution where the feared security forces. Give up put down their arms and say, you know, we're not going to support Madore or anymore where with this new president and everything's going to change. It didn't happen. It sounds like there was good public supports on the streets anyway for Mr. Guido or the people rallying behind him more widely. The short answer is. Yes, I mean, given that he was a relatively unknown figure last year. And now he is unquestionably the most famous opposition leader in Suada. It is probably were saying that a lot of the support for two is a sort of protest vote against Maduro Midori is not popular. But he given that he is saying that he's leading a popular revolu. Nation that in his last a contested election. The one that you know, Guido and the opposition and much of the international community says was rigged last year in a he's standing for reelection. Or he stood for reelection. In the midst of the deepest recession in the world inflation heading for ten million percent, everyone feeling poor more miserable public services here. Collapsing. So, you know, the idea that he could really come on Syria support seems implausible and what about the military whose allegiance has always been the Lynch pin here. What what support does Mr. Guido have from them? I mean, it might be fair to say not as much support as he hopes since he came on the scene in early January. He has repeatedly said look, I can only do this. If the military come with me, I think there's no question in the lower ranks of the army and the forces people know happy head because they're suffering. Exactly the same way the most. Venezuelan's suffering. The problem is that the high ranking generals and the of Venezuela that notoriously has a top heavy army with with thousands of generals a lot of them on a benefiting from the chaos here from the corruption which Unity's that may afford them a new also the whole forces. This is one of the things that were job is Maderas assisted. Did he politicized that institution? Effectively everyone sort of fouls their allegiance to the socialist, revolution and not just Venezuela. So it is a relatively world controlled institution. As as one guy to is is finding out and what will happen to Mr White. Oh, if this fails altogether. If this fails, which is perfectly probable identing it's necessarily the end of quavo. You know, he will probably continue an hope that the drip-by-drip discontent in the military against Maduro. We'll alternate. Really bear fruit. And I think the other person to watch is there Puerto Lopez. He's now out of house arrest. He's going to be living. It seems in the Spanish embassy. That means he's conceive people. He can meet people he can negotiate and that will be an instinct additional little twist to this long-running saga.

Venezuela Mr. Guido President Trump Caracas Leopoldo Lopez Jason Palmer North Korea Madrid Pai Tau Nicolas Muddle Hong Maduro Midori Mr. Muto United States Stephen Gibbs Mr White Madora Government
The strain in Spain: an election looms

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:22 min | 2 years ago

The strain in Spain: an election looms

"Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist radio. I'm your host. Jason Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. In Japan policies and attitudes. That took hold after the second. World War have repercussions that still affect day to day life this week the government at last apologized to tens of thousands of people who were forcibly sterilized in post-war eugenics. Push our correspondent talks to one of them. And the rebuilding of Japan after the war took on an almost military quality as soldiers swapped uniforms for suits. That's made the country's work ethic. Famous notorious even as a new emperor ascends next week. Japanese employees are getting extra time off work to celebrate. But they're not sure they wanted. First up though. 2017 Spain's wealthy semi autonomous region of Catalonia made a push for independence. And former that sheet or the no. That unconstitutional referendum. It voted to break away from Spain. Madrid soon crushed secession bid. But the on issue was far from over it helped trigger this Sunday's general election, the third in little more than three years Spain's, prime minister. Pedro Sanchez called the snap poll in February that those cleaness. Another econ seem worst after a crushing defeat in parliament all Kombucha that up a lower than yours. Equa- his minority. Socialist government had depended on support from small regional parties, including the Catalan nationalists, but they voted with Mr. Sanchez's right wing opposition to reject his twenty nineteen budget plan. His government was paralyzed. The coming election is supposed to break that impasse. But the political landscape remains a fractured. The simmering cuddle on crisis, looms, large, still and Europe is looking for a stabilizing force in uncertain times. Spang goes to the polls on Sunday, the twenty eighth, and it's a very important election because you have another European country that is plunged into real political crisis. Christopher Lockwood is our editor for the Los Eero Spain's been led by government that any had twenty four percent of parliament's, very weak minority government and the prospect after this election is you still went to have a majority and we've seen this pattern happen quite a lot in Europe in Germany. It took many months to form a coalition Belgium had terrible problems putting together Italy the same. It's a growing problem. The fragmentation of political parties in Europe. And I think we're about to see on Sunday a nasty new case of it in Spain. So what do you expect the outcome of the election to being do think Mr. Sanchez will be able to hold onto power? I think that the socialist party which currently forms the minority government will again emerge as the largest party. But it will be very well short of having a majority and the real problem is that there are no. No, viable poss- to a stable code shouldn't at the moment. And the reason for that is the political spectrum has fragmented with the entry of a couple of new parties until recently Spain essentially had two big parties since left in the center right party. But what you've seen is the entry of radical left party Damus a party more or less than the center called the Donoso the citizens party and now about to enter parliament for the first time a fairly far, right? And he migration party cools. Vox on the problem is when you've got five twenty parties in parliament, none of them can form a coalition very easily because none of them seem to want to work with each other. So the danger is that you'll end up having some very inconclusive coalition negotiations fully by another election. If you have another election this year as many people are predicting that will be the fourth of action in four years. This is not a happy state of affairs. But as you say Spanish politics has not always been this way. What's driven all this fragmentation? Well, a couple of things I think clearly one was financial crisis followed by the year is in crisis and this hit Spain very hard. Indeed that led to a demand for new parties to come and solve the problem. If you like, but then the other thing that changed in Spain was the emergence of Catalonia and separatism there as a political issue. So it brought back onto the table. The problem of nationalism in Spanish politics. This takes you all the way back to Franco, of course, early in the Spanish, civil war body parts of it was precisely for over Catalonia and tempted succession there, and none of this has gone away. There has been a tension between Catalonia and the center founders of years, but it had been hoped that it was sort of put to bed then that all changed with demands by Catalina have an independence referendum and then actually declare independence. Both of those things were not permitted under the current constitution. As a result of which the independence that they unilaterally declared was decreed illegal with. Oppressed by direct rule from Madrid. And the people who promoted it put in jail, they're now being tried and nine of them face the prospect of extremely long jail sentences, which again, but devils the whole political atmosphere and also poisons relationships between a number of the stabbing parties and what about outside Spain. How much do you think this election matters in terms of European stability? Well, it will be engine to see what happens with vox, FOX gets taken into a coalition. I didn't think was very likely, by the way. But it could if that happens that will clearly send a lot of shivers down European spines because it will just to mate taking into power of other right wing parties. I think more likely is that Spain will just continue in this rather unfortunate period of political paralysis that's going through. And I think that's bad for Europe in a different way. The reason is that Europe needs more strong countries. Traditionally Europe was run by sort of Franco German access and one of the great strengths of having Britain in the EU. Is to certain extent balancing third power between those two having something to say to both countries to the Germans to be like Germany and apostle of the free market and sound budgetary principles. But also to the French preserving the importance of national foreign defense policies in particular certain sort of sovereigntists attitude towards the way things were done in Europe. Now Britain's leaving the you'll says it wants to leave the and people would like to know we'll be another power to balance out the Franco-German access and Spain sometimes suggested could have been one of those that seems very unlikely if it remains paralyzed it's the calm bit has terrible problems and now political problems. So I think that instability in Spain, you know, robes Europe of another potentially valuable additional actor, Chris. Thanks very much for coming in my pleasure.

Spain Europe Pedro Sanchez Catalonia Madrid Japan Jason Palmer Germany Los Eero Spain Socialist Party Socialist Government Spang Britain EU Prime Minister Christopher Lockwood
Troubling: a death in Northern Ireland

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:29 min | 2 years ago

Troubling: a death in Northern Ireland

"South This economists podcast is sponsored by linked in jobs. Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economists radio. I'm your host Jason Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. A minority of South African people have steadied formal jobs too many, including a large fraction of the country's youth do piecemeal work or are unemployed altogether. We look at the efforts to bring the young into the workforce. And there's a lot of talk about public figures particularly candidates in America's upcoming presidential race speaking, multiple languages, what's with these polyglot politicians. But I. A funeral will be held today for a young journalist from Northern Ireland who was shot dead last week all for the loss of lira. Our hopes and dreams all of her Mazen potential with snuff type a single Barrick. Lira Mckee had been reporting on violent unrest in the city of Londonderry. We believe this to be a terrorist act. We believe it's been carved violent Republicans yesterday. A group called the new IRA took responsibility for the killing it even apologized. The incident was shocking reminder of the fragility of peace since the end of the Northern Ireland conflict known as the troubles. This was an attack on everybody in northern. It. Doesn't matter if you're Catholic or Protestant. British are this is an attack on democracy? The troubles began in the nineteen sixties and painted mostly Catholic Irish nationalists against the British army Northern Ireland police and mostly Protestant loyalists. For three decades violence and terror was a part of everyday life, the turmoil claimed more than three thousand five hundred lives, but in nineteen ninety eight the Good Friday agreement largely brought an end to the conflict today is about the promise of a bright future. Dave, and behold, a line can be drawn bloody past some low level violence continued, but this latest killing has fear and outrage. The funeral today of Larry Mckee is going to feel in many ways. Like, we'll most states occasion. Tom Wainwright is the economists Britain editor where expecting to see the Irish T show that the prime minister will say the president of island the secretary of the UK as well as low two local politicians from Nova Nyland, of course. And so it's going to feel like a big deal, and it really is a big deal in Northern Ireland. This kind of killing of innocent civilian in what seems to have been a terrorist attack something that really has shocked people. It's by no means the gnome since the peace agreements of twenty one years ago. This kind of thing is much less common than it used to be in people here really really shocked by what happened last week, and Tom what can you tell me about the group responsible for misbehaves death, new IRA and its relation to the other groups with IRA in the name, it's it's a bit confusing. Picture it is it really isn't. I think to understand that you've got to go back to the Good Friday agreement of nineteen ninety eight and. What happened? There was that the IRA and most Republicans agreed to end any kind of struggle and take their fight for the United Ireland to the debating chamber of the streets. But at the time there was some Republicans who disagreed with that to this represented, a capitulation, and these guys who are now widely noted dissident Republicans have continued that struggle on a fairly low level. But nonetheless, they are security worry five the security agency raised the threat in Northern Ireland is severe they have continued trying to police officers, for instance. And so why do the new IRA kill Lear mckie? Well, she seems to have been killed by stray bullets. She was watching a riot taking place in the city of Londonderry Derry as it's known to Republicans, and she was watching from next to police come and she was shot in the head and later died, and this riot was kicked off really after police had been raiding homes in the area shortly beforehand seems that they were concerned on the. The Easter rising some local Republicans might be out to coast trouble. And seems that some cycle dissident Republicans is this as a excuse to get that people on the streets and co some trouble and the new IRA said it was an accident and apologized there's some significance to that. Right. There. Is yet seems that they really feel as if that on the back photo of this that agreed which has said, the it's propensity is violence to said that the Republican coups, but they seem to be well aware that locally these kinds of acts of violence in which older NRI innocent civilians killed or injured go down extremely badly and really risk setting that goes back, and we've seen evidence of this already in dairy, the headquarters of a local political party, which is supported by the IRA people being smearing red painted handprints on their offices a form of protest and lately various Republican murals have been graffiti as well by people saying things like not in my name. Name. And so they think realize that this could set them back in a big way. Police also reporting that moving one hundred people have sent them with information about the killing and in a city like Derry, that's really unusual. This is not a place where people have historically been happy to talk to the police about Republican activists. So we could be seeing Quanta change. So do you get the sense from all that then that there is just simply less tolerance for the kind of violence that was so common during the troubles. I think that's right. I think since the Good Friday agreement which was almost exactly twenty one years ago. Many people in Northern Ireland of come to see the peace that's being achieved is enormously valuable, and the idea of going back to that is something that really worries a lot of people. And I think most observers thing that the chances of returns to scale violence, very slim, but any sign that violences on the rise is obviously a worry, especially at the moment with Brexit going on which is causing all kinds of problems for Northern Ireland. We've also got the problem of the Northern Ireland assembly having been suspended now for more than two years. So there's a feeling Northern Ireland is inevitable position so events like this do concern a lot of people that people worry that things are being destabilized that, but you mentioned Briggs in in passing there. Do you think that all the negotiations and the degree to which Northern Ireland has been such a lynchpin of the negotiations has sort of reignited tensions? It's certainly reignited tensions. Yeah. We haven't yet seen a big kicking off of large scale violence or anything like that. But tensions absolutely have been heightened. And it's not surprising because the peace deal made back in nineteen ninety eight really hinged in many ways on the UK an island shed membership of the European Union that help to enable these countries to have a border, which is not just open. But invisible, I mean, if you go there and drive between Northern Ireland and their public of island, you can do so without even realizing that you've crossed the Boda, and of course, membership of the EU means the two countries of members of the single. Markets, and so no customs checks needed and since nineteen ninety eight people know of Nyland being able to choose whether they take Irish or UK possibles in many ways, they've been allowed to feel as if they are either Irish Oprah show oath if they want and so the UK now leaving the European Union really will subject that to strain. And it's clearly pulling the UK an island upon a way that nobody on typically to twenty one years ago and many people particularly in the Republican community. Most of them voted to remain, by the way, think that Britain is in some way reneging on agreements that were made or hinted that twenty years ago, so it is a time of heightened tension. Yes. Tom. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you.

Northern Ireland IRA Tom Wainwright British Army Northern Ireland Londonderry Larry Mckee Jason Palmer Nova Nyland Britain UK United Ireland America European Union Londonderry Derry Mazen Lear Mckie
The new mediocre: the world economy

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:03 min | 2 years ago

The new mediocre: the world economy

"Hello. And welcome to the intelligence on a communist radio. I'm your host. Jason Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. In the Suhel vast swath of land that stretches across the African continent. There's a worrying trend jihadists of several stripes growing in number and in influence, we tag along with an international training exercise aimed at preparing African forces contained a threat. And you might think that the public's interest in the world's changing climate has been on a steady rise you'd be wrong, a dive into data about online searches reveals that climate concern comes and goes. First up though. Over the past six months, a pessimistic picture of the world economy has been emerging speaking at the US chamber of commerce last week Christine Lagarde, the head of the International Monetary Fund issued a warning the global economy is at a delicate moment. Only two years ago. Seventy five percent of the global economy experienced an upswing. So it was a synchronized growth acceleration for this year. We expect not seventy five but seventy percent of the global economy to experience a slowdown in growth. Exactly the opposite of what we had. The IMF later today. We'll be publishing its forecast for the year. Simon Cox are emerging markets editor based in Hong Kong. We already know little bit about it from a speech Christine Lagarde gave she pointed out that they'll be cutting their forecast. They had expected back in January world economy to grow by about three and a half percent sheer. So it sounds like they're going to shave some off that forecast. However, she did emphasize the left is not expect a recession this year. So it's a slow down and one that should autumn out by about mid year in nephew. And why are we seeing this Loda? So the slowdowns quite broadly based the guard pointed out that a variety of countries have slowed down from last year. China has been trying to slow the growth of credit for some time. Now, there's also been of course, this trade will trade tensions between China in America have damaged sentiment. More broadly earlier in two thousand eighteen we saw the Federal Reserve raising interest rates which caused a of problems for variety of emerging economies and euro-zone to seems. Perennially weak takes very little seems to slow its momentum. So order these things happening together have added up to a slight gloomier outlook the me had props year ago, and is any one of those factors dominant in this lowdown. So the trade war has attracted most of the headlines. I think the feds raising interest rates and China's efforts to curb leverage, probably more important. Although it has to be said the trade war has inflicted greater damage on sentiment than I would have expected. It's not so much the practical concrete effect of the tariffs. It's more this notion that two of the world's biggest economists consi I and no longer working in concert to try and keep the economy going and with this downturn than in prospect, what can policymakers around the world due to to get ready to make his already taken some measures. And most importantly, the fed has signaled that it won't be raising interest rates again anytime soon, I think that pose an interest rates has been quite bawdy welcomed by financial markets. And I think it came just. In time a little bit too late. And also China has also turned attention away from curbing leverage towards shoring up growth, and in the past China's been quite effective in reviving demand when it decides to so those both measures that policymakers have already taken and then looking more broadly with always very much welcome Germany's splurging bit. Why would that be such a singularly helpful factor to mini vans, quite tight public finances? It's obviously the biggest economy in the zone surrounded by much weaker economies that would benefit greatly from the spillovers of higher German spending. So the one Konami that's really in a position to spend more refuses to and that leaves its neighbors who aren't really in a position to spend more having to do so to try and up to mind in their own conham is so euro-zone as a whole exports demand weakness to the rest of the world when it really should be pulling its weight. So you mentioned one of the big factors here is fed sort of pausing in its rate increases is their case for a cut. I think possibly one of the perennial worries about this recovery is the central banks have not yet been able to quote, unquote, normalize monetary policy that they haven't been able to raise interest rates to what historically would have been more normal levels that matters in particular if there's a downturn because impasse recessions central banks had to cut interest rates really quite severely in order to offset recessionary impulses. And they sent me don't have room to do that anymore. Now the best insurance policy against having to cut heavily is to cut a little early. And so there's perhaps a case for the fed to cut even if that results in a little bit too easy. The damage that would do is very little in comparison with the damage of cutting too late that is US might of heat a little bit might have a little bit above target inflation something that really would concern. Nobody very much at all. So there is perhaps a case for the fed to be preemptive. The only nuance is that if the fed now did that would be seen as a bit of a sign of panic. Because they seem to be while the set against doing that absolutely have to so in the the worry with growth forecast that look like this one will is that we're headed for kind of another global recession. How do you see things playing out this time give us give us cause for optimism? So there are few signs that quote has bottomed out actually undulated number from China wasn't too bad German industrial production was okay, the US labor market still looks reasonably robust, although earnings growth has been a bit disappointing. So we have a number of lax from the data just getting numbers for March. Now, the lag in the processes, right? So it'll of prepared this report using data that might now be several weeks old, and as Christina guide said in speech, economic weather is very unsettled. It's changeable, and so it's possible. That's hope that the slowdown has already finished and seeing the first signs of stabilization, perhaps even a modest uptick in growth. So as as you say things are unsettled if things are. Actually on the up, and perhaps we haven't you know, crunched the numbers yet for how much it's on the up what might threaten that other whole variety thinks that could still destabilise growth, we've never really been able to get back to a fully healthy economy that's growing at its full potential without a lot of help from monetary policy. So you can think of I don't know the disruption from Brexit would obviously be obvious danger signed seven Newell of trade tensions. It's remarkable. How Optimus dick snatcher markets are about to deal between China and Trump, and yet we've been hearing that as a deal imminent for quite long while now without it actually happening. So there are a number of risks years ago. Christine Lagarde actually coined this phrase, the new mediocre, it was her take on the more common phrase, the new normal and her point was that you global growth was not as often as it had been Patou still pretty disappointing by historical standards, looking back over ten or twenty years. And I think that's where we're at. You know, the good is never that. Good. Hopefully, the bad won't be awful. Really stuck in this new mediocre right somewhere between cautious optimism and get used to it. That's right. Simon. Thanks very much for your time. It's It's my. my pleasure.

China Christine Lagarde Federal Reserve International Monetary Fund Simon Cox United States Jason Palmer Suhel Us Chamber Of Commerce Konami Hong Kong Markets Editor America Germany Christina Guide
"jason palmer" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on WGN Radio

"And once again a face off circle Lewis, right? What was not a strong faceoff team? Overall. Blackhawks got a ferret out in these situations. Make sure we'll give them a quick setup opportunity tapes the face off circle against Reinhard. The drop of the puck the get it again. But Skinner so that was Skinner my bet now he sends the puck down ice into the sabers own crystalline and left it as net along the goal line. Big Rasmussen crystalline nine games against the hawks in his career, six assists, two Sam Reinhart right wing at center ice. Rick wide pass digest Skinner hawk line along the left wing boards. Pressured by Krueger who checks the puck down to Murphy. He'll spend it up the right side and all the way down and in behind the sabre net. Fox David camp had the puck for a moment. Pushed off of it by crystalline, it the other way I go into the hawk zone to Reinhard right circle. Fires a shot over the net around the glass and back down ice into the sabers zone. And Eric Gustafsen is out of the penalty box. Hawks are at full strength. That was a great opportunity. Reinhardt said a couple of really good looks early on. Nobody down the right wing side for the Blackhawks to defend that Latimer. Volka acts of the Saint Louis blues enters the hawk zone to the left wing corner. Pulse. The puck in behind the hawk net. Jason palmer. Unveil they're battling to civil collect corner. He'll carry it up the boards. Give it a Thompson. Phoenix. Arizona native. He lost the puck in the far, corner grit. Seabrook slept it away. But the sabres get it back Thompson for the left circle turns around and fires that deflects up off the glass behind the hawk net. Palm and Bill strokes at behind that left.

Blackhawks Skinner Reinhard Jason palmer hawks wing corner Thompson Sam Reinhart Murphy Fox David camp Lewis Big Rasmussen sabres Arizona Seabrook Eric Gustafsen Krueger Phoenix Reinhardt Rick
The Economist launches 'The Intelligence', a new daily podcast

podnews

02:09 min | 3 years ago

The Economist launches 'The Intelligence', a new daily podcast

"Economist newspaper from London is launching daily podcast. Jason Palmer will host it. It's called the intelligence, and it'll be published at the same time as pod news six in the morning. New York time eleven AM London from January the twenty ninth digital says it has eight staffers it's hosted by Acosta Spotify appears to be testing an import function which will allow you to add podcasts from another app on it appears to look inside your media library. Our technical analysis of recent podcast has been improved under the hood. And his now measuring more podcasts. More offer bit rates Luff's levels and other things you'll find this analysis appearing in selected podcast pages to just search pod news dot net. The BBC sounds app continues to gather bad press, the BBC who's lost a number of radio presenters recently, including Chris Evans. Simon mayo and Charlie sloth has suffered another setback with the announcement that Brent Spencer, formerly digital editor for BBC radio's music channels. Has accepted a new role as digital content director for rival Bauer media, formerly under Bret watch come and mayor's film review. The listen up is a new podcast app that can be operated. One handed for some reason. Hot pod. Focuses on Pinner a kids podcast previously owned by panoply, which is now being spun out as an independent company podium to a hosting analytics platform has announced a slew of new features Rhody is talking pay major firmware update for their pro cast mixer wonder what it is radio days Europe has published its preliminary program, it's a conference in Lausanne in Switzerland at the end of March, and it's the world's meeting point for the world of radio an audio Tom Webster from Edison research and James Kriton pod news editor that's me her among the speakers hand to events for you podcast. Toronto the uncomfortable. Where digital media comes together is February twenty-second to twenty fourth in Toronto in Canada wrap up warm and podcast festival. In Hamburg, Germany is February twenty five to March one featuring German-language podcasters report wall metu, and that's the latest from our newsletter. Pod news dot net.

BBC Jason Palmer Toronto James Kriton London New York Germany Acosta Spotify Chris Evans Brent Spencer Tom Webster Bauer Media Am London Simon Mayo Hamburg Charlie Sloth Canada
The Intelligence: Trailer

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:56 min | 3 years ago

The Intelligence: Trailer

"For one hundred seventy five years. The economist has been looking beyond the headlines cutting through the noise with clear thinking now, we're going to bring you that same sound reasoning in a daily podcast with our editors and correspondents and meet your host. Jason palmer. It's called the intelligence. Every weekday. We'll bring you what you need for the day ahead, clarity and context on the stories shaping your world from politics, they say that militarily flourishing yet clinically in a bit of a funk, the reality is that the longer this continues in the longer the war continues, the more Turkish attitudes toward Syrians will harden. British solutions have been incredibly damaged. The least thing we could do is to ask people. What is your collective will to business? He then became known as the kite zoo killer cuts of being this kind of web of cross shareholdings. In fact, surprisingly for a foreign executive he actually developed quite a kind of following in Japan, the analogy that a lot of people using in China is saying well, this is a bit like Tim cook. Who's the boss of apple suppose, he was arrested in Singapore and extradited to China doubled pulls a huge Inc in the US to science and culture, there's something bones about majoring yourself. Against the universe deeper issue is how every generation makes the art of their time. That's what's happening here. Global network of journalists will take you to the places where news is being made and talk to the people making it. So I met Jamal hoagie at the Oslo Freedom Forum engaging midget economic to us for the Michigan. To myself had a chance to discuss all these problems with Shinzo Ave. Japan's Prime Minister. Funding is one of the most interesting people I've interviewed in my years in China. He is a force of nature in the flesh. And with the incisive analysis, you expect from the economist we'll dig deeply into the biggest news stories and reveal some you're not hearing. Elsewhere in news are the most interesting financial bubble that you've never heard of the whole of Legos are take yearly creative. Traffic the pillow, I roast beef. I think when I write their bit trees, I don't feel any nervousness about the audience. I feel obligation to the person I'm writing about get more than just the facts get the intelligence. Join me for twenty minutes every weekday starting on January twenty ninth. Subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you like to listen.

China Apple Japan Jason Palmer Tim Cook Jamal Hoagie Michigan Prime Minister Oslo United States Executive Singapore Huge Inc One Hundred Seventy Five Years Twenty Minutes
The Intelligence: Trailer

The Economist Radio

02:56 min | 3 years ago

The Intelligence: Trailer

"For one hundred seventy five years. The economist has been looking beyond the headlines cutting through the noise with clear thinking now, we're going to bring you that same sound reasoning in a daily podcast with our editors and correspondents and meet your host. Jason palmer. It's called the intelligence. Every weekday. We'll bring you what you need for the day ahead, clarity and context on the stories shaping your world from politics. They said that is militarily flourishing yet politically in a bit of a funk, the ballot is that the longer this continues in the longer the Syrian war continues, the more Turkish attitudes toward Syrians will harden. British decisions have been incredibly damaged. The least thing we could do is to ask people. What is your collective will to business? He then became known as the kite zoo killer cuts of being this kind of web of cross shareholdings. In fact, surprisingly for a foreign executive he actually developed quite a kind of following in Japan, the analogy that a lot of people using in China is saying well, this is a bit like Tim cook of apple suppose, he was arrested in Singapore and extradited to China doubles, a huge Inc in the US to science and culture. You know, there's something bones about majoring yourself. Against the universe deeper issue is how every generation makes the art of their time. That's what's happening here. Global network of journalists will take you to the places where news is being made and talked to the people making it so I met Jamal cash hoagie at the Oslo Freedom Forum engaging gauging midget phenomena to us for the Michigan. To myself had a chance to discuss all these problems with Shinzo Ave. Japan's Prime Minister. Funding tone is one of the most interesting people I've interviewed in my years in China. He is a force of nature in the flesh. And with the incisive analysis, you expect from the economist we'll dig deeply into the biggest news stories and reveal some you're not hearing. Elsewhere in news are the most interesting financial bubble that you've never heard of the whole of Legos are particularly creative. Traffic is the pillow on roast beef. I think when I write their bit trees, I don't feel any nervousness about the audience. I feel an obligation to the person. I'm writing allowed get more than just the facts get the intelligence. Join me for twenty minutes every weekday starting on January twenty ninth. Subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you like to listen.

China Apple Japan Jason Palmer Tim Cook Jamal Michigan Prime Minister Oslo United States Singapore Executive Huge Inc One Hundred Seventy Five Years Twenty Minutes
"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

04:47 min | 3 years ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"A new year with the best of a week of stories from across the economist. I'm an macelroy curated today's selection and coming up the young economists to watch this decayed, the company's county their employees every step and a life spent trying to solve the riddle of Israel. Offers cover of twenty nine thousand nine take stock of Donald Trump's presidency is he enters his second two years. It's been a rocky start for the government shutdown seesawing markets and the departure of further cabinet members. But we argued for calm assessment. Mr. Trump is so polarizing there's a danger of ignoring his achievements. Shortly before Christmas, he signed a useful bipartisan criminal Justice reform into law. Some of the regulatory changes to schools and companies have been helpful in foreign affairs, the attempt to change the terms of America's economic relations with China is welcome to but any orthodox Republican president enjoying the backing of both houses of congress might have achieved as much or more during his two years as market surged and the economy roared, Mr. Trump felt invulnerable but his luck maybe. Out to turn. Although the economy is still Howdy strong. The sugar high from the tax cut is fading and growth is slowing in China and Europe markets, which Mr. Trump Harrell's is a proxy for economic. Success are volatile Republicans were trounced in the house in the midterms the new democratic majority would investigate the president's conduct. And at some point Robert Mueller, the special counsel will complete his report on links between Russia and the Trump campaign with less favorable conditions. We won't that the chaos and confusion might increase. He has already been implicated in two felonies and several of his former advises in or heading for prison as his troubles mount. He will become less bound by institutional machinery, if Mr. Mueller indicts, a member of Mr. Trump's family. The president may instruct his attorney general to end the whole thing and then make agreed. Juice use of his pardon POWs what then so we all touch should congress and the world prepare for what's coming foreign ally. Should engage an hedge work with Mr. Trump when they can. But have a plan B in case, he lets them down Democrats in control of the house have a fine line to tread. They must hold him to account but not play into his desire that they serve as props in his permanent campaign. Meanwhile, Republicans find themselves in a familiar dilemma, speak out and risk losing their seats in the primary. Stay silent and risk losing their party and their consciences after two chaotic is it is clear that the Trump show is something to be endured. Perhaps the luck will hold an America and the world will muddle through but luck is a slender hope on which to build prosperity and peace one of the notable shifts during Mr.. Trump's first two years who's in the dynamics of global trade in all week ahead podcast US economics, editor Sameeh canes declared the twenty nineteen will be the year of the trade deal. This the renegotiated NAFTA, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and in you deal between Japan and the EU to name just a few. But as she told Jason Palmer, these new deals under longer just about tariffs. You have rules on trade in data? You have rules on how intellectual property works in the in the two countries. Right. And what's wrong with it? Yeah. I mean, it sounds pretty great. It sounds pretty good to have all these these trade deals will this activity going on and for some folks it really is. If you're a politician than these deals are instruments of diplomacy, the Japan, and you get to stand up and say that they're preserving the world trading order, and and that's great for them. The worry is that you end up with this very distorted system where some producers again. Getting the market access. They're making the sales just because of this low tariff not because at the best producer of the thing. And you're giving these produces oughta fischel advantage through these trade deals around the world legions of economists are watching these shifting forces and trying to explain them and every decade, the economist publishes our own list of the brightest young sparks on the scene. The latest episode of money talks went to meet some of them and find out what big questions they're trying to resolve..

Mr. Trump Harrell Donald Trump Trump president Robert Mueller US China America Israel Japan Jason Palmer congress Mr. Mueller indicts Russia Europe producer NAFTA
"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"There are some big debates and discussions going on at the moment within the economists about Britain and the U state of liberalism, but we have solved one of the really big questions whether using split infinitive is incorrect. Grammar George Bernard Shaw once wrote to a newspaper about an editor who insisted on and making air quotes. Correcting split infinitives lane. Green writes about language for the economist in the Johnson column and show said I ask you sir to put this man out said adrift and try an intelligent Newfoundland dog and his place without interfering with his perfect freedom of choice between to suddenly go to go. Suddenly and suddenly to go. Okay. First of all just to unflinchingly be clear about this. What is splitting tentative someone decided that the we're two with another verb like to go were to walk to eat belonged to the verb in that form that they called an infinitive some decided once upon a time that you can't put anything between the two and the verb or else you had split the infinitive some crime that no one had ever heard of before this announcement. When when did it become a rule though in English? Okay. So it was never really rule in the sense. That everyone observed it we have split infinitives going back to the thirteenth fourteenth, century, middle English poems. Then the split infinitive as usage kind of goes into Klein arounds at Shakespeare's time. He only split one infinitive and the first person to write a rule about it was in about eighteen hundred and that was because around that time people were starting to split them in print more again. But it's been in regular usage continuous usage throughout history of English. And here's the real question in modern English. Why do people care so much because it does like people up? So are. Thinking about English kind of goes back to exactly this era. I mentioned right around the turn of the nineteenth century. The first grammars were being written the first big successful dictionaries were on the market. And so people started sort of in by being rules as a way of showing their kind of class distinction that they were clever and educated. And so he got stuck in there. Even though it went against the natural grain of English language for our own part. I recall absorbing the style guide here, and it says essentially vises you to not do it. But that's not because of the rule, but because of this this anger why changed now? Well, we changed the ruling because in no other area of our thinking, do we say this is right. But it annoys so many people that you shouldn't say it, you know, we believe in free trade. So we don't say well free trade is a good thing. But saying so no, so many people that we're going to be against trade. Right. And big pushback was a difficult decision to come to. Well, I'm not gonna name any names of publication. No bylines. But there were a couple of. Editors who said I think it is more a thing of etiquette. We won the day despite that. Okay. So give me an example where splitting is unavoidable. Okay. So one example is she decided to gradually retire. Now. This is a so called split infinitive. But he put the gradually anywhere else. You get a different meaning gradually. She decided to retire. That means she decided gradually, and that's not what we're trying to say she gradually decided to retire has that same incorrect meeting, and she decided to retire gradually is and big US. It could meet you decided gradually or she decided that the retirement should be gradual. The only unambiguously correct one is the so-called Clinton. Right lane. Thanks for coming into game. We talk about this with us. It's been pushing. That's all for this edition of the week ahead. You can subscribe to the economist at economist dot com slash radio offer twelve issues for twelve dollars or twelve pounds. I'm Jason Palmer in London. This is the economist..

editor George Bernard Shaw Britain Jason Palmer Green Newfoundland Johnson US London Clinton twelve dollars twelve pounds
"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"jason palmer" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Hello. And welcome to the week ahead. On a communist radio. I'm your host. Jason palmer. Venezuela is starting twenty nineteen wracked with hunger. Inflation and increasingly autocratic government. We take a look ahead to President Nicolas Medeiros, second term presiding over the mess trade talks between China and America are looming once again, but the whole system of international trade is changing we examine why? And what is it that causes people to so reliably and violently react to split infinitives? I up Donnelly. Play better. After claiming victory in a sham presidential election in Venezuela. Nncholas Maduro was sworn in for a second term in may last year that term officially begins next week. They prevail. He promised peace and prosperity for the nation and happiness for its people. But seems of violence hunger and desperation have become emblematic of Mr. Medeiros Venezuela together with his predecessor and mentor. Ugo shabas? Mr. Madero presided over the collapse of what was once Latin America's wealthiest country. Economic mismanagement and corruption on an unfathomable scale have created a humanitarian crisis driving at least two and a half million Venezuelans to flee the country since two thousand fourteen and the nation's descent into dictatorship has blocked the way out of the crisis. So as Mr. Madero embarks on his second six-year term what's in store for Venezuela. How strong is his grip on power, and how will the region cope with a refugee crisis that rivals that of Syria. As nNcholas Maduro starts his second term as president next week. There's very little sign that the crisis in Venezuela is easing. Brooke Unger is our America's editor inflation keeps on rising by some accounts. It was a million percent last year. Some people think it's headed to something like ten million percent next year MU you have massive food shortages shortages, a medicine, and the exodus continues will I guess the first question, I have is if things are so bad. How is it? Mr. Madero managed to get reelected last night. Very few people consider it to a been a free and fair election. I mean, the so-called trivia storage, Regina has been rigging elections now for some years. This is a fairly recent development. They used to be quite popular, especially when oil prices were high, and they had a lot of money to splash around. But you know, at least since two thousand fourteen two thousand fifteen oil prices have started to decline the economic mismanagement has gotten worse the regime has got more unpopular, and as it's become more in popular. It's become more determine. To hold onto power through fraud and through fours. So given the scale of the crisis as he laid out a miss Madeira has seemed to be incredibly durable through throughout this. How has he managed to maintain his grip on power? He's done a much better job at holding onto power than I think a lot of people thought he would. I mean, I think too much of the outside world. He looked rather a bumbling person. But he's proved to be very very shrewd at least it staying in power. If not a governing his country. There are a few reasons for that. I mean, the key to the regime's durability is really that it has very little money. But it knows where to spend that money. It spends that money, basically shoring up its support in the army, and among the other armed groups that keep it in power. I mean without the military. This government would not exist. There's also the role of the president has access to a network of Cuban spies who help them stay on top of any plots that might be against them..

Mr. Madero Venezuela Nncholas Maduro Mr. Medeiros Venezuela Brooke Unger President Nicolas Medeiros president Jason palmer America Ugo shabas Donnelly Latin America Regina Syria fraud China