26 Burst results for "Jason Goldman"

Johnson

Dave Ramsey

00:29 sec | 3 weeks ago

Johnson

"Slaughter A nationwide pause of Johnson and Johnson's one Dose Cove in 19 vaccine will continue. A CDC advisory panel wants to look into more data to see if a handful of rare blood clots Are linked to the vaccine. Doctor Jason Goldman's on the panel also suggest we consider the risks first benefit of the vaccine compared to the risk of gang covert itself and the potential death from the disease. The reports are very rare six cases out of more than seven million

Dose Cove Johnson Jason Goldman CDC
"jason goldman" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:16 min | 7 months ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on KOMO

"So power of our walk in walk in, They're just everyone kiss the guys in the beautiful women and Everybody just give you a big fat kiss. His recovery is now part of his stump speech. Who has had it here Who's had it? Ah, allot of people a lot of people. We are the people I want to say hello to because you are right now, Immune, Dr Anthony Fauci says. We just don't know whether or not people who have had Covic are permanently immune. In her essay, the first lady strikes a different tone than her husband. Writing that although her symptoms were minimal quote. They hit me all at once, and seemed to be a roller coaster, she says. She experienced body aches, a cough and headaches and felt extremely tired. Most of the time, she writes, that quote the most impactful part of my recovery was the opportunity to reflect on many things. Family friendships, my work. And staying true to who you are. It's only happened to three people in this country during the pandemic. Almost Bryant Calvert has more on the local man whom local doctors are saying has had covert 19 not once but twice when the man who's in his sixties was first diagnosed back in March that about with the Corona virus kept him in the hospital nearly a month and a half. He had a fever and pneumonia at the time. He was eventually discharged from the hospital after testing negative several times. Five months later, the same man had covert again. The double whammy distinction belongs to on Lee, this man and to others here in this country, and now a local team at Swedish is taking a closer look at how likely you could get Copan 19 a second time. Dr Jason Goldman and infectious disease specialist tells the Times. Quote. It's not unexpected. This would occur because we know immunity wanes to other respiratory infections like flew in the case of our Seattle man. The second strain of covert E. Kat was a variation on the first virus he dealt with. It's more confirmation that there's more than one strain of covert, which lessens the likelihood that a single vaccine will pause. The pandemic and his second bout with Corona virus didn't make him as sick as he was the first time suggesting even if you catch a different strain, your body may have the ability to fend off the worst impacts. But before researchers can bank on that they have to consider the case of another member of our Double Whammy club. Twentysomething Nevada man who's second bout with covert 19 was much more severe. Brian Calvert camo News Your Money at 20 and 50 past the hour on Comeau News. There's your couple Money news, sponsored by Propel Insurance Stocks bounce back from some early lows to finish just modestly negative. The Dow down over 301 point, finishing the day down, just 18 points, the S and P and NASDAQ Seeing some modest losses as well. Traders taking in the Labor Department's report today showing that first time unemployment benefit claims edged up by 53,000 to 898,000 last week. Meanwhile, a separate report from the Labor Department says that import prices were up 3/10 of a percent while export prices were up. 6/10 of 1% and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey is being handed a subpoena from the Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to testify about social media censorship. The move comes after Twitter and Facebook blocked a New York Post story about Joe Biden. Son. That's your money now. I'm Frank Miller. Come. Oh news. With Halloween right around the corner, then Thanksgiving and a raging pandemic continuing to march across the country. Health experts are growing concerned, Dr Anthony Fauci tells ABC is good Morning America. It's understandable. People want to be together for the holidays. But there's a danger if you have vulnerable people, the elderly and people with underlying conditions. You better consider whether you want to do that now, Or maybe just for a stroll it and just wait and say, You know, this is an unfortunate unusual situation. There were nearly 60,000 new Corona virus cases in the U. S. On Tuesday. That number hasn't been that high in two months. The death toll now stands at about 218,000 with no clear idea of one of vaccine maybe available. Dr Fauci says His best advice continues to be where a mask a social distance and limit the size of family gatherings this holiday season. Health update SEVERALLY Kessler, NBC news Radio. Governor. Easley is leading by example. By getting a flu shot Como Su Romero has more. The governor made small talk with the nurse Anitra Pickens, who gave him his vaccine inside a tent at a drive up flu shot clinic at the state Capitol. Afterward, governor Inslee said Getting a flu shot this year is one of the most important things we conducive lives so that we can reduce the problems and not Philip are hospitals with people with the flu. At the same time, we're fighting this covert pandemic more than 200. State employees were expected to get their flu vaccine at the one day clinic. See Romero come on news. Scientists at the University of Oxford say they've created a new rapid adage in test for the Corona virus that can offer results in his fuse five minutes..

Dr Anthony Fauci flu Covic flu vaccine Como Su Romero the Times Dr Jason Goldman Twitter Labor Department Bryant Calvert E. Kat governor Inslee Seattle University of Oxford Anitra Pickens Brian Calvert ABC fever cough Nevada
"jason goldman" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

04:31 min | 8 months ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"Jason Goldman came by my house. Is it something very weird? At one point, he disappeared. That's come up next year. Then came the morning call myself but I'll bite. Go. Thiss wants him. Good. Give them good Girls straight masterpiece. Living it up in the city that was saying Rome gotta kiss myself. I'm so pretty police and a fireman. Hallelujah! Girl said. Hallelujah! Girls don't give it to you. Believe me, just watch I just don't believe me. Just a minute. So much time to get it. Julio, get the stretch. Jackson, Mississippi Way Go show Police and fire man Like a dragon bone over its You know about that money, Hallelujah! Girl said Hallelujah, girls! Hallelujah! Because upset Don't give it, Tio. Believe me, just watch Don't believe me. Just watch Fuck you. Fuck you! Fuck you! They'll fuck you up only if you don't Don't believe me. Just just Karen and Katie in the morning. Morning. 1075 K z L. Jason Goodman came by our house..

Hallelujah Jason Goldman Thiss Girl L. Jason Goodman Julio Rome Mississippi Karen Jackson Katie
"jason goldman" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

02:10 min | 9 months ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"Station, 1075 You need more proof that Jason Goldman has a psycho half. I didn't think I did, but apparently we dio. So you were in a situation where everyone was doing one thing, and you're going with not doing it yet, But I wouldn't LaBella's a psycho path. Different different. Sure, whatever. I don't know if tears conform. Oh, like you don't hear? Yes, because I was caught off guard. You know, being caught off guard is something that usually sometimes Jolts emotion mystery and this has been a tough year. You know, 2020. We haven't been doing a lot of things anyways. We still had our baseball season but has come to an end for the year. Okay? And you have a group of 12. 12 13 year old boy, some 14 and at the end of the game, the coach Which was not expected, and the coach is a doctor, So that's very unexpected. We're at the end of the last tournament, which we lost in the championship game of six games. Basically, at night on Sunday land in my son's there all the 12 and 13 year old boys there and you hear the coastal everybody gather round. All the families gather round and as soon as he starts talking He has that quiver in his voice like I've never seen like emotion like Like he always can't get through. I'm so proud to be with culture. Children for baseball, and he makes this emotional, apparently a speech the whole time I was crying, like very emotional and the quiver is in his voice. The entire Time. And I'm just like Like nodding my head, not realizing that all parents around me and then I start seeing some of the 13 year old kids in 40 years. You start crying. I'm like Our kids is their last game in tournament together. You know the team would be different next year, and it's been years that we've been together and that he's going on and on and on. And I'm just like that I was I was appreciative, emotional about.

baseball Jason Goldman
Citizen Scientists Deserve Journal Status Upgrade

60-Second Science

03:15 min | 1 year ago

Citizen Scientists Deserve Journal Status Upgrade

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman in twenty eighteen biologist. Jan Van Daddy published a paper that described the discovery of five species of non native snails and slugs in southern California. The research would not have been possible whole without some twelve hundred volunteers. Who uploaded nearly ten thousand photos of gaster pause to the slime project. That's snails and slugs living in metropolitan to environments on an APP called naturalist so the entire existence of that paper is dependent upon the citizens scientists. How do you credit those people. Greg Paulie herpetology curator at the Natural History Museum of US Angeles. There's some very specific requirements that a lot of journals and a lot of academic Mkx society views and those requirements largely would exclude non-professional scientists. and to me that's absurd. That's why Paulie together with vendetta and several Australian. Biologists are arguing. That criteria must change to recognize citizen scientists as authors on Scientific Journal articles. They propose what they're calling group Co.. Authorship they make the case in the journal Trends in ecology evolution the author list on vendetta snail and slug paper includes the phrase citizen science participants in slime. But that phrase is absence when you look up the paper on Google scholar. The publication software simply isn't equipped to handle that kind of authorship and so it erases the group's vital contribution in another case several years ago in Australia. A team of researchers tried to condition native monitor lizards to avoid chowing down on the invasive and poisonous cane toads and for the the most part and worked with the only reason it was successful was because they partnered with the traditional landowners in North Western Australia. This group called the ball arrangers. Several journals flat out refused to allow. For the inclusion of the Rangers as Group co-authors eventually the researchers did convince the editors editors of journals to allow it. But the group's title was abbreviated as if it was a first and last name in online indexing software be rangers. The researchers has argued that these errors and omissions don't only render the critical contributions of an indigenous community as invisible they can also be perceived as discriminatory if the person who had made that contribution was an undergraduate or a graduate student who was trying to pursue a career in the scientists. We would all say no of course not person should be a CO author. That group of people should be a CO author. But we don't necessarily extend that same line of reasoning to citizen scientists allowing for Group Co.. AUTHORSHIP is not a new idea. It's in two thousand and four the Journal. Nature published a paper titled Initial sequencing analysis of the human genome. It listed as the sole author. The International National Human Genome. Sequencing consortium so. Let's just co OPS. This group authorship a model and turn it into group Co authorship. Since this really shouldn't be that hard doc. Thanks for listening. For Scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman.

Group Co Jason Goldman Greg Paulie Jan Van Daddy The Journal Scientific Journal California Google Rangers CO Natural History Museum Of Us A Academic Mkx Society North Western Australia Australia Group Graduate Student Sixty Seconds
"jason goldman" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"How about people that? I talked to talk nerdy have written books and a lot of them are like professors, or they're working scientists, or blah, blah, blah, and they do they take sabbatical. It's like I mean, not always, but the ones who do. It's like, yeah, that's the only way to write a book, like it's really hard to do when you're trying to do another thing. Yeah, I managed. I did manage to do the genetics book while I was working, but I truly didn't do anything else. I emailed, the people that I would normally expect to see in three or four months and said, you will not see me. Yeah. I will say no to every invitation. It was wonderful. But so I really did that was surely I worked nine to five I went home and wrote until I went to bed every single night. And then that was my weekend that was it. So you still had the regular job at you're able to leave your job at work. Yeah. Totally it wasn't mentally exhausting. Or anything it was, it was a Turbie fide. So also, I didn't have a kid, I didn't have any other responsibilities. So that's all I did this him around was just absolutely no way. So it was so cool though. Like just sat down every morning with a Cup of coffee and just just typed until noon had some lunch and then just edited what I typed all morning, and then some days, I was like, well that was really good. Look at that. That's actually a pretty good sentence. That is, what is what was I doing? That's such good advice. I feel like the more that I struggle with writing. I don't really write professionally much. I co wrote a book with g you, but, like honestly, maybe wrote like five of the chapters, like it's a big book, and it was written by five people, you know, so, but I right now my biggest writing challenge is academe because I'm back in school. And so I'm having all these papers all the time and when I talked to professional writers like you, like, Jason Goldman like my, a lot of my friends who do this for a living. The biggest piece. Of advice, I always give me as like just get a first draft on paper like it doesn't matter if it's garbage. But I struggle with this so much. Like, how do you how do you allow yourself to do it? Do you like right with your mouth, like, do you transcribe or do you actually sit down and write with your fingers, and just kind of go? I don't that doesn't make sense. But I'll just keep going. How do you keep yourself from going back? Yeah. I can see how being a perfectionist being an elliptical and wanting to just have everything look good from the beginning. It's really hard to get over that. But, but yeah, I just know that something's better than nothing. And it just keeps getting easier. I mean, it's the first step is always the hardest one to take. But yeah, I just I just say, I'll fix it later. And you have time to that's the thing you built it into your schedule on a typical day for you. Like when you were working on every day amazing. Which of course, we'll dive into like I keep saying in a second like how much would you get on the page? I think I was reading about a thousand words a day. Okay. And then. And what I did was I kind of planned out that what I what, what word count, I wanted to get to every day, and I wanted to adverage about a thousand words day, and then I would just add it in the afternoon, not necessarily the same thing. I wrote that morning. But I would just be kind of editing and general each after because I was kind of spent in terms of actual, like creative energy and producing something. I was like, okay I can't do anymore. I'm kind of brain dead. But it's a different mode when you're editing stuff. You've already written on being like oh, this is just this whole this whole kind of tangent. I went on is just garbage goodbye. Or like, oh, this is the part where because when I write a lot, I will.

Jason Goldman four months
Hyena Society Stability Has Last Laugh

60-Second Science

02:27 min | 2 years ago

Hyena Society Stability Has Last Laugh

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman. Turns out that for it's not what you know. But who, you know, spotted hyenas live in large mixed sex clans with fairly stable, social hierarchies, and the females are in charge the match lineal hierarchies that we see in spun hyenas are also found in a lot of old world monkeys Michigan State University biologist ally Strauss it's been protecting for a long time to number people what forces maintain this system 'cause it's somewhat unusual in the animal kingdom in some kinds of animals societies your place in a dominance hierarchy can be explained by physical attributes like body size. But in other animals, dominance rank can be acquired through things like aids or nepotism Strauss. Collies collected data about five generations of four groups of wild spotted hyenas in Kenya. That they observed over a twenty seven year period, and the researchers saw multiple instances in which a smaller hyena came to dominate a larger one the even seen severely wounded hyenas become dominant to healthy ones. The results are in the journal proceedings of a National Academy of sciences, given those examples it would seem that rank and spotted hyenas is fairly arbitrary. But it turns out that what researchers call rang reversals happen only rarely in this species just fourteen percent of the time. So how does it stay so stable over time? They are systematically related to the coalition support that we observed show females who had stronger coalitions with their top allies were more likely to increase their social rank spotted hyenas could only climb the social ladder if they were able to maintain a strong alliance. The social bonds of the. These animals are really very fundamental in establishing the structure of the societies. In other words, the strength of relationships is what puts one hyena in groups spotlight. Thanks for the minute for scientic Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman.

Jason Goldman Ally Strauss Kenya National Academy Of Sciences Michigan State University Twenty Seven Year Fourteen Percent Sixty Seconds
Urban Coyote Evolution Favors the Bold

60-Second Science

03:05 min | 2 years ago

Urban Coyote Evolution Favors the Bold

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman cody's are now common residents of many large urban areas. And while it doesn't happen all that often coyotes are increasingly coming into conflict with people and with pets there, these missile carnivores, which most people see them, just as, you know, large carnivores university of Washington, Tacoma, Volusia biologist, Christopher shell being in say like a city like Altangerel sport, Chicago or New York as just mind boggling and on Spiring, and in some instances for our people because they don't know much about the almost could be something that generating spear because of misunderstandings show wants to understand how cody's come to feel so comfortable around people. So we can come up with strategies for preventing it, and he suspected might have something to do with. The parenting. Our main goal was to see and test. Whether or not parents that have extended experience of people and human disturbance, get habituated to the point where they actually transfer that becuase in in that fearlessness to their offspring show in his team focused on aid Coyote families living at the US department of agriculture 's predator research facility in Utah, so captive, they live in large enclosures and lead mostly typical wild lives. Typically, the counties are fed in such a way as to minimize human contact, but for this experiment. The researchers did something different instead of just walking away immediately. We fed them. And we just stared at him turns out that when parents became more. Fearless around people that is became perfectly happy to eat while people were watching them. They're off. Spring became more. Fearless as well. And each litter of Coyote pups was more fearless than the last. In fact, the most cautious pup from the second. Litter was bolder than the boldest pup from the first litter that means that an entire family of coyotes can become completely habituated to humans in just two or three generations. And that's when they get into trouble, regardless of what type of behavioral type in animal has it seems like all of the animals without infiltrative costs to Biebel towards people are finding out that being bold in vantage and urban area, which means those of us who live in Coyote country need to work together to send a signal to coyotes that being bold is a disadvantage, and that starts with doing everything we can to ensure that our yards are as uninviting and unappetizing as possible. Thanks for the minute. Scientific americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Jason golden.

Jason Goldman Cody Coyote Jason Golden Volusia Us Department Of Agriculture Christopher Shell Tacoma Spiring Utah Washington Altangerel Chicago Biebel New York Sixty Seconds
Different Humpback Whale Groups Meet To Jam

60-Second Science

03:30 min | 2 years ago

Different Humpback Whale Groups Meet To Jam

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman. Male humpback whales are the concert singers of the marine world these ocean giants belt out tunes that can be heard perhaps hundreds of miles away the songs attract, friends and lovers and maybe keep rivals at bay. And now we learned that humpbacks in different ocean basins, the south Atlantic and the Indian on opposite sides of the African continent. Share melodies that song that my lunch between individuals folk today, the best example of cars onto cultural transition from peer to peer rather than from parent offering Melinda rectal marine conservation, scientists with the wildlife. Conservation society's ocean giants program. The International Whaling Commission has identified seven distinct humpback whale breeding populations in the southern hemisphere. These are whales that meet up in the same warm tropical waters each year to mate and give birth. But when mating season is over. Whales migrate to Chile polar regions to gorge on krill using genetics and photographic surveys of migrating humpbacks, researchers know that males in these colder feeding areas interact with other males from different breeding populations. But scientists did not know this meet up provides the whales with the opportunity to have vocal jam sessions where they trade melodies and the amount of song overlap between the whales that breed off 'gabon in the Atlantic. And those that breed near Madagascar in the Indian Ocean varies year to year. That's according to a study of more than fifteen hundred individual sounds that were recorded between two thousand one and two thousand five the results are in the journal, Royal Society opened science that might sense that in some years that may be different Asian graphic conditions. Patchily distributed pry that my name populations individuals have to move the to find food and that might bring them into classic context with neighboring populations and Philip song exchange. The fundings present researchers with new opportunities to understand how culture is transmitted among animals, but it also allows even greater insight into the workings of populations of humpback whales it shines the connectivity potentially on the times go, which is what genetic information doesn't genetic data can show the different populations had historical interactions but songs can reveal how to populations interact on a much faster time scale. But combine. Ending song information from these populations with Wales. That breed off the Atlantic coast of Brazil rectal, says researchers can gain more comprehensive understanding the dynamics of global humpback whale culture back while it's an incredibly in a complex display. It quite amazing. How complex it is. And how it that shooting? Amazing example of culture in in animals. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman.

Jason Goldman Atlantic Indian Ocean International Whaling Commissi Gabon Royal Society Chile Melinda Brazil Madagascar Patchily Wales Philip Sixty Seconds
Do-Gooders Should Survey Communities First

60-Second Science

03:30 min | 2 years ago

Do-Gooders Should Survey Communities First

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman all trees in cities do miserable. Good for biodiversity and for human health. They scrub pollution from the air they provide habitat for wildlife. They make streets look nicer, and they even reduce stress and have been linked to reductions in crime back in twenty fifteen a group of Toronto based researchers discovered than planting just eleven more trees per city block could reduce heart related conditions by the same amount. As if everybody living on that block became a year and a half younger, but in Detroit between two thousand eleven and twenty four team a quarter of eligible homeowners turned down in offer from a local nonprofit for free street. Trees ironic, considering Detroit's nickname was once the city of trees was actually over eighteen hundred tr. Trees that were rejected out of an eligible seven thousand four hundred twenty five. So it was a big enough issue at that point where it warranted further investigation. Forestry researcher Christine Carmichael who did the research at Michigan state and has since moved to university of Vermont, the nonprofit created an education campaign to get more. Residents to accept the free trees the assumption being that if people had all the facts, they'd be more likely to take the trees, but when Carmichael talked to residents she found that they understood the benefits of trees their unease was about trust. Basically what I found was that opposition into trait to tree planting among some of these residents resulted primarily from negative past experiences with street trees, particularly in low income neighborhoods that were grappling with blight from vacant properties, which created an additional burden of care for their neighborhood. In the last half century or so more than half a million Detroit. Trees died from disease neglect at the same time. The city underwent dramatic demographic shifts by twenty sixteen Detroit was eighty two percent African American and had the highest percentage of low income residents in the country as a result. It was primarily low income African American communities who were forced to deal with the consequences and the hazards like falling limbs posed by dead trees in speaking with residents Carmichael found that they'd be more willing to accept free trees, if they could be more involved in the decision making process locals wanted input on tree size, and whether they produced flowers, they also have a reasonably wanted to avoid trees that could drop rotting fruits or sap on cars and sidewalks the findings by Carmichael and marine. Mcdonagh are in the journal society and natural resource. It's important to provide a space for people's stories to be heard about what their experience of community change has been and let them know that you understand and respect their experience. And I think that would open people up more trusting the intentions of organizations that come into a neighborhood to do good. Thanks for the minute for scientists Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman.

Detroit Christine Carmichael Jason Goldman University Of Vermont Toronto Michigan Researcher Mcdonagh Eighty Two Percent Sixty Seconds
"jason goldman" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"Them. Split the province. Jason. Last year. I mean, this is behind the scenes Jason Goldman did his which I do too typical thing he pointed at hoping for agreements. See, no. No. He would offer hugs. He would say hug if you take care of all these books. I'll split whatever we make fifty. Hired for when I moved you hired, Matt. Yes. Yeah. I also did it with him. Okay. That he did. He did help. Your cooking. Did come and help you to. I took some snow. The piece of her drive the way that he could take for free. Yeah. That was nice. Thank you. Well, I resold. A for a great price. I'm just hoping to make like some credit or maybe a couple of blocks. So the main thing is get the books at your house. Yeah. Get books out of the house and give them to people who can enjoy them. So I go into said bookstore yesterday. And I had asked you guys before I left have you ever done this? And everyone said it's easy. Just do blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. Yeah. I talk as easy process. Great. You know, they'll it's a super simple. They'll help you and all this stuff. Right. So I go in without the books because I can't lift them out of my car. And I go to the desk, and I'm like is any anybody. To ask everybody seems very busy. And they're not really paying attention that I'm there and finally one guy makes eye contact with me, and I explained the situation. I said, look, I just I can't bring them in. But so would you be able to help me get the boxes in no lie? He goes. Well, how big are these boxes? They're like they're moving. This fine. Then after I said, they're moving boxes, and they're just full. There's very heavy. I cannot. He goes or I mean, there's a a over there. Customer service. I cannot lift him out of my car. Right. I am I going to get him on a Dolly and upper ramp and opened the door and then to. Pounds of books trying to balance all the dollar saying I wasn't gonna help. Right. Took one of these. They have these crates that you fill up. And so I was gonna take one of the crates that I could manage out to the my car and start filling it up and care. I was like I was like you do it. I right asking for some help. So anyway, we go out to the car and we load a box, and I'm carrying one of the other boxes. And then we close it. And there's still another boxes left in there. And we go in and we put it down and the got on on this table. And the guy goes there's the instructions up there on the board of what to do with these. Now, the boxes are brought in to all the books have to be transferred to other boxes while. I'm reading step by step of an I'm like, okay, step two. Not fiction or fiction. I don't know what book this. Meanwhile, they're still a box out in the car because he just disappeared. I thought that was it or what? So there's still a box full of books. Probably fifty bucks still in my car. Great. Okay. I guess I'm going to have to figure this out. So I go back out to my car. And I get the thing. And I am carrying you know, when you're carrying something so heavy you start to shrink down to the ground. And you're going to. Dude, doesn't even work there stopped and said do need some out and just follow you into the store that'd be great all the door. So he holds the door for me. And I make my way over and the dude who was helping me before looks like. Stop. You run a valuable lesson lady..

Jason Goldman Matt
"jason goldman" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on Ologies

"At all how a memory works? A murmur ration- is a flock of birds like starlings in these liquid looking formations through just bogglingly gorgeous to watch. It's so weird. Look it up. It's like a living lava lamp in fast motion. It's like a screensaver someone would stare at in college while being on drugs in the dorms or something but like birds. Because I look at it. And I'm like, oh, that's that's witchcraft like what did that so beautiful and crazy is it fluid dynamics. Is it is it like crowd think? How do they do that? Okay. Next could make something up. Little info on that. So memory tend to happen when there's a predator around in the birds are evading it, and this is really cool. It doesn't matter the size of the flock each bird is reacting not to the size of a huge flock. But just to the seven birds around it, they calculated this the used physics. I dunno some Italian researchers came up with it. So it's like you're super in tune with your little posse. And then a bunch of little posses make up this one big swirling, diving massive monster posse, I read it's incredible. I know I've loved watching it. It's amazing. I've seen it so many times and I've never seen them like crash. Did you care about dinosaurs? When you were a kid or do you care about the link, the birds are dinosaurs? Or do you are you like dinosaurs can take it hike take hike? Okay. Dinosaurs, also code really super in the dinosaurs. And I didn't make the connection between birds and dinosaurs. And I don't think scientists. Had solidified that until I had gotten super into birds. I like to remind myself every now and again, then I'm going dinosaur watching. Dinosaur. Correct me if I'm wrong, I feel like if Steve Jobs had to design an orifice it would be a quicker. So simple. It's one thing. So a cla weak- is his like the home button on an iphone. It's really all you need. It's a one stop shop for liquid waste solid waste and then as bonus it's also a sex portal so birds gated on via what is called no joke, a khloe kiss. They just smooch butts. Sometimes only for a few seconds. Now, if you've heard gossip about like duck mating. Well, a lot of it might be true waterfowl gonads, Google it or you can go straight to an article on NAT geo called duck penises grow bigger among rivals, which was written by a friend of mine, Jason Goldman, whose eight wildlife journalist, great icebreaker, topics. He covers some good ones. Now. Now back to click us..

Steve Jobs Jason Goldman Google
Colorful Peacocks Impress Females with Good Vibes

60-Second Science

02:57 min | 2 years ago

Colorful Peacocks Impress Females with Good Vibes

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman one of the most impressive scenes in the world of birds is a peacock displaying. It's impressive. Iridescent feathers, technically known as its train while the female PM looks on that peacock spreads his train out and ruffles at beckoned forth as the sun highlights the red blue and green within the feathers. But these iconic trains are only half the story of how the boys impressed, the ladies, both male and female p fouls sport crests on their heads small feathers that sticks straight up like a mohawk. They crest feathers that actually give the peacocks their Latin name they're called Pravo croissant, the crested pheasants. And so I was intrigued by the fact that people didn't really know what the function of the express were Haverford college physicists, Susan came a biologist might see those feathers and assume their visual signals, but as a physicist Cain had a different idea. We were curious in my laboratory about whether the preferred by Brayshaw properties of the crest feathers might by any chance agree with the preferred vibrational properties of this up train rattling display that the males to so Kane in her colleagues exposed crest feathers from. Deserve dead pe- fell to simulated displays of male and female, social behaviors like wing, shaking and train rattling. And so we were just got us back to find out that in fact, they did agree with all the means is that the p head crests are specifically tunes to the vibrations produced by the train rattling of its own species. The crests thus act like a sort of special antenna meant to pick up a single kind of sound the findings are in the journal, plus one the researchers also points out that there are at least thirty five other types of birds distributed across ten taxonomic orders that have both head crests and displays with the vibration components. A lot of those kind of tactile aspects of displays are really not even very well described university of British Columbia zoologist Roz Deccan who worked with Kane on the study. There are species that dance vibrate on purchase. And you know, the females sharing the same purchase the Malan feeling what's going on through parts of her body like feet there species where birds rub feathers on each other. What we're suggesting here is that a sensory function of feathers in social displays may be more widespread than we appreciate right now seems that the females really do feel something about a particular peacock, thanks for the minute for scientific Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman.

Jason Goldman Peacock Kane Brayshaw University Of British Columbia Malan Roz Deccan Physicist Susan Cain Sixty Seconds
Frog Picks Maternity Ward Like Goldilocks

60-Second Science

02:37 min | 2 years ago

Frog Picks Maternity Ward Like Goldilocks

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman in the jungle home is anywhere. You can raise your babies while trying not to get gobbled up by somebody else. Take a tiny creature from Brazil whose name is longer than it is the, but he is broad snout casque headed tree frog. It likes to hang out in the little puns that form in cavities within Ramilia plants. These tiny pools are technically known as Fido tell Mata from the Greek words for plant and Pont. A male finds Melia and attracts a female who lays her eggs directly into the water. The male stays behind to guard, the eggs and the tadpoles spending the rest of his life within that one plant, but not just any Ramilia pool will do it's so crazy that all some really nice big permits in never found our rock there. If I. Would be the frog. I would like that for minute herpetologist miracle Solway from Brazil's state university of Santa Cruz coating his graduate students, Amanda lantern Silva brought Dan we may did research, and we saw that they were trade-offs in all solo and his team surveyed two hundred and thirty nine Ramirez within a protected part of Brazil's Atlantic rainforest of which seventy four were occupied by frogs. The frogs preferred big bre Melia ads, but the very largest bromellias were unoccupied by the frogs, which suggests there's a Goldilocks situation are the researchers think it has to do with the size of the frogs alligators shaped heads if the Bermudez water tank was too large and the frogs head can't form a tight seal around the opening which would make them and their offspring and easy meal. But if the pool was too small it might dry out completely. So they are really picky. Concerning day their houses, they need to clean house with fresh raw too. And it should not be large not small. The study is in the journal plus one so many says these findings remind us that we need to think about the nuanced habitat needs of species when it comes to conservation. It's not enough to bring some frogs and release them into the rainforest. We also need to ensure they're able to find the habitats they need to live may end raise their young. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman.

Jason Goldman Brazil Ramilia Melia Mata Bermudez Amanda Lantern Silva Santa Cruz Ramirez DAN Sixty Seconds
Little Aphids Ride Big Ones To Safety

60-Second Science

02:49 min | 2 years ago

Little Aphids Ride Big Ones To Safety

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman imagine. You're an eighth amid a tiny insect that sucks. Plant sap for a living. You're munching away. When Akao comes along to munch on the same plant urine, you feel it's warm breath. So you drop to the ground to avoid being eaten and runaway. The ground is a scary place for eighth did. But it's better than a cow's mouth. But if you're an especially small young Fid also known as a nymph scampering over cracks stones twigs is really difficult. Luckily, young eighth solution. They climb aboard the back of a larger effort that's also making an escape and hitch a ride cowboy style there there's a pile of at the beginning that prime on the adult sometimes you eight or nine names at all climb on the adult university of Haifa into Tamala gist. Moshe Gish thanks to a series of experiments Gish learned of the nymphs actively seek out adults after dropping to the ground. It's not that. They just try to climb onto any old thing. They find nearby for the adults. The Knicks are bit of a nuisance. There is some disadvantage for the Holt slows down the grown-ups trying to toss off their writers like a mechanical bull at a college bar, and they'll toss off a relative just the same as they will and unrelated him, but somehow evolution has allowed this piggyback writing behavior to persist probably the course that the adult pays for that Demet is not high enough to balance the benefits that the colony gets from saving a few mint. In other words, the advantage to the younger bugs outweighs the cost imposed on the older ones. The entire colony benefits. The results are in the jerk. Journal frontiers in zoology, eighth deserve some of agriculture's most important pests, but to gifts they're also a part of a fascinating important ecosystem most people, they think of as if we think of they think of tiny dots on their plans that kilt their plans the whole world there will be interactions with the host plant, and there's a chemical warfare between aphids and their host plants. It's a co even Lucien and it's an arms race. There's a lot of action going on between the Dan plants and the eighth they're predators in the feds. And the element is whole world. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman.

Jason Goldman Moshe Gish Frontiers In Zoology Adult University Of Haifa Tamala Gist Knicks Demet Akao Lucien Sixty Seconds
"jason goldman" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"Music station one zero seven five Fukushima, Jason Goldman. You're not sure what a food coma is basically if you eat a heavy meal a big meal that you're almost zombie afterwards. You get tired. Yeah. Tired? Your body is working to digest the food. That's correct. That is correct. You have. Oh, gosh. Yeah. I have a problem where I look at food, and I'm like almost like a drug where I can't stop. My brain. I'm full, and I keep going, and then all of a sudden when when my brain finally tells me, I'm to full I over eight tired and out of whack everybody's problem. Yeah. The number one thing they say if you want to lose weight is to slow down your eating. That's why. Yeah. Why tripper is? So the guy that works in our building so skinny because because he takes so long to eat cold. You don't wanna even eat the food anymore because it tastes disgusting because he is basically beginning salmonella because. Slow skinny is genetics. But yeah that probably helps a little bit. I blame everything on genetics because that makes me reasonably overweight. The average American spends nine entire days of their life. You add up the hours in a food coma. Oh, nine hours in the top foods that give you put you in a food. Coma are things like hamburgers. No pizza, no data and mashed potatoes. Yeah. Oh. Zahn ya. More casserole. Heavy burritos are on the list fries. If you have I think you eat a bunch of cheese fries. Yes. Bacon cheese, fries. I think you're instantly. I thought is something on the thanksgiving table. Well, that's stopping maybe. Yeah. Well Turkey has what trip of trip to fan? Yeah. I heard that was a little bit of a myth about the Turkey making Tai. They say, it's just you just ate so much. Yes. And also, I think that you're ingesting enough trip to fan to have an effect. Exactly. Yeah. Now, I will say this. I didn't know you guys are such. And I'm eating whether it's sushi or sometimes at the rise, if I'm eating whatever, I'm eating I typically never feel full, and let's get some kind of potato in in me or bread it. Nothing. I'll never feel full. I can keep eating and eating and eating like sushi sometimes the rice, but if there's not a lot of rice. I can't really get on sushi. My girlfriend's will suggest going out for sushi. You know, and I think. I love.

Coma Jason Goldman salmonella Zahn nine hours
"jason goldman" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"Attack in a pro hugs ad an endorsing. It just dogged hot. He still endorsed the plaza. Typical hogs. All right. We have attack ad against Jason Goldman in wartime. We cut it down from two hours to. One point one minute. Yeah. Jason Goodman, pretends that he's a tough guy who. Stand up for you. But what Jason Goodman doesn't want? You. Always. He's a gigantic accident talk for Keisha in two thousand fifteen Jason Goodman declared on the air that they were done with having kids. A few months later his wife. Jason Goodman, told his wife in two thousand seventeen that she can no longer spend money on Amazon since then Carol has spent over ten thousand five hundred. Early twentieth. Eighteen that she can no longer host expensive parties. So far this year. She spent over five thousand dollars. Her friends like turning the magical age of twenty eight daughter Everley turned one. Control of his wife spending. How do you expect him to control the spending in Washington, Jason Goodman, talks a big game? But like his performance in the bedroom. He just doesn't measure. Carol. Size.

Jason Goodman Jason Goldman Carol Everley Amazon Keisha Washington five thousand dollars one minute two hours
"jason goldman" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"There's a really amazing article by Jason Goldman, and there's a link on the website discussing quote, unquote. How can we cat? How can we tell an accident from purposeful action? And this article discusses ideas around social skills and reasoning in really helps differentiate between intention or purpose behind an action. So a really important thing. The t landed in your lap. Ouch. Okay. Another marker of an accidental violation. Is that crap? I am so sorry, monkey I owned that I did an action. It caused you pain. I'm really sorry, are you? Okay. My first thought is wow, not about me, but are you? Okay? I didn't mean this to happen. Are you okay? Anything I can do to help you? Do you need assistance? That's a big thing. Right apologizing isn't necessarily about me. It's letting you know that I didn't do it intentionally so that you're willing to Haas ably accept help from me, but now an accidental violation can become something a heck of a lot less incident really quickly. There are two places in the example. We give here where the actions occur. Number one, the violation. The tea was spilled into someone's lap either by an accident spill or an intentional, poor and number two, the reactions, and I think this is very important. There are two parties involved. So there are two sets of reaction to consider. Right. So you point one to defining the initial incident. Is the person who caused the spill to happen? Make sense. There are two basic past. They take one accept responsibility or being accountable example again. Yeah, I'm sorry. Oh, what can I do? Let's get you dried up. Let's get your pants into the dryer. Are you are you burned? Let's see if we can't can't get that taken care. Things happen often on planet just just life, right. The first path is however understanding that what happened was a result of someone's the actions that that you performed. It's it's being accountable for the consequences. Second one is blaming others. And we've all seen the blame game happen. It's unfortunate, and it's, I think it comes from a culture of not always taking responsibility for what happens and our part in it. There's a lot of reasons and we're not going to get into it. There's a few articles went on our website that talk about blaming and the blame game, and why people blame and the links are there, but this act of blame can take an accidental violation and make it into something else. The original action might not have been might have been attentional. It might have been totally just accidents, harm damage, all the rest of it, but think about it. If I then accidentally spill the tea and then I blame you because somehow it's your fault for sitting there right, or making me excited about the top to where I flung the t. across the table into your lap. It's all your damn fault. What does that do that. That creates a secondary violation is intentional. Yeah. And intentional say it's it's an involuntary intention. I still chose not to accept responsibility for did, but I blamed you for it. The first one was an accident, but the second one is an intentional violation. And so you can get a, I guess, a domino effect violations. And I've even seen it go the other ways and intentional act, and then blaming the other person for the intentional act. Gas lighting is a possible event of that. Absolutely. I've seen it also in consent violations where there was a kid sent violation, and then the person was blamed. You were wearing that khloe you're wearing those clothes, your fault, you addressed to sexy. That's why had to rape you or whatever you asked for it. I didn't do. I didn't make mistake now..

Jason Goldman Haas rape khloe
"jason goldman" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman. Almost safe has an outsized influence on the behavior of other animals. We have long hunted them and more recently we destroy habitats to build housing and coffee shops, and we build roads to drive from our houses to those coffee shops. But some of our influences are far more subtle Clavier noticed a striking pattern in our data from far flung places like Tanzania, Candida, Nepal, where animals that we were staying seemed to be more active at night when they were around. But people university of California, Berkeley wildlife, ecologist Caitlyn gainer to see animals really were changing their activity schedules. Gainer enter team rounded up one hundred and forty-one studies of sixty two kinds of mammals from across six continents. And they found that mammals near people across the globe have settled on a new strategy for. Survival. They take to the night when most of us are comfortably tucked into our beds counting sheep, the finding is in the journal science, for example, an animal that would ordinarily prefer to spend half his active time during the daytime and half at night shifts to two thirds of his active time under darkness and our particular human behaviors do not seem to matter something that that's a price me in the city was just how consistent the shift towards nocturnally what is across types of human disturbance. We'd expected to see animals being a little bit more discerning, perhaps responding more strongly to activties, like hunting that actually do pose a risk to the animal apple. We found with that whether it is infrastructure development over hunting or even just hiking through wilderness areas. All these human activities, illicit response in wildlife, suggesting that they're playing it safe around us in a way. This reaction is a good thing. The night shift allows animals today. More safely coexist with us in shared spaces. But what's not yet clear as any long-term physiological changes. Animals may go through from jesting their daily schedules because many can't simply run away from us, nor is it obvious what impacts these changes might have on broader ecological communities and on the food web even think we're leaving no trace in the outdoors. Our presence can have pre lasting consequences for scientic Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman.

Jason Goldman Caitlyn gainer Tanzania Berkeley university of California sixty seconds
"jason goldman" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman Kabo colonial is a small seaside village on Uruguay's Atlantic coast. The permanent year round population is just ninety five people living in around fifty homes. Another. A three hundred and fifty homes are used between December and February by tourists, hoping to see Pinna pets. I seal and felines the whole out on the town's rocky Cape in January alone, more than thirty thousand tourists visit. What are the impacts of so many tourists on these marine mammals between nineteen ninety six and twenty fourteen European and South American biologists, monitored both the animals and the people to find out over that timespan the has tolerance for human disturbance declined when annoyed they moved further away from the tourist viewing area or even dive back in the water to swim away. Those responses are contrary to the communist some shin that wildlife becomes habituated to human activities. The study is in the journal applied animal behaviour science. The researchers think that offense initially constructed in the late nineteen nineties is to blame it was. Built with good intentions to heat people a safe distance from the colony. But the fence isn't long enough to keep people away from the most critical part of the habitat. It might even funnel people towards that area as they try to find viewing spots closer than the fence would allow or could be the fence actually does its job keeping people away. But as a result, they are just far enough away that the animals never really get used to them. The truth is that Pinna peds seem to be doing well in Uruguay. While the amount of animals in the rookery varies day by day, the best estimate is now around two thousand of them more than there were twenty years ago, but it's hard to say whether tourism has played any role in increase. The animals have also become protected from hunting under your Gwen law. And there are environmental factors at play in governing their population like prey availability and climate change. Still the study tells us two things. First, photographic wildlife tourism may not always be as low impact as soon and second eco-tourism. Developers should get input from social psychologists who can help anticipate the behaviors of the visiting humans as they observe the behaviors of the native wildlife. Percentage of Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman.

Jason Goldman Pinna Uruguay rocky Cape Atlantic Gwen sixty seconds twenty years
"jason goldman" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Wanna do for a while i've been wanting to leave the research bench although more recently i was begin falling more in love with research in thinking about maybe i wanna stay them this whole thing happened and i'm like no no no i don't like academia i'm very roenick so no i wanna pursue science indication fulltime i wanna continue doing research in science medication i wanna keep promoting citizen science in ways to research in belts knowledge outside of academe yeah which i think would be really fun and i'm just really excited to be able to have more time in energy to devote to sharing sides that i've been lucky to learn more broadly that's such a great goal in you know what it reminds me that using talk nerdy as a platform i have this problem the same way that you were saying like i'm kind of self conscious when i do self as i think about and i did i don't want to i have this problem where i'm like i don't like to self promote in a mike okay entire hour on this podcast every week and minimal good wanna sell you anything but i completely forgot that i co run a science communication training camp every year along with my coco wonder how many people listen to talk nerdy even know about this but jason goldman whose incredible science writer along sara curtis he's also incredible sides writer and myself we founded i think we're coming up on year five what the wow we found it i come camp several years ago in an effort to get a group of like minded science communicators whether it's people who are professional scientists or people who are professional science communicators in everything in between who wanna come together to learn from one another and also to learn from kind of industry giants and spent some time just kind of debriefing and hanging out in the woods 'cause we call it camp confusing because for grownups but it's fun you get to stay in it's like glam like their cabins and they're really nice and you have your own bathroom but the food's really good it's in a beautiful part of la that surrounded by nature and this year it's going to be from november second through fourth of anybody who's listening who's like been so hanging on our everywhere during this during this chat if this is for you if sicom is something you wanna start or something you've been doing for while i highly wreck amend you come join us at this year sicom camp i think you'll love it and you can learn more about it at sicom camp dot com that's easy to remember right i've only heard.

writer jason goldman
"jason goldman" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"Don't live in the middle of a big city check check check he doesn't mean give you a dang study found living to one hundred is about twice as common in rural area that's a surprising to me because you think you'd be closer to hospitals and things like that but maybe there's more there's other dangerous saying the pollution the stress in the big city yeah yeah so that makes sense jason goldman you're so lucky on this one if you're not extremely tall what about if you're truly short oh no it says you're not extremely tall people who make it to one hundred ten to be shorter general alcohol doesn't say okay but says very common is very it's very uncommon for tall people to live yup i don't know why you don't see all right you don't see huge big tall people you don't you don't sorry matt it's it's the discovery yeah you'll see those what's who was the guy that was here the the basketball player he never made it to the nba battery talking about well now my ling anyway he there wouldn't during his documentary they were talking about they did it because he is just some crazy tall they said that it's some it is in their genetics to not live as long oh no i've got to play the nba his name was george murison who has seven foot seven and then one day i turn on the news he died like forty five that'd be so rough on the body you to get giant titus which doesn't help as well so yeah we're all in good shape index anchorman he's he's kinda tall tall are you six three okay you're out and my husband to oh sorry not to one hundred doesn't mean okay you're at a healthy weight on now so the rest of us although we can change that we could we should says people who make it to one hundred are almost never obese university like really obese people but they say what you hit seventies in your seventies or eighties is not good to be too thin either they've got to be in the middle there you're right handed i am lefthanded people don't live as long.

jason goldman george murison basketball nba seven foot one day
"jason goldman" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"Of the game it's a strategy why is it not fair when everybody else here they can't hear you you did not say it wasn't fair i did not ever say that don't like how that it just takes away some of the fun for me that's all it's a risk though because if he gives a wrong then you can hear the rest of the question why should i guess the question gets thrown out you have to say the finish the question and then that's true it's it's risk it's my own opinion it has happened to me i've also used it on using it directly through it number one person who can't take it's a great morning about one thing that you're having a bad day joins i want every ten serious park from the get better that was funny now if you don't know that for every once in a while jason yeah i am reliance is coaching or twenty two okay team anybody so all the way jason goodman had had a few drinks at his party somebody filmed him a huge like mashed yeah ironically the karaoke song i was thinking was frankie valli we we have the clip somewhere we have thousands of clips this is very quick but jason goldman drinking doing karaoke it was a it wasn't a karaoke was just a song playing filming me and i was getting mad.

jason goodman frankie valli jason jason goldman
"jason goldman" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Things are that may have good relationships with local government and they have good relationships with national government and they have this is infrastructure and they worked really hard to develop those relationships and develop there's expertise and use kind of scientific methodology method in uh dates collection to to provide evidence for the what they're trying to get done oversee that that to me is is how we have to go about doing these things itsel l important as there's so many ethical issues surrounding this sort of like paternalistic sort of imperialistic colonial approach to conservation that go much farther than you know getting getting in there getting something accomplished leaving an egg all going to shed you'd like breed kind of a culture of like dependency and it also just has this like really bad deeds yuck factor really irregularly elizabeth's absolutely organised and it's kind of like oh you can't take every your own chat let it come in and take care of it for you and of course that's never going to work or at least it's never gonna work longterm now but there are so many opportunities out there i think one thing about conservation that always excites me when i get to talk about it on the show and i talk about this with my friend jason goldman a lot and he wrote up an ngo article about about this work that you did it's hard sometimes he's a freelance journalist writing about conservation in urban wildlife it's hard to not constantly right really fucking depressing story but there's so much hope on the other side of that you know all almost more than in any other field there's so much home and the idea that first you have to identify these places and these organisms that are in peril and once you can identify them you can work to do something about it and so i think it's really cool that this project specifically that you were involved with helped identify these these organisms that really do i think need need help to make sure that their numbers maintain and potentially even grow and so it's cool that you did that it's cool to your continuing to work on that is that all your.

elizabeth jason goldman
"jason goldman" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on Ologies

"Correct me if i'm wrong i feel like if steve jobs had to design it orifice it would be a claycourt so simple hits one laying so a wakar is his like the home but in on an iphone it's really all you need it's a onestop shop for liquid waste solid waste and then as bonus it's also us export portal so birds gated on via what is called no joke eight clo equal kiss they just smooch butts sometimes only for a few seconds now if you've heard gossip about like duck mating well a lot of it might be true waterfowl gun ads google it or you can go straight to an article on that geo called duck penises grow bigger among rivals which was written by a friend of mine jason goldman whose a wildlife journalist great icebreaker topics he covers some good months now back to clic us why is it reptiles and birds are dislike i got us a single port here in don't worry about it they have a whole different um physiology physiological mechanism for waste excretion than we do um and reproduction so you they they'll of internal go nuts too which it would be weird if they didn't get no it'd be um but they have a really different sort of kidney system than we do and so they are able to produce there was sort of his one product and shoot it out it's much more efficient um they're not as good at.

steve jobs iphone jason goldman
"jason goldman" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"jason goldman" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific americans sixty seconds science i'm jason goldman gutted a minute all meet the would tiger moth it's bright yellow red orange skills send a warning to potential predators these wonderful conspicuous colors and to be connected arlene to some sort of chemical defense so when we see the reaction of the bridge to them then we got interesting study more in detail the chemical defenses per se biologist bibiana rojo us from finland's university of drive us gila animals that pair visual warnings with other defences are called oppose semantic if a hungry predator were to try showing down on this mauve it would find a mouthful of nasty tasting possibly even toxic bug parts roh has entered team found that the would tiger mas secretes nasty fluids from lands on its neck and from his abdomen at first glance the seems like a fairly routine sort of defensive strategy after all nature is full of redundant processes but the researchers discovered that the would tiger moth is the first species known in which the different fluids from the different parts of a massive body each target a different type of predator the fluids for the maas abdomen deter ants but are completely useless against birds meanwhile the next fluids are unpalatable to birds but don't bother ants in fact the ants actually preferred this fluids of sugar water the finding is in the proceedings of the royal society b so we now have the first example of an animal having multiple independent chemical defenses.

jason goldman arlene finland university of drive sixty seconds