18 Burst results for "Jason Berry"

"jason berry" Discussed on JustATouchof_J

JustATouchof_J

06:04 min | 11 months ago

"jason berry" Discussed on JustATouchof_J

"Doing my simple jason berry. Brave voice. I hope you always think of this episode like was crazy it was just look. Just what i learned is very simply okay. Some any lights. This who is says okay. How does do so simple. What is this what is this. What is this is just such a j. Hey y'all know put it out there for you okay. So what is the thing that i always tell your when i'm getting about it is thank tell you zillah nobody make you feel like you went through and why please don't oh my gosh listen okay. It ain't what is hit for game. Don't do so okay. It's just corny. You know an on yourself. You ain't please please don't by doing crazy stuff you just you already know. Look twenty episodes of its check it out. Gate get yourself together and its second day that say oh skating on a battle he is show. Yes they hated. When you let that this little ad show. They don't like to know now. I want you shine bright like a damaged child. You realize you listen girl because she out there signing prayed i could yes. I think every time. I'll tell you on dancing so better rally you could see Killing okay because you know. Mama i do not dance. I was dropped below solar soda. You this real hat yes How their body and for those who know that name by pace which is just such ten tended up club anywhere. Look the last thing that say his spread low. Okay 'cause it's the brooklyn man and this is just it sets j. Y'all know. I got put that out pieces for you. Spread the because the world needs love it out that day but spread love man please. Man life is so short. I think if i learned anything you know besides believing and trusting more their life is short. You can't take it for granted. Man love the ones you're witch episodes. Okay just just said today you know. I don't know which one it is episode. Three hundred twenty one show season three are right. There's a lot of episodes out here. But i just learnt that i learnt though to say what are really did i learn god is really like building was like he just maneuvered this whole thing like he led me to the people day gave me the. Da show but these people had a whole facility to gut health and then he led me to certain people who are nutritionists dietitians and how people was dead. I said like. I never thought some people would be there for me. Dear for me and people. I thought would be. There was nowhere to be found. Okay like it was. Just like a shocker guy which is putting people out there. And i'm just like this omega. He was just like maneuver situation. Tell i'm a believer. I was a believer before you go but now like i am confirmed like i understand. You know god will do it. He will do a full. You my hair coming back and everything my hair salon. Then he just he just fixed it all right. You know gave me everything that i needed and then told me. He told me what all this was before happened. You know. I just didn't think it was day. I didn't think leaky gut and autism. I don't know. I didn't know why. But now i know why but oh my god it's just such you know i've really learned you shows guy you know maybe do i had to put it out there and pieces for some i just because y'all just needed to know that you know maybe some is really out there just struggle with certain stuff and he just like you know because he's never what you go through has never really for us for other people got you know allows things to happen in your life a lot of time for other people. Yes so. I'm okay with that because gloria winning anyway you know this too shall pass is what he always tells me and then he'll never put mental me that i can bear. I can't bear okay and you're either all right so look i'm about here okay. Last changed tag. People gordon on and on and on and i'll be i i will be back. I promise i will be back as soon as something else. I'm not mom. Thank you for listening to twenty days. Did oh my gosh. I had to come up with something else. I could talk to you. I'll tell you the t. Yeah but listen right now just listen. To all the episodes this oughta episodes. I'm a make sure they're getting played on break. Radio okay the reruns and stuff like s young get down. Please share them. A lot of people are sharing them. They're like really. Don't really inspirational. You know. and this was the first part of my journey. I guess this is the first part. Maybe i'll do a second part. Second part is so know whatever guy you now put it out the pieces for your. I love your sake. Hair be blessed. Keep me.

jason berry today second part Second part twenty episodes second day first part season three Three hundred twenty one Killing one twenty days brooklyn gloria zillah show
"jason berry" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"jason berry" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To you so that we could get more tables outside s. Oh, there have been some a few silver linings to this terrible cloud over our industry, but we're just happy to have Employees employed. Our restaurants exist and we know that we're going to come back from this. Hopefully this spring or summer as the world starts to settle post vaccine and come out of this pandemic. Jason Berry, founder of Need Hospitality and design at the Washington D. C restaurant company that will pay its workers to get the covert 19 vaccine, Jason thank you very much for speaking with us and best of luck to you. My pleasure. Thanks for having me on Public health leaders on the local level are usually low profile. But in this pandemic, many of them especially in rule areas are the public faces of the shutdown, and that's made them into targets of angry social media campaigns of protests outside of their home, even death threats. Colorado Public Radio's Andrea Dukakis has the story from that state. It was another week of constant work. No sleep irate citizens in December near the holidays making Hillman decided she needed something anything to feel good about Her job is public health director. I went out and gave vaccine at the nursing home because We're feet down. Tillman was a physician assistant in her old life. Now she heads up public health into rural counties on Colorado's Eastern Plains. We were crying with happy crying. It's so nice to be able to Do something that is appreciated. And you're told. Thank you. Hillman hasn't heard a lot of thank you. Since the pandemic began, She has gotten angry letters, Emails, threats about covert 19 restrictions. One threat, the sheriff and district attorney investigated. On the other side of the state. The threats came home for Lee and Galan. She's the public health director for two counties in the Southwest, a career she took up after being a social worker and dinners. Last month, she was working at home on a zoom call with local officials. But then I kind of hood, this invoices and something that I couldn't quite make out. And then I heard a loud banging And so at the loud banging, I went into my window outside. She saw about 20 protesters, 6 ft. From her door. There was a man holding a huge sign that said, End the lockdown and she was yelling a bad person lives here. She told the officials on Zoom what was happening, then hung up and called the chief of police law enforcement came, Jelen says the protesters left after a few hours. There were no arrests. I don't love being in this pandemic anymore than anybody else. I don't love wearing masks. I miss seeing my friends and family. I miss going over to people's houses. I miss hugging people. I miss eating at restaurants. But this is my job, And if I didn't do the things that I'm doing as a public health director, I would be negligent in my duties. Ironically, Lan says she's also faced threats from people who don't think the cove in 19 restrictions go far enough. Dylan has faced this outpouring of anger for many months, just like her counterpart in Gunnison County, Joanie Reynolds. Police have been monitoring threats against her since April. On the day of the insurrection in D. C. Reynolds heard about a new post on social media. I mean, they just talked about, um you know what to do with me and whether they should sue me or whether they should have a protest at my house or whether they should hang me from a branch of justice. Stories like this from Reynolds, Jolan and helmet and have led to what one public official calls a brain drain since the pandemic began, and it's happening across the country. Laurie Freeman is the CEO of the National Association of County and City Health workers, and it doesn't really matter whether it's a red or a blue, state or county. Or whether it's rural urban Suburban nationally, more than 80 public health officials have resigned or been fired. Since the start of the pandemic. Here in Colorado, about a dozen of the state's 53 public health directors have left their jobs. That trend is caught the attention of state lawmakers like Democratic representative Yadira Caravaggio in the middle look endemic. It's really concerning toe lose that expertise because these individuals aren't allowed do their jobs safely because they're having to worry about if somebody's going to target their family or themselves. Cara Veil plants to sponsor a bill to protect the personal information of state and local health care workers, it won't fix the problem altogether. It Especially in the short term, but LeAnn Dylan says she plans to see it through. There is a job that needs to get done. We have a mission right now. I am committed to seeing through that mission. And to seeing an end to covert 19 in southwest Colorado for here, and now I'm Andrea Dukakis..

Jason Laurie Freeman Jason Berry Andrea Dukakis LeAnn Dylan Yadira Caravaggio Lee Dylan December Jolan Colorado Joanie Reynolds Tillman Gunnison County Galan Lan Reynolds 6 ft Last month Jelen
"jason berry" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"jason berry" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"About your money at 7 21, and we have your real time traffic right now with Kevin Dean Fish. All right. We'll check in with 10 news meteorologist Meghan Perry. Hey, Good morning, Increasing sunshine today with showers. Ending early fair weather will be. The trend is to the end of 2020 with mild Santa Ana winds. The coast in the low to mid sixties in the valleys in the upper fifties to mid sixties with San Diego's most accurate forecast and maybe see 10 news meteorologist Meghan Perry. Take a look at current temperatures Right now it looks like LeMay, PSA is 48 Rancho Bernardo 47 downtown. It's 53 Coco News. Time is seven Won the regional stayed home or order in Southern California, including San Diego, will officially be extended today after the governor Monday said they were taking a final look at the cove ID numbers. Waiting for the Monday numbers to make it official with bull stuff in California and the San Joaquin Valley, hoping to loosen the reins. Gavin Newsom anticipates the covert stayed home orders to continue in those areas because of ICU capacity issues. Do you think somehow you're immune from impact of coded? There's the direct impact. That is the transmission of this virus. There's the indirect impact. God forbid you have a stroke or heart attack. Your car accident or you have other acute care needs the impact. Of these. This virus is pandemic well, the region's about the temple restrictions since early December after falling below the icy availability threshold. Hey Louis. Kogo News More than 13,000 students in the San Diego Union High School District will continue distance learning until 2021 R into 2021 School board voting Monday to halt the district's reopening plan that what about students back to the classroom next week? The move comes after the union representing teachers filed a lawsuit to block the return, parent Jason Berry tells reporting partner 10 News. A lot of parents are very frustrated that that there is the appearance that the teachers Are not willing to go back. I think that they need to show that they're willing to go back. The union estimated that up to 20% of teachers would not return in January, either for health concerns or child care issues. We'll see clear skies later today after a night of heavy rain downpours, causing some street flooding because of the storm gutters. The winter storm also left five inches of snow in the mountains in the East County. Not only did they get rain but on sunrise highway Plows were out. Also at the 6000 FT level it Laguna Lodge. It was snow John is at the lodge, he told Coco News. This is an exciting time of the year. You know what always amazes me How many people show up there like in their twenties or thirties or sometimes even 40. They've never seen snow pick out of the first. No. Large, usually packed is also practicing social distancing because of the pandemic. We're on Lee well in 10 people the time in the store, which means you may have to stand on the porch and wait for a while. That's the way it goes. But John says there is a big blanket of snow that should be around for a couple of days. If you are headed up, snow change required. Phil Farrar. KOGO News The size of stimulus checks is producing some fire on Capitol Hill, Jill NATO reports from Washington in an early morning tweet president Trump said, Give the people $2000..

John Meghan Perry San Diego San Diego Union High School Di Gavin Newsom Southern California Laguna Lodge Kevin Dean Fish Jason Berry San Joaquin Valley Phil Farrar LeMay Coco News Rancho Bernardo East County Lee Louis
"jason berry" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"jason berry" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Regional stay at home order in the Southern California region, which includes San Diego will officially be extended today after the governor said they were taking a final look at the cove. It numbers Waiting for the Monday numbers to make it official with bull stuff in California and the San Joaquin Valley, hoping to loosen the reins. Gavin Newsom anticipates the covert stayed home orders to continue in those areas because of ICU capacity issues. Do you think somehow you're immune from impact of coded? There's the direct impact. That is the transmission of this virus. There's the indirect impact. God forbid you have a stroke or heart attack. Your car accident or you have other acute care needs the impact. Of these. This virus is pandemic. Both the region's about the temple restrictions since early December after falling below the icy availability threshold. Hey, Louis Kogo new doctor. Mark Galley will be holding a news conference about the situation at noon. We'll cover that on cocoa and coming up at 7 11. This morning, we'll get an update from county Supervisor Nathan Fletcher. More San Diego businesses are suing the county over code 19 restrictions. Last week, 25 Jim's filed a lawsuit against the county for the right to reopen Under current restrictions. Gyms are not allowed to operate indoors. Many of the gym owners involved with lawsuits say science is on their side between June and December, the county reported. More than 118,000 covet infections and county workers interviewed more than 68,000 people infected Jim Jim's were linked to possibly 277 cases. Retail, though, was believed to be responsible for more than 6300 cases. Students in the Sandy Gato Union High School district will not be returning to campus in January. The school board vote comes after the union representing teachers sued to block a return to in person learning, saying the district's reopening plan violates the state's public health rules amid the pandemic. Jason Berry's daughter was looking forward to returning to Earl Warren Middle School, he tells reporting partner 10 news. This whole situation is causing a stunting to, I would say entire generation of kids burying other parents are starting a grassroots effort to make it easier for people to become substitutes. Union leaders say most teachers want to return to the classroom, but not at the heights of the pandemic. Deadly December is putting more pressure on morgues at San Diego Hospitals for San Diego hospitals notifying the medical examiner in recent weeks that their morgues were nearing capacity, some of used local funeral homes to help the things worsen Sunday when a medical examiner transport picked up five bodies from Sharpe Grossmont Hospital in La Mesa and is now storing the deceased. This comes a San Diego sees the biggest surgeon covert related deaths since the pandemic started the week before. Christmas was the deadliest so far with 129 lives. Lost. Joshua Lipton KOGO News. A new coronavirus stimulus bill when $2000 checks is on its way to the Senate after the Democrat led House narrowly voted to pass it on the measure would override the $600 payments included in another relief package. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says she hopes the Senate does the same thing. The present And of the United States has put this fourth is something that he wants to see. In terms of and part of his signing the legislation yesterday. I hope that that will be that view will be shared by the Republicans in the Senate. This comes after the president took issue with the $600 amount and called to give Americans more help. He also complained the covert relief and government spending package allocates too much money for foreign aid and items he described as wasteful bipartisan rebuke for the president. The House votes to override his veto of the annual defense policy Bill. Jered Halpern has that story. A majority of Republicans joined the majority of Democrats in the House to override President Trump's veto of the $740 billion Nash. No defense authorization act on this boat that yea so 322. The nays are 87 President Trump vetoed the bill over objections to a provisional lowering the Pentagon to rename bases honoring Confederate leaders. And because the measure failed to eliminate protections for social media companies. The Senate is expected to take up the veto override this week. If successful, it would be the first time Congress has voted to override a veto from President Trump. Novavax is moving one step closer to adding another Corona virus vaccine to the arsenal for health officials in the U. S vaccine company is starting Phase three trial of its covert 19 vaccine. It will have 30,000 volunteers to try out the vaccine, and the trial is receiving funding from Operation Warp speed. Novavax has its headquarters in Maryland. We're going to use time is 507 and learning more about Anthony Warner, the man responsible for the Christmas morning explosion that rocked downtown Nashville. Mike Tobin has details on what Warners neighbors said about the bomber. Rick Loud was a neighbor of Anthony Quinn. Warner, who went by Tony Loud was one of the few neighbors who interacted with Warner, he says. Just before Christmas, the man ideas, the bomber dropped a hint that he was about to do something big. So is Santa gonna bring you anything Good for Christmas. Research is quality said yes, Loud says even when he saw FBI, Tennessee Bureau of Investigation and 80 vehicles pull up at Warners home in Antioch, Tennessee, it took awhile to accept the reality that his neighbor was the bomber. The neighbor claims Warner told him he was going to become famous on Christmas in the world would never forget him. New Year's resolutions that you can actually keep allegedly. That's coming up. Let's see. I'm gonna be rich. I'm gonna be thin. I'm gonna Yeah, I'm gonna be happy by the way Pro tip. Do not get on your scale. I made that mistake this morning. That's all I've got for you. Real time. Traffic. Updated weather in three minutes. Togo News time 50 Wait. I'm used radio.

San Diego Senate Anthony Warner President Trump president Gavin Newsom Jim Jim San Diego Hospitals San Joaquin Valley Warners House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Southern California Sandy Gato Union High School d California Louis Kogo Nathan Fletcher Togo official
"jason berry" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"jason berry" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"A guy who were runners in scoring position who could not have played better as a Yankee your call is different than Manny Machado thank you need the way I see it today's to consistently go deep into ball games that take the pressure off the bull pen the line I'll take away from the Houston Astros to me it's a win win the waiting for the Yankees at the like the Yankees and make a move that is a splash well your goals this flash and so is it a broken hairy is up next on a phallic some hairy how you doing a good morning good morning to you was going on I'm a match and other actions for many years and I you know I'm a little sister says this I'm wondering it is he worth they can own should we come back I mean you were is mentioned the Jason berry and but they and I got a twinge right away it seems like everybody else you when they leave the Mets and they want to come back to the match they seem to be doing great on the other teams but when they hit the mantle of certainly go downtown no wonder uses so students were waiting for why should he be starting in Los real cool what I think he's got a sherry first things first Terry he can get back on the baseball field before I'm entertaining the idea of Katie play every day Kenny fleet back into the fold in the every day lineup let me see an SS but is go out to left field and play consistently go play four games in seven days I'm series staffing in the don't fill out I think the Mets Y. O. SS was back now I don't that's why you had that whole issue with the video in the picture and the frustration within the mess that was posted I think the Mets won says his back I think they want that insurance money well it it says but it says I can give it a go well then you've got to find a way to get back out there and figure out what his role is going to be says it is if he does come back and can be somewhat effective his future is going to be is the H. now is there an American League team that be willing to take him off for a year he'd have to really look the part and would have to get a clean bill of health before you even consider that but that's gonna be sore on what's going to twenty twenty what is the potential role for says but is there on his back to him I said as very part the white what else do I this is a new day I was talking about Chicago into misty Upham billable shopping was a wide receiver had mixed in next year when you think remember the when shopping for wide receiver help they brought in Taylor Gabriel from Atlanta they brought in Allen robinzine from the Jacksonville Jaguars they spend money on wide receivers the problem is Mitchell to basically is not any good to white and they could have had the show Watson they could have Patrick balls they traded up to go get make sure basically that is going to be tough to live that that is going to be so mad if you're walking around Chicago and your Big Bear fan you're walking off Friday night talking shop having some phone get out of work thinking about you we got a football how many conversations in Chicago you know we could have more homes you know we could have lots and we got stuck with this guy is a total staff to basically is awful hello you dying to get on the field against these giant defense and dementia basting you can make plays against the giants then yeah Hey Stana packet foot shell my thanks to suss across the way on the other side work pal everybody who called outstanding stuff is always we are back with all football Friday show we got couple surprises lined up what vehicle I pigs well I'm chasing cats will also have bill cracking burger for those you saw actually he's going to be in studio people reached out always a big fan of the show so he's going to be in tomorrow right after the Thursday night game awesome fall rat a gate what shows coming up boomer NGL coming up because everybody.

Manny seven days
"jason berry" Discussed on Z104

Z104

13:09 min | 2 years ago

"jason berry" Discussed on Z104

"This is the best of our knowledge I'm Bob Barrett nor guest today is Jason berry author of the book city of a million dreams a history of New Orleans that year three hundred one of the big traditions in the city is carnival season especially Mardi Gras I asked how this tradition involved are carnival was European tradition very popular and France Spain and Italy that was transplanted to New Orleans with the various waves of Europeans who came here I refer in the book to the map of the world neighborhoods because many these neighborhoods help so many different peoples that they were almost like miniature versions of the world itself and of course the African presence has been profound since the very beginning of the colony our the city has to say what you find in carnival is a tradition that grows far beyond what people originally thought it would be Darris Dr C. assumed that carnival was there for the balls and fancy dress gatherings and lavish food and the fine music that they enjoyed but rather quickly along it also became a celebration of the streets and you know by the early twentieth century it was such a growing part of the city stretching over several weeks in the middle of the winter they really turned into an industry and now it pumps a billion dollars into the economy every year or so it's a kind of stage for a larger constellation of the identity pageants I mean the old line cruise serve aristocracy parade with businessmen and key as kings and you know young women debutantes is queens whereas the crew Zulu which began as a black satire of the white royalty is now a lavish parade and there also was sort of political power house in town and you get one sense of how the city has changed after very hard it's racially as many cities in the south have undergone today the king of Mardi Gras racks prominent businessman every year goes down to the Mississippi doc and welcomes the barge that brings the king of who to bet begin his reign on Lundy grub today before Mardi Gras all this is televised the mayor reads a proclamation that essentially giving the city over to rex rex in turn is lavishing his breeding of Zulu quite a symbol of inter racial harmony and while that might not seem all that important to some people when you think of how divided and splintered the country is right now over racial issues I think public pageants like this which presented idea of hope have an important role the city has had a very colorful let's say racial history starting with I guess I guess you would have to go back to the the the funeral of Jefferson Davis was held there yeah Jefferson Davis was a massive funeral you know and and eighteen ninety two really what's interesting about these funerals is how they changed and how that changes reflected the way the city was changing I would even go back farther to eighteen sixty three in the middle of the civil war New Orleans fell early eighteen sixty two admiral Farragut came up the river and captured the city and for several years it was quite well governed befriended he achy generals most of the historians you know quicker in that regard there was a black an African American troop called the Louisiana native guard who fought against the south one of their leaders Andre cryo was a rather courageous captain who was killed at the battle of port Hudson near baton Rouge eighteen sixty three and his body lay on that field for almost six weeks after his death his spirit appeared in a seat series of seances held by these creel's in town where he speaks to them and treats them to fight for freedom it's it's really an amazing turn of events by the time his remains such as they work came back the funeral for cardio was one of the largest the city to that point had ever seen and it was the first for an African American with marching bands but some thirty seven benevolent societies burial societies and so it was a signal to the white creoles and to the other ethnic white that the African Americans were now a culture on the rise and in the years after the war the civil war became re branded as the lost because how did that affect the city's history profoundly so the lost cause was a basically a mythology that spread across the south it was a determined effort by former Confederate officers and soldiers to cast the war as this noble undertaking not about slavery but over economic differences and putting up the statues to Confederate soldiers was a way of immortalizing the nobility of this war at and and the way it was taught in school books the way in which they regained power was through vigilante tactics I wouldn't even use the word justice lynching became one of the main tools in securing white supremacy across the south it has all of this was happening in the late eighteen eighties forty thousand black folk so over the twenty year period culminating in nineteen hundred moved in to New Orleans and brought with them these traditions of rural church worship with jubilee dancing with ecstatic rituals and is that music along with the blues current was absorbed by brass bands the black brass bands of the music change their old spinal column you might say of military marches for funerals began to loosen and show more improvisation an adaptation of the funerals reflected that by the early nineteen hundreds there were huge gatherings of people in the street for these black funerals and the police at that point were very reluctant to arrest people because these were religious processions even though the press pants were blowing probing pretty boy it like so you find rituals like that threading through the annals of the town and to me very hold a mirror there like caravanserai I have about a given moment in time well I didn't write this question and I'm not sure who did but I'm gonna ask it anyway did jazz invent New Orleans or did in Orleans invent jazz all mine that's one of the hardest questions of ever been enhanced well I I would put it this way chance arose here because of the unique social composition of the city the map of the world neighborhoods that were here where this africaine ET African American idiom of the poly rhythms of yester year melding with European melody and instrumentation because the birth of jazz it is a a an African American idiom but no sooner had that happened then there were Jews and Italians and Irish and German musicians in this city that was teeming with brass band and so there was this rich musical exchange that began which I don't know if it's arguable whether something like that could have happened in in a New York or Chicago or other large cities but I think the main ingredient that distinguish did here was the role of the creoles the black creoles many of whom were music professors and engaged the darker African Americans who did not know how to play but played improvisational Lee by year and it's that coming together of the improvisational music and the formally trained sounds of clarinetists and trumpeters and even you know pianist who feel one pattern and take it and absorbed into another and I think it happened here because of the society well there's no way we can end this without talking about could Trina ten years after Katrina Leung more but almost fifteen years after Katrina now right how much has this re booted this city well it's important to remember that eighty percent of the city was under water and an average level of four feet I have many friends who lost their homes and belongings my wife and I were quite fortunate our house did not flood but one of my close friends Michael white the clarinetist and composer lost everything five thousand CD's four thousand books all of his sheet music and I did an entire chapter on him because to me he represents a sort of New Orleans every man in what he had to do to rebuild not just his career but his life and and he managed to prevail he didn't quite beautifully he's done on a number of CD since then so it was a long aching struggle we got a real boost when lander was elected mayor in two thousand ten he managed to access a great deal of federal money for rebuilding the infrastructure but the town came back because the people were determined to return whether their houses were destroyed or not and re claim their piece of the world many musicians who suffered terrible losses nevertheless managed to come back and rebuild and I think it's really a testimony to the resilience of the people that the city today is quite robust we are probably eighty thousand fewer people than we were before the storm it's about I guess three hundred eighty thousand population now that said it's becoming a city the young subtracting young people to the digital economy to the film industry the restaurants the art scene so you know New Orleans is a comeback story for which America can be proud can you imagine what the city might look like today had there not been Katrina well yeah I I can easily imagine it I think the lower ninth ward would still be a large populous neighborhood with many folks living in houses that had been handed down over three or four generations where the mortgage was paid but they didn't carry insurance sadly and that's why so many people couldn't come back and rebuild you know whether New Orleans would have the reputation it does today is an international place had the world not watched in horror hi I don't know I would be loath to say that Katrina was a good thing for the city but what it did do is elevate the importance of the city historically in the world site and as we slowly rebuilt more and more people became interested in coming here I was never there before Katrina and died I've seen it in the past three years now I've gone maybe over half a dozen times I just I I I I could see why people love this city and would never want to leave well I grew up here I went off I came back and I've been here now back you might say for for quite a long time and I can't imagine really living any place else Paris would be very nice but New Orleans is a rare place and it is a culture that is both American in its lines of custom and habit and yet it stands outside of the American mainstream with its Latin and and carribean folkways and cultural stream so it really is a remarkable place again the name of Jason berry's wonderful book is city of a million dreams a history of New Orleans at here three hundred.

"jason berry" Discussed on NFL: Move the Sticks with Daniel Jeremiah & Bucky Brooks

NFL: Move the Sticks with Daniel Jeremiah & Bucky Brooks

10:18 min | 2 years ago

"jason berry" Discussed on NFL: Move the Sticks with Daniel Jeremiah & Bucky Brooks

"And i'm talking left or right just guys you can play with and you can win. There is there is none. There's not enough talented left tackles coming in the n._f._l. Fell so you get one like you said. It's a known commodity. That's number three the last one and this is part of the discussion. I think book is we talk about having a head coach and general no manager. The head coach is always right now tomorrow today he <hes> what's going to help us win a general manager long-term that's why it used to be general managers could hire a couple of coaches because they always had to look after the long term of the organization. We're a head coach is trying to just make sure he survives another year so this was a right now decision not saying it's right right or wrong. I'm just saying head coaches. Look at it and say we gotta play next week. I need some help and that's why you see a decision like this. Being made is funny. I i love all these points like because all these points i think are apply several situations but in houston it is all about the quarterback you have a legitimate quarterback you found him in a draft identified them now is bid around you brought up the example with gerry goffin what the ramsey jared goff in terms of surrounding him before his mom and he's played like a king since their point <hes> <hes> the championship window being open right now as much as we like to speculate a man. This team is going to be good to go for the next two three four years. We never know on a year you to your basis. Due to the chemistry continuity of the team changes if the window is open you gotta some you got to bust through the window right now. This is your chance in terms of the pipeline there you're right. There isn't a pipeline at college there. There isn't a single college. Debt is pumping out offensive tackles office of lyman at a rate where we're saying. Hey these guys can absolutely get you just go to university. You can get it. We talked about stanford and all the office of lima date have come out of stanford last year's. Those guys hasn't really panned out at materialize realized so if stanford is at the upper end. Maybe one of the elite programs them in iowa and maybe wisconsin hordes noted at notre dame has been the best been the school is hard to find him in so if i can't find him then what i gotta do is i got overpay because someone else in the pros has developed develop my guy now. I'm gonna take it from me. So that's what you do and then the head coach versus gentlemen. A debate is one that always goes on and and meeting rooms around the league. The head coach is short term. He is singularly focused on. What can i do to help us win week. One week two week sixteen the general manager is supposed to be the one that acts as the checks imbalances to the head coach a coach on. We still got to set this up for sustained run but the way going now d._j. The way the volatility in the league is you. You can't even really think about a long-term plan. You gotta find a way to get your team into the playoffs and win some games and hopefully that playoff run will buy some time to then rebuild field on the fly. There's no long term plans to as a project metairie down and don't build it back up. Even though the dos are trying to do that owners want to see if if you can win dan repair while you winning not reveal why you winning and last thing and then we'll move on and talk talk to <hes> to our buddy bruce feldman but i know they do not have a first round pick the next two years but now is the time and as i'm guessing it's necessary. I think that's that's what most people in the league expect to happen that wants the year's over that nixon syria will make that leap from new england in general manager there for bill o'brien and houston texans but if it's it's not next somebody else you better get the right g._m. Because next year while you have no one i believe they have a second round. Pick and with picks even peter king might have said this they have they have three third round picks next year and i believe two fourth round picks so while you don't have a one three threes fours you've gotta to you better. Make sure you're scouting. Accounting department is led by the right guy and you can go out and find those key players and because now the the margin of error is not there. I mean you've got you've cutty hit on those picks. You can't afford to miss on them so that to me is is <hes> underscores the importance than hiring the guy the we can talk about this we saw the seahawks hawks kinda take a loaf of bread and feed the masses they slice and have many picks slice it off and they were able able to get <hes> a plethora picks that allow them to fortify their roster. We will see the next day comes to houston. He has to be one of those guys. That can be a miracle worker worker. He has to be able to take the hammer the picks they have trade parlay those into multiple picks and then parlay those picks and two players and so is a waltari tiered process but they got expanded picks to have and then they got to bring in the right place to feel the knees on that team and also going to have an opportunity to be active in free agency. I i would believe too when you're not gonna have a first round. Pick the next couple of years. You'd probably get a big ticket. Item there in free agency so it'll be answered the follow this texas team and see what they end up doing going forward. We're all right buck. Let's switch gears here. Talk a little college football. I had a chance a little bit earlier today to catch up with our buddy bruce. Feldman bruce says if you don't bruce works for the athletic is one of the best writers for college football and has been for a very long time working for various outlets and does a wonderful job on fox as a sideline reporter order for one of their top college football teams. Nobody knows these college kids better then bruce feldman. He's been a great resource for us over the years and had a chance to visit with him about about some of the goings on from week one of the college football season abors appreciate you joining us man. I understand. We're at a baseball game right now so we hear a little noise in the background. You're not actually participating in this game. They'll right. We're watching. We're watching youngsters out there. We are watching. It's my five year old steine. It's the beginning of all baseball practice which yeah i know about. What kind of swing what kind of are we working with. <hes> not bad. He's a little <hes> but he's really into red so he's favorite player as to which she's profile. That's good. That's good copyright. There and scouting got to have a good copy already got it. I love it. He's already payment. I want to jump into some of these. Some of these college football topics here for first thing. I want to ask you about because i thought watching football all weekend and get a chance to to watch a lot of tape of these games. The thing that kinda just stood out to me. I thought the star of the weekend was really lincoln riley highly. I mean what this guy's been able to do year. After year. After year we know about the transfers to first round picks to first overall picks and here comes jalen hurts and <hes> bruce to me. Look look more comfortable more confident as a passer. The scheme seems to fit him and i just keep coming back to lincoln riley and and i don't know that we've seen anything like what he's been able to do. In terms of of really getting the best out of this position yeah user friendly to the extreme and i think what's really interesting to here's your three buried distinct personality. All maker runs pretty well. Obviously kyla runs really well. In jalen hurts bigger dude who runs well with the personalities are really really really different. I think to make them all fit is impressive how he gets guys comfortable and remember. The first guys were transfers and they sat out a year. <hes> ah jalen just got there in the spring hit the ground running also new offense of line. I think i've said this a couple of four. I think the best kept secret in in major college. Football is attached to lincoln riley and that's bill meanwhile the offense a line coach they only had one guy back and what what he does not just develop and his guys but also in the way they scheme scheme up some stuff in the run game. That's a lot of beedon law and riley working together and i i just don't think <hes> he probably gets enough credit for what he does but but lincoln's lincoln's ability to attack defenses and get people off balance with things it just like he always has a lot of interesting little wrinkles and i think that's what that makes jason berry different from the other guys but leach does what leads does and he does a really adds stuff because he doesn't want to take anything away from the system lincoln field because always adding stuff and he makes it where it's pretty seamless and how able to get these guys to grasp but this is really early. I know it's just one week into the season but it just kind of begs the question you know three years from now five years from now is lincoln riley still is he still in norman at that time in your opinion or do you think this is eventually going to get to the point where he wants to scratch an niche and then go try. It tried out the next level eventually. I think we'll get to that point. I don't think he's there now for a couple of reasons one. He has a really young family family that they've gotten settled in there too. I think he knows he's got a great situation. He's got the best in college football. He works for joe castiglione. I think he sees an opportunity to really make an imprint in college football what he can do there and i think he knows that the n._f._l. Is going to be there. <hes> you know five years yes from now. I think what if you're him you're pretty close to to ask a real shot to win some rings and i'm talking to national titles not no big ten title the big twelve titles and the addition alex grinch as a defensive coordinator now. This is his staff. I don't wanna say that you know. He didn't feel any sense of ownership. When when mike stoops bob's brother was running off run on the defense but i do feel like there is h window here and again you know he he recruited at quarterback. Who's a freshman from arizona spencer rattler who is a really good fit. I mean it feels like almost everybody. If you have talent is a good fit for what lincoln's gonna do 'cause is he gonna fit it to you but i think i think he's gonna be there for the run of at least wherever happens in the next four or five years with these recruits and then i would see i would not be are you surprised if he jumped but i would i would. I would be surprised if he jumped within the next year or so. Well might have to wait for them the n._f._l. Might have to wait for him. I should say but i know one thing. I guarantee you that these these oklahoma games aren't just being watched around college football guarantee. There's n._f._l. Teams in n._f._l. Off of coordinators studying what lincoln's do him because he seems to got a couple of good <hes> wrinkles each and every time you see this oklahoma team play a couple of other quarterbacks want to hit on before we get over some other guys from from these four what stood it out to you.

lincoln riley Football n._f._l general manager lincoln football houston bruce feldman Feldman bruce stanford jalen baseball oklahoma peter king seahawks arizona notre dame
"jason berry" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"jason berry" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Care giver Landeskog was on side not that game that was that was the biggest move that the ad was made up until about five minutes ago are they get you in as the schoolboy work on it Donskoy from the San Jose Sharks not be a trade days sign in as a free agent fifteen goals last year coming off of his best year I in the NHL so some depth signing there they also land can we call him P. ET is that okay sure why P. E. P. E. Bellaire Bellemare bell where P. E. Bellmare who was Amy I think it was the third line center for the night's this past year they signed him to replace Carl Soderberg at a much much nicer number and then it five minutes ago are we giving Dan Rosen full credit for this report yells Dan Rosen is reporting that the ABS have dealt hi Jason berry Alex Kerr for in a sixth round pick in twenty twenty four Naseem Khan jury care is a Callie Rosen or kale I will always care no ale yeah kale rose in in a third round pick in twenty twenty Colorado also gonna take on half of berries remaining salary I as part of the transaction and this is a significant move wall I did kind of hope that the ads would just like have the best blue line ever with all the moves they have made both through the draft and and over the last few years and in the choir and other guys through trades and stuff like that that they have to just keep everybody but this is the way the world works when you make a trade you have to give up something to get something and the ads are now dealing from a position of strength on the blue line with my car and Johnson in by room X. Severa I and they needed desperately someone to anchor a sending second line now over sun Cotchery slides in there as the second line center you can have a cannon and Rantanen who obviously will be back for the Colorado Avalanche next year and for many years to come you have the two of them as they do on the top line then you can go the second line and have Landeskog with Cotchery and then you give Tyson Joe's the third line and you say here you go young fella we've cleared the deck Alex Kerr foot is gone Carl Soderberg is gone the bell mayor is going to be our checking fourth line and you get a run the third line I like the way that this adds rosters shaping up I still think they need to help in between the pipes if not to replace or so plant Philip group our which really Bobrovsky was the only man that was going to do that on the market they got to find a back up I think I don't think Povel Frank whose is ready to be a backup goaltender at the NHL level there are guys that are still out there they are being snatched up the the bad wheels the Blackhawks took robin Lehner you have semi on Varlaam off not that any of us wanted him back but he goes to the islanders and Bobrovsky going to Florida he was the big goal tender on the market and our old Colorado College friend Curtis mackel any will go I am back up vassal last year and die in Tampa so there aren't a lot of guys left on the market but there are some that would be worthy of being second string behind group our and I still think that that is something that the ABS need to do but I like this move I think it makes the ABS bad terror which is why teams need to do because if you're not better you are getting worse and right on cue story number two.

Landeskog five minutes
"jason berry" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"jason berry" Discussed on KOMO

"ABC news. You probably want to eat healthy, but getting enough organic fruits and vegetables into your diet every day is not only time consuming. It's expensive. That's why at Texas SuperFood. We've created a blend of the best USDA organic vine-ripened fruits and vegetables, powerful enzymes in probiotics and energizing herbs all in a convenient capsule or powder. We call it Texas SuperFood complete organic. Hi, I'm naturopathic doctor Dennis black. And I invented Texas SuperFood almost twenty years ago with one goal in mind to help people like you who lead busy lives. Get the all natural nutrition that every one of us needs and deserves. So if you can't won't you don't eat all your Ganic fruits and vegetables every day. Texassuperfood complete organic makes eating healthy easy CR full line of quality, nutritional products at Texas SuperFood dot com or call us at eight five, five, Texas, fifty five that's eight five five Texas, fifty five Texas SuperFood dot com. Reaction coming into the steps taken by American Catholic bishops on how to deal with clergy sex abuse. Here's ABC, Sherry Preston. Jason berry, who's written extensively about the pre sex abuse scandal says the move this week in Baltimore shows the bishops are in deep mode of self-protection the bishops did approve new steps to deal more strongly with clergy misconduct, including setting up a hotline for people to call or write in with concerns. It'll be run by an outside entity. But once bishops are informed of the allegations. There's no specific procedure in place for informing law enforcement, and that critics say is just a continuation of leading the church police itself. Sherry Preston, ABC news. Injuries runaway golf cart at a major golf tournaments, as ABC's Chuck Sivertsen, a golf cart used by.

Texas ABC Sherry Preston USDA Dennis black Chuck Sivertsen Jason berry Baltimore twenty years
"jason berry" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"jason berry" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Preston about what these steps are also the effects does ongoing sex-abuse crisis is having, especially on the Catholic community. We'll probably one of the biggest things that they have done is they have set up a national hotline. It'll be operated by yet to be chosen independent entity field allegations of abuse and cover up by bishops and, and, and this is something that people have been calling for, but even that doesn't go far enough, because what the way it will work is a national hotline again. It'll be operated by now tied vendor for Catholics to call right? With complaints that they have the hotline gets that report, it will go then to a Bishop who will be responsible for reporting it to law enforcement and to the Vatican, and bringing lay people in if they choose were saying you should bring people in from the very beginning, and there were certain people who were saying, look there should be no intermediate. When you find out about this, you should automatically call the police, there should be one interview, and it should be done by professionals as for the bishops. They say that this is a very good first step. Maybe they can have other discussions in the future. But for now that is what the bishops of doing talk to us more about this coming national hotline. Do we have a time line, at this point, there's no time line at this point, the idea is to publicize information of how people could make accusations and crooked a matter is whether or not, it will include the lay people who could actually investigate the timeline is the idea is, you would call up, you could write in, or you could actually inform them and say, this is what's going on one person. I, I know that people in Boston are very familiar with Jason berry, who's written several books about the Catholic church of this abuse scandal. And what he said, is this is a group of men accustomed to regulation, as they know it in the democratic the new policy show that they are still in the mode of self protection. And that's the question that you have to get past. It's like are we going to require them to call the police to? Call in a professional who can look this up. Some say good first steps, but they don't go far enough. How has this sex abuse crisis effect Catholics here in the US, their habits their insights, what inside do we have from the recent Pew Research Center survey? Yeah, if you look the Pew Research recently did a really extensive study, talking about Americans and how they see the Catholic sex abuse, one quarter of all, US, Catholics say that they had scaled back mass attendance, and they have scaled back on donations or stop donating to the church and response to recent reports of sex abuse and misconduct. Something that is obviously rocked the church, the church is trying to get under control. These.

Catholic church US Pew Research Jason berry Pew Research Center Catholic community Preston Boston one quarter
"jason berry" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

11:15 min | 2 years ago

"jason berry" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Released and blue the socks off of expectations expectations around two and a half percent came in at three point two percent. That is an awesome beat. It's a huge beat. And you know, for the for the Trump fans out there, you can honestly take a look at this GDP report and attributed fair bit of it to trade policy. Trade was the main thing that bumped this GDP number up a little bit it. It wasn't consumer spending. It wasn't you know, some some random little impact that happened here there. It was largely be as exports jumped while imports contracted now, if you're gonna take the contrarian view here, you're gonna say well that can't last forever. You know, if we get rid of some of these trade tariffs with China than that number is going to, you know, reach back, and then we'll be around two percent again. But you know, what I'll take solid GDP while we can get it. I mentioned earlier one one issue that I'm taking with the commentary of the White House. Houses economic advisor. Larry cudlow coming out this morning and saying, hey, you know, what inflation is too low. We need to cut rates still the fed needs to cut rates in spite of three and a half percent GDP or three point two percent GDP quarter. I really take a big issue without give me more sugar. Yeah. You're saying, you know, hey, GPA was three point two percent. And there's no inflation. Well, we want some inflation. So we're gonna lower interest rate. So if you guys want to invest your money in CD's pay you less than at the same time all the cost of goods is going to go up. So screw you American saver one. Other thing I'd mention about GDP as somebody who's fairly skeptical about the value of a lot that our federal government. Does remember all the hand wringing about how the federal government shutdown? That's gonna kill the economy. It's going to take all this out of GDP. It's like, no, Nope. Didn't do that. At all. Incorrect. Amazon reported earnings that revenue was about in line with expectations which was a bit of a disappointment. Quite frankly, they only grew their revenue at seventeen percent year over year, which frames on is not a terribly great number. However, they beat their profit expectations by fifty percent earnings per share expected to come in at four dollars and seventy two cents. They came in at seven dollars and nine cents per share. A massive earnings beat revenue as we mentioned was about in line still impressive. This is a company that has gone from producing revenue of four point one billion dollars back in awaits. And they're up to nearly sixty billion dollars in a quarter in revenue at this point in time. So still impressive growth but slowing down. And it begs the question, you know, what is the next move for Amazon. What are they trying to do at this point to continue that sort of revenue growth your way to younger? Remember this? The hot thing in the late nineteen sixties was conglomerates. You know, ITT and an essentially grandfather worked for ITT Amazon has it looks in many ways like a conglomerate for the twenty twenties, and that's just going to put together a bunch of different businesses. It's going to figure out how to do them better than the incumbents in. It's just going to keep killing people. I was saying last hour essentially these days, you take any industry, even I could see Amazon I can see an Amazon way to get into oil exploration and natural gas production. Or I mean, there's been hints that they might start buying gas stations that that's not quite into exploration budget. They've talked about so Amazon Amazon web services, you think about a business. It's all about crunching trillions of pieces of geological data. Yeah. It could be impressive. The newest announcement regards Amazon, they're gonna be porn eight hundred million dollars of the next quarter into expanding one day delivery for a whole lot of their products, which for me, usually isn't that big of an issue. But honest to God, I can see a lot of people signing up for this. Because they say I used to still go to CVS I used to still go to WalMart. It used still go to the grocery store for certain items with one day delivery. I don't need to do that anymore. I'm going to finally start paying that one hundred ten hundred twenty dollar annual fee and be an Amazon prime membership be an Amazon prime member. Which is frankly what Amazon's really rooting for when they when they are existing as a company, that's what's really driving their prophecies this. We had a poll question out on our website today. It's about a businesses accepting or not accepting cash and the poll question out on financial exchange, show dot com should businesses be required to accept cash as a form of payment. Yes, or no, I recognized by the way, I. I fully recognize we've got a few texts about this on the program that not accepting cash is a form of payment. Does you know effectively make all of your transactions tracked? If if you're trying to hide transaction if you're trying to, you know, just not be tracked by your credit card company or Google or the federal government than credit cards kind of ruins that in spite of that. I don't think businesses should be prohibited from rejecting cash. Don't think businesses should be prohibiting. They should be allowed to sit. We're not accepting cash. So what about the unbagged what about very low income people about homeless people? What about people that just want to protect their privacy? I get it. Don't shop at that store. Now. There are certain things that I think you need to accept legal tender for it says right on there on the currency that it's legal tender must be used to accept pay all debts. So obviously, if you're going to Bank, and you have to pay off your loan. They have to accept cash, and I think same goes for some basic purchases that you must make. But if I'm a I'm a specialty store, I'm an apple store. Why do I have to accept cash? We're going to get the I think you're in the crosshairs of the American Civil Liberties union push this too hard. Yep. Fair. And clearly I'm on the wrong side of this because every municipality saying back off companies you have to accept cash WalMart had a big bid to to create the largest UK grocery store there as a group was going to be combining with with another grocery store out there. Jason's berry been rejected by UK regulators. So all marts kind of out there without an idea of what to do at this point. Although if you're WalMart, and you look at the entire world. I can't imagine that the UK market really adds up to all that much. I would look at this kind of a bad signal for, you know, WalMart expanding in Europe, generally. But yeah, this will not be the undoing of the WalMart. Not too tight up. Jason's now when I read this story, I think this came out like a year ago, maybe six months ago that they were trying to get rid of this this branch. It really seemed to me like this is a distraction. We need to get rid of this and go focus somewhere else that we can focus on India's that we can focus on competing with Amazon, really. And unfortunately, it's going to distract management from perhaps more important areas of of their business Deutsche Bank on the other hand been I would say the most struggling another not a US based Bank. But most troubling large Bank that does business in the United States there talks with rival Commerzbank have fallen apart at this point. And they're not going to be merging which seems to be motivated by. German national pride to no small part. You know, deutscher wins a, you know, it's kind of sick Bank. And if a went up getting bought or, you know, falls apart in a way that allows Chinese banks American banks, French banks UK banks expanded Germany that will be wounding to national pride. Something fascinating in the strait of the Wall Street Journal, they have a six percent perpetual bond that is now trading at a big discount eighty-seven point nine euros. Yeah. And so that's essentially a six point eight percent permanent yield. You soon the Georgia banks can still honored fifteen years. Correct. Is a reason for. But that I could say for the short term six point eight percent, guaranteed from a giant German Bank. I would if I were portfolio manager I would think twice about is that a good again too. Yeah, I suppose I I get nervous about I mean at this point without some ratifying. This company is going to have to pi- cut their investment Bank people. I think they have to raise capital, they're gonna have to do something to raise capital that was the attempt with Commerce Bank is to form a larger company and have some access to capital that's not happening for your Bank stock price over the last five years gone from forty plus dollars down to you right now training eight dollars and sixteen cents down two and a quarter percent today too. So. Not great news for Deutsche Bank. I really don't see how they get out of this either without some sort of capital influx on I'm pretty nervous about deutchebanks big operations going forward. Japodlay you fully. That looks I wanna full body Clinton. Yeah. Nope. I'm half. Mexican. And I hate Mexican food love to pull a loco man, by the way. Or Anna's I love Anna's too. But a lot of people didn't realize that you police stock was I believe the second best performer and the S and P five hundred year today, they were up some sixty odd percent through through early this year. That's what happens when you poison and sick and people and your stock gets pounded, and then it slowly recovers. I mean, not that slowly covered pretty darn quickly. But nonetheless, they, you know, the stock was down this morning. And apparently investors are shaking it off. But the company has revealed in an SEC filing that it received a new subpoena from the US federal prosecutors just eight days ago requesting more information tied to exactly what we were talking about all the people getting the full body cleanse from Chippewa illnesses. Trace back to Simi valley, California, Los Angeles, sterling Virginia and Boston when a little more about exactly were where they think this was the Cleveland circle incident. Or if this is a different chip. So my question is. What is what are the investigating? I mean, what do they need to find out here about these illnesses? Are they going to shut down the company? It's not like they didn't disclose them. Can they change their operations? I I don't understand what they're going after here. It's it's curious to think what federal prosecutors going after is it some sort of, you know, willful refusal to notify health are whatever that's that's the only thing that would make sense to me is did you intentionally try and avoid disclosing this at a few locations that had happened in more places than you didn't disclose it to investors and to well, then the SEC would be investigating them rather than just federal prosecutors. I'm confused about conspiracy to commit mass diarrhea federal crime. Yeah. Barely stock. Still up today though. Stocks up one percent, I think it was down yesterday, but stocks backup. Yeah. It was actually down down pretty big yesterday down from seven eleven down to six sixty. So big drop yesterday. We are going to take a quick break when we come back. Shroud me and from Zacks investment research talking to us about the earning season, thus far stay tuned right here to the oh, wait. We're also gonna be playing trivia, I almost missed it so Cheryl is gonna join us, and they were gonna be doing some trivia,.

Amazon WalMart Deutsche Bank UK United States ITT Amazon fed China Jason SEC White House Larry cudlow Trump advisor American Civil Liberties union Wall Street Journal Google German Bank
"jason berry" Discussed on Z104

Z104

08:08 min | 3 years ago

"jason berry" Discussed on Z104

"Jason berry author of the new book city of a million dreams. A history of New Orleans at year three hundred the history of race relations in any southern city is likely to be difficult and New Orleans is no exception. I asked Jason if the fact that the funeral of Jefferson Davis, the president of the confederacy was held in the city was a turning point for those relations. Yeah. Jefferson Davis was a massive funeral in eighteen ninety two. Really what's interesting about these funerals is how they changed and how the changes reflected the way the city was changing. I would even go back farther to eighteen sixty three in the middle of the civil war. New Orleans spell early eighteen sixty two Admiral Farragut came up the river and captured the city and for several years. It was quite well governed under the Anki generals, most of the historians. Concur in that regard. And there was a black an African American troop called the Louisiana native guard who fought against the south one of their leaders. Andrei Cayo was a rather courageous captain who was killed at the battle of port Hudson near Baton Rouge and his body lay on that field for almost. Six weeks by the time his remains such as they were came back. The funeral for Kayo was one of the largest the city to that point had ever seen. And it was the first for an African American with marching bands some thirty seven benevolent society's burial societies. And so it was a signal to the white Creoles and to the other ethnic whites that the African Americans were now a culture on the rise. And in the years after the war, the civil war became rebranded as the lost cause how did that affect the city's history? Profoundly. So the lost cause was basically a mythology that spread across the south. It was a determined effort by former confederate officers and soldiers to cast the war as this noble undertaking, not about slavery, but over economic differences and putting up these statues too. Confederate soldiers was a way of immortalizing the nobility of this war. And and the way it was taught in school books. The way in which they regain power was through vigilante tactics. I wouldn't even use the word Justice lynching became one of the main tools in securing white supremacy across the south as all of this was happening in the late eighteen eighties forty thousand black folk moved over the twenty year period, culminating in nineteen hundred moved in to New Orleans and brought with them the traditions of rural church worship with jubilee dancing with ecstatic rituals, and is that music along with the blues. Current was absorbed by brass bands. The black brass bands, the music change the old spinal column, you might say of military marches for funerals began to loosen. Show more improvisation and adaptation and the funerals reflected that by the early nineteen hundreds there were huge gatherings of people industry for these black funerals and the police at that point we're very reluctant to arrest people because these were religious processions, even though the brass pants were blowing probing pretty buoyantly. So you find rituals like that threading through the annals of the town and to me they hold a mirror. They're like caravans have memory about a given moment in time. Well, I didn't write this question. And I'm not sure who did. But I'm going to ask it anyway, digest invent New Orleans or New Orleans invent jazz. Oh, my that's one of the hardest questions I've ever been asked. Well, I would put it this way chess arose here because of the unique social composition of the city. The map of the world neighborhoods that were here where this African Idi African American idiom of the poly rhythms of yesteryear, melding with European melody and instrumentation caused the birth of jazz. It is a an African American idiom. But no sooner had that happened. Then there were Jews and talian and Irish and German musicians in this city that was teeming with brass bands. And so there was this rich musical exchange that began which I don't know it's arguable whether something like that could have happened in in New York or Chicago or other large cities. But I think the main ingredient that distinct. Finished it. Here was the role of the Creoles the black Creoles, many of whom were music professors and engaged the darker African Americans who did not know how to play but played improvisational by year. And it's that coming together of the improvisational music, and the formally trained sounds of clarinetist and trumpeters and even pianist who feel one pattern and take it and absorb it into another. And I think it happened here because of the society, well, there's no way we can end this without talking about Katrina. Ten years after Katrina l'amour almost fifteen years after Katrina. Now how much has this rebooted this city? Well, it's important to remember that eighty percent of the city was underwater an average level of four feet. I had many friends who lost their homes and belongings. My wife, and I were quite fortunate. Our house did not flood, but one of my close friends, Michael white, clarinetist and composer lost everything five thousand CDs. Four thousand books all of his sheet music, and I did an entire chapter on him. Because to me he represents a sort of New Orleans every man in what he had to do to rebuild not just his career, but his life and he managed to prevail. He did it quite beautifully. He's done a number of CD's since then. So it was a long aching struggle. We got a real boost when Landry was elected mayor in two thousand ten he managed to access a great deal of federal money for rebuilding the infrastructure, but the town came back because the people were determined to return whether their houses were destroyed or not and reclaim their piece of the world, many musicians who suffered terrible losses nevertheless managed to come back and rebuild. And I think it's really a testimony to the resilience of the people that the city today is quite robust. We are probably eighty thousand fewer people than we were before the storm. It's about I guess three hundred and eighty thousand population. Now that said it's becoming a city of the young. It's attracting young people to the digital economy to the film industry. The restaurant. What's the art scene? So, you know, New Orleans is a comeback story for which America can be proud again. The name of Jason berries, new book is city of a million dreams. A history of New Orleans at three hundred. You travel a bit south of.

New Orleans Jefferson Davis Jason berry African American troop Admiral Farragut president New York Katrina Louisiana Jason berries Andrei Cayo Kayo Michael white port Hudson Baton Rouge America Landry
"jason berry" Discussed on Z104

Z104

08:08 min | 3 years ago

"jason berry" Discussed on Z104

"Is Jason berry, author of the new book city of a million dreams a history of New Orleans that year three hundred the history of race relations in any southern city is likely to be difficult and New Orleans is no exception. I asked Jason if the fact that the funeral of Jefferson Davis, the president of the confederacy was held in the city was a turning point for those relations. Yeah. Jefferson Davis was a massive funeral in eighteen ninety two. Really what's interesting about these funerals is how they changed and how the changes reflected the way the city was changing. I would even go back farther to eighteen sixty three in the middle of the civil war. New Orleans spell early eighteen sixty two Admiral Farragut came up the river and captured the city and for several years. It was quite well governed under the general's most of the historians, you know, concur in that regard. And there was a black an African American troop called the Louisiana native guard who fought against the south one of their leaders. Andre Cayo was a rather courageous captain who was killed at the battle of port Hudson near Baton Rouge and his body lay on that field for almost. Six weeks by the time his remains such as they were came back. The funeral for Kayo was one of the largest the city to that point had ever seen. And it was the first for an African American with marching bands some thirty seven benevolent society's burial societies. And so it was a signal to the white Creoles and to the other ethnic whites that the African Americans were now culture on the rise. And in the years after the war, the civil war became rebranded as the lost cause how did that affect the city's history? Profoundly. So the lost cause was basically a mythology that spread across the south. It was a determined effort by former confederate officers and soldiers to cast the war as this noble undertaking, not about slavery, but over economic differences and putting up these statues too. Confederate soldiers was a way of immortalizing the nobility of this war. And and the way it was taught in school books. The way in which they regain power was through vigilante tactics. I wouldn't even use the word Justice lynching became one of the main tools in securing white supremacy across the south as all of this was happening in the late eighteen eighties forty thousand black folk moved over the twenty year period, culminating in nineteen hundred moved in to New Orleans and brought with them the traditions of rural church worship with jubilee dancing with ecstatic rituals, and is that music along with the blues. Current was absorbed by brass bands. The black brass bands, the music change the old spinal column, you might say military marches for funerals began to loosen and. Show more improvisation and adaptation and the funerals reflected that by the early nineteen hundreds there were huge gatherings of people industry for these black funerals and the police at that point we're very reluctant to arrest people because these were religious processions, even though the brash pants were blowing froing pretty buoyantly. So you find rituals like that threading through the annals of the town and to me they hold a mirror. They're like caravans of memory about a given moment in time. Well, I didn't write this question. And I'm not sure who did. But I'm going to ask it anyway, digest invent New Orleans or did New Orleans invent jazz. Oh, my that's one of the hardest questions I've ever been asked. Well, I would put it this way jazz arose here because of the unique social composition of the city. The map of the world neighborhoods that were here where this African Idi African American idiom of the poly rhythms of yesteryear, melding with European melody and instrumentation caused the birth of jazz. It is a African American idiom. But no sooner had that happened. Then there were Jews and Italians and Irish and German musicians in this city that was teeming with brass bands. And so there was this rich musical exchange that began which I don't know it's arguable whether something like that could have happened in in New York or Chicago or other large cities. But I think the main ingredient that distinguished it. Here was the role of the Creoles the black Creoles, many of whom were music professors and engaged the darker African Americans who did not know how to play but. Played improvisational by year. And it's that coming together of the improvisational music, and the formally trained sounds of clarinetist and trumpeters and even pianists who feel one pattern and take it and absorb it into another. And I think it happened here because of the society. Well, there's no way we can end this without talking about Katrina. Ten years after Katrina l'amour almost fifteen years after Katrina. Now how much has this rebooted this city? Well, it's important to remember that eighty percent of the city was underwater in an average level of four feet. I had many friends who lost their homes and belongings. My wife, and I were quite fortunate. Our house did not flood, but one of my close friends, Michael white, clarinetist and composer lost everything five thousand CDs. Four thousand books all of his sheet music, and I did an entire chapter on him. Because to me he represents a sort of New Orleans every man in what he had to do to rebuild not just his career, but his life and he managed to prevail. He did it quite beautifully. He's done a number of CD's since then. So it was a long aching struggle. We got a real boost when Landry was elected mayor in two thousand ten he managed to access a great deal of federal money for rebuilding the infrastructure, but the town came back because the people were determined to return whether their houses were destroyed or not and reclaim their piece of the world, many musicians who suffered terrible losses nevertheless managed to come back and rebuild. And I think it's really a testimony to the resilience of the people that the city today is quite robust. We are probably eighty thousand fewer people than we were before the storm. It's about I guess three hundred eighty thousand population. Now that said it's becoming a city of the young. It's attracting young people to the digital economy to the film industry. The restaurant. What's the art scene? So, you know, New Orleans is a comeback story for which America can be proud again. The name of Jason berries, new book is city of a million dreams. A history of New Orleans at year three hundred. You travel a.

New Orleans Jefferson Davis Jason berry African American troop Admiral Farragut Jason president New York Katrina Louisiana Jason berries Kayo Andre Cayo Michael white port Hudson Baton Rouge America
"jason berry" Discussed on Z104

Z104

08:08 min | 3 years ago

"jason berry" Discussed on Z104

"Jason berry author of the new book city of a million dreams. A history of New Orleans at year three hundred the history of race relations in any southern city is likely to be difficult and New Orleans is no exception. I asked Jason if the fact that the funeral of Jefferson Davis, the president of the confederacy was held in the city was a turning point for those relations. Yeah. Jefferson Davis was a massive funeral in eighteen ninety two. Really what's interesting about these funerals is how they changed and how the changes reflected the way the city was changing. I would even go back farther to eighteen sixty three in the middle of the civil war. New Orleans spell early eighteen sixty two Admiral Farragut came up the river and captured the city and for several years. It was quite well governed under the Anki. General's most of the historians. Concur in that regard. And there was a black an African American troop called the Louisiana native guard who fought against the south one of their leaders. Andrei Cayo was a rather courageous captain who was killed at the battle of port Hudson near Baton Rouge and his body lay on that field for almost six weeks by the time his remains such as they were came back. The funeral for Kayo was one of the largest the city to that point had ever seen. And it was the first for an African American with marching bands some thirty seven benevolent society's burial societies. And so it was a signal to the white Creoles and to the other ethnic whites that the African Americans were now culture on the rise. And in the years after the war the civil war became rebranded as the lost cause. Ause how did that affect the city's history? Profoundly. So the lost cause was basically a mythology that spread across the south. It was a determined effort by former confederate officers and soldiers to cash the war as this noble undertaking, not about slavery, but over economic differences and putting up the statues to confederate soldiers was a way of immortalizing the nobility of this war. And and the way it was taught in school books the way in which they regained power was through vigilante tactics. I wouldn't even use the word Justice lynching became one of the main tools in securing white supremacy across the south as all of this was happening in the late eighteen eighties forty thousand black folk moved over the twenty year period culminating in nineteen hundred moved in to New Orleans and brought with them. These traditions of rural church worship with jubilee dancing with ecstatic rituals, and is that music along with the blues. Current was absorbed by brass bands. The black brass bands, the music change the old spinal column, you might say of military marches for funerals began to loosen and show more improvisation and adaptation and the funerals reflected that by the early nineteen hundreds there were huge gatherings of people industry for these black funerals and the police at that point we're very reluctant to arrest people because these were religious processions, even though the brash pants were blowing throwing pretty buoyantly. So you find rituals like that threading through the annals of the town and to me they hold a mirror. They're like caravans of memory. About a given moment in time. Well, I didn't write this question. And I'm not sure who did. But I'm going to ask it anyway, digest invent New Orleans or did New Orleans invent jazz. Oh, my that's one of the hardest questions I've ever been asked. Well, I would put it this way jazz arose here because of the unique social composition of the city. The map of the world neighborhoods that were here where this African Idi African American idiom of the poly rhythms of yesteryear, melding with European melody and instrumentation caused the birth of jazz. It is an African American idiom. But no sooner had that happened. Then there were Jews and Italians and Irish and German musicians in the city that was teeming with brass bands. And so there was this rich musical exchange that began which I don't know. I it's arguable whether something like that could have happened in in New York or Chicago or other large cities. But I think the main ingredient that distinguished it. Here was the role of the Creoles the black Creoles, many of whom were music professors and engaged the darker African Americans who did not know how to play but played improvisational by year. And it's that coming together of the improvisational music, and the formally trained sounds of clarinetist and trumpeters and even pianists who feel one pattern and take it and absorb it into another. And I think it happened here because of the society, well, there's no way we can end this without talking about Katrina. Ten years after Katrina l'amour almost fifteen years after Katrina. Now how much has this rebooted this city? Well, it's important to remember that eighty percent of the city was underwater an average level of four feet. I had many friends who lost their homes and belongings. My wife, and I were quite fortunate. Our house did not flood, but one of my close friends, Michael white, clarinetist and composer lost everything five thousand CDs. Four thousand books all of his sheet music, and I did an entire chapter on him. Because to me he represents a sort of New Orleans every man in what he had to do to rebuild not just his career, but his life and he managed to prevail. He did quite beautifully. He's done a number of CD's since then. So it was a long aching struggle. We got a real boost when Landry was elected mayor in two thousand ten he managed to access a great deal of federal money for rebuilding the infrastructure, but the town came back because the people were determined to return whether their houses were destroyed or not and reclaim their piece of the world, many musicians who suffered terrible losses nevertheless managed to come back and rebuild. And I think it's really a testimony to the resilience of the people that the city today is quite robust. We are probably eighty thousand fewer people than we were before the storm. It's about I guess three hundred and eighty thousand population. Now that said it's becoming a city of the young. It's attracting young people to the digital economy to the film industry. The rest. The art scene. So, you know, New Orleans is a comeback story for which America can be proud again. The name of Jason berries, new book is city of a million dreams. A history of New Orleans at three hundred. You travel a bit.

New Orleans Jefferson Davis Jason berry African American troop Admiral Farragut president Katrina New York Louisiana Jason berries Andrei Cayo Kayo Michael white port Hudson Baton Rouge America Landry
"jason berry" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

07:39 min | 3 years ago

"jason berry" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"With us. On the fan. The Sunday voting and avoiding everybody. This is Bob Solter remove into the home stretch segment of our program hits. Ed Randall has long talk baseball after nine o'clock update Rick wolf the sports edge after eight o'clock update on the fan. Jason berry is an American investigative reporter who's based in New Orleans. He's been talking with us in our seven o'clock hour of our program. I mentioned that the beginning of our discussion with him he's known for pioneering investigative reporting on sexual abuse. But in our discussion today is talking with us about say new book entitled city of a million dreams. A history of New Orleans certainly has a passion for New Orleans. Having been born raised in the city now for a lot of people you say New Orleans, and the first thought that comes to mind those images of Katrina that we've mentioned thus far in our discussion. But. For you. On a personal level. What was it like for you? When you returned home after Katrina. Oh well. My wife, and I were quite fortunate in that our home did not flood as I said earlier eighty percent of the city took water at an average level of four feet. I spent weeks driving around at night in neighborhoods that were completely dark, no electricity. Ghost towns. I began reporting writing a lot about various events following city. Government is it slowly began to come together. I did wonder many times. Whether we were destined to be a broken, mud town Nagin the mayor at that time played the race card and getting reelected till black people. We've gotta keep city hall anyone with help from Jesse Jackson. And Al Sharpton, many people believed that he had had some sort of nervous breakdown. And I do to this day based on all sorts of information. He his second term was surreal. It was he was so detached from what real governing entails. He was a narcissist. Many politicians are but he was a narcissist. Who didn't know what to do and other than try to get himself on television? He's now in prison for. You know, trying to extort money. I mean, the guy was just a mess and. Through that period from I guess what two thousand six to two thousand ten the signs of decay and broken. We're everywhere even as people began to rebuild and come back, you know, with federal programs that offset insurance did not cover everything. I I often wondered what our future was. But I think like a lot of people here. I you know, I didn't have to do much. But in following what other people had to do. It was a deeply sobering experience. And in the end, I think when Landru ran and got elected the whole people had was he delivered. I mean, he managed to get the federal government because the levees were federally managed and broke. It really was a federal disaster. And so Obama. Got behind him. And the city it helped his sister was US Senator at the time Mary Landrieu and the money flowed and the infrastructure was very slowly rebuilt stopped to say, we still don't have problems with the city is is far better. I would say on balance and it's been in decades. And when you talk about your work. One of the things that we have to mention of mentioned the fact we're talking with Jason berry who's the author of city of a million dreams a history of New Orleans at year three hundred he joined us by phone on her program. You were also producing a movie on jazz funerals. I understand. That's correct. What's that project? It's only taken twenty years. What's it like how much time? Well, I began I began filming jazz funerals in the late nineties with a grant from the Ford Foundation. And at the time, I was interested in two things. I wanted to understand where they came from just as a research matter and the book, I originally envisioned. Whoa about that point of origin. How did this? How did this remarkable tradition of people playing music and dancing in the streets for the dead? How did it arise? But there was another reason why I got interested in it. And that was because with so many youngsters dying in the crack wars and drug wars the cracks funerals were so different from the time honored processional that I had seen and and the the combination of beauty and a sort of ecstatic dancing, you know, after the cemetery. The this variant this branch off the trunk of funeral. So to speak was much rougher hard edge body language, and it was musicians who told me about this traditional jazzman who aboard what was going on. The fact that younger bands were not wearing uniforms, and and not playing religious music. It was being sort of stripped of its religious essence. So those two things that got me interested, and I kept working on the. Book and raising money as I could to keep shooting. I when the flood hit in two thousand five the whole project went I won't say belly up, but it was up ended because Michael white clarinetist who occupies a key part in the last portion of the book, he lost everything in his house it flooded up to eight feet and by the time he got back. I followed him with a cameraman, and he'd lost four thousand books five thousand CDs, all of his sheet music and. It was one of the numbing experiences. I've had just following him through the house. He became to me a kind of every man of the city and. We were both dealing with issues as everybody was after the flood for years. And finally, it was about twenty fifteen when I began to get proposals going and got some grant support, and we did a Kickstarter, and we got the film moving again. We're now in in post production. We still have a waste to go. But I think we'll have a rough cut by the spring and hopefully be entering festivals in the fall. Congratulations on the progress with the movie, and certainly congratulations on the publication.

New Orleans Jason berry Ed Randall Katrina Bob Solter investigative reporter Al Sharpton Jesse Jackson Rick wolf Ford Foundation US Obama Nagin Mary Landrieu Landru Michael white Senator eighty percent twenty years
"jason berry" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

12:07 min | 3 years ago

"jason berry" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"He is the author of city of a million dreams a history of New Orleans at year three hundred east joined us by phone on our program. There's so many different areas to potentially go in this discussion. One of the things that New Orleans is very famous for as well that we haven't mentioned thus far mardi gras carnival or mardi gras. How important is that in the history of New Orleans? It's of of pivotal importance because it began as a kind of cluster of celebrations in the well, really. Going back into the Spanish era, colonial era in the late even the French era in in in the eighteenth century, but by by eighteen seventy two it it became a way in which the city could market itself and announced that it had gotten past the bloody civil war. And here was a vacation place for the rest of the country to come to. When you have a king Rex every year going through the streets on a float it it promotes an other worldly fantasy. Well, as it became an engine of the economy drawing in millions of tourists over the years. It's now multibillion dollar enterprise. At the same time. It allowed for a constellation of identity. Pageants whereby not just the wealthy elite. In in the costumes of kings, and queens, but middle-class people from working neighborhoods or African Americans who carried their own cultural memory and used carnival as a stage. I mean, the best example probably are the black Indians of mardi gras. They're also call mardi gras Indians. And they date back to the eighteen eighties as a symbolic drama of resistance. These are the descendants literally of the dancers in Congo square of the early enslaved Africans and adopting the persona and the costume of the native American they perform the resistance dramas. The the outfits now with the many splendor feathers and sequins and beat it patches that you find are fast being recognized as. Hi, examples of folk art several of these costumes now, hang in museums. And so across the society carnival is a way for people to sort of interpret their lives. You can bet your back pay that Roger Goodell will soon be on a carnival float memorialize is the guy who stole the Super Bowl. I did we we we move on. And when you talk about an examination of this book. I mean, it's so character driven one of the questions that naturally comes to mind is. How tough was it deciding who to profile and preps was the tougher situation who not to. Well, let me compliment show on the question. I haven't been asked that yet and it cuts to the marrow. It was very hard to decide who not to include. I when I should add to write the book I wanted. I wanted a historical narrative that did not rely on politics and economics as a way of explaining the city. I I wanted to capture this baroque, multisided popular culture that puts forth the image of the city and to do that. I had to include, you know, politics. I had to include some of the economic dynamics, but I was much more concerned. And in each chapter has two or three people who hold a mirror to the the way in which the city was in its daily life at a given moment. I mean, it would have been easy to do an entire chapter on moon Landrieu who was one of the greatest mayors mitch's father in the nineteen seventies. Or for that matter Chep Morrison who was a glamorous mayor when I was growing up in the nineteen sixties and yet in the long run of history did not fare very well because he didn't do anything to stand against the worst of the segregation forces. So I took a different approach, and that was to find people and develop them in three dimensional texture being scrupulous about the facts. I mean, you know, not inventing dialogue or anything like that. For example, sister Gertrude Morgan was a folk artist whose work now hangs in museums. And if you were lucky enough to find it on the market and her picture sell for substantial figures, she began painting in the nineteen fifties. She thought of herself she was a mystic. She believed that she was a bride of Christ. And God the father and that I compare her to Saint Catherine of Sienna and William Blake the visionary poet. She goes into the city and catches the eye in the late fifties of Larry Bornstein. Here's a wildly colorful art dealer by his own admission. He was arrested three times in Mexico for trying to steal antiquities and ferret them out of the country had to pay bribes to, you know, get out, and he sees her work and likes it and starts reps. This is the ultimate odd. Couple. And. As her work matures. She is inspired by the book of revelation the battle between heaven and hell and the idea of the neutral Roussel is this place where we all go. These soaring images of choirs kind of waving like wheat and the wind. Her work is beautiful. And she's right there at preservation hall when Bornstein it takes his art gallery and opens it up for jazz and soon Alan Jaffe became, you know, born she's partner later took over the hall and these two guys are almost like Jewish uncles. These benevolent figures to this woman who's old enough to be their mother, and they're taking care of her. They're making sure that, you know, her house is, okay. And she is painting up the storm at a time when the freedom riders are coming through and gay bars are starting to. To stop in the payment of bribes to the cops and the costuming of gay mardi gras starting to sprout its wings. It's a whole period of revolutionary ferment that really kind of captures the theme of the book of culture pushing against a repressive legal system in in in due course, segregation fell in fact, one of the reasons it fell was because one reason David Brinkley did an NBC news piece on preservation hall. And here's Allan Jaffe, playing the tuba with a black band against the law and the city government, such as it was realized how can how can we sustain something? What do we do? Do we go punish the guy who was on NBC TV? Well, of course, they didn't. And in time the city changed and Gertrude Morgan was right in the middle of all of that almost like the spirit figure from the past. So I found her much more compelling than the elected officials. Of that time. You had worked with. Mayor MICH Landrieu on his book in the shadow of statues. What was that experience like? Well, it was quite informative and quite pleasant. I had known Mitch for quite a long time. We were we were not close friends. I liked him. I used to see a church now. And again, and we had never actually had a meal together. He called me up one day. And Well, I I did an op Ed piece defending his stance on the statues, and he called me and thanked me and invited me. Down to gal your hall to see the speech. He gave which I went to having no idea. It would be these speech, you know, put him on the map nationally now. I guess I don't know maybe four or five months later, he called me out of the blue one morning and asked if I'd be willing to collaborate help him on on a book he had gotten a contract to do. And I I agree. We came to terms and he would come to my house at five fifteen five thirty in the afternoon driving himself. No city driver. I mean, he was so scrupulous about not doing work on city tied. And but this time he was getting hammered by a lot of these conservatives who were furious about the statues coming down, and I thought he'd put the city on the right side of history. Fortunately, I had done a great deal of reading to that point about the loss cause and I took a brief cul de sac from my own work to help him finish his book. It is his book all the way, I should say he had written a fair portion of it before he came to me. I obviously helped him, you know, with editing and polishing, and and we did long interviews, and then, you know, fuse them together into the narrative, but the you know, the two things that strike me about him. Oh, I is courage and doing something that he knew would lose support among many whites in the state had he never taken the statues down. He would have sailed out of office as the great rebuilder and could have run for the Senate or governor. I think right now among whites in this conservative state. He would have trouble doing that. But the other thing that was so striking to me was his his true concern about youth homicide. He absolutely could not abide by the all of the killings going on not just in the city, but across the country, and he put in place certain programs, try to divert use on the jagged edge. So that they would not be drawn into drugs or guns. That's a hard road. Ho, and you don't find many other big city mayors who make an issue of that as he did. So. I think history will be quite kind to him. I have no idea if he's going to run for governor. I'm not part of his inner circle, we you know, we have occasionally mails things like that. But if he were to run, I think he'd be a formidable candidate Ed Randall is long talking baseball after nine o'clock update. This morning sports edge fellows are eight o'clock update. We are in a discussion with Jason berry on for as the author of city of a million dreams history of do Orleans at ear three hundred more with Jason as we continue here on the fan. Hockey fans. Wouldn't it be great to just put on a t shirt and shorts? No coat hat.

New Orleans Mayor MICH Landrieu Gertrude Morgan NBC Ed Randall Larry Bornstein preservation hall Jason berry Chep Morrison Roger Goodell Allan Jaffe Senate David Brinkley Mexico Hockey Ho Mitch
"jason berry" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

09:25 min | 3 years ago

"jason berry" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Good morning. Welcome to another coffee in culture here on a Saturday afternoon and talk about sixteen one two three seven KTAR. See you're going to go a little bit north Santa Fe today, actually just outside of Los Alamos. New Mexico were talk to Jason lot who has superintendent at Bandelier national monument and Jamie's Attila who is cultural resource manager otherwise known as archaeologists have been national monument. Jason thanks for coming by good afternoon. Thanks for having a good afternoon and Jamie, good issues. Well, nice to meet you. All right. Let's get into kind of some real general things about Bandelier national monument. Not a national park wrecked. That is correct. What are the advantages of being a monument over park if there are any well, yeah. In the public perspective. I think generally the public thinks there's a hierarchy within the National Park Service with national parks on the top and national monuments may be in the lower area. I think what the public thinks including myself, and that's not the case. When you see the word national monument. It actually means how it was created. So a national monument was established by president whereas every other type of national park was established by congress. Gotcha. Generally speaking, they antiquities act that gives the president the authority to establish national monuments. Additionally, national monuments are not just in the National Park Service. You see him at Beale AM, you see in the forest service, and you see it in other land agencies. All right. That's good. To know. It's good information. And we've heard about the antiquities act in the last year and a half quarter bit Gimmie let's get into Bandelier Bandelier has been a national monument for how many years for just about almost one hundred and three years, actually, February eleventh is one hundred and third birthday. No kidding. So not long after New Mexico became a state Bandelier was designated a national monument by president Woodrow Wilson. Okay. With the national forest service originally established as a national monument now, you're part of the NPS we transfer the National Park Service in nineteen thirty two. Okay. I noticed that on your head you guys get to wear the very cool flat brim smokey bear hat. All right. So. A national Monmouth mid for about one hundred one hundred and three years, very very soon. In fact, next or this week is coming week. It is. Can you put a date on? How old bandolier actually is for when it was first inhabited? Right. You know, we see evidence of people using Bandelier the landscape the plateau around it for as long as there have been people in North America. So we don't have any super old habitation sites in Bandelier proper. But we find paleo Indian the earliest people's evidence their points and things in Bandelier in surrounding areas. So yeah, in central folks have been using the the landscape for a very long time. So earliest Indians pay paleo Indians dating back to approximately win probably ten thousand years ago for this area. Yeah. And you and you find tools from ten thousand years ago. We find either fragments of spear points, so casually what we find the the the way the points were made is pretty distinctive is a very fine craft. And when we find these points, they're very distinctive is paleo Indian. So it's made out of in our area. It's obsidian. It can be made. They can be made out of shirt, which is found in the from Sarah pattern. All right. But a lot of obsidian in our area in this block. Right. And those those would have been chipped out created into into a point. Yeah. Yeah. Obsidian is a really great material for making a spear points arrowheads and just utility knives. And things like that it's volcanic glass, and so you can really easily shape it caffeine culture here. Nice Saturday afternoon with Jason Lodden, Jamie Sivota from Bandelier national monument wonderful. Not too far from Santa Fe just outside of Los Alamos. I neglected to mention that my name is Richard Eades. And I'm your host today on coffee culture, Jason tells where Bandelier where people from Santa Fe confined Bandelier if they're new to the area. Now, the the easiest way to find bandoliers head up towards Los Alamos, go up there and you hit highway four travel through white rock. It's about twelve miles past white rock on highway four and you'll see the sign on this side of the road come on in and you'll go down and free holies canyon where visitors center is located. We also have campgrounds seventy miles trails and a lot a lot of time in the backcountry. How many people come approximately per year how many people visit Bandelier national about two hundred and ten thousand get outta here. Really the buildings in Bandelier are also a very unique story about how they came about. And we'll get to that. That as well. But you know, I think for a lot of people that two hundred thousand people that do visit bandolier the majority of those Jason would be coming because it is known as like very early dwelling kind of community like the early early earliest condos. Yes. So we were established primarily for the cultural resources specifically, the ancest- will Pueblo that inhabited the area the earliest structures are very unique caveats. You don't find those types of archaeological or habitation sites really anywhere else in the country. They're very unique. Right. And then just the that landscape on the power Reto plateau right there on site advice called era. It's a very unique place. That's the that's the key to this entire this entire region. Between Bandelier in Poway is vice Caldera is the volcano. So there are actual dwellings in the sides of the cliffs he mentioned Jason berry unique because you don't see to Mesa Verde. You don't see chocolate cannon. You don't see it at Aztec ruins. You don't see basically just just hollowed out parts of the parts of the cliff? The people inhabited made fires in you can still see the smoke or the the carbon from the from the fires. It is very unique. And jamie. Why is that what happened advice Caldera that create? This the various Caldera. The one point two million years ago, and then one point six million years ago, basically ojected all this hot rock ash, and it settled over the existing topography at the time and that hot rock ash came together at welded that in the rock called tough, and it welded together to become more solid. But even after it cooled and welded. It's still a very soft material. So you know, folks utilize that to carve out these dwellings. But yeah, it all started with vice called erupting in a relatively recent erupted twice one point six million years, and then one point two million years. Yeah. Yeah. So we see there's essentially two layers of tough that you see the canyon side and both were across the plateau. Both were you utilized to make these cliff. Dwelling explosion, was it. I think I've been told in the past that it was probably one of the largest explosion bigger than Krakatoa one of the largest explosions in history. By of earth. It was a large explosion a lot of volume of rock came out and geologists have traced this in layers all the way to Oklahoma. I believe so. Yeah, if you were, you know, it's it was pretty pretty big deal. The whole area. Jimmy, you mentioned that it was soft and people could carve in it. The actual case where they carved by humans were they carved by water and erosion over maybe hundreds or one point two million year. They were mostly carved by humans people utilized existing voids and things like that gas voids and stuff that had been trapped in the rock and just enlarge them. Okay. And literally, you know, use tools rocks and things like that sticks to to carve it out and some of the inside some of the cave dwellings, you could still see kind of the cut marks and things like that the Mark from humans, actually Holloway, Johnny bigger. I think people need to realize that that was the start point for these these homes, but you want to explain a little bit about how they built in front of them caves, they're living in they were indeed, we'll get to more detail about the caves, and the kiva and all of the wonderful things abandoned. Lear national monument superintendent Abadan Leers here today Jason lot and the archaeologists cultural resource manager, Jamie Savell, and Jason LA we'll be right back and coffee and culture here on a Saturday afternoon. I'm Richard needs a one on one fuming twelve sixty one.

Bandelier Bandelier national monument Bandelier Bandelier Jason Los Alamos National Park Service Lear national monument Santa Fe jamie president New Mexico Richard Eades superintendent Jason berry Jason Lodden Oklahoma congress Caldera
There are a lot of fish in the sea. Blockchain could help keep track of them.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:50 min | 3 years ago

There are a lot of fish in the sea. Blockchain could help keep track of them.

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by hot cloud storage. If your company is thinking about moving data storage to the cloud, then you need think about with Sabi it's less expensive than just the maintenance on your current on premises storage. See for yourself with free unlimited storage for a month. Go to Assab dot com. Click free trial and use the offer code was Sabi. There are a lot of fish in the sea. Blockchain could help keep track of them from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying. The digital economy I'm jed Kim in for Molly would. Blockchain. It's the buzzword in startups. The digital transaction technology backs, the crypto currencies. We hear so much about, yeah, I'm talking about bitcoin, but business plans abound to give every industry of blockchain makeover. We're talking real estate drug prescriptions. My usual beat as a reporter on marketplace is sustainability and companies in that space. See blockchain as a way to verify every step of product takes Jason. Berry hill is doing that for sustainable seafood. I talked with him about a project called fish coin right now. He says the fishing industry operates in murky waters, seafood supply chains. Unlike many different commodities there very long and fragmented. And because of that, we lose track of where this seafood comes from. You know a lot of the seafood they think is coming from Alaska. It's Alaskan seafood, yes, but it it goes to China, I and it comes back here or elsewhere in Asia in berry hill says, the fix for this problem is data data collected. They reported at every turn. Concerned that seafood really is sustainable. He caught processed and sold, but it hasn't been easy if I may shrimp farmer in Indonesia, or if I'm a wild capture Fisher in in Asia, why am I going to take the extra effort to capture and communicate data about the seafood when it has zero impact on my lively enter fish coin boat captains shrimp farmers, warehouse workers, and others can get digital tokens in exchange for a reporting where they got their product and who they ended it off to. They can exchange this virtual currency for something of actual value credit on their cell phones. Each fish coin transaction is recorded on the blockchain, a shared leisure that is open, transparent and controlled by no one in particular. Berryhill says that last part is important because sustainable business depends on trust. I was at a conference recently, the global aquaculture alliance, and it has a lot of the major players in the in the seafood industry there. And I was on a panel and I was very. Thing. I said, if we created the perfect platform for traceability who in this room gets to own it, everybody kinda looks around. And then I said, what about a government are, is anyone here comfortable with the government, owning it and which government? So who gets to own the data flow? In other words, the problem is that there's no good answer that question. What blockchain does well is that it is will it can be a decentralized platform. It can be something where we can share data, but it's very unclear which particular individual owns it because it's shared ledger. That's where it has a lot of power, and that's where it's very appropriate for the seafood industry. Jason berry hill is with each mile technologies which designed fish coin. He says he doesn't have a background in seafood, but in telecom and it was working in the mobile payments market in Asia that got him into this world and the realization that while very few fishermen have a Bank account or a government issued ID almost all of them have a cell phone. I'm jed Kim, and that's marketplace tech. This is a PM.

Jason Berry Hill Blockchain Sabi Asia Berry Hill Jed Kim Alaska Reporter Berryhill Indonesia China Molly Fisher