22 Burst results for "Jasmine Garst"

Biden To Bump Up Food Assistance

Morning Edition

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Biden To Bump Up Food Assistance

"Executive actions and other measures to bolster economic relief and protections for workers. Marketplaces Jasmine Garst. Joins us now, Jasmine. This includes more food assistance for people. Yes, Biden is expected to ask the Agriculture Department to expand food assistance. What we used to call food stamps by 15%. And that's to match the cost of meals kids would be receiving if they were still going in person to school. That would be roughly an extra $100 every two months for a family of three. Order will also expand overall access to emergency increases in food assistance. What else is on the

Jasmine Garst Agriculture Department Jasmine Biden
Economic recovery: one step forward, several steps back

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:58 min | 1 year ago

Economic recovery: one step forward, several steps back

"A big day. This was for the two people who will arguably be running this economy for the next number of years i speak here of course number one. A fisherman jay powell who did an online thing at princeton today in which he said among many other things now is not the time to exit. Allow to translates. If i might that is fed. Speak for we're going to keep on propping up this economy with low interest rates for as long as we have to and the other guy the one who's going to be in charge of this economy in six days said i see your interest rates jay and i will raise you one point nine trillion dollars. President biden is rolling out his economic relief. Plan tonight another fourteen hundred dollars in checks to individuals more unemployment assistance billions for vaccines and testing. Tracing all the stuff we all kinda thought would be in there and however much does pass the new congress. It is not going to come a moment too soon. Because this being thursday we got new numbers for initial unemployment claims this morning a big spike backup to almost a million people who lost their jobs last week and that comes as some new research from the federal reserve shows. The unemployment rate for this economies highest paid workers has fallen down underneath five percent. While for the lowest paid workers. We have it's as high as twenty percents marketplace's jasmine guy gets his gone. The numbers paint. What economists have called case shaped recovery. Things are improving for the better off and getting worse for the rest. Paul iverson an analyst at the university of iowa's labor center says there are long term ramifications to this people that were already in a precarious position that were one paycheck away from disaster. Now find themselves without that paycheck and so disasters the result industries like hospitality which tend to be low wage and employ more black and latino have been particularly hard hit by the pandemic manet. Yanko is an economist. At the university of michigan issue of very very different levels of unemployment in different sectors of the economy is not going to go away until we allow our restaurants and hotels to near full capacity in yesterday. Speech federal reserve governor brainerd. The need for urgent economic policy to help millions of unemployed americans travel logan an economist at ohio state university agrees we do need to support the income of the workers. Take uley those who are indeed high contact service industries working reductions than ours and now facing increasing and prolonged unemployment but he also says it conomic recovery hinges on the success of the vaccine rollout jasmine garst for

Jay Powell President Biden Paul Iverson University Of Iowa's Labor Cen Princeton JAY Yanko Federal Reserve Congress University Of Michigan Brainerd Ohio State University Logan Jasmine Garst
"jasmine garst" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on KQED Radio

"First. There's news today of more layoffs, as expressed by the 743,000 more people who signed up for unemployment benefits in the last week. That is higher than the week before. Pointing tomb or job market trouble. There is more positive news from Corona virus Vaccine researchers early human trial data on Oxford University's vaccine candidate, The one to be manufactured by AstraZeneca, seems to work especially well for adults in their sixties and seventies. And this vaccine might be easier to make and to distribute marketplaces. Jasmine Garst explains why trials on the Oxford vaccine showed that it is safe causes few side effects and produces a strong immune response, even in people over 70, some of the most vulnerable to cove in 19 3, other vaccines Fizer, Biotech, Sputnik and Madonna have also already reported good preliminary data. But the Oxford vaccine could be easier to distribute worldwide because it only requires standard refrigeration. The UK has ordered Maura of the Oxford vaccine than of the other ones, 100 million doses. Lead researcher from the University of Oxford has said data on whether the vaccine protects people from the virus will probably be released before Christmas. It will then have to go to regulators for approval. I'm Jasmine Garza for marketplace. Markets. The Dow is down 66 points 2/10 percent. The S and P 500 is flat at the moment, and the NASDAQ is up 5/10 percent for those watching this little Derby to see when the Dow goes above 30,000 for the first time that Time is not now the Dow's A 3 29,078 Marketplace.

Oxford University Jasmine Garza Jasmine Garst AstraZeneca Maura UK researcher
"jasmine garst" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on KCRW

"Jasmine Garst went to spend some time there. Father, Edward Mason remembers when he realised covert 19 was going to be devastating to his community and Brownsville. It was back in mid April in the local public housing complex. A lot of seniors weren't answering their phones on whether went into the building Military department's they found 10 Seniors who had passed away alone in the apartment. Predominately black with every Latino influence is well. Since then, the virus has killed dozens of his parishioners to large sectors employment for our community for the men. It's grocery stores. And for the women, it's home health aides in the health field Both of which were essential workers who kept working So you had launched segments of our population. Most of whom live in apartment buildings, high density buildings. Having to go to work every day. Palacio, 41 is one of those essential city workers in New York's homeless services. I met with her at her Parentshouse. Her mom was frying fish for lunch in the kitchen while her dad watched the news. Colossi. Remember is going to work with people who were getting sick. She asked for guidance from her employers and got none. By late March. She was sick to the body aches. It's just like something took over my body, and I could not even Move like it took over my chest and I had to stop that I could not function. I had to call my supervisor. Tell her I can't the way Palacio describes it. Covert 19 came into Brownsville like a wildfire. Soon her entire family got it, including her mom and her dad, who is nearing 80. Her next door neighbor fell into a coma. Her uncle died from it, Palacio says. It wasn't just the fact that she got infected. It's the care she received. That makes her upset. I remember going to The health clinic in this neighborhood and the insole If you feel the sick, why did you come here? You want to get me sick? You want to get other people sick and we were scolded. As an essential worker like myself. Some essential workers say treatment like that made them feel disposable. Carmen has worked at a hospital in New York for nearly 20 years in close contact with patients. She asked that we not use her last name. She's worried about employer retaliation. We meet on her stoop in Brownsville on a hot summer day, and she points to all the people who died here In the last few months. We lost the people in the supermarket where we lost people that used to sell food all sigh. They harden and they they, possibly because they were letting the people that she's in her fifties At the end of March. She asked for some time off since her husband has a heart condition that makes him high risk and she was being exposed every day. Dating a proof need to stay home. So I I asked for time off. They didn't approve it. She eventually got sick, She says it was very hard to find testing here. When she finally did. She tested positive. She was told to go home. I have the paperwork by church. So we pray. Then on the phone, we prayed to why Sunday. MPs are then also trusted and movement there. Have mercy on us and the whole war. She eventually recovered from the virus and is back at the hospital now working Brownsville is calmer now than it was back in March and April. Neighbors air cleaning up their garage. Big graduation sign hangs on someone's porch, A car bumping music drives by Many residents here wonder about the second wave of infection and how much New York and this neighborhood can endure. I'm jasmine Gars DH for marketplace. You know, a same day delivery has become kind of a thing in this pandemic. Not so much from Amazon, which has been doing it or trying to do it for years, but Cos.

Carmen Brownsville Palacio New York Jasmine Garst building Military department Edward Mason supervisor coma Amazon Parentshouse
"jasmine garst" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on KCRW

"And one property gets damaged often there are clean ups that have to be done if an economy is to recover market place jasmine Garst as that one thirty year old Kevin that is Abell lives in the Bronx a lower income New York borough that's mostly black and Latino when he saw stores in his neighborhood being damaged during this recent wave of protests he was upset so he put out a call for help on social media he didn't know what to expect in the event around a thousand volunteers showed up in his appeal raised nearly forty thousand dollars which he says he'll be donating to businesses that didn't have insurance the only way to keep the community going it's if we take care of it and this is what we're doing this is how we're gonna invest the money that we are based in because we are the community but property damage is on a much lower scale than in past protests like those in the nineteen sixties after the assassination of Dr Martin Luther king today's incidents are being overstated says professor Lester Spence from John Hopkins university he says there's a lot of hysteria on social media and although there has been damage to minority owned businesses and black neighborhoods actually the economic violence visited upon the neighborhood is far more damage he's talking about lack of investment low wages and a general dearth of opportunity unlike in the past he notes the reason disturbances haven't been concentrated exclusively in low income black and brown neighborhoods they've also had businesses and wealthy predominately white areas like soho in Manhattan and he says there's reason to believe those wealthier neighborhoods will rebound far more quickly than the poorer ones professor Jamie and Cunningham with Memphis university agrees events are associated with negative consequences afterwards more police killings of civilians lower property values less job opportunities population leaving these community both white and black armor so you do want to be aware that you really want to address some of these underlying inequities that exist in society in other words a broken window is easy to fix the hard work is fixing why it got broken in the first place I'm jasmine Garst for market place take a look at Amazon's top twenty non fiction bestsellers the best week you might notice a pattern white fragility is one title how to be an anti racist so you want to talk about race me and white supremacy those of the adults much of the same in the children's section and not just on Amazon either as marketplaces are comparison reports online book sales have been steady through the pandemic firm mahogany books in Washington DC it's a black owned bookstore with mostly black customers thanking the killing of George Floyd and the protests owner Monday young says she's heard from a lot of new customers in the past week who are telling her Hey I never realized the thing was this is deep or I was very aware I'm selling my hopeless but also in the face of where I want to learn and be educated young says most of her new clients are white and lots of them are buying books for their kids at wild rumpus children's bookstore in Minneapolis Katie McKinley a manager says ninety five percent of their recent book sales are about race and social justice and people are buying ten twelve at a time the volume is something we've never seen before keyboarding or a white woman in Pittsburgh recently ordered some books for her two and a half year old son having him exposed to it early and then as things happen in our world we're going to be revisiting these blocks and putting what happens in the world in the context of understanding the ox this wall of interesting books about race is something that Danielle Clayton of non profit we need diverse books has seen before this always happens this is just like literally every single time there is any sort of a flare up or event we get a whole bunch of oh my gosh our range and then everyone goes back home and it's quiet again but this time she says like the protests it feels bigger America bears.

jasmine Garst
"jasmine garst" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"That's a tough call I'm jasmine Garst for marketplace it was a Washington post it does pull the other day showing black and Hispanic workers are more likely to be laid off than whites they're also less likely to have much in personal savings which means unemployment benefits become all the more important our documentary podcast the uncertain hour has a new season out the latest episode of which is all about unemployment insurance the history of it and who gets it here's Christy Clark she's the host of the answer now Congress passed the law that created our unemployment benefits system in nineteen thirty five as part of new deal legislation they designed it to give people money to survive while they looked for a new job but bill Spriggs an economics professor at Howard University says written into that law was this big catch that certain jobs didn't qualify for unemployment benefits including two key ones are cultural workers and domestic workers agricultural workers you know farm workers and domestic workers like housekeepers nannies which sounds kind of bureaucratic and technical at first but there's a deeper and uglier backstory here's what happened in order to get any of the new deal legislation passed into law including unemployment insurance there had to be by and from politicians across the country including the southern Democrats and they had a very particular world order they were trying to enforce one of white supremacy the signs were obvious like literally they would have above the water fountain color only quite early and the south did not want that disturbed N. repeatedly threw out every piece of legislation in the new deal they tried their best to ensure that system would not be challenged at first in early new deal legislation way before we got to unemployment insurance white southern Democrats were really explicit about what they wanted to put into the laws it's in the legislative record like in a measure that allowed the president to regulate industries for fair wages they wanted to have quite wages and black which is like a really written out that way written out that way because that's how they operated on the site that was quickly defeated because then the northern Democrats just we're gonna go for it so northern Democrats in Congress made what's been called a devil's bargain the compromise with them was okay you can't say this only goes to white people so the compromise is you can exclude certain occupations that's okay I will live with that so we will exclude agricultural workers we will exclude domestic workers and it just so happened that workers with those jobs were disproportionately black disproportionately women and poor so a few years later when Congress was drafting laws around unemployment insurance southern Democrats just said we want to exclude farm workers and domestic workers wink wink that's basically it so we will say agricultural workers but in the south that means we don't want black people to get this that's what they did and just to play out why historian Alice o'connor from UC Santa Barbara says excluding those workers from benefits was partly about keeping labor cheap like for cotton farmers who needed seasonal workers to come pick their cotton if those workers got some money when they were not working that might make those workers a little less desperate and have a little more bargaining power to ask for higher wages the next season this kind of protection empowers workers it puts them in at least somewhat less dire circumstances says that they're not necessarily beholden to one local employer it took years of pressure from civil rights and labor activists but domestic workers and agricultural workers did gain access to unemployment insurance in nineteen seventy six but for forty years those jobs were excluded jobs that had been disproportionately done by black people generations of certain workers didn't get the same safety nets as everyone else and that had a huge impact on their ability to weather hard times to build wealth to climb up the economic ladder inequalities that are still playing out today I'm Christy Clark for market place the new season of the uncertain hour is called a history of now I kind of love you can get it where ever you choose down this final note on the way out today you know you can get economic forecasts pretty much anywhere Wall Street analysts the Congressional Budget Office the federal reserve they are kind of a dime a dozen those forecasts one place though not updating its prognostications this summer breaking a streak that goes back to the nineteen seventies the White House nobody likes to be the bearer of bad.

jasmine Garst Washington
"jasmine garst" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Right now that's a tough call I'm jasmine Garst for market place it was a Washington post if those poll the other day showing black and Hispanic workers are more likely to be laid off than whites they're also less likely to have much in personal savings which means unemployment benefits become all the more important our documentary podcast the uncertain hour as new season out the latest episode of which is all about unemployment insurance the history of it and who gets it here's Christy Clark she's the host of the answer now Congress passed the law that created our unemployment benefits system in nineteen thirty five as part of new deal legislation they designed it to give people money to survive while they looked for a new job but bill Spriggs an economics professor at Howard University says written into that law was this big catch that certain jobs didn't qualify for unemployment benefits including two key ones are cultural workers and domestic workers agricultural workers you know farm workers and domestic workers like housekeepers nannies which sounds kind of bureaucratic and technical at first but there's a deeper and uglier backstory here's what happened in order to get any of the new deal legislation passed into law including unemployment insurance there had to be biased and from politicians across the country including the southern Democrats and they had a very particular world order they were trying to enforce one of white supremacy the signs were obvious literally they would have above the water fountain color only quite early and the south did not want that disturb and repeatedly threw out every piece of legislation in the new deal they tried their best to ensure that system would not be challenged at first in early new deal legislation way before we got to unemployment insurance white southern Democrats were really explicit about what they wanted to put into the laws it's in the legislative record like in a measure that allowed the president to regulate industries for fair wages they wanted to have quite wages and black which is like a really it written out that way written out that way because that's how they operated on the site that was quickly defeated because then the northern Democrats just we're gonna go for it so northern Democrats in Congress made what's been called a devil's bargain the compromise with them was okay you can't say this only goes to white people so the compromise is you can exclude certain occupations that's okay I will live with that so we will exclude agricultural workers we will exclude domestic workers and it just so happened that workers with those jobs were disproportionately black disproportionately women and poor so a few years later when Congress was drafting laws around unemployment insurance southern Democrats just said we want to exclude farm workers and domestic workers wink wink that's basically it so we will say agricultural workers but in the south that means we don't want black people to get this that's what they did and just to play out why historian Alice o'connor from UC Santa Barbara says excluding those workers from benefits was partly about keeping labor cheap like for cotton farmers who needed seasonal workers to come pick their cotton if those workers got some money when they were not working that might make those workers a little less desperate and have a little more bargaining power to ask for higher wages the next season this kind of protection is empowers workers it puts them in at least somewhat less dire circumstances says that they're not necessarily beholden to one local employer it took years of pressure from civil rights and labor activists but domestic workers and agricultural workers did gain access to unemployment insurance in nineteen seventy six but for forty years those jobs were excluded jobs that have been disproportionately done by black people generations of certain workers didn't get the same safety nets as everyone else and that had a huge impact on their ability to weather hard times to build wealth to climb up the economic ladder inequalities that are still.

jasmine Garst Washington
"jasmine garst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Now that's a tough call I'm jasmine Garst for market place there was a Washington post it shows all the other day showing black and Hispanic workers are more likely to leak be laid off than whites they're also less likely to have much in personal savings which means unemployment benefits become all the more important our documentary podcast the uncertain hour as new season out the latest episode of which is all about unemployment insurance the history of it and who gets it here's Christy Clark she's the host of the answer now Congress passed the law that created our unemployment benefits system in nineteen thirty five as part of new deal legislation they designed it to give people money to survive well they looked for a new job but bill Spriggs an economics professor at Howard University says written into that law was this big catch that certain jobs didn't qualify for unemployment benefits including two key ones are cultural workers and domestic workers agricultural workers you know farm workers and domestic workers like housekeepers nannies which sounds kind of bureaucratic and technical at first but there's a deeper and uglier backstory here's what happened in order to get any of the new deal legislation passed into law including unemployment insurance there had to be by and from politicians across the country including the southern Democrats and they had a very particular world order they were trying to enforce one of white supremacy the signs were obvious literally they would have above the water fountain color only quite only and the south did not want that disturb N. repeatedly threw out every piece of legislation in the new deal they tried their best to ensure that system would not be challenged at first in early new deal legislation way before we got to unemployment insurance white southern Democrats were really explicit about what they wanted to put into the laws it's in the legislative record like in a measure that allowed the president to regulate industries for fair wages they wanted to have quite wages and black which is like a really it written out that way written out that way because that's how they operated on the site that was quickly defeated because then the northern Democrats just we're gonna go for it so northern Democrats in Congress made what's been called a devil's bargain the compromise with them was okay you can't say this only goes to white people so the compromise is you can exclude certain occupations that's okay I will live with that so we will exclude agricultural workers we will exclude domestic workers and it just so happened that that workers with those jobs were disproportionately black disproportionately women and poor so a few years later when Congress was drafting laws around unemployment insurance southern Democrats just said we want to exclude farm workers and domestic workers wink wink that's basically it so we will say agricultural workers but in the south that means we don't want black people to get this that's what they did and just to play out why historian Alice o'connor from UC Santa Barbara says excluding those workers from benefits was partly about keeping labor cheap like for cotton farmers who needed seasonal workers to come pick their cotton if those workers got some money when they were not working that might make those workers a little less desperate and have a little more bargaining power to ask for higher wages the next season this kind of protection is empowers workers it puts them in at least somewhat less dire circumstances says that they're not necessarily beholden to one local employer it took years of pressure from civil rights and labor activists but domestic workers and agricultural workers did gain access to unemployment insurance in nineteen seventy six but for forty years those jobs were excluded jobs that have been disproportionately done by black people generations of certain workers didn't get the same safety nets as everyone else and that had a huge impact on their ability to weather hard times to build wealth to climb up the economic ladder inequalities that.

jasmine Garst Washington
"jasmine garst" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And protesters across the country calling for a day of action to bring attention to workplace issues made so much worse by this virus with may first rent due for many there also rent strikes nationally with so many people out of work and unable to pay market place's jasmine Garst reports for the last two months mark all the good from Chicago says he has not been able to pay rent he's thirty two a new bird driver and says work has dried up due to the virus he says neither his stimulus nor unemployment check have come in yet you know I live paycheck to paycheck at this farm and so if there's no income coming in there's no bill money going out Illinois like New York has frozen addictions but all the good pays over thirteen hundred a month and will be able to pay the backlog some organizers of the run strikes nationwide are asking those who can still afford rent to join people like all the good and withhold payment advocates want runs to be canceled until people can return to work safely Nicole dean is with the alliance of Californians for community empowerment she says that without additional protection once addiction moratorium's are lifted there would be massive defections in California after a pandemic or attendance would be in potentially tens of thousands of dollars in debt landlords are warning that a strike could ripple through the economy in other ways Doug baby the president of the national multi family housing council says he understands renter situation but well that big bad landlord has a mortgage and has a payroll and when you stop paying they're going to start cutting people look just like the people going around straight instead he says the federal government needs to help run enters directly beyond a one time stimulus check otherwise he says the housing crisis will get worse for many it already has Terrill Thomas a freelance florist in Oakland says she is how to make a decision whether to pay her nine hundred dollars a month in rent or keep paying for food and health care I grew up in the bay area this is my home and if I lose this apartment I I don't make enough to afford a place at market rate and that that is yeah it's really scary she's chosen to pay for food and health care and to strike on rent I'm jasmine Garst for market place on this very unusual first of may I.

Chicago Illinois New York Nicole dean California president federal government Terrill Thomas Oakland jasmine Garst Doug
"jasmine garst" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"And when things begin to normalize in Austin Texas I mean dealer for marketplace these would seem on the face of it to be heady days for companies that can pipe hour after hour of contents to your devices to help kill time during or simply distract from these weeks and months of quarantine and to some degree they are but there's also some peril here case in point Netflix it said today that its gonna issue another billion dollars in debt to keep buying and making more of the content we're all counting on right now borrowing money is not new for Netflix right but with the crisis still in its early days is it sustainable do you suppose market place jasmine Garst has now if there's a deep dent in your couch from all the Netflix watching during quarantine you're not alone after many quarters of slow growth the company announced its new subscribers are double what was expected but even as CEO reed Hastings cautioned against reading too much into that Tim Hamlin from the media consulting company for terror group agrees even reed Hastings said in his call today he expects those numbers to be relatively short lived and will sort of tamp down as the virus plays out and people start to go back outside again there are more streaming platforms than ever trying to tap into that captive quarantine audience meanwhile Netflix has already lost more key shows like friends and will soon lose the office and so it's been happening more to original content.

Netflix CEO Tim Hamlin reed Hastings jasmine Garst
"jasmine garst" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And DM vis essential services and we opened up I'm jasmine Garst for marketplace there's been a stay at home order in effect you're in California for a bit more than three weeks now but same as everywhere else there are still lots of people going out to work every day health care workers grocery store employees clearly essential categories also construction crews rescue a Montana is an apprentice carpenter here in Los Angeles she is one of the ten people were profiling in our series about the American labor force it's called the United States of work as of right now she tells us her job site downtown is still open she sent us this I feel thankful that I you least get to work and get to get my paycheck still but it is kind of also a little scary going to work it's I think I want a quieter because people are more separate there's less interactions during breaks and lunches well like spread out and now we have hand sanitizing stations kind of stave team I was team as you can since it is in a construction site but they're they're really trying to to keep us all safe while working in the afternoon when I get out it's the city seems so sad and so quiet even the traffic isn't there I went to LA is known for the LA traffic it's all just gone what does worry me is I live with my mom and she does take public transportation to work and she does work in a fast food restaurant I I think that even if we are where.

California Montana Los Angeles United States jasmine Garst
"jasmine garst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For a basic commercial license some drivers require additional training Andrew Nova Kovic teaches agricultural economics at Cornell University in some aspects of of general trade no one driver can go in and out of the truck and you can you can be CDL answer right class you're in business but in in certain parts of the food industry it is not so straightforward the commercial vehicle training association along with several major trucking associations have sent a letter to governors asking them to declare driving schools and DM vis essential services and re opened on I'm jasmine Garst for marketplace there's been a stay at home order in effect you're in California for a bit more than three weeks now but same as everywhere else there are still lots of people going out to work every day health care workers grocery store employees clearly essential categories also construction crews rescue a Montana is an apprentice carpenter here in Los Angeles she is one of the ten people were profiling in our series about the American labor force it's called the United States of work as of right now she tells us her job site downtown is still open she sent us this I feel thankful that I you least get to work and get to get my paycheck still but it is kind of also a little scary going to work it's I think I want is it quieter because people are more separate there's less interactions during breaks and lunches well like spread out and now we have hand sanitizing stations kind of stave I mean I was team as you can since it is in a construction site but they're they're really trying to to keep us all safe while working in the afternoon when I get out it's the city seems so sad and so quiet even the traffic isn't there I what LA is known for the LA traffic its largest garland what does worry me is I live with my mom and she does take public transportation to work and she does work in a fast food restaurant I I think that even if we are aware we can't say the same for the for the people around us those rose two months out she's an apprentice.

Andrew Nova Kovic Cornell University jasmine Garst California Montana Los Angeles United States
"jasmine garst" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Depends on you even though it feels like forever it's really only been like three weeks that millions and millions of people in this work force have newly started working from home and among the many adjustments to our new realities and yes long time work from homers we hear you on this among the many adjustments is that you have to really try to connect with your colleagues and sometimes people for a little bit too hard market place jasmine Garst as now when you paint a picture for you you're at home working you're in your sweatpants your kids are tearing each other apart in the background and your hair let's not even talk about your hair and suddenly you get a video call from your boss it's a rough thing because of the level of axis dusty because people can contact you at any hour Michael Cohen works in Tel Aviv Mallory McMaster teaches executives and workers how to be better communicators she says even though video calls are one step closer to in person meetings and phone calls it's still a lot of work to be watching say a dozen of your colleagues that one's actually harder and it takes more energy to communicate that way she's reminding some companies not to use tools like zoom as a way to check up on workers only for actual meetings and she recommends everyone to be assertive with their time what I call people and maybe set a limit of like two hours of video calls a day or two hours of conference call today and be upfront and honest with your teammates and your employer then your client about that but there's another deeper reason these video calls feel tiring and each one is a psychologist in New York it's really nice to connect with others and I think in there I think there was this initial outburst as soon as the as soon as the stadium places got put into place but seeing the people in doing this form of communication can just remind you of what's going on that's the reason so many people are at home is a deadly disease and it's okay to want to disconnect from that.

Michael Cohen Mallory McMaster New York jasmine Garst Tel Aviv
"jasmine garst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Economy depends on you even though it feels like forever it's really only been like three weeks that millions and millions of people in this work force have newly started working from home and among the many adjustments to our new realities and yes long time work from homers we hear you on this among the many adjustments is that you have to really try to connect with your colleagues and sometimes people for a little bit too hard market place jasmine Garst as they'll let me paint a picture for you you're at home working you're in your sweat pants your kids are tearing each other apart in the background and your hair let's not even talk about your hair and suddenly you get the video call from your boss it's a rough thing because of the level of axis dusty because people can contact you at any hour Michael Cohen works in Tel Aviv Mallory McMaster teaches executives and workers how to be better communicators she says even though video calls are one step closer to in person meetings and phone calls it's still a lot of work to be watching say a dozen of your colleagues that one's actually harder and it takes more energy to communicate that way she's reminding some companies not to use tools like zoom as a way to check up on workers only for actual meetings and she recommends everyone to be assertive with their time what I call people and maybe set a limit of like two hours of video calls a day or two hours of conference call today and be upfront and honest with your teammates and your employer then your clients about that but there's another deeper reason these video calls feel tiring and each one is a psychologist in New York it's really nice to connect with others and I think in there I think there was this initial outburst as soon as the as soon as the stadium places got put into place but seeing the people in doing this form of communication can just remind you of what's going on that's the reason so many people are at home is a deadly disease and it's okay to want.

Michael Cohen Mallory McMaster New York jasmine Garst Tel Aviv
"jasmine garst" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on KCRW

"Is a kind nice environment and at a time when the world is dark and uncertain and Graham sometimes the best thing you could possibly do is to go into a warm safe spaces with people forced to stay home around the world online games are also a great way for friends to stay connected fifteen million people plead the leaders call of duty game in the first three days after its recent release that's a record Neil mac or an analyst with Morningstar says more players also means they should spark some demand for micro transactions and which are basically in game purchases things like better guns are new costumes it's not all good news for the industry Sony's new console the PlayStation five is supposed to launch this Christmas Mike salmon is with maggot a consumer research company normally they would start production in ironically enough on China about right now to get enough councils made nor to launch globally seven says that will likely get delayed and new games are also hitting snags as creative teams figure out how to work from home I'm jasmine Garst for market place when you get right down to brass economic tax we kinda have to keep shopping now right stuck at home or not that whole consumers account for seventy percent of this economy thing that we see all the time but for a lot of people buying stuff that's discretionary anything that's not food and supplies to get him through this pandemic feels kind of weird and maybe a little bit wrong market place's Kristin Schwab looked into the ethics of nonessential shopping right now twenty five percent off converse sneakers two for one yoga pants free shipping like a lot of us Joe Berlinski in Illinois he has been watching the sales pour into her inbox but she's not buying much it just doesn't seem appropriate she says it feels silly to buy stuff he doesn't need and she doesn't want to put warehouse and delivery workers at risk but she did break down once lipstick from Sephora it was half off with free shipping the pattern you know practical purchase no right now suit your Rita could Dolly at Forrester says stores are discounting stuff they might not normally put on sale a nice shirt for those the meetings and sweat pants to pair with them she says big picture buying right now is good if you know you've had your eye on something and it's on sale you actually are helping a retailer manage its cash flow in the meantime I mean I I don't think that that's that's at all a bad thing but what about those bad feelings surprise disgust embarrassment that you were so excited about a sale so we Johnson king teaches ethics at New York University people can feel I'm so sad disorientation well we're wondering is what we care about out of line with what's really important and she says it's normal to question the tiny things you can control when the world feels chaotic and Johnson king says give yourself a break if a fancy new coffee maker helps you start your day and a scented candle helps you relax when it's over consider those joys essential items for your mental health I'm Kristin shop for marketplace.

"jasmine garst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A pandemic I'm jasmine Garst remarks there's a series we've been doing for a while now called adventures in housing it's about the workarounds people are using in the journeys they are taking trying to find a place to live in this economy even before the pandemic housing was in on enviable adventure for a whole lot of people and it is even more so now here is today's installment my name is Aziz Rockledge and I live in Los Angeles California hi this is a mental health center I'm a smoothie mastered a smoothie shop and the waiter on a boat marina del Rey it's just a very weird time to do any sort of business you know and specifically find a new place to live basically my current residence my lease is ending and I have to move out I don't have the option of staying and while it's already difficult to find a place to live that circumstances just kind of multiplied doubly or triply so by the fact that two of my two of my three jobs have shut down and the third one looks like it might do that as well so finding money to put down a deposit on a new place is difficult and fewer people are renting right now because of concerns around the virus fewer people are are looking for new roommates I was looking out of place in west Chester it ticked off that checked off all the boxes and things were going positively with the landlord and the prospective roommates I was talking about moving furniture in after radio silence from.

Aziz Rockledge Los Angeles California west Chester jasmine Garst
Universal, banking on home audiences, to stream movie releases

All Things Considered

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Universal, banking on home audiences, to stream movie releases

"Universal Studios has a plan it's cinematic releases we have learned are gonna go straight to streaming beginning with trolls world tour on April the tenth the date was set to open in theaters films that are in theaters right now Emma and the hunt for instance might be available for streaming as early as Friday great for consumers really not so great if you're a theater owner here or internationally trying to stay in business during a pandemic workable is jasmine Garst has them the invisible man already in theaters is one of many universal titles that will be available on streaming did you figured out a way to be invisible for about twenty Bucks you

Universal Studios Emma Jasmine Garst
"jasmine garst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On your own I'm jasmine Garst for market place that's when the trade war was the big economic story we did a bunch of work about Mexico and our trading relationship with them which is critical of course Mexico is one of this country's biggest trading partners we didn't often though tell stories on this program of the people and the places in Mexico so it is good for us then that Rick Martinez he's a contributing editor at bona petite is on a driving trip through Mexico food and culture and some economy state by state down there we got him on the phone from Zac Atticus Rick thanks for taking the time to talk to us thank you so happy to be here first things first I suppose is I have to figure out where you are where we found you all right so I am in a town called second thank us in the state of Zacatecas which is about five hundred miles northwest of Mexico City so it's a slightly and and the northern part of the country it's a sixteenth century Spanish colonial mining town it's really really beautiful I will say I'm looking at your Instagram right now and it's I'm like in the pictures both of the place and of the food which gets us to why we're talking to you this is a it's a a multi stage project you got going on here right give me the backstory so I've been wanting to write a book about the food of Mexico I feel like you know it myself included but I think most Americans have a very limited scope of what they understand to be Mexican food and the reality is is Mexico is a huge country with a lot of different geography a lot of different cultures and indigenous people and a lot of immigration from different parts of the world that have contributed to the cuisine and I wanted to share that and bring that to light and in the United States so I went to Mexico City I bought a car and I am driving across the country I'm hitting all thirty one states plus Mexico City which is sort of like another state in and of itself and so far I've hit eighty four cities and twenty two states and about ten thousand miles tell me about the ten thousand miles you put on that car what I want to specifically is economically what are you seeing are you seeing opportunity are you seeing a hardship are you seeing what do you see I'm you know I'm seeing everything I think either one of the things that strikes me most about this country and the people in this country is that they're incredibly optimistic an incredibly happy and incredibly hard workers you know there there are cities like for example one of my favorite cities who G. done which is in Oaxaca and that town has been devastated by earthquakes it hasn't got all gotten a lot of money from the government to rebuild and a lot of the the buildings particularly in in the at the center of town are are still destroyed and abandoned by the building that houses the Makhado has no just moved to the streets and it's almost like a twenty four seven medical though so they're they're out in the streets you know one o'clock in the morning selling tamales and gives us and taco stand and that's the thing that I really love about this country is the people are so warm and inviting and they're willing to share with you whatever they have been you even if they don't have that much tell me about going to the market there and second tech is what are you seeing in the stalls and and which for everything TV the food is pretty incredible because it's a Spanish silver town it's a little bit more influenced from colonial Spain for example in this part of the country enchiladas are a big deal here so in July second thank us I had some amazing Menudo yesterday for breakfast it was actually it probably one of the best breakfast I've had on this trip it was a a big bowl of Menudo which is a basically it's tripe it's beef tripe stewed with Chiles and oregano and garlic and onions and and I had a a big glass of freshly squeezed orange juice which I love I mean it's it's citrus season down here so a lot of the the states in the north have amazing it's citrus farms but that was an incredible breakfast and that was just a little a little stand along the streets and all this woman Dona Lupe all that she sold was Menudo in the mornings and she just sold until she ran out and that was it what that's it sounds amazing what your next stop my next up there is a town called list pinas it's a really beautiful small town and one of the main reasons I'm going there there is a a master of ceramics and pottery and he's been recognized by the the Mexican government is being a master of his craft and one of the things that I'm doing I'm collecting plates and dishes and pottery to use as props for the the recipes in the book so that all of the recipes are are served in shot on plates from the regions that the food comes from Rick Martinez contributing food editor at but a batik cookbook to come in and Rick will.

jasmine Garst Mexico
"jasmine garst" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on KCRW

"You want to do on your own I'm jasmine Garst for market place that's when the trade war was the big economic story we did a bunch of work about Mexico and our trading relationship with them which is critical of course Mexico is one of this country's biggest trading partners we didn't often though tell stories on this program of the people and the places in Mexico so it is good for us than that Rick Martinez he's a contributing editor at bona petite is on a driving trip through Mexico food and culture and some economy state by state down there we got him on the phone from Zack at tech us Rick thanks for taking the time to talk to us thank you so happy to be here first things first I suppose is I have to figure out where you are where have we found you all right so I am in a town called second thank us in the state of Dhaka thank us which is a bounty five hundred miles northwest of Mexico City so it's a slightly and and then northern part of the country it's a sixteenth century Spanish colonial mining town it's really really beautiful I will say I'm looking at your Instagram right now and it's I'm like in the pictures both of the place and of the food which gets us to why we're talking to you this is a it's a a multi stage project you got going on here right give me the backstory so I've been wanting to write a book about the food of Mexico I feel like you know it myself included but I think most Americans have a very limited scope of what they understand to be Mexican food and the reality is is Mexico is a huge country with a lot of different geography a lot of different cultures and indigenous people and a lot of immigration from different parts of the world that have contributed to the cuisine and I wanted to share that and bring that to light and in the United States so I went to Mexico City I bought a car and I am driving across the country I'm hitting all thirty one states plus Mexico City which is sort of like another state in and of itself and so far I've hit eighty four cities and twenty two states and about ten thousand miles tell me about the ten thousand miles you put on that car what I want to specifically is economically what are you seeing are you seeing opportunity are you seeing a hardship are you seeing what do you see I'm you know I'm seeing everything I think either one of the things that strikes me most about this country and the people in this country is that they're incredibly optimistic an incredibly happy and incredibly hard workers you know there there are cities like for example one of my favorite cities who G. done which is in Oaxaca and that town has been devastated by earthquakes it hasn't got all gotten a lot of money from the government to rebuild and a lot of the the buildings particularly in in the at the center of town are are still destroyed and abandoned by the building that houses a medic although has now just moved to the streets and it's almost like a twenty four seven medical though so they're they're out in the streets you know one o'clock in the morning selling tamales and gives us and Douglas and and that's the thing that I really love about this country is the people are so warm and inviting and they're willing to share with you whatever they had to you even if they don't have that much tell me about going to the market there and Zach attack is what are you seeing in the stalls and and which for everything TV the food is pretty incredible because it's a Spanish silver town it's a little bit more influenced from colonial Spain for example in this part of the country into a lot of us are a big deal here so in July second thank us I had some amazing Menudo yesterday for breakfast it was actually probably one of the best breakfast I've had on this trip it was a a big bowl of Menudo which is a basically it's tripe it's beef tripe stewed with Chiles and oregano and garlic and onions and and I had a a big glass of freshly squeezed orange juice which I love I mean it's it's citrus season down here so a lot of the the states in the north have amazing it's citrus farms but that was an incredible breakfast and that was just a little a little stand along the streets and all this woman Dona Lupe all that she sold was Menudo in the mornings and she just sold until she ran out and that was it what that's it sounds amazing what your next stop my next up there is a town called list being yours it's a really beautiful small town and one of the main reasons I'm going there there is a a master of ceramics and pottery and he's been recognized by the the Mexican government is being a master of his craft and one of the things that I'm doing I'm collecting plates and dishes and pottery to use as props for the the recipes in the book so that all of the recipes are are served in shot on plates from the regions that the food comes from Rick Martinez contributing food editor at bona petite cookbook to come in and Rick will talk to.

jasmine Garst Mexico
"jasmine garst" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"jasmine garst" Discussed on KCRW

"This is market place on car result after twenty five years the devil is come down on judge Judy Judy Sheindlin announced today she is going to be wrapping up or hit courtroom show next year try let is one of the highest paid stars on television getting it is reported forty seven million dollars a year and her show is the most watched series in syndication yeah syndication might not be familiar to those who've grown up in this world of streaming so market place jasmine Garst explains how it works Tim Brennan is a big judge Judy guy he watches almost every day he says there are a lot of court shows but there's only one Judy should have prevented mass some of those other court shows are just kind of ridiculous don't play she was me I don't like it branded watches her on fox six in Milwaukee but she's on the CBS station in LA that's because the syndicated shows are sold station by station across the country meanwhile a primetime show like survivor only airs on CBS channels David Lieberman teaches media management at the new school there certain times of day that the networks don't control they do control prime time usually but not data and that's where the local station might say we were going to buy this show from making it to syndication either reruns like Seinfeld or ongoing shows like judge Judy can be really lucrative but the rise of streaming could change the model says Tim Hamlin media analyst with a particular group I shall like judge Judy may actually be more attractive if packaged up and and more directly accessible to consumers instead of having to go through the intermediary pipe if you will of a TV station you could make the argument that the new syndication may actually be through streaming services Sheindlin says there will be reruns of judge Judy and she's starting a new show called Judy justice no word yet on where that will I'm jasmine Garst for marketplace is fashion week wraps up this week ending a months of regular runway.

Judy Judy Sheindlin jasmine Garst Tim Brennan Judy guy Milwaukee LA David Lieberman Seinfeld media analyst Sheindlin Judy justice CBS Tim Hamlin
After Boeing Crashes, More People Want Help Taming Fear Of Flying

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:43 min | 3 years ago

After Boeing Crashes, More People Want Help Taming Fear Of Flying

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from American pest as the leading provider of safe sustainable pest control solutions across the DMV. Let American past help you to take back your home or business. From menacing pests. Visit them today at American pest dot net. Boeing seven thirty-seven, max airplanes have been grounded worldwide this after two deadly crashes within less than five months. There was particular concern here because it was the same kind of plane, but crashes were main really rare and yet an entire industry exists to help fearful flyers including online classes and since the two. Boeing crashes enrollment in some cases has more than doubled. Here's NPR's jasmine garst this summer musician, Katie sue, how will be touring England. And she scared who it really is a serious mental challenge to to sort of walk through those doors and get on the plane. You know, I often have to take anti anxiety meds in order to make it possible. For me, her fear is so bad. Had when she was a teacher in Mississippi and sue how wanted to visit her family in Michigan. She take a fourteen hour bus ride rather than spend two hours in the air. And then there's that upcoming trip to Europe it's a great career opportunity, but still she's freaked out. She can't stop watching the news about the Boeing seven three seven max, she gets nervous just talking about it. You know, if this happens with one type of plane, how many other examples of, you know, a faulty sensor or something, malfunctioning and pilots who are highly trained have no idea how to deal with it. There's this whole industry built around fear of flying for two ninety nine. You can buy an app called am I going down? There's another one offering hypnosis relaxation for four ninety nine the list goes on and on. There's also a myriad of classes. Many top by retired pilots. There's fearless flight dot com. Fear of flying help dot com and another one S O A R which has been around since nineteen hundred. A two here's an excerpt from the SOA are online video seminar. It's like being an elevator. And you're coming up to the floor where you're going to stop you feel a little lightheaded. So you might think the airplanes falling. But no, it's not it's just slowing down at climb. That's SOA ours. Founder captain, Tom Bunn, a retired United Airlines pilot, and licensed therapist, his course, which includes videos and counseling starts at two hundred dollars bun explained to clients how planes fly and why they don't just drop out of the sky. It is one common concern he hears. Bunn. Also teaches techniques to handle stress and fear graduates of SOA are like Ben camera. Now say it's worth the price is debilitating to my life. I wouldn't would not go away with my family cheminots. Phobia started in nineteen Ninety-three when his vacation flight from New York to Mexico hit strong turbulence he was terrified when he got back to New York. He vowed never to get on a plane again. And for the next eight years, he didn't even cancelled his. Honeymoon to Greece. They drove to North Carolina. Instead, eventually he enrolled in SOLER, he basically went all about how planes fly how they get up in the air. What turbulence really is his package even included a letter to give to your flight attendant explaining that, you're working on your fear and would love to meet the captain before takeoff. Kevin how could fly again and then nine eleven happened. He was working at the World Trade Center. I was in the first tower plane hit the building, and I could not get in couldn't get into playing again. So all these chips, I had planned after going through this whole thing to be able to fly. Again, I shut it down. It would take Cameron out another four years to board a plane again, the fewest just being inside being uncomfortable and not being able to be in control. You know, when you drive a car, you have the control here. I didn't have the control. I didn't know how to handle it. He says he finally did the SOLER training sessions again, the techn-. Seeks to handle stress and fear and trusting that pilots are highly trained and they to want to get home safely. I ask him. Now. If the recent Boeing seven three seven crashes worry, he says, no in fact, just last week. He took a trip to Los Angeles for him being able to even get on that plane without being afraid that was the real journey. Jasmine guards NPR news, New York support for NPR and the following message. Come from the seventh annual charm city bluegrass festival with the bridge deer tick steep canyon, Rangers and the Jeff Austin band, April twenty six and twenty seventh at Baltimore's druid Hill Park tickets at charm city, bluegrass dot com.

Boeing Katie Sue NPR New York Tom Bunn DMV Europe Cameron Soler Kevin North Carolina Druid Hill Park Rangers Los Angeles Founder Baltimore World Trade Center Greece Mississippi Michigan
After Synagogue Attack, Web-Hosting Sites Suspend Gab

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:12 min | 4 years ago

After Synagogue Attack, Web-Hosting Sites Suspend Gab

"This podcast. And the following message is brought to you by jet dot com. Your one stop shopping destination. The jet experience provides a unique and relevant Dortmund with no membership fees. Start shopping conveniently at jet dot com or on the jet app today. Now, we have more about a social media site where the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting. Suspect reportedly posted anti-semitic attacks before walking into the tree of life synagogue with four weapons Robert Bowers apparently got fired up with words, he reportedly used gab which calls itself and alternative to Twitter and his popular among the far, right. Here's NPR's. Jasmine, garst gout is a site that proudly promotes free speech. It boasts that it lets anyone say anything, but it's been controversial critics have called it a home for anti-semites and white nationalists Robert Bowers was a user before allegedly going on a killing spree. He posted about the Hebrew immigrant aid society, a group that supports refugees. He said the group quote likes to bring invaders that kill our people. I can't sit by and watch my people get slaughtered. Screw your optics. I'm going in Andrew Torbay is the CEO of gab in an interview with. NPR? He defended the platform. I know you direct threat in there because I don't what what would you expect us to do with both like that? We you want us to just censor anybody. That says the phrase I'm going in is that what you're proposing here. Well, I got some birds. And here's the thing he answered it, bad speech or hate speech Harvey wanted to find that he's more speech and always will be when does online free speech become a threat. This isn't the first time the issue has come up in social media. Just last week. It came to light that the man accused of sending explosive devices to prominent Democrats in the media had a history of threatening tweets tore BA says gab follows strict rules, including no threats. He says he created gab because he saw no room for conservative points of view on social media. Take Twitter or whatever thousands upon thousands of people calling for someone to kill. Donald Trump saying they're going to kill Donald Trump expressing hate towards white people towards Christians towards minorities who may now support Donald Trump, they allow hate to be spewed at certain groups and certain people. So where is the line between free speech and inciting violence? I think the line is where free speech becomes a threat. Kelly. Mcbride is a senior vice president at the pointer institute for media studies. She says Torah is prioritizing free speech above all other constitutional values, and that is not necessarily what our constitutional framers intended. Right. They didn't want the government curbing free speech, nor did they want citizens to be irresponsible with their speech. She says last year Google band gobs app. Apple rejected it and Microsoft terminated its agreement with it last month just in the last twenty four. Hours at least two web hosting platforms have suspended gab CO. Andrew Torah is not backing down. We're not going anywhere toward says gab condemns the shooting, but he thinks it's now being targeted unfairly over the weekend. The social media site was filled with anger some of it directed at the Jewish community jasmine guards and pure news. New york. So that was over the weekend. And then last night gab released a statement saying it would be inaccessible for a period as it transitions to new hosting provider. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything.

GAB Robert Bowers Andrew Torbay Donald Trump NPR Twitter Mcbride Dortmund Gout Pittsburgh Synagogue Comcast Jasmine Andrew Torah Harvey BA CEO Apple