35 Burst results for "Japanese"

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

18:50 min | 4 d ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"Can't imagine Damon not wanting to have you on. Oh my God, that would be like a career. Have you ever had any interaction with him? No, but I am friends online with their live bass player. Okay. But he's very sweet and he's a big Japanese breakfast fan. To the point where he was like, can you write down be sweet to me baby on a piece of paper so I can get it tattooed in your handwriting? And I was like, wow. Did you do it? I haven't sent it, but I'm like. I have really bad handwriting, but yeah, I love that, man. I hope I get a call sometimes. Yeah. And the other thing is pretty hate machine, which is one of my favorite records. Did you listen to the new Halsey record? No, but I know that I will, and I know that I'll probably like it because he's never really put up anything that I don't enjoy. Have you listened to the Hollywood? Yeah. It feels very pretty. That's perfect. It's really exciting when you hear a producer's voice in that way. Yeah. And certain changes and obviously all of the sequencer stuff. I mean, it's just amazing that production can have that kind of voice. I mean, you were like that too. There's so many things about that fucking record. It doesn't get old to me. It's aged magnificent. It feels completely timeless and modern. Yeah. A lot of those decisions that he was making and that kind of voice, it's very much in this huge pop rock record that's out now. It sounds fantastic. And you said something as well that you were fascinated about the idea of locking yourself away to make a record. Is that not how you make records anyway? I picture you. I guess. I haven't done that kind of dangerous mentally dangerous. It's like pull all the chase out of it. Yeah, I mean, when I was younger, I had like, you know, not anything as fully formed, and I've definitely grown a lot as a composer. Producer since then, but I was just talking to my husband about how I would love to do that again. If only to just get the raw source. How you made the first record sort of going down to the chef? Yeah, yeah. I mean, but I think having a concentrated period of time are you like, don't leave until you have a record where you that was like more casualties. You know, like I'm going to be going down there to write some stuff. We'll see what happens, but to go into a space for like ten days and be like, I'm gonna leave with an album. Yeah. Is really exciting to me. And yentl. And told you, I want to talk about Barbra Streisand. Yeah, my mom loved Barbra Streisand, loved the movie lentil. And I think it's like a really underrated musical. It's just about a young Jewish woman who wants to study the tall mood on a quest for knowledge and so she cross dresses as a man. Now hearing you say it like that. It's like tootsie meets fiddler on the roof or something. I have not seen Tutsi and I've been reading that's on my list of movies. They made a pretty cheesy, like a little broad musical that. I mean, I'll go see any cheesy musical because I just like are you musical fan? Have you thought about participating in a musical? I'm kind of actually working on right now. Well, for the stage, but I don't want to jinx it so I'm not going to say, but yes, I was never growing up. I was never a musical theater person, but now I just maybe it's just having moved back to New York after being away for so long. I'll just see anything. Me too. I bought tickets to Broadway in October. It went up to see David Byrne. American utopia. I watch it on the plane just fell so hard and love that when I saw that the tickets went back up, I was like, I must. Yeah. I must go. I also thought, oh, I wonder if she's ever played shows in Korean then I saw something where you say you ended your last or was that the first show that you'd ever played in Korea? Yeah, we've played two shows in Korea. But that must have been kind of insane and emotional and that's how the bookends. Yeah, the book ends with the show and soul, and it was like wild to just, you know, that's another thing that I just never anticipated. I never had even the imagination to foresee me playing there. In the book, I talk about I was telling my aunt who's there, things are going really well. We played Coachella. She was like, sure, sure, you know. And then when I told her, you know, we're playing a show and so I'd love for you to come. She had like my cousin called me and she was just like, you know, my mom's really excited to see you. We're just curious who pays you? Is there like an office or something like that? And I was like, oh, you know, we get the money from the door and there's a promoter who looks a show and, you know, she's like, okay, and so she came to the show, and I was like, how many people? There's like probably like 500 people here and I was like, oh, like any other email this is my huasa, which is like the Korean word for like company or office. I was just like, this is like make a living. It was a really sweet moment. And it was just wild to see, you know, the city where I was born where my mom grew up and all of these kids, 'cause my mom's photos on the album on the vinyl. And all these Korean kids leaving the show into the night, the streets of Seoul with my mom's photo and this big square. It was surreal. But yeah, I don't know if you've heard of shinjin kyung. He's like this. We talked about him. Yeah, it's amazing. Actually, just the snippets that they played of his music when you mentioned him. I was like, I was like literally went on disk to order. Yeah, you should listen to the song. There's a song that's like 6 minute song called henny by this woman named Kim Jong mi. Who wrote the song for this woman. This incredible folk singer. And it's just this very slow orchestral build with this looping acoustic guitar. And I would love to hear your take on it. It's like so striking. You know, I had gone to this vinyl bar. Due to beat cafe in Japan in Tokyo. Is it a vinyl bar? Yeah, it's like it's like a bar where like a lot of musicians go to hang out. I'm not sure I've been told so many wonderful places like that in Tokyo, but I don't remember the name. Since Shibuya, there's kind of like a similar equivalent in Seoul where there was all these all these musicians go to this place called Jung jungle, which is this vinyl bar and soul when we were there early on bridges was actually his crew. Yeah, I went there and I never really listened to much Korean music and so much of what we think about when we think about Korean music is obviously KPop. But there's also this very rich 60s kind of like funk pop scene. And our promoter was telling us about this guy Shinji khang is almost like a sort of filled specter type without the mental illness and wrote for all these amazing girl groups from the 50s to the 80s and it's kind of like I think a recluse who just like this incredible psychedelic rock guitar player. And so we played as a song and we were all drunk and just floored. You know, it's just like so beautiful. And then the next day I went to like hang out with my aunt and my husband was telling you, oh, have you heard of Xinjiang? We just learned about the sky and just like, how do you know about that guy? Right. You're a mom and I used to sing the song by the pearl sisters called coffee hang on that was one of his songs. And then yeah, the book ends with us singing not to ruin it for you but the book ends with us like singing a shinjuku song together and karaoke that they used to sing together when we were kids. It was such a crazy thing because I never knew when my mom was ever even really into music. Yeah, I mean, obviously, created a huge, huge country, but even going around Thailand and places in Indonesia and getting the 60s records like there's this band called the gimbals from Indonesia that yeah, I mean, now there have been so many compilations of psychedelic funk in these. And like city pop is having this really cool city pop is amazing. And city pop is not that far sonically from some of jubilee, like just really slick 80s, but very groovy, always like something cool going on with the percussion. Totally. Yeah, I mean, I think that we were hesitant to claim that, but it was certainly something that Jack and I were into, and be sweet. There's this another Xinjiang song called boomerang that's performed by the bunny girls and I think it was like an 80s like city pop type of bob that was from what I recall from that session I had played this very upfront plucky baseline that I just was like, I want to do something like this. And then Jack came up with this incredible baseline that is such a enormous part of what makes that song great, I think. Just for people who might not know explain what city pop is. I honestly don't know if I feel like you could maybe do it. It's like 80s. It was sort of like almost like was it? Was it just in Japan? It's like 80s funk. Like the 80s Japanese equivalent of yacht rock. So it's a little more moved on technology wise because it's the 80s and not late 70s, but it has that same basis of quite complicated R&B jazz steely Dan like that chord family with really slick production really lovely melodies. And it's like dancy, right? Cat power you talk about who's a big influence. She which is another person who famously kind of like locked herself into a room and came out with moon pics. Was that an earlier record? Was that like before the greatest? Is that okay? I think that that album is about her breakup from Bill Callaghan and she was like somewhere in the south in this house and he was like, maybe off on tour, and she was like freaking out alone and wrote this incredible haunting record. She has this incredible voice, but also just like, her earlier records are maybe a little bit more like low fire or just it felt accessible for me as a young woman that I could make an album like that. I discovered her it was like playing in the background right when the greatest came out and that's the one she went and recorded in Memphis with all the great musicians. Phenomenal. I was just remember ask someone, hey, what's this playing in the background? I literally thought they were going to say some 70s rare soul thing. They're like, that's cat power. And I remember that record feels like within your yeah. Yeah. Yeah, right show guy. But yeah, that's me. But cat power. Do you ever feel like you do hate that? I have grappled with it so much. You still like put me on edge and people say that, but now I'm just like, it's of course I'm retrograde. I mean, I think that there's a saying that my therapist likes to say or maybe it's my sister. I was so surprised as my therapist sometimes. But if it's hysterical it's historical. If you're getting so fired up, then there is something deep down that you're being a little bit just like can't pick your voice and obviously like it works for you. You know? Like I was reading George Saunders new book at swimming upon in The Rain, which is this book about Russian literary masters like Chekhov and turgenev and Google or whatever. And he was talking about he's like examining the form. And he's like talking about he wanted to write in this very sparse gruff Hemingway kind of way. And just wasn't working for him and then he wrote a joke on a piece of paper one time and heard his wife laughing from the other room. And he was like, I didn't want to be. Right. Funny, short story, George Saunders guy, but I just am. And to a certain extent, you can't really control what works for you. Even if you want to be like sparse masculine cool guy writer. Yeah. And your voice is like, just serves the thing. I mean, it's crazy for me because I would love to have George Sanders voice. I think many writers would love to be a funny, smart like quippy guy, but it's great to hear that he just has to accept that that's who he is in a certain extent. It's funny that so many people would love to be in your producer and known for this huge like iconic hits. But there's part of you that just like, I don't know if I want to be retrograde or whatever. Yeah, I think that anytime I rebelled against it intentionally, is always sort of a disaster. When my record version, which was sort of my breakthrough record that had valery and some other records on it came out and it was this huge thing. And the cool press like hated me the NMA was like, I was like, back on the enemy it was a magazine and it meant something. I was like public enemy number one. Yeah, they hated me in England because that whole album was covers of songs by radiohead the jam, the Smiths, really sacred cows and pop indie world, especially really English things. And it was so wildly popular here it was a bit of a novelty and I was known as Amy Winehouse's producer, but there I was having like top 5 hit off the top 5 hit and it was just like, I would have hated me. It was that critical master you're just like, you're forcing everyone to make an opinion about it because it's just omnipresent. And then for my second record, I was like, I'm not going to do any more. I'm just going to do sense. And there's songs on that record that I'm really proud of what I'm not proud of is that I agreed to be on the cover of the NME smashing a trumpet. I was trying to disown something so violently that was something that was at one point. And it was because they like to recognize, can we do it'll be fucking hilarious, you know, whatever. And yeah, like I said, there's things on that record I still like, but yeah, so now I think it comes with a little bit of being settled into age and realizing what your voice is like you said with the George saw on this thing that I do. I don't mind. And if I want to try something occasionally that's not that I do it and it's probably not even a successful because I think I am better. I don't love the fucking sounds of the 70s. I don't yearn for the emotionally. They didn't mean anything to me growing up. It's just literally the sound. It excites me. And probably a lot of things too. Are you working on a new record now? Uh, no. Okay. No. I'm in this interesting place where I like for the last 5 or 6 years I've always had three projects going at once. And then all of them came out in the same year. I had the soundtrack this record this book. And that was always the plan I was always kind of working and thinking about them and now I'm just like an empty vessel. I have no idea what my path is now really. Because you would have been on tour maybe otherwise, right? Yeah, I mean. I mean, we still will be on tour, but I just, I've always had something I've worked towards. I don't know if you're like this, but I'm never like, I'm not someone that is continuously working. It's kind of like on music at least. I have to turn on turn off. Okay. And so I don't know what my direction is. And it's hard right now because it feels like I'm at some kind of peak or I hope I'm not. But it's impossible to not feel that way where I'm like, well, it's all downhill. Yeah. But I'm sure a lot of musicians feel it's so frustrating because I feel like after the first record, your sophomore album is just like, oh my God, I have to avoid the sophomore slump. There's so much pressure. The third one will be so easy. And then you hit the third one and you're like, oh, but this is where it's really supposed to culminate with who I am as an artist. It's a statement. It has to be bombastic. The fourth one will be easy. And then you get to the fourth one and you're like, what am I supposed to prove now? I never really get no relaxing at any point in time. Okay, awesome. Yeah. Thank you for this. Yeah of course. So great to chat. Such an interesting intelligent talented creative engrossing force. It was such an interesting chat too I could have talked for another hour, but she had a heart out somewhere to go or something. It's amazing too to think that yesterday at 8 a.m. I knew nothing about Japanese breakfast and the talents of Michelle Zhang and her writing. And now I do. And my brain is the better for it. Take me out with the fade in. Thanks again to Japanese breakfast for taking the time to talk with us. A special fader thank you to our Grammy and Oscar award winning host Mark ronson. Please visit the fader dot com slash podcasts to read the original cover story and check out a playlist of artists mentioned in this episode. If you like the show, please share it and review us on your favorite podcast app. Please join us next Monday to find out which of your favorite artists will be uncovered next. Executive producers rob stone and John Cohen for the fader podcast network. Talent booking, Robert English. Producers, Alex Robert Ross, and Matty Russell Shapiro. Directed by Daniel Nevada and produced by the fader and association with dot NYC. Engineered and mixed by David Rogers Barry. Theme music by DJ premier. For fader uncovered merchandise, please visit shop dot the fader dot com. Thanks and see you next week. All that time at the wine store is keeping you away from your real life at the studio, the party and the after party. The prisoner wine company delivers bold and intriguing wines directly to your door, so you can stay focused on what's important. As an official sponsor of uncovered for a limited time, take 20% off and get shipping included on the star studded prisoner lineup by using code uncovered at the prisoner wine company dot com slash uncovered. When you order from the prisoner wine company, you're not just getting a bottle. You're getting a statement piece worthy of a spot on your mantle. But this is not for pretension. This is wine for creators and people with great taste. The prisoner collection features a one of a kind Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, and Pinot Noir. All made in the same iconic style as the prisoner red blend, the bottle that changed the game 20 years ago when the prisoner winemaker's first set themselves apart from the rest of the industry with their innovative blending techniques. And you know, if a meticulously crafted zinfandel is more your thing, check out saldo, which is made with grapes curated from over a hundred vineyards. 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"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

08:05 min | 4 d ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"Always like something cool going on with the percussion. Totally. Yeah, I mean, I think that we were hesitant to claim that, but it was certainly something that Jack and I were into, and be sweet. There's this another Xinjiang song called boomerang that's performed by the bunny girls and I think it was like an 80s like city pop type of bob that was from what I recall from that session I had played this very upfront plucky baseline that I just was like, I want to do something like this. And then Jack came up with this incredible baseline that is such a enormous part of what makes that song great, I think. Just for people who might not know explain what city pop is. I honestly don't know if I feel like you could maybe do it. It's like 80s. It was sort of like almost like was it? Was it just in Japan? It's like 80s funk. Like the 80s Japanese equivalent of yacht rock. So it's a little more moved on technology wise because it's the 80s and not late 70s, but it has that same basis of quite complicated R&B jazz steely Dan like that chord family with really slick production really lovely melodies. And it's like dancy, right? Cat power you talk about who's a big influence. She which is another person who famously kind of like locked herself into a room and came out with moon pics. Was that an earlier record? Was that like before the greatest? Is that okay? I think that that album is about her breakup from Bill Callaghan and she was like somewhere in the south in this house and he was like, maybe off on tour, and she was like freaking out alone and wrote this incredible haunting record. She has this incredible voice, but also just like, her earlier records are maybe a little bit more like low fire or just it felt accessible for me as a young woman that I could make an album like that. I discovered her it was like playing in the background right when the greatest came out and that's the one she went and recorded in Memphis with all the great musicians. Phenomenal. I was just remember ask someone, hey, what's this playing in the background? I literally thought they were going to say some 70s rare soul thing. They're like, that's cat power. And I remember that record feels like within your yeah. Yeah. Yeah, right show guy. But yeah, that's me. But cat power. Do you ever feel like you do hate that? I have grappled with it so much. You still like put me on edge and people say that, but now I'm just like, it's of course I'm retrograde. I mean, I think that there's a saying that my therapist likes to say or maybe it's my sister. I was so surprised as my therapist sometimes. But if it's hysterical it's historical. If you're getting so fired up, then there is something deep down that you're being a little bit just like can't pick your voice and obviously like it works for you. You know? Like I was reading George Saunders new book at swimming upon in The Rain, which is this book about Russian literary masters like Chekhov and turgenev and Google or whatever. And he was talking about he's like examining the form. And he's like talking about he wanted to write in this very sparse gruff Hemingway kind of way. And just wasn't working for him and then he wrote a joke on a piece of paper one time and heard his wife laughing from the other room. And he was like, I didn't want to be. Right. Funny, short story, George Saunders guy, but I just am. And to a certain extent, you can't really control what works for you. Even if you want to be like sparse masculine cool guy writer. Yeah. And your voice is like, just serves the thing. I mean, it's crazy for me because I would love to have George Sanders voice. I think many writers would love to be a funny, smart like quippy guy, but it's great to hear that he just has to accept that that's who he is in a certain extent. It's funny that so many people would love to be in your producer and known for this huge like iconic hits. But there's part of you that just like, I don't know if I want to be retrograde or whatever. Yeah, I think that anytime I rebelled against it intentionally, is always sort of a disaster. When my record version, which was sort of my breakthrough record that had valery and some other records on it came out and it was this huge thing. And the cool press like hated me the NMA was like, I was like, back on the enemy it was a magazine and it meant something. I was like public enemy number one. Yeah, they hated me in England because that whole album was covers of songs by radiohead the jam, the Smiths, really sacred cows and pop indie world, especially really English things. And it was so wildly popular here it was a bit of a novelty and I was known as Amy Winehouse's producer, but there I was having like top 5 hit off the top 5 hit and it was just like, I would have hated me. It was that critical master you're just like, you're forcing everyone to make an opinion about it because it's just omnipresent. And then for my second record, I was like, I'm not going to do any more. I'm just going to do sense. And there's songs on that record that I'm really proud of what I'm not proud of is that I agreed to be on the cover of the NME smashing a trumpet. I was trying to disown something so violently that was something that was at one point. And it was because they like to recognize, can we do it'll be fucking hilarious, you know, whatever. And yeah, like I said, there's things on that record I still like, but yeah, so now I think it comes with a little bit of being settled into age and realizing what your voice is like you said with the George saw on this thing that I do. I don't mind. And if I want to try something occasionally that's not that I do it and it's probably not even a successful because I think I am better. I don't love the fucking sounds of the 70s. I don't yearn for the emotionally. They didn't mean anything to me growing up. It's just literally the sound. It excites me. And probably a lot of things too. Are you working on a new record now? Uh, no. Okay. No. I'm in this interesting place where I like for the last 5 or 6 years I've always had three projects going at once. And then all of them came out in the same year. I had the soundtrack this record this book. And that was always the plan I was always kind of working and thinking about them and now I'm just like an empty vessel. I have no idea what my path is now really. Because you would have been on tour maybe otherwise, right? Yeah, I mean. I mean, we still will be on tour, but I just, I've always had something I've worked towards. I don't know if you're like this, but I'm never like, I'm not someone that is continuously working. It's kind of like on music at least. I have to turn on turn off. Okay. And so I don't know what my direction is. And it's hard right now because it feels like I'm at some kind of peak or I hope I'm not. But it's impossible to not feel that way where I'm like, well, it's all downhill. Yeah. But I'm sure a lot of musicians feel it's so frustrating because I feel like after the first record, your sophomore album is just like, oh my God, I have to avoid the sophomore slump. There's so much pressure. The third one will be so easy. And then you hit the third one and you're like, oh, but this is where it's really supposed to culminate with who I am as an artist. It's a statement. It has to be bombastic. The fourth one will be easy. And then you get to the fourth one and you're like, what am I supposed to prove now? I never really get no relaxing at any point in time. Okay, awesome. Yeah. Thank you for this. Yeah of course. So great to chat. Such an interesting intelligent talented creative engrossing force. It was such an interesting chat too I could have talked for another hour, but she had a heart out somewhere to go or something. It's amazing too to think that yesterday at 8 a.m. I knew nothing about Japanese breakfast and the talents of Michelle Zhang and her writing. And now I do. And my brain is the better for it. Take me out with the fade in..

George Saunders Bill Callaghan turgenev Jack George Sanders Chekhov bob Memphis Dan Japan NMA valery Amy Winehouse swimming radiohead Google England George Michelle Zhang
"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

08:11 min | 4 d ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"Amoeba video, which was interesting because there was no I read. Yeah, I literally. Thank you for spending so much time with me. I woke up at 8 a.m. yesterday and I had never heard a note of music and now I could write a dissertation that I enjoyed it 'cause there's a couple of things that I definitely wanted to talk about Nine Inch Nails. But when I said the thing about collaboration, and you said that you love the gorillas. I was like, if the gorillas ever make another album, I can't imagine Damon not wanting to have you on. Oh my God, that would be like a career. Have you ever had any interaction with him? No, but I am friends online with their live bass player. Okay. But he's very sweet and he's a big Japanese breakfast fan. To the point where he was like, can you write down be sweet to me baby on a piece of paper so I can get it tattooed in your handwriting? And I was like, wow. Did you do it? I haven't sent it, but I'm like. I have really bad handwriting, but yeah, I love that, man. I hope I get a call sometimes. Yeah. And the other thing is pretty hate machine, which is one of my favorite records. Did you listen to the new Halsey record? No, but I know that I will, and I know that I'll probably like it because he's never really put up anything that I don't enjoy. Have you listened to the Hollywood? Yeah. It feels very pretty. That's perfect. It's really exciting when you hear a producer's voice in that way. Yeah. And certain changes and obviously all of the sequencer stuff. I mean, it's just amazing that production can have that kind of voice. I mean, you were like that too. There's so many things about that fucking record. It doesn't get old to me. It's aged magnificent. It feels completely timeless and modern. Yeah. A lot of those decisions that he was making and that kind of voice, it's very much in this huge pop rock record that's out now. It sounds fantastic. And you said something as well that you were fascinated about the idea of locking yourself away to make a record. Is that not how you make records anyway? I picture you. I guess. I haven't done that kind of dangerous mentally dangerous. It's like pull all the chase out of it. Yeah, I mean, when I was younger, I had like, you know, not anything as fully formed, and I've definitely grown a lot as a composer. Producer since then, but I was just talking to my husband about how I would love to do that again. If only to just get the raw source. How you made the first record sort of going down to the chef? Yeah, yeah. I mean, but I think having a concentrated period of time are you like, don't leave until you have a record where you that was like more casualties. You know, like I'm going to be going down there to write some stuff. We'll see what happens, but to go into a space for like ten days and be like, I'm gonna leave with an album. Yeah. Is really exciting to me. And yentl. And told you, I want to talk about Barbra Streisand. Yeah, my mom loved Barbra Streisand, loved the movie lentil. And I think it's like a really underrated musical. It's just about a young Jewish woman who wants to study the tall mood on a quest for knowledge and so she cross dresses as a man. Now hearing you say it like that. It's like tootsie meets fiddler on the roof or something. I have not seen Tutsi and I've been reading that's on my list of movies. They made a pretty cheesy, like a little broad musical that. I mean, I'll go see any cheesy musical because I just like are you musical fan? Have you thought about participating in a musical? I'm kind of actually working on right now. Well, for the stage, but I don't want to jinx it so I'm not going to say, but yes, I was never growing up. I was never a musical theater person, but now I just maybe it's just having moved back to New York after being away for so long. I'll just see anything. Me too. I bought tickets to Broadway in October. It went up to see David Byrne. American utopia. I watch it on the plane just fell so hard and love that when I saw that the tickets went back up, I was like, I must. Yeah. I must go. I also thought, oh, I wonder if she's ever played shows in Korean then I saw something where you say you ended your last or was that the first show that you'd ever played in Korea? Yeah, we've played two shows in Korea. But that must have been kind of insane and emotional and that's how the bookends. Yeah, the book ends with the show and soul, and it was like wild to just, you know, that's another thing that I just never anticipated. I never had even the imagination to foresee me playing there. In the book, I talk about I was telling my aunt who's there, things are going really well. We played Coachella. She was like, sure, sure, you know. And then when I told her, you know, we're playing a show and so I'd love for you to come. She had like my cousin called me and she was just like, you know, my mom's really excited to see you. We're just curious who pays you? Is there like an office or something like that? And I was like, oh, you know, we get the money from the door and there's a promoter who looks a show and, you know, she's like, okay, and so she came to the show, and I was like, how many people? There's like probably like 500 people here and I was like, oh, like any other email this is my huasa, which is like the Korean word for like company or office. I was just like, this is like make a living. It was a really sweet moment. And it was just wild to see, you know, the city where I was born where my mom grew up and all of these kids, 'cause my mom's photos on the album on the vinyl. And all these Korean kids leaving the show into the night, the streets of Seoul with my mom's photo and this big square. It was surreal. But yeah, I don't know if you've heard of shinjin kyung. He's like this. We talked about him. Yeah, it's amazing. Actually, just the snippets that they played of his music when you mentioned him. I was like, I was like literally went on disk to order. Yeah, you should listen to the song. There's a song that's like 6 minute song called henny by this woman named Kim Jong mi. Who wrote the song for this woman. This incredible folk singer. And it's just this very slow orchestral build with this looping acoustic guitar. And I would love to hear your take on it. It's like so striking. You know, I had gone to this vinyl bar. Due to beat cafe in Japan in Tokyo. Is it a vinyl bar? Yeah, it's like it's like a bar where like a lot of musicians go to hang out. I'm not sure I've been told so many wonderful places like that in Tokyo, but I don't remember the name. Since Shibuya, there's kind of like a similar equivalent in Seoul where there was all these all these musicians go to this place called Jung jungle, which is this vinyl bar and soul when we were there early on bridges was actually his crew. Yeah, I went there and I never really listened to much Korean music and so much of what we think about when we think about Korean music is obviously KPop. But there's also this very rich 60s kind of like funk pop scene. And our promoter was telling us about this guy Shinji khang is almost like a sort of filled specter type without the mental illness and wrote for all these amazing girl groups from the 50s to the 80s and it's kind of like I think a recluse who just like this incredible psychedelic rock guitar player. And so we played as a song and we were all drunk and just floored. You know, it's just like so beautiful. And then the next day I went to like hang out with my aunt and my husband was telling you, oh, have you heard of Xinjiang? We just learned about the sky and just like, how do you know about that guy? Right. You're a mom and I used to sing the song by the pearl sisters called coffee hang on that was one of his songs. And then yeah, the book ends with us singing not to ruin it for you but the book ends with us like singing a shinjuku song together and karaoke that they used to sing together when we were kids. It was such a crazy thing because I never knew when my mom was ever even really into music. Yeah, I mean, obviously, created a huge, huge country, but even going around Thailand and places in Indonesia and getting the 60s records like there's this band called the gimbals from Indonesia that yeah, I mean, now there have been so many compilations of psychedelic funk in these. And like city pop is having this really cool city pop is amazing. And city pop is not that far sonically from some of jubilee, like just really slick 80s, but very groovy,.

Barbra Streisand Damon Korea David Byrne Hollywood Seoul Coachella Jung jungle Tokyo henny Shinji khang Kim Jong New York Japan Xinjiang Indonesia Thailand
"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

04:49 min | 4 d ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"Was songs that other people didn't take, but I know. That's what B suite was. I thought I was going to be giving it to someone else. Right. And then when we were finished with it, I was like, I love the song. I was like, this back pocket single I had for like two years, three years. Maybe that would be interesting as well for you to actually make the beat and the music and send it off to somebody else that you like to do the top line thing. You completely. Yeah, I mean, I don't know if I feel like as competent or confident as a producer in that sense to do that. But I am really interested for the next record and two very different things. One where I just completely produce it myself and one where I work with just like fucking like 8 writers and producers on things. That's one thing that I never understood was just like seeing the credits on a huge pop song where they're like 8 riders and they're like, how is that possible? Yeah. Sometimes it's because they've used an interpolation or a sample from a song that already had four riders or something, but yeah, when I look at that too, the songs are like crazy when you look at some of the ones you're like 16 riders like. And then someone tries to make a meme like Bohemian Rhapsody one rider like to compare the two songs or like that is some kind of statement on their merit. And it's just like I think especially as a woman in music, it was always really important to me to be like, I am the force behind this, but I think that it's just a very different time where it's like you see all of these fantastic, huge pop songs now that have a bunch of writers and producers on it. It's like, well, the more brains the better. Right. I'm torn in this path now. It's just like, I think that there are certain things that you can do when you are the sole producer writer on something. And you have this vision that's so singular and only you can figure it out when you're in a room by yourself and you have endless hours to tinker and not be judged by someone who's like waiting to move on. But then there's also something really spectacular that can happen from a bunch of greats in a room with coming with different ideas and all even just the idea of a writing group or the more perspectives telling you if something is great, the better it's going to be. Yeah. In a way. And I think it's also like all our music is so beat focus whereas doing some drum programming on a Michael Jackson song in the 80s or 90s certainly when it got you credit. Now we listen to music because maybe it's got this crazy snare drum or like a beep sound in the background that's like the air candy that brings us in. So like a DJ snake or somebody Diplo who has these drums of doom and brings them in like they get publishing because they're an equally valid reason of why people like the song or something. It's hard for me because I do come from a little bit of an old school mentality like that just like, well, that's arrangement. I basically cut myself out of publishing sometimes because even when we were writing, maybe it sound like rehab. I was like, well, change it to an a minor because it should be more jangly there or something. For me, that's like, maybe I have this lofty image of myself, but that's something that Quincy Jones would have said in the middle of a session, right? I don't necessarily need 25% of the publishing for that. But now I kind of wish I had it. It's sort of crazy when you look at the credits to a song like sicko mode and you see over 20 writers. But that is the postmodern songcraft world that we live in. You throw in a reference to an old tribe called quest lyric, maybe an old biggie sample, then you also have to clear the song that biggie sampled in his song that you sampled. And sicko mode is amazing. It's a mini epic, so there's a couple of producers that worked on the beat. Is Travis Scott cheating? Of course not. I mean, the song is undeniably a classic, and it's the better for having all these elements. But I also see why it's easy for an old school raucous snob to take shots and say, Bohemian Rhapsody was just written by one person or Eleanor Rigby by two. Although we do all know that that's a Paul song. Even when we sat down to write uptown funk, Bruno was like, hey, we've been doing this crazy jam live in our shows and we throw some lyrics to Trinity at James over the top of it for fun. And that was sort of the jump off point for uptown, and we were very happy to give Trinidad his publishing for helping inspire our tune. Plus, I'm a DJ, like all I have is songs going around my head all the time. So if I'm working on a song and I think of a cool hook to sample from an old rap tune or an old lyric throw in, I can't help myself, and I'm also happy to credit those original creators. Yes, of course it hurts sometimes to see your sliver of the song pie get smaller and smaller, but it is all in the name of a better song. I was surprised at such a dominant singular force who can write produced and do everything by herself like Michelle's honor, shared this magnanimous view on the modern creative process. But then again,.

Travis Scott Michael Jackson Quincy Jones biggie Eleanor Rigby Bruno Trinity Trinidad Paul James Michelle
"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

07:12 min | 4 d ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"I'm not, maybe just everyone feels like, oh, but I'm supposed to be doing this thing, but we're all supposed to be doing this other thing. This pandemic has had such an enormous impact on music. I'm starting to DJ out regularly for the first time in 18 months, and I have no idea what music to play. I mean, especially anything that came out in the last 18 months. For nearly 30 years, the only way I had to gauge if a song worked or if I really loved it was partly by playing it for a crowd. So I'm thinking to myself, have there even been any new songs in the past 18 months that are actually sort of bang as our am I just going to play truth hurts and going bad by Meek Mill and pretend the last 18 months didn't happen. Also, maybe do people want to forget the last 18 months happened? Do people crave a different kind of mood while in lockdown? IE is blinding lights forever tethered to our feelings of isolation. But the truth is, there's no real way to know until you get out and play it. And that seems to be the same for many musicians I know going back out on the road. This fear of do I still have it? Can I still connect with the crowd be removed? Well, they know how to let loose. Do I need to address the audience and the elephant in the room? IE the trauma of the past 18 months. We all know the connection between band and audience or DJ and dance for is one of the best feelings ever. From both sides of the equation. But when you haven't done it in such a long time, it's very easy to have all these anxious thoughts bounding about your head. That is until you just get out there and do it. You did the entire score for can you explain to me the video game? Old news. No, that's coming out at the end of this month. Yeah, what is that called? It's called sable. And it's an indie video game, and I grew up playing video games with my dad when I was a kid and I've always really appreciated that art form. And there are these two guys based in London who run a gaming development. It's really just the two of them making this open world desert exploration game called sable, and the art is really beautiful. It looks kind of like moebius, meets like a Studio Ghibli kind of artwork and yeah, I've been working on this soundtrack for like four years. And it's about to come out at the end of this month. And I spent a lot of my lockdown working on enabled and just like making ambient music. I mean, I used to be in the video games when I was growing up, but I don't really know that much about it now. So now, a video games you literally mean it's like a game that you buy for a console or everything online and sort of played. It's going to come out on Xbox. So it's like a legit. It's like a legit indie game, yeah. And I don't know. I've never done it before. It's a very new thing for me. Is it hours and hours of making music and you give it to them and they do what they want to do? Are they giving you scenes almost like a film to score? It's been different over the years, like I was so excited to get started. And they invited me on very it's been years. It's been four years. When they first brought me on, it was a lot of just documents of just explaining what areas were like, and then seeing little animated gifs of what they were working on and what the character looked like, what the desert looked like. And then they'd send me this dock that was like, you know, there's glow worm cave and there's like the dunes and the badlands and it has a lot of mountains in this area. And so initially, I was just so excited to get started that I would imagine what the glowworm cave would look like and I would start writing. I was doing a lot of it on just like midi plugins in Ableton like in the van. Like I remember touring Europe and I was like, in the sprinter, working on writing what I thought would look like a glowworm cave. And then a year would go by and I would see more photos or videos of the actual area and I'd be like, oh, that's not what I envisioned, and I would have to write a new track. And then another year would go by and I would actually get a playable build where I would go in and play the game and realize like, oh, what I thought, this campfire moment was going to be like, is totally different when you actually play it or this area is totally different. And so then I would write more material. But then because I had started so early, I had so much material that then whatever didn't work that I redid, I could find other areas to place it in. I mean, you seem like you have a good attitude about it, but it must be kind of annoying like made me instantly think of the times and like I've worked on a song, the singer leaves the studio and you work on it all night, adding all these arrangement things that you love and like you even come in the morning. They kind of just like, what did you do to the song? Just that instant dejection that I mean, honestly, it only takes like three minutes tops to get over. Did you have that a bit? Like when you're just like fucking I think because what I do is like, I don't do what you do ever, you know? And I've never been not to sound reductive, but for me, I've always just directed everything, you know. And I was so excited to be a cog to be a creative. Yeah, like I just wanted to be like the perfect employee creative employees in a way. It helped that I just really trusted their vision, I think that they're incredibly talented. I think I just got really lucky where they didn't really want that much change. They were just happy with whatever. I came up with very few times they were like, oh no, it's more of this vibe or just like great, put it in. Have you ever written a piece of music by collaboration or creation or is it always you and then you bring it to maybe the co producer or something like that? Is your creative processes at all lyrics melody music have to come out of your or do you write with people? On this new record, it was the first time that I kind of wrote with someone from the beginning for B suite. I worked with Jack Tatum from wild nothing and it was the first time that I just came I went into a room in LA with nothing. And like came up with a synth line, he came up with the base and the bead and then I kind of started writing the progression from there with the melody and the lyrics. Did you like that process? I think I'm more open to it now, but it is harder for me. Oh, I did this side project called bumper with this guy Ryan Galloway from this very underrated band called crying, who's like an incredible producer. And it was the first time that I kind of just wrote top lines on a couple of his very fully formed tracks and then I maybe had a couple of small suggestions of what to do musically. But it's not as fulfilling for me if I'm not. Like I actually was so miserable when I was like, I was trying on in LA for a brief period of time writing with other people to send out. I don't even know for yourself, but just to see if I could write with someone and I just hated it. Yeah. Because I also think that maybe just my role was always just like, oh, you're the top line right. Yeah. And it's not. No. It's exciting for me to do remain instruments guitar and keys when you write. Maybe it would be even interesting to switch it the other way. If it wasn't for you and you weren't as precious about it, 'cause I always feel like great artists make amazing stuff when they're writing in their head for someone else. I think she talks quite publicly that her whole last album.

Meek Mill moebius London Jack Tatum Europe Ryan Galloway LA
"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

06:56 min | 4 d ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"New thing that we've never even done before. Have you got to do any shows yet? Do you have them? Yeah, we went on tour with us. Oh, great. A couple of weeks ago. We did a two and a half week run and next week we're going to do 5 weeks. Where was the first show? The first show was in Silver Spring, Maryland, like outside of D.C. at the fillmore. I was the first time I'd played a film more. Which was crazy because I remember seeing a DVD of the yeah yeah, yes, play the fillmore in San Francisco. And so like that out of that room was like really exciting. That was actually the biggest show that we've ever the biggest headlining show that we've ever played. But yeah, I mean, it was like it was strange because we were coming into toro during the honeymoon period of COVID where it was like, it's over, you know? We were vexed and there's nothing to worry about anymore and we get to go back to our livelihood. But then like a week into it, it was the delta variant and getting masks and vaccine proof in place. And now it's just kind of like, I don't know what the future is going to look like. I don't know when this is ever going to come to an end and if shows are even the right thing to be doing. I imagine not only was it your first show, but I'm sure it was probably like most people in that crowds for sure, like I'm just trying to get a sense of like the energy was just like electric in this way or were you just like it felt great I feel like I felt like shy a little bit. I don't know. I don't really have much of a the banter. Well, no, I'm fine with banter, but I don't like leading the charge on a major communal issue. It's difficult for me to have confidence because I'm always thinking about so many different perspectives of the thing. I didn't feel right to give a speech I just wanted it to be an enjoyable evening where we just ignored the elephant in the room kind of. But yeah, I felt like, you know, my tour stamina was definitely majorly impacted by like a year and a half off. Of just being around 9 people all the time in a bus or like, you know, having to talk to a large group or just I used to be able to do multiple things on tour, like a lot of the book was written on tour, like in my downtime, and this was just like survival. I have to just do the one thing. I just don't have the capacity to do multiple things right now. I think a lot of us are still just getting used to getting back to work. Yeah, I had my first DJ gig and I don't really play as many shows. I mean, I used to do 5 gigs a week, but a year and a half off of something that I've done at least 200 times a year since I was 18 years old. I really was sort of having not an existential crisis because I knew I was going to do it, and it was probably going to be okay, but I was just writing myself with the fact that it's going to kind of suck. And I was like over practicing and there's something bad also about overpowering. It was his first show for like a DJ game. Oh, DJ. And I came off and I kind of thought it was terrible. I thought they were all going to pat me on the back and be like, it's okay. It's been a while. I thought I was going to get that and everyone was like, that was amazing. I think people the standards are much lower because they're just like a loud sound exciting. It's true. And I think that yeah, everybody was excited. I think it wasn't nearly as bad as I thought it was. And actually, yeah, my first session back in the studio with somebody who I had them at before was kind of like a big star. I nearly canceled three times like the week before because I'm like I haven't been in I probably don't have any idea. How does that kind of session? I can't even imagine. I mean, I guess I have some insight into that world, but yeah, it was with lizzo. We'd never worked together before. She's a giant star. She's extremely talented. She's I can tell she's a creative force as well. And I was just like, what am I going to do? I don't have the fucking crazy drums. I don't have the thing that everybody shit sounds like within huge 8 O 8s and things like I'm going to go in and what if I just sit at the piano and I pick up the guitar and like no core, like no interest in progressions come out? But do you have chord progressions at the ready? Are you just sitting there see what happens on the day? Well, I had just been so cold and rusty through COVID because I'd been in an air-b-n-b for the first 6 months in England. I was like, I'll finally learn able ten and I'll get learned that shit and I just I'm glad I learned it and taught myself it, but I will never be as good at able tennis people that started on that. And I was starting to hate my music because I do need. Is it a pro tools right here? Sorry. What do you work on? Well, I just miss having all my outboard gear and weird effects it to put things through that that might make one sound that inspires me or there's something maybe because of it's how I came up with sitting in an upright piano will sometimes inspire me more and something better will come out than a midi keyboard or just any of this old gear, probably because I'm used to it. It's not so much a crutches. It's like, I think it's just part of my DNA. So I was already hating all the music that I was making. And then I was about to go into the session with this big, you know, star and then I was like, well, I'll go four hours early, and I'll just try and fucking get out a couple little rough ideas, so at least when she comes in there's like four things hopefully she'll like one of them. And then it worked. It was fine. And I actually surprised myself, and I was like, oh, this is I love doing this. This is still the thing that when it locks into place that I'm probably supposed to be doing. I started doing this podcast during lockdown and other shit 'cause I was like, maybe I'm funneling out of music into the guy who makes music to the guy who talks about music. That's fine. I'm sorry to turn your podcast into my nose. It's really interesting to eat. There's a lot going on that has changed everyone in this industry is feelings about music, I think, because it's just very different. What we do requires being in a room with other people or a lot of people. I don't know. I think a lot of us are grappling with what? There's so much unknown of just like, what is our purpose right now? Yeah. I've always had this very pure feeling about art and music that, you know, it is the most important thing. And it was the first year where that really faltered and I was like, I don't know if it's the most important thing. There's so much going on in the world that it doesn't really feel like my little song is very important. Yeah. And I think that we just do a very different kind of thing. We contribute in a very different way, but it's certainly reliant on being able to survive first and coloring the world in this way that makes it enjoyable. But it was the first time that I think I really questioned what I was doing. And did you have an idea where their thoughts in your mind of what you should do instead or where you kind of just like devote my entire life to climate activism or volunteering to take care of people without housing or what I mean? Or get involved in politics. But.

Silver Spring fillmore lizzo toro D.C. Maryland San Francisco tennis England
"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

07:58 min | 4 d ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"It's some of the more conventional alt rock elements that make her music really stand out to me. We'll be right back in a moment. This episode is brought to you by HP plus. In a world full of smart devices, shouldn't your printer be smart too? It is with HP plus. These printers know when they're running low. So you always get the ink you need delivered right when you need it. Plus, you save up to 50% on ink. So you can print whatever you want. As much as you want, any time you want. That is pretty smart. Get 6 free months of instant Inc when you choose HP plus. Conditions apply, visit HP dot com slash smart for details. So was it quite a guitar record until you got with Ned and started adding the samples of it's not like I was some like fucking indie rocker upon kid, but I do sometimes lament the lack of guitars in any kind of cool music. It's like almost impossible to make something cool now and of its time and have guitars in it. You either have to be doing something really interesting and new with the thing or you just have to be so fucking cool yourself and interesting that just by nature of you being of the time. I did love that about even though your music has all these other things. What were your first loves? It seems like guitars, and that's quite an important thing that you've stuck to through your. Is that like an Oregon thing? Is that just like what you love? Yeah, because I grew up in Eugene, I grew up with Pacific Northwest India raw. What is that? Very vulnerable, kind of confessional lyrics with dynamic, softy, guitars. And who were some of the best Elliot Smith and death cab for cutie, we were really into modest mouse built to spill and granddaddy and so all the K records bands like mount Erie and microphones and we're going back to the 90s and early 2000s, were there any way to answer contemporarily sort of doing it at the time you did it or is everybody listening to this older generation of music? Well, I feel like modest mouse and death cowper like coming out with records and my teens and so that was what I was really into. So when you put out the first record, was there a moment that the show started get bigger, people are hitting you up, however it is social media. It was there a moment that you're like, oh, something's clicking in. Yeah, I mean, I think there was a you know how it is it's like there's a series of moments that happens. I have exceeded all of my grandest ambitions at this point in time. But we literally started touring in a Honda Odyssey minivan. Our first North American tour was 5 weeks opening for mitsuki in a minivan with a little turtle top where we put all of the merch. And even then I was like, something is happening. Because it was the first proper North American tour that we were on. We were getting paid $250 a night, and I was like, this is great. We're doing it. And then from there, it was just like slowly getting bigger. And I remember being on that tour and being like, if I ever get to wear mitsuki's at now as a headliner, selling out music hall of Williamsburg with our name on the marquee, I've made it. I can just retire. And then you get there and we did that maybe like a year and a half later. And as soon as you get there, you're like, what's next? Yeah, of course. So in the fader, you're just sold out tonight at what's the one in San Francisco. The great American music hall or something, I think that's the time. Yeah. Yeah. And you say an interesting quote, actually, I mean, you say a lot of interesting shit, but you're talking about how you have no chill in your sort of laughing about it and slightly apologizing for your energy. But you say something that I think a lot of people know, but maybe don't know how to either say it in the right way or like to pretend that they're modest or humble. You say, I'm aware I have this magnetism in this energy that when I'm in a room, yes, I'm aware of it and sometimes it's great and sometimes I like it and sometimes I'm like a little bit embarrassed of it. But I like that because I think most people are like I think that I'm sure Lady Gaga was aware she's sitting in a room like she can not be normal. And it's not just because she's famous. I think people who do something really magical on stage. It's not like that's the only part and there's something somewhere else in your body. Yeah, I mean, I don't even think that you have to be famous to have that. I think I just have always been a clown. You know? I mean, I think my mom was like that too, or she had this kind of energy where she was just chatty and social and unembarrassed and confident with who she was. And just had a way of connecting with people in a room and not everyone. I don't know. I've seen it's an extra so now are you feeling embarrassed overly modest 'cause you don't think that you have an extra, I do think that the people that I've worked with to keep bringing up, but the Amy's and those people, they don't necessarily court that attention, like you said, you don't have to be famous. There's just there's some kind of unquantifiable energy around. I mean, I certainly hope so. But I also feel like part of that is just, you know, I've never shied away from being the center of attention. It's almost like come fairly natural to me to be like a clown. You know, even in after school, activities were always just like leading some kind of tirade. I remember doing an interview with pitchfork and she was talking about reading my book and she was like, when you're talking about starting out in music, you never talk about being nervous. And I don't really remember ever feeling that way. In a weird way, like I feel more nervous about where I'm at now and proving that I deserve to be here than when I first started out because it was just like who cares. This is me and this is my creation and I think it's amazing and I want to share it and that's the path. You don't have that moment even a lot of people have the 5 minutes before you go on stage like those crazy nerves. I do, but I feel like I had exciting, you know. I mean, you would be like sociopath if you never felt anything. No, no, I have to have the worst. I mean, even going out before DJ gig it could be 300 people. It could be 10,000 at a festival. Vomited nervous. I mean, I've learned to control it a little bit because I realized that some of those are just impostor syndrome issues or whatever you want to label. That's incredible that you have impostor syndrome. Yeah. And that's another episode. I mean, even in that fader cover, you say you're a shark. You had a lot of anxiety and depression that you dealt with from adolescents on. So you just had to always keep busy and keep. Making things. Yeah, definitely. It's weird to hear this back. But yeah, I feel that's true. I feel like that's probably a lot of creatives where you just feel like I need to make something. Yeah. Otherwise I will just dwell on festering thoughts. Yeah. And luckily, you're good at a lot of things. I mean, actually, I love your videos. Thank you. Is savage? What's it called? Savage good boy. Savage good boy. Is that the most recent videos or okay. I've been rewatching the entire Sopranos because my wife has never seen it. So it's so good. Every day we watch at least three hours of Michael imperioli. So to suddenly having really not seen him, he's frozen in my mind as like the year 2000 Christopher multi. And you're a video. He looks so good. He looks amazing. And he's still the same beautiful sort of Italian like a fucking marble sculpture face, but white hair, beard, like a much different imperial. First of all, what was the.

HP mitsuki instant Inc Elliot Smith mount Erie Ned music hall of Williamsburg Pacific Northwest great American music hall Eugene Odyssey Oregon Honda India Lady Gaga San Francisco Amy depression
"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

08:36 min | 4 d ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"Hope or was it always just sludge? I mean, I think that we kept it going because we thought we were just paying our dues. And I think then in a way, I was. By the time Japanese breakfast started to take off, I felt so prepared of just like little things of like what to do when your pedals are fucked up and how to not freak out if, you know, just like things to avoid. We were just smart about it by the time that it started working out. Did you feel like also that you liked watching a lead vocalist adjuster? We haven't done any of these really in person. I know I wanted to thank you. I just really wanted to see your studio and I feel like my Internet is always like fucked up, so I don't want to do it soon. But I'm a huge fan. So I wanted to meet you. When I found out that I got to do this, I was like listening to them irresponsibly. Thanks. That's very sweet. Yeah, this is so much fun to do this in my actual studio walk in and see you looking at cents and gear. So when Japanese breakfast started to gain this popularity in acclaim, did you at least feel like you'd earned it a little because of all the times that you had spent in these other things sort of slogging it out on the road? Yes. Absolutely. Yeah. I felt like a late bloomer, but I was really grounded by the time that things started happening for me. I was able to build a really good thing whereas I think that if it had happened right away for me, I would have taken it for granted. Yeah. For me, that moment happened a little later in life I was ready 31. I think you are how old 24? Oh gosh. I was like 26 when psycho pump came up, I think. So yeah, I definitely thought that my career was I had been knocking at it for ten years, maybe even like 13 counting 18 years old when I got my drum machine making demos. And at 31, I'd had a that came out that sold ten copies. Also, a lot of people that I really like that was sort of my peers are hard to even believe, but Kanye later on danger mouse just were skyrocketing. And I was like, and I had to just look at it and not in some really sad solving myself to sleep. I was like, maybe I'm not as good at this as I thought I was and maybe I love journalism actually, like you said, there was a lot of things I was doing music for Hyundai commercials in Japan just to keep the lights on. And I just was like, well, fuck it. If I'm not good enough to sort of make hits I might as well make the music that I like. And I just started making shit that I liked, and then I made this record version, which at the time I was making and then I met, obviously, Amy Winehouse and Lily Allen and people who had enormous amounts of talent. But I think it was because I was just like, well, if I'm never gonna make a hit, I might as well make the shit that I like and there's something about they call it what the power of surrender. Do you think oh my gosh, yeah, I've never heard that, but that is absolutely what happened to me. I mean, after my mom died, I was like, this is the sign that it's over. I was already floundering from after I got out of college to like 25 in this band. And I was like, you know, this is a sign you're 25 years old. It's time to grow up. And after my mom died, I moved to New York to get a job. And advertising or literally was out to just get a job doing whatever it took to make money. Yeah. I know your must be so exhausted talking about your mom and you just wrote a book about it, but just for people who might not know the full story because it is quite woven and we don't have to overdo it, but this story that the book is about the grief of losing your mom who you're extremely close with. And that really happened in between these two bands, right? Yeah, so I moved back to Eugene Oregon where I'm from in 20 14 and my mom had a really aggressive stage for cancer and I lived there as a caretaker for 6 months and after she died. I lived there for another 6 months helping kind of pack up the house. And my one quiet insular thing that was separate from just the slog of helping my dad pack up this house was I would go to this little shed at the bottom of the property, my parents lived out in the country. And I would write songs about what had happened because I just didn't know how to communicate with other people, which is odd because I'm very open book chatty gal. And I just didn't know how to talk to people about what had happened. And so this was my way of communicating that to myself or sorting through it. And I just had no ambition at all of this record that I was making in this cottage. It was just for me. And then over the next year, I worked on arranging it. I had a friend Ned eisenberg, who had an apartment and crown heights, and I would just go over there and the two of us would mix it after I got off of my 9 to 5 job. I would drive in rush hour traffic to crown heights. And he would work on the songs in FL studio and we would a brilliant producer and originally we were just going to be mixing it, but he started adding all these samples and synth lines to things I had recorded in Oregon. And then I just thought, you know, I'm going to trick a small label to put out this record and I sent it out to ten very small, not even like known indie labels. And no one wanted to put it out except for this very small label and frostburg Maryland called yellow K records that was funded by the skies vape shop in prospero, Maryland. I told them a friend I'm not going to tour. I've done that. It's not going to happen for me. I have this 9 to 5 job. I just want to press 500 copies on vinyl. And over the next ten years, maybe we'll slowly sell them. Yeah. And then he was like, okay, I'm gonna hire a PR person. I was like, why? You know, there's your waste of money. And I actually didn't in the press release, I didn't tell anyone that it was this record about losing my mom, but I had put her photo on the cover and had been very open in the interviews that followed. Is this the first full length? This is the first. And so I think because I had surrendered and decided that this was never going to happen for me, because it was like. Oh no, now it's your time. Yeah. It's strange because listening to it and knowing a little bit about your story just from reading that fader cover. It's deceptively joyful in some ways like I thought that record it combines so many things I love. It has the synthesis these amazing maladies. It's just like a swirl of sound because everything's kind of just like distorted the right amount where it's just bleeding into each other. You can't tell what instruments doing. Like my bloody Valentine's like the go team. It's like a lot of shit that I really love and I probably should go back and read the lyrics at some point because I was just like, oh, this is like, I wouldn't say fun. That sounds right, but I always am a little bit like melody and beat first and then like lyrics second, but that was the record that you were really channeling your grief and what was going on with your mom too. Most of the songs on there. Some of them are old songs that we kind of can't. I think the first thing that struck me about psycho pump was the guitars. I just assume because this is some super cool alternative band with the sci-fi name that it would be some sort of eccentric post electronic kind of thing. And I guess there's some edict in my head that guitars have stopped being cool. We've run out of ways to make them interesting. And now since and program music at the dominant force in alternative music, whatever alternative music means. You get these indie bands following all over themselves to reinvent themselves to sound like new R&B, and I find it all a little exhausting. So when I heard psychopomp in the guitar, I was like, fresh. I mean, maybe it's the kind of old guy I mean, but I do miss guitars. And I'm not even really a guy. But an instrument is really only as cool and progressive as the person wielding it. And the songs that it's being used to play. So it makes sense that in this reinvention of shoegaze and indie part through Michelle's owners lens, it does feel vibrant and exciting because she is vibrant and exciting. I came up listening to bands like lush. My bloody Valentine and Sonic Youth who made wonderfully inventive music with guitars by playing with sonics and tunings. And I feel some of that here. As Zhang music progresses, the production and sonics do evolve. But inversely,.

Ned eisenberg Lily Allen Amy Winehouse skies vape shop Kanye Eugene Oregon Hyundai Maryland crown heights Japan frostburg prospero New York cancer FL Oregon Michelle sonics Zhang
"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

01:41 min | 4 d ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"Of ESPN college football, ESPN, the ESPN logo and ESPN college football are registered trademarks of ESPN incorporated. Yesterday I kind of woke up and this is the first time I was like, oh, I fucking love this. No, I read the cover article first. Then I listen to the first album. I was like, wait, I've been missing this in my life for 5 years. I get combines. A lot of things I really love and it's great. And the second and third record. And then I saw that you wrote a New York Times Best Seller. So by four p.m., I'm riding my bicycle to mcnally Jackson to get a copy of the book. I actually called the bookstore. I was like, do you have a copy of crying in the H 5 and the guy? Kind of snicker down the phone as if I'd called tower records that name and like, do you have Guns N' Roses appetite for destruction? He's like, yeah, we wrote a few copies of that. So I just had such a Japanese breakfast day. And then by the end of the day, like most New Yorkers I was scooping buckets of water out of my basement. Oh my God. I'm Mark ronson, and this is the fader uncovered podcast. In this interview series, I'll be speaking with some of the most influential and groundbreaking musicians in the world. From genre defining stars to avant garde trailblazers about their lives and careers. Each episode will be rooted in these musicians iconic fader cover stories and institution that over the past two decades has told artist stories like no other. The podcast is the chance for us to talk about the past present and future, reflecting on their breakthroughs, diving into their lives when they're covered hit shelves and discussing what the future might hold now. And it's an opportunity for me to speak to some of the artists I most admire. This.

ESPN mcnally Jackson football New York Times Mark ronson
How Sean Spicer Transitioned to a Career in Politics

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:31 min | 2 weeks ago

How Sean Spicer Transitioned to a Career in Politics

"Back to one. On one with my good france sean spicer. So let's finish this story how you got fascinating career. Transitioning from asia studies japanese into politics running campaigns. How'd you end up in the white house. Working the president so i i was mobile ice in the navy from two thousand eight to two thousand eleven. I got off active duty in basically january. Two thousand eleven. I went on terminal leave. And so i was looking for the next professional move My wife and i wanna start a family. We didn't really think politics anymore was the right. You know the most stable and conducive to to raise kids and so i was looking for some corporate stuff and a mentor. My said there's this. New chairman of the rnc has just been elected. Would you guys should talk. We met we hit it off. My wife was like look. This is probably what you want to go to the national party. Sort of like the major leagues and she understood how important that wasn't said okay. It's a two year gig. Go for well. We finished the first two years and we really wanted to change the party and make some Some huge changes in how we did business meaning. We wanted to shift away from all adds get more into a data specific model where we helped candidates up and down the ballot reform. The primary system reform the debate processing systems. We stuck around for two more years. That made it four. We did very well in the midterms. And then you not sticking around for presidential as sort of like walking out for the super bowl and so again. I look my is literally my god. It's now going with my six year so we did

Sean Spicer White House France Asia Navy RNC National Party Super Bowl
Volvo recalls older cars; air bag inflators can explode

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 weeks ago

Volvo recalls older cars; air bag inflators can explode

"There is a recall for older Volvos due to major airbag issues Volvo is recalling nearly two hundred and sixty thousand older cars in the U. S. because the front driver's airbag can explode and send shrapnel into the cabin the recall is in addition to one made in November of twenty twenty that was done after an unidentified U. S. driver was killed the latest recall covers S. eighty sedans from two thousand one to two thousand six and S. six days from two thousand one through two thousand nine the problem is similar to widespread trouble with airbag inflators made from bankrupt Japanese air bag maker Takata I surely handler

Volvo U. Takata
Trains packed with commuters as Japan fully ends emergency

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Trains packed with commuters as Japan fully ends emergency

"Japan's ending its coronaviruses state of emergency with citizens back using public transport in high numbers I have two kids busy Shinagawa train station a sea of mosque wearing people rush to work with many returning to the office he's often months based at home emergency measures are ending off the more than six months following a steady full in new cases over the past few weeks as the country tries to rejuvenate its economy outgoing prime minister Justin he day single has thanked the Japanese for that patience and cooperation but he's urging them to stick to that basic antivirus misuse experts attribute the drop in cases the vaccination programs on social distancing efforts on Charles Taylor that's what

Shinagawa Train Station Japan Justin Charles Taylor
Fumio Kishida wins Japan leadership race, setting him up to become prime minister

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:17 min | 3 weeks ago

Fumio Kishida wins Japan leadership race, setting him up to become prime minister

"Japan's ruling liberal democratic party or ldp held its leadership runoff election. The last round was between two former foreign ministers. Kishida fumio and kotaro. Mr kushida came out on top. The ldp has dominated japanese politics since its founding in the nineteen fifties. So the party's new. President will be the country's new prime minister when tsuyoshi he steps down toy so in his victory speech. Mr kishida said that from today. I will with all of my energy. Get straight to work. How and where he will channel that energy though is still something of an open question as is how much. The electorate will support him. This year's election for the presidency was more unpredictable than most heading into the vote. Today there was some some genuine uncertainty about who would emerge the victor noah. Sneider is the economists. Tokyo bureau chief but this kind of free for all uncertain circus like for the mvp at least election campaign. I think really master distracted from deeper and more worrying trend in japanese politics namely growing voter apathy and disillusionment from the political process and given that apathy. How do you think it is that. Mr kishida came out on top. The dynamics of this election were a bit complicated. But let's unpack them. Konno tato former foreign and defense minister was the favourite in public and the favourite amongst younger diet members in the ldp who saw him as potentially more transformative figure who also crucially might help them keep their jobs in elections that are looming in later. This fall masan however is unpopular amongst. The party's old guard and and they see him sort of unreliable uncontrollable. He has a reputation for being a bit of a maverick so he won. The the vote of the rank and file in the first round of the party's election but he didn't win enough support amongst his colleagues to win the election outright so it went into a second round run-off there to she support from within the party really proved decisive. It is i think a result that reflects the enduring strength of the ldp's establishment and is in some ways the kind of rebuke of public

LDP Mr Kishida Kishida Fumio Kotaro Mr Kushida Tsuyoshi Liberal Democratic Party Victor Noah Sneider Konno Tato Japan Tokyo
North Korea says hypersonic missile made 1st test flight

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 weeks ago

North Korea says hypersonic missile made 1st test flight

"Hi Mike Ross you're reporting North Korea says it tested a new hypersonic missile North Korea says it has successfully tested a new weapon a hypersonic missile it implied is being developed as nuclear capable the announcement came a day after the south Korean and Japanese military said they detected North Korea firing a ballistic missile into the sea the U. S. Indo Pacific command said the launch did not pose an immediate threat the latest launch by North Korea followed through rounds of missile tests earlier this month at the U. N. General Assembly Monday north Korea's U. N. ambassador demanded the Biden ministration permanently and the joint military exercises with South Korea hi Mike Rossio

North Korea Mike Ross U. S. Indo Pacific Command U. N. General Assembly Biden South Korea Mike Rossio
The Life of Patsy Matsu Mink

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:19 min | Last month

The Life of Patsy Matsu Mink

"Hat matsu. Takemoto was born in pya. Maui hawaii territory. On december sixth nineteen twenty-seven patsies grandparents emigrated from japan to work in hawaii. Sugar plantations growing up as a third generation. Japanese american patsy witnessed heavy discrimination towards japanese americans and indigenous hawaiians when patsy was fourteen years old fighter jets bombed pearl harbor. Patsies father was subsequently taken by authorities one night and heavily questioned. Though her dad returned safely. The next day patsies family lived in fear from that point on patsy later said that that moment made her realize that one couldn't take citizenship and the promise of the. Us constitution for granted hats. He graduated for maui high school as both class president and valedictorian. She went on to study to different colleges in the mainland. Us before moving back to hawaii in nineteen forty eight. Patty graduated from the university of hawaii. With a bachelor's in chemistry and zoology patsies original career goal was to become a physician but no medical school would accept her so she decided to change career paths and instead pursued law she applied to university of chicago's law school and accidentally got accepted as a foreign student at the time. Patsy was one of only two women in her class in nineteen fifty one. Patsy earned her. Jd and married graduate student. John francis mink a year later. The couple had their only child. Patsy faced a lot of discrimination for being a working mother and having an interracial marriage many major chicago law firms rejected her application so her family relocated to honolulu in nineteen fifty-three patsy. He became the first japanese american and woman to pass the bar and practiced law in hawaii but many law firms in hawaii still turned her away instead. Patsy went into private practice and taught business law at the university of hawaii.

Patsy Takemoto Hawaii Maui High School Maui Pearl Harbor Japan University Of Hawaii John Francis Mink Patty United States University Of Chicago Honolulu Chicago
Should All Adults Get a COVID-19 Booster Shot?

Woman's Hour

02:02 min | Last month

Should All Adults Get a COVID-19 Booster Shot?

"All adults have a cave boost up on. What will the government sent me thinks. Say with the health secretary Javid saying he was confident. A booster program would start later. This month is something. The joint committee on vaccination and immunisation is grappling with and we tending to scientists to. Give us the answers on friday. The face off dame sara gilbert the scientists who led the team that developed. The oxford vaccine was splashed across the front of the daily telegraph. Saying there shouldn't be a mass booster program. She backs advice to give boosts to vulnerable people. Dame sara gilbert spoke to me on friday. And i also where the people should have a booster. If they're offered one it's a very complicated situation and newspaper. Headlines tried to get of the whole situation encapsulated view words which are going to excite people's interest. That's not actually a good way to be putting across the message here. We need to think about the different people in the population. It's really clear that people would compromised immune systems benefit from having a third dog vaccine. That doesn't mean that that s gunshot apply to everybody and we also need to be thinking about when boosters will be given Because if we give them to everybody very early then we might face a situation of saying the fact that boost does house declined before we actually see a more cases coming in winter season. Which is when we would expect to see cases of ours like this so it's not something that you can put across really in the newspaper headline. It's a lot more complicated than that. What i like to think about though is where we using vaccine doses in the wild and the problem is that we simply don't have enough awesome if we have enough doses to vaccinate everybody in the world with two devices we wouldn't be having to have the discussions about should we use them in one country or another. I'm not so so very complicated because we have to think about which vaccines survivable where they all. The expiry date for them is with us. Particular batch is that we have now whether it's feasible transport them

Javid Joint Committee On Vaccination Dame Sara Gilbert Daily Telegraph Oxford
Hugh Hewitt and Dennis Prager React to the Attacks from 9/11/2001

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:16 min | Last month

Hugh Hewitt and Dennis Prager React to the Attacks from 9/11/2001

"This is hugh hewitt including The worst broadcast. I've ever had to make and i've made a lot of bad broadcast in the middle of the last election. Peggy noonan wrote in the wall street journal that the day would come when the terrible big bad thing would happen and that she feared it would be soon and for that reason she preferred president bush over vice president gore. The terrible big thing has now happen and it will take some time for the enormity of it to settle in across the united states. So large is the scale of the devastation. They're joining me. Now is Dennis prager who will be taking over me along many of these. Salem radio network stations dentists three of these four airplanes which were hijacked and crashed headed for los angeles the devastation. That will see out sort of anticipated here. The big horrible thing happened. Listen i You know. I'm choosing my words carefully for with you and And my broadcast Many of the stations. You're on after you The a war has been declared against the united states and war has been declared against western judeo-christian civilisation and and i measure those words of measured. They're not they're not new to me. I have believed that. There is this war when when people screaming. Iran death to america that america's the the satan people take that stuff seriously. We laugh or a lot of i. Don't little of americans just laugh at those slogans but if enough people believe that the america is satan that it is very appropriate thing to Murder as many men women and children who are satanic as as possible as I have come to expect from you. Dentist underscored something. I hadn't thought of there will be rejoicing around the world today. In some course exactly there will celebrations and parades. That's right sharing. This is how this national holiday in. Tehran in sudan in among palestinians exactly As the japanese general. What did he say. We woke up the sleeping giant. we will regret it. That is what i think has happened

America Hugh Hewitt Peggy Noonan Dennis Prager The Wall Street Journal President Bush Gore Salem Los Angeles Iran Tehran Sudan
Race to Succeed Japan PM Suga Heats up

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:04 min | Last month

Race to Succeed Japan PM Suga Heats up

"Is now a wink. Since japan's prime minister yoshihiko super said he is to stand down as leader of the ruling. Ldp the race to succeed him is already in full swing. Well let's get the latest now for monaco's tokyo bureau chief in asia editor funeral wilson Good to have you with us. Thanks for joining us. Fear with good very good afternoon. Good morning to you. And now has the announcement of sucres departure really sunk in among the japanese yet. I mean it was. It was quick. It wasn't necessarily great surprise but it was a bit of a shock. Actually it was surprised he actually resigned. Honestly that was a shock because on thursday he was saying he was going to stand for re election as leader. If the ldp of course everyone knew this election was going to happen at the end of the month. Trenchant temper no surprise there but it looked like he was gonna run. He was getting all his Pieces in place softening up the right people look like he had and then suddenly on friday. He said no. I'm resigning and it seems that he was really hope by the The big the heavyweights in the party. It was time to go so it was a surprise. It has sankei. And i think there's been a lot of dissection in the media and the candidates are now emerging so who are the front runners in all this well. It looks at the moment. I mean lots of names have been mentioned obviously and anyone who follows japanese politics and you have to follow it closely to know who lost these people are but it looks like it's going to be a three way race basically. You've go tara conner. Who's the front runner. He's the man in charge of vaccines at the moment administrative reform. He's the one most people think he certainly has popular support. He's he's a bit of a loose cannon in some ways. He's very good at disrupting. He's not always good building consensus. I think he's the front runner. You have to mir kishida former foreign minister and sunai takeuchi. Who's the wildcard. I would say former intern faz. Minister earned would be japan's first female prime minister and she is being back rather curiously. I have to say patients up. Who's obviously still very influential. But in every other sense i would say she's an outlier.

Yoshihiko Super Wilson Good Monaco Tokyo Japan Asia Tara Conner Mir Kishida Sunai Takeuchi
Apple App Store Changes Fail to Stem Push for Overhaul Bill

Mac OS Ken

01:54 min | Last month

Apple App Store Changes Fail to Stem Push for Overhaul Bill

"Peace offerings and settlements between apple and developers won't stop congressional moves against app stores couple of weeks ago apple announced a proposed settlement with smaller developers. Perhaps the biggest concession offered by apple was the one that would let developers use communications such as email to share information about payment methods outside of their ios app. A few days later apple settled with the japanese government that settlement included a pledge to let reader apps such as net flex and spotify. And who knows. Maybe some that actually involve reading under terms of the settlement apple will let reader apps include an in napa linked to their website for users to either setup or managing account and sign up using a non app store. Payment method will be possible according to a piece from macrumors. Maybe they think it's not enough. Maybe they just wanna look tough. Whatever the reason the piece from apple and cider has at least one. Us senator saying legislation up ending up stores. Run by apple and google will go forward last month. A bipartisan group of senators introduced the open up. Markets act speaking the bloomberg one of the. Bill's sponsors senator. Amy klobuchar democrat of minnesota. Said though apple is taken some small steps to respond to criticism of its anticompetitive conduct. They did not go. Nearly far enough there is growing momentum to pass the open up. Markets act to finally address apple and google twin monopolies. And i will continue working with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to get it done. You didn't ask but i'll tell you anyway. What annoys me is. They're gonna point to this as a thing that they got done

Apple Japanese Government Napa App Store Amy Klobuchar Google Bloomberg Minnesota Bill United States
Vaccine Chief Kono Popular Favorite to Become Japan's Leader

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last month

Vaccine Chief Kono Popular Favorite to Become Japan's Leader

"Japan's vaccine chief is looking like the favorite to become the nation's next leader Indian polls showed the outspoken cabinet minister in charge of vaccinations Tero Colo has the most popular support to become the country's next leader current prime minister Justin Heidi soon because something announcement last week that he will not seek another term has opened the way full array of candidates single spaced nose diving popularity over the government's coronavirus response fifty eight year old co no a graduate of Georgetown University and fluent in English is a rarity in Japanese politics usually dominated by elderly man he's got many fans among younger people with whom he communicates via social media I'm Charles Taylor this month

Tero Colo Justin Heidi Japan Cabinet Georgetown University Government Charles Taylor
Study Reveals the Secret to Longevity in Japanese Centenarians

Ben Greenfield Fitness

01:59 min | Last month

Study Reveals the Secret to Longevity in Japanese Centenarians

"To ancient things. A new study is pop. The is a japanese study and his japanese study was looking at a group of japanese centenarians. Who seem to have these seemingly magical powers. They have an average age of one hundred seven amongst the healthiest longest living humans on earth protected from chronic diseases that that inevitably haunt a lot of the rest of us as we age like obesity and diabetes hypertension and cancer. But what they found these people that really stood out was the trillions of microbes that lived in their gut It wasn't the amount of the microbes but it was. It was the composition of those gut bugs. The composition of those gut bugs basically. They had a bacterial signature. Those similar to the strains of bacteria in in each and every single one of the centenarians but a lot of them had a very similar microbiome in one strain in particular stood out and it was type of bile acid. Okay or is it a bacteria that synthesizes bile acid now bile acids what you might know. Is this kind of boring bodily fluid that's commonly known for digesting fats. But it's now being called as a class of entering hormones hormones that go beyond their classic role in fat digestion and absorption. So what they found. Is that these bile. Acids helped to protect sensitive gets infection and other environmental stressors. So it's really interesting because we know that that the gut bile acid content to decrease a little bit as one ages in the secondary by lasts a really powerful so they've done studies in mice before they looked at the these these microbiomes humans and they found that the gut bile acids to regulate immune cells and prevent some dangerous microbes from taking over the gut. And what a what they looked at in the seniors a particular group of gut bugs called or owed oral back to rasaie adora backdoor and that turned out this little bile acid called eyeso- aloe lithocholic acid or eyeso- aloe

Hypertension Obesity Diabetes Cancer
Suga Bows out of Party Vote

TIME's Top Stories

02:15 min | Last month

Suga Bows out of Party Vote

"Japan's prime minister you shahida suge is resigning. Here's what that means by amy guna. You'll shahida suge is bowing out. As prime minister of japan amid increasing anger over his government's handling of covert nineteen in the wake of the tokyo olympics. He announced friday that he will not seek reelection as leader of the liberal democrat party or ldp at the end of september suge age. Seventy two became prime minister just one year ago after long-serving prime minister shinzo ave stepped down over health concerns. He said during a party meeting friday that he wanted to focus on the corona virus pandemic instead of continuing on as the head of the ldp with a general election upcoming in the fall. Sagoes resignation paves the way for a new leader of the world's third largest economy. Here's what the know about subas resignation and what it means for japan. Why is suge stepping aside after just a year in office. Soukous popularity has plummeted over his handling of the corona virus. Pandemic japan is currently battling its largest wave of the virus since the pandemic began subas insincere and ambiguous comments and actions on containing the pandemic every single day have may japanese citizens very frustrated says yoshikazu cotto a research fellow at the racquet insecurities economic research institute in tokyo. The public nowadays basically does not trust the government at all suka hoped the olympics would help boost his popularity but despite a record medal count for japan has ratings sank even lower. The number of covert nineteen cases has surged to all-time highs in recent weeks in japan due to the more contagious delta variant. The japanese public angry after subas decision to hold the international event in the midst of a pandemic as increasingly ignored government pleas to stay at home support for the prime minister was below thirty percent in both july and august according to polls by local media suge has long been under pressure due to criticism of his corona virus response and a host of other issues says christie davila the deputy director of the asia program at the german marshall fund of the united states.

Shahida Suge Subas Amy Guna LDP Japan Shinzo Ave Liberal Democrat Party Tokyo Olympics Yoshikazu Cotto Racquet Insecurities Economic Suka Christie Davila German Marshall Fund Asia United States
Smart Bathrooms: Are They a Smart Decision?

Double Tap Canada

02:15 min | Last month

Smart Bathrooms: Are They a Smart Decision?

"You told me the other day the your bathroom. You're what do you call the restroom. Cova i have no my bathroom. Nassar bathroom exists. Yes yes right well in your master bathroom yes you've made it super smalls from my understanding. I may have got a little bit farther than i should have. Legal march japanese toilet I do japanese. It's a it's a canadian made. It's called lovie The toilet as you approach it. The seat will open no way allies. Swear it has remote control as a built-in Function which you heat of the heat of the water that speeds up your little touchy Control the intensity of the headwaters so you get a good cleaning it goes battled for all the crevices and you can also control the The extension and the position. that's the For the meal cleaning. Then there's the female cleaning hop today it's Then there's A fan that pulls out the air so that when you're doing something a little bit more odorous gets rid of that for us. It doesn't really comes with. Does that airlock does it. Yeah it's eco-friendly. When you flush it it does it. Expose water in very nicely. Keeps very little water What else does it have. A heated seat so keeps you nice and toasty nice. Yeah that's nice always good. You can control the heat of the seat as well and of course the water and everything else And that's about all that's all the toilet does. Oh that sounds amazing. Thing hang on more. Did i mention the shower. That is controlled by voice so mohan Which is very famous. Zooming of you know taps a system. Could you by mowing the letter. You and it's a whole shower systems in my shower. All you have got the rain shower thing and the handled telephone handle type thing. And i've got a little keypad like little keypad on there. And that keypad connects via wifi network. And there's an alexa skill for that and I can literally say Start my shower. Preset to whatever i do and it will turn on the right thing. It'll get the temperature and it keeps it at the proper temperature of the entire

Nassar Cova Lovie Mohan
Moderna, Japan Partner Recall 1.6 Million Doses

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last month

Moderna, Japan Partner Recall 1.6 Million Doses

"U. S. drugmaker Madonna ink and its Japanese pot now recording more than one million doses of its coronavirus vaccine the decision to suspend one point six three million doses came off the confirmation that contamination of some of its vaccines reported recently was tiny particles of stainless steel to keep the pharmaceutical companies in charge of sales and distribution in Japan of the mid and the vaccine the company said the contamination came from the process of putting stops on the files I did Spanish factory Japanese officials said about how many people had received shots from the data files before the problem surfaced I'm Karen Thomas

Japan Karen Thomas
How Much Do You Know About Planet Mercury?

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:02 min | Last month

How Much Do You Know About Planet Mercury?

"Admit it isn't the sexiest planet. There's no atmosphere like venus. It isn't an object of exploration like mars. It isn't big like jupiter in. It doesn't have the beautiful rings of saturn. I'm guessing most of you haven't really given to thoughts about mercury. And i'm reasonably confident in saying that because most space agencies and astronomers don't really think about mercury either more on that in a bit i i should probably do a quick tale of the tape for mercury. Mercury is about point. Four astronomical units from the sun and an astronomical unit is the average distance from the earth to the sun the massive of mercury is approximately thirty eight percent that of earth. the planet has no discernible atmosphere. Which makes it more like the moon than any other body in the solar system. One of the most unique aspects of mercury is that a day on mercury is longer than its year. One year on mercury is eighty seven point nine earth days and one solar day on mercury is one one hundred seventy six days. Mercury is the second hottest planet in the solar system behind venus. The only reason why venus's hotter is that it has an incredibly thick atmosphere that traps heat. Mercury has no atmosphere whatsoever during the day surface. Temperatures on mercury can reach eight hundred and forty degrees fahrenheit or four hundred fifty degrees celsius. Whoever on the nightside of the planet temperatures can dip down to minus two hundred seventy five fahrenheit or minus one hundred and seventy celsius mercury was known to ancient peoples. But they didn't really know much about it because of how close it is to the sun it would only appear just before sunrise and the eastern horizon or just after sunset on the western horizon. The name mercury came from the roman. God mercury who was the messenger of the gods ancient china. It was known as the our star and in modern chinese korean japanese and vietnamese. It is literally known as the water star. The indians associated the planet with buddha and the day wednesday and the germans associated with the god odin and oddly enough wednesdays the mayan people associated mercury with an owl and thought that it was the messenger to the underworld

China
1.6 Million Moderna Doses Withdrawn in Japan Over Contamination

Mark Levin

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

1.6 Million Moderna Doses Withdrawn in Japan Over Contamination

"Japan suspended use of about 1.7 Million doses of Moderna vaccine after contamination was found an unused vials and that's where his concern of a supply shortage as the country tries to accelerate vaccinations. The health minister says contamination was reported from multiple vaccination sites. Officials say some doses might have been administered, but no adverse health effects have been reported so far, Takeda pharmaceutical company Japanese drugmaker in charge of sales and distribution of the vaccine in Japan, said. Decided to suspend the use of doses manufactured in the same production line as a safety precaution, has Madonna to conduct an emergency investigation and told medical institutions and organizers to stop using the vaccine produced in Spain and share the production numbers that may be affected. I'm

Japanese Drugmaker Japan Takeda Madonna Spain
Japan Suspends 1.63M Doses of Moderna Over Contamination

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Japan Suspends 1.63M Doses of Moderna Over Contamination

"Japan has suspended use of about one point sixty three million doses of Madonna vaccine after contamination was found in unused vials raising concern office supply shortage as the country tries to exonerate vaccinations amid a covert nineteen signage the health minister says contamination was reported from multiple vaccination sites officials say some doses might have been administered but no adverse health effects have been reported so far Takeda pharmaceutical company a Japanese drug maker in charge of sales and distribution of the vaccine in Japan says it decided to suspend use of doses of manufactured in the same production line as a safety precaution it also Madonna to conduct an emergency investigation until medical institutions and organizes to stop using the vaccine produced in Spain and shot the production numbers that may be affected I'm sorry I shockingly

Japan Madonna Takeda Spain
"japanese" Discussed on VelociPodcast

VelociPodcast

05:03 min | 7 months ago

"japanese" Discussed on VelociPodcast

"But it's not that bad. It's just noisy and it takes about twenty minutes or i'm sure maybe there's longer ones stuff but you just lay there and try to ignore the noise. They put headphones on you with music but the noise drowns out the music almost immediately so that was almost pointless. I almost would have rather had them not put on the headphones with the thing and just put on headphones that you know white noise or trenton counseling or something. That wasn't as bad as i was led to believe it was going to be. I got a very interesting thing. It looks like the same as a tube like a cat scan but they fill you up with stuff that's gonna make your bones joints glow so this is some kind of medicine or juice they put in you. Having had a fever for weeks at a time when they put it in my arm it was cold and it felt really good and that was a weird feeling. Because i could feel it. Spread throughout my veins from my body. Lincoln went through my left arm and they went through the like down my chest and i actually feel it's sort of getting into my legs and stuff then put me in the machine and this was one of the more interesting experience. I have no idea what's going on. They've explained it to me and japanese. I've only got vague understanding of what they've said to me so in the machine and all the stuff that was cold a few minutes after they've turned the machine on starts to heat up which is very uncomfortable and i think i now have a sense of what the beginning of being microwaved feels like now. Never got to the point where it was painful and i complained. Be honest about that. But like when the inside of your body starts to get hot unexpectedly that is a surprise and it's a bit of a shock and i'm sure they told me was going to happen but i missed it. The guy who runs the machine came out and check the screen multiple times and he seemed very confused about what he was seeing inside my body. Now i didn't take that to mean anything for all i know. That's really they come out and check the machine multiple times but he did have a confused look on his face and i don't think anyone had told him about my body because that wasn't the stuff they were concerned with..

about twenty minutes one japanese minutes Lincoln
"japanese" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

04:40 min | 8 months ago

"japanese" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

"That's another conversation for another day but okay anyways of both my stories. I would have to say there is a bit of truth. Who both of them say both creatures originated in stories that are thousands of years old. As i've said a couple of ties like any good folk tale have been passed on for generations in my research. They found a paper about reality. Japanese folktales and the author says quote tells tied up with certain. Localities told because people believe them. Folktales are narrative art in the true sense of the word and there were world can be an expression of creed are works of high art. You see with the coppa and the makuto guy she. You stories were created in order to have a viable explanation for things that scared people and to them was otherwise unexplainable. I completely agree with the optin said adage. We fear what we don't know so a lot of these stories were created order to lessen people's fear like with a cop out for example since his story is thousands of years old. Perhaps at one time there was really a water creature that could hurt and kill people that eventually became extinct leaving stories behind that once real now seems that the stuff of legends although where the whole b- hold sway comes from i don't have idea Inquiring minds really wanna know. Yeah as for makuto guy. I think i explained it. Well my story as it relates to people superstitions beliefs surrounding death the soul. Japan has a long history that we only know a little about as all good stories. Go like a game telephone which is often lost in translation. Believe it's fun. And in some cases scary to believe that the creatures japanese culture exists to quote a couple of folklorist quote. Japan possesses bore legends than any other country in the world. The legend is therefore a true story in the minds of the folklore retain it in their memory and pass it on to the next generation..

both thousands of years old Japan japanese both creatures one time ties Japanese stories
"japanese" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

05:22 min | 8 months ago

"japanese" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

"Ozaki banacci machine go stories on gay issues paying stories wakabayashi funny stories and yoki bochy which agreed star. I get a feeling that nashi means stories. And yeah so excuse are pronunciations. I'll say that. Now because there's a lot of japanese throughout this and we are definitely not well-versed in machado got. I'm going to butcher some shit in and of course there are a number of supernatural stories. Some which we'll discuss today that discussed creatures such as yokoi monster spirits. You'll get into more later. Tango which are heavenly dogs and utes which are ghosts just a few oh urinary. Da along with the country's religions a lot of historical texas also basis for japanese folklore thalji for many many years like most cultures. A lot of these stories are passed down through oral tradition Storytellers would travel from village to village telling the stories along with providing illustrations of the sales. Oh okay that's fun. yeah One of these historical tax was completed in eight twelve Common era eight twelve called the koji. A records of ancient matters the kogi contained stories of the world's creation The origin of the gods in japanese emperor ancestry just for an example according to the koji in the beginning heaven and earth were formed from a permeable whose life then emerged from the earth. While in the heavens three deities appeared followed by two others which became the separate heavenly deities after them came to seven generations of the ages of the gods to singular deities and then came of that came from a substance floating us and five male and female couple deities. Wow in addition to jiechi there was also new hungry or not hunt sake. Critical of japan that was completed in seven twenty common era that in addition to myths and also is attributed to helping establish the genealogy of the imperial family. I did not hear any mention of Venus creating all of them. What eloquent tear felony. So yeah happy science. He created all of this shit. I keep thinking like at least the us creating thing. It just sounds to me like a metaphor for semen could be the like in there to just proper to talk about it. So it's the who's One thing that i learned. I thought his co. As in japanese culture everything in nature has a comey which is a deity or spirit which has resulted in a huge pantheon in which some claim there are millions of different commies sunol millions of dot. Communists is nice in regards to deities. the two. most important are easily. Doggy and his sister is of course to have created the islands of japan. And many of the gods and goddesses in addition to all the major deities and spirits there are also a number of minor deities called tango ten. You are mischievous deeds. That are said to be part. Human and part bird that live in trees in the mountainous areas and often played tricks on humans. But don't like to be tricked themselves One of the creatures that came from the buddhist tradition is that of the which is said to be more a more threatening group of spirits. They are portrayed as large horned demons that can transform into either both both humans or animals. And you've probably seen the masks. You see those often. Yeah the only can be invisible can steal human souls and are often associated with bad things such as death and disease Japanese folklore mythology is quite important to the japanese culture which can be seen in how it's represented in art drama literature and so on speaking of literature. Japan has quite an extensive literary history and has been credited in creating. The first novel called the tale of gingy. The first novel ever..

first novel texas Venus both today earth two others seven generations two Japanese Japan japan three deities Ozaki banacci tango ten eight twelve five male Doggy One One thing
"japanese" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

02:46 min | 8 months ago

"japanese" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

"Love plum wine. It's sweet and delicious. Well when i got to the checkout prune juice i'm walking through the day and actually this is fine but plum. Wine has a weird shape bottle pinkish to the register. I'm like yes. And i scan it. And it's a raspberry sparkled teeny and so i just picked up the wrong the wrong bottle and i didn't realize it and by that point i was like i don't wanna like go back and turn this and then go back so i was like you know what we can just say plum wine in the show and i. Yes oh this explode. When i put that yeah and for me i got a few things i for my drink. I got manet which is a soda from japan. And you open it very weirdly. So i'm going to figure that out. It's one of those drinks for it has the marble in it. So so you've never had one of these before. I actually have all right. I dropped the tab. God is going to be so fun. Push push yes good job but that was easy. I've never tasted it either. Let's see it's like sprite but lighter and with that. Since i was getting japanese stephan i was at the store and they had some. I brought some patchy stick strawberry. And then i've elman crush and then i also got us some much motomachi. Oh cool. i've never had there. What the hell is this. I thought it was like a cookie. This thing it's like a mushy mushy piece of crab. God oh god. So latin s. Oh oh yuck. I thought it was going to be different as well. So all right. So folklore and mythology and japan is thousands of years old and is highly influenced by the country's two major religions. shintoism which is indigenous to japan and buddhism which originated in india making its way to japan. Interesting yeah shintoism A little more so it is the influence since it is a religion that includes a number of magical creatures and spirits as well as a number of gods and spirits that are believed to be found in animals. the earth and other objects Japanese folklore mythology are are similar in that they both have a number of ds and spirits and are set in both real places japan as well as legendary places like the heavens and underworld and so on a majority of the stories you'll find in japanese folklore are creation myth such as the creation of japanese islands in the lives of the dvd's humans animal spirits and magical creatures folklore. Japan traditionally falls under a number of categories. Such as mukasey banacci tells of long ago..

india japan mukasey banacci two major religions Japanese Japan both one thousands of years old latin earth japanese buddhism
"japanese" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

02:34 min | 8 months ago

"japanese" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

"A pride and proud there have different multiple meanings. You're like a sweet little sentiment. And then he got ruined so anyway This is a full episode. Yes and i think it's going to be a good one so every other week. We're going to bring you a full paranormal topic. We have lots of stories information. And then i'm actually. I'm excited for believers skeptic portion of this where we debunk or. Excuse me while we believe in. Chris burbs denver. Because i wouldn't sure if there was going to be an eat unique debunks considering the topic. But i didn't think about that. Yeah so first of all all say it now. So if you're wondering about the whole pod. Yeah that i just said and then you heard a little sound effect at the beginning of sounded different. Yeah we are now part of a network called the pod baath network which promotes a small group of weird spooky in just plain odd podcast so we can find them on twitter. Instagram or just look up pod moth network or go to pod moth dot network for more information. We were super excited about that. And you're going to be hearing some Maybe some ads or commercials and our episode of our partners into very nice. Go check him out. Yeah absolutely so back to our show so topic. This week is going to be a lot of fun. It's going to be a lot of fun we've seen like we were talking about our top episodes of last year and this kind of came about as a result i could loose result because we saw that folklore from different areas. People seem to enjoy that. Yeah and there was a main that i posted that was about in japanese culture. If you if you can't fall asleep then that according to folklore you're gay. Yeah that's what kind of spot this episode. So if you didn't know we are talking about Japanese folklore basically and there is so much so much we didn't even scratch the surface like it's ridiculous like we actually kind of stuck to one just sub topic folklore. So that's why we could branch out into multiple episodes. I think we plan to because this is some wacky shit crazy so with that drinks. I don't want to because you telling me at dinner that you're embarrassed. Well you must had a mishap. I had a mishap. Let me just go in and go. Yeah okay so you actually nailed it. I was trying to get so. I went to fries..

twitter last year Instagram This week Japanese Chris burbs denver japanese first pod
"japanese" Discussed on The JRPG Report

The JRPG Report

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on The JRPG Report

"The first thing you have to learn is Their versions of the alphabet on in there are three alphabets. One IS GONNA. What is Kinda once called Katana here gone on to put it simply the closest version? They have our alphabet. The car is basically the same thing. Except it's used in different situations so here gone is used for just normal words contact again to oversimplify it and explain it is used for like imported inform is not a native. Japanese word. I would write it in the second alphabet. Basically those first two off bets are the same Arab not so many characters. There's less than one hundred between the two of them but the third alphabet is where everybody gets killed off is called. And I've told you I've met people who have agered in Japanese and they still showed Kanji because need to learn over two thousand characters just to have a basic proficiency in the language. I think it's a two thousand one hundred forty six or something like that that the Japanese government say is. These are like the required Kanji what you need to be able to read a newspaper and quote unquote be literate adult in language opposites a.

Japanese government
"japanese" Discussed on Bad In The Boondocks

Bad In The Boondocks

12:13 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on Bad In The Boondocks

"Tweeted me like an animal. He he was to kind of scum. Who would plead with me? When I say that we call he did the hair influence? My God babe shut the Fuck Up. Please please. Don't do that Damn Sondhi. That song is is the worst it so played out in Nagoya in one thousand nine hundred eighty five again intended to leave the sex industry. Saddam began working as a maid at a restaurant. She soon became romantically involved with the customer at the restaurant. Goro Oh Imia. Where's this going? You'll hear a professor and banker who aspire to become a member of the DNA. In Japan knowing that the restaurant would not tolerate a maid having sexual relations with clients and bored with Nagoya. She returned to Tokyo. Engine a Mehemet Sadda- in Tokyo and finding that she had contracted syphilis paid for her. Stay in a hot springs resort noise so the other guy didn't know that he had syphilis. Sue Guess not well he has something to say about her but paid for her to stay in a hot springs resort in Gusau Tsu from November November until January of nineteen thirty six in January. A MEA suggested that Saddam good become financially independent it by opening a small restaurant and recommended that she start work in an apprentice position in such business back in Tokyo Saddam. Aw began work as an apprentice at the Yoshida year old I nineteen thirty six the owner of this establishment. She's ishita forty. Two years old at the time had worked his way up in business. Starting starting as an apprentice at an ill restaurant he had opened the Yo Shit agape Tokyo Neighborhood Nineteen twenty went Saddad joined. His restaurant Ashida was known as a womanizer who she did little in the way. Ah running the restaurant which was managed mostly by is why not long after. She began work as she began making. It Bantus advanced advantages ward Saddam. Amelia had never satisfied obey sexually so she was an interest in and she gave me into Ishida. How by letting him get get in her but did she kill him? In mid April Ishida and Sadda- initiated their sexual relationship in the restaurant to collect. I don't like on one of the tables to the accompaniment of a romantic ballad sung by one of the restaurants quiches so it was one of the tables exactly against it right on April approach. Twenty thousand nine hundred thirty six DA and a sheet up met for a prearranged sexual encounter at a teahouse well. It's the contemporary equivalent of I. Love Motel gone so you go to teahouse have sex back in those days. Could God planning only a short fling. The couple remained in bad fucking or four days four days. What did they know what they never mind more fucking days service but they would not? They don't need the room serve this they would continue fucking while the room service came in that. That is Yetlis how is that not raw and you know what he actually wasn't ridiculous. And how average Helen the head tail cise size is the motion. But how the hell did he stay. Wrecked all that Tom own the night of April twenty seventh nineteen thirty six. They moved to another house. Oh my God neighborhood of Blue Taco. Todd I'll be like bit. She got going somewhere. I got to go to bed. I sure they will continue to drink and have more sex. God sometimes sometimes with the competent of a gisha singing Jesus they would continue to ferociously have sex even as the maids entered the room to serve sake They next moved their marathon. Sex Sex doubt to the Ogooh neighborhood. Ashida did not return to the restaurant until the morning of May a nine hundred thirty six. They started on April twenty third January in February March April twenty and he got to the restaurant on the eight count them days. Are you freaking kidding. Me and how much in horse bro is crazy. How in the enjoy your meal? Well after all the Shida the first day of Tada later said it's hard hard to say exactly also good about a seat but it was impossible to say anything bad about his looks his attitude he it Skills Alaba way. He expressed his feelings inside me. I had never missed such a sexy man oh yeah as they separated Saddam became agitated and began drinking excessively. She claimed that with Ashida she knew love for the first time in her life and the thought that Ashida was back with his wife life entering his wife made her jealous over a week before the murder sadab became considering hiring it omay night. Nineteen thirty six. She attended a play in which a Gisha attacks for love or with the large knife. After after seeing this obey decided to threaten Ashida with a knife it they're mixed sexual meeting oil. Oy Ashida so as she going to cut off his stick Omay Eleven nineteen thirty six. She called some of her clothing clothing. And use the money to buy some Sushi and a kitchen knife Saddam later described meeting a sheet of that night according to kitchen knife out of my bag and threatened him as had been done underplay. I had seen and I say he. You wore that Komodo just to please one favor customer you Besta Kill you for that. He ishita started and drew away. A little it'll be able to light and he said he thought it was all a joke. Ishida I answer Dr returned to Ogle where they remained until his dad during their frantic. Doc love making this time obey put a knife to the base of a sheet us. Yes yes and said she would make sure he would never play around with another woman. Oh Dana she laughed at this. Why are you GonNa Laugh? You've got a frigging knife European. However two nights into this out of sex two nights of this Saddam began choking Ashida and he told her to keep on saying that this increase displeasure while and she had him do it to her as well now on the evening of May sixteen thirteen so this is five days later? Yeah White Sadda- used her OBI sash to cut off Ishida's breathing during his intense orgasm. They both thoroughly enjoyed it. They repeated this or two more hours. Mock God do you. I would think that you would die from that alone. Not On that for could your freedom fruitcake. You just have to be careful shit. Though what was once it off. Stop the strangulation. She can do it too much. is she the space became distorted and would did not return to his normal appearance. She did that on purpose. Ishida took thirty tablets of a sedative called cow motion to try to sue his pain because he was hurting so much from the strangulation row intent while take thirty though according to obey as a Shida started to does he told her. You'll you'll put a quarter round my neck and squeeze it again while I'm sleeping walked. You Know Ma God did so. She didn't kill him. If you talk ought to strangle me. Don't stop because it is so painful afterwards where that is key is for him crazy Z.. Sadda- commented that she wondered if he had known at her him but own reflection decided that he must have been joking. Oh King about two. Am on the morning of the May Eighteenth. Nineteen thirty six as Ashida was asleep. Sadda- wrapped her sash twice around his neck and strangled him to death. Oh my God so. He didn't offer the pills later. Told police after I kill a sita. I feel totally at ease as a heavy burden has been lifted from US orders and I felt a sense of clarity give with as she does body or a few hours probe she could have got to have sex with Damn Jesus Christ but hours she next severed his genitals with the kitchen. Jesus she cutoff is it. Seen this is ball's yes but took the average size penis rat did with breath.

Saddam Ashida Ishida Mehemet Sadda Tokyo Nagoya syphilis Goro Japan Tada Sue Guess professor US Blue Taco Yetlis Gusau Tsu Amelia Helen Eighteenth
"japanese" Discussed on Plant Of The Week

Plant Of The Week

05:52 min | 2 years ago

"japanese" Discussed on Plant Of The Week

"That would be a great addition to your landscape. Scape now for this week's bond products plant of the week Talk about your plan of the week. Well the plan to the week is a group group of plants Japanese maple by big picture it statement. Japanese maple is a A whole oh genus species etc etc.. We won't get into those details but There are the green ones there are the red ones. The Greens does vary in density of the green. The red ones vary all the way from an orangey red clear into a burgundy now. Many any people have used that plant some well most appropriately as some have asked to take a little bit too much of a risk but by and large. They're sturdy trie. One of the things to mention is that the first three years until they are settled in route wise and and firmly so to speak. You need to be cautious about mulching now not up against the trunk not more than two inches deep but you want to keep the freeze thaw cycle like we were it just through this week from being too significant On my street and and there there's no science behind this but I planted one some years years ago. A neighbor with the same essentially exposure to the west and so on planet one. I- mulched mine. I took well. Let's just say care. Make sure it went into the winter moist so that it froze in at thirty two and stayed there etc The other party did not there's lasted three ears mine. Is there thirty five years later now. There's some good luck in that and a lot of other possibilities but it as Japanese maples go. The green wins are quite attractive in structure size and shape and so on All the way from what. I'm GONNA call a reasonably full leaf. Maple like in most cases Sir most most observation and then some are very very they're called dissect them as a matter of fact very finely cut and then on the red side the same thing By and large they're a tree. Well you can grow them as a SHRUB and we'll get into that in a moment but fifteen to twenty five feet so don't crowded against the house It's it's tiny when you put it in if not just because it's the way you wanNA handle it in size hits because it's expensive when they get real big but in any event Twenty twenty five feet the The plants are capable of being grafted. So that you can either. In the red informs or the green forms you can keep it from being called. I'm a called a standard tree and I'm going to go now to a lot of the uses for the Red Forms Whether they be the full leaf type or most especially to one's called dissect them that are draftable grafting onto a standard red will a standard Japanese maple trunk green form etc and you can graph those in bud them in as technicals go At anywhere from mm six to twelve to fifteen inches above the ground on up to you can make almost a lollipop. Blake tree the one I have in front of my home is as was grafted the red dissect them type was put onto the stem at about thirty two inches above the ground. Now it's considerably bigger than that but it's it's a plant that can be varied in uses varied in beauty. And the only thing I would recommend I would not put it against a strong. Oh I wouldn't put it on on on Westside hillside where the wind sweeps up Up The hill the The Sun dries the soil in the summertime. And so on. That's that's asking just a little bit too much however they will grow their if you give them that good three year starts so that's more or less the whole group in an in a nutshell so to speak vic not most of the time when you see him I I'm just going to say of an ornamental. Use them next to a sidewalk up close to the house. It's a focal focal point. And they really want you to see right And so many times you see them with that beautiful umbrella shape how do you how do you achieve that well. Part of it. His Mother Nature part of it is action the gene pool the plant. That particular plant has come from my to pick on mine and many like it was. It is a weeping form and I don't mean penniless like a cherry or a weeping willow but the growth tends to go down word so when your pruning if any of the stems catch a bad case of jeans and they start turn up you can clip off. If there's two or so in that area you can clip off. The one is turning upright literally. Go down close to the bud or or the next side of stem and so on and clip off the upturning part. So what I have done and it takes me some. I don't know thirty minutes a year Over the period of time I have accentuated the down your down angled forum is what it boils down to. I've also kept it in size. Four that area now a lot of times they're put in and you don't even know the Japanese maple because they just stay small. That's nice where you have a question. Caller has questioned about our provider. Coming up next on talk so stick with us..

Greens Twenty twenty I