35 Burst results for "Japanese"

U.S. condemns latest North Korean missile launch

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last week

U.S. condemns latest North Korean missile launch

"Japan says a North Korean missile launched had a range to hit the U.S. mainland Japan's defense minister yasukazu Hamada says preliminary analysis shows the missile fired by North Korea is believed to be an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of targeting the entire U.S. mainland He says it landed inside the Japanese exclusive economic zone about 120 miles west of haikyo Japan's most northern main island Hamas says the north's latest missile launch is a reckless act that threatens Japan as well as the region and the international community

Yasukazu Hamada Japan U.S. Haikyo North Korea Hamas
North Korea test launches suspected ICBM, Seoul says

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last week

North Korea test launches suspected ICBM, Seoul says

"North Korea's latest missile test shows potential ability to hit the United States The Japanese defense minister says that the latest long-range missile that North Korea has test launched could potentially reach the entire continental United States Japan's defense minister told reporters that the suspected intercontinental ballistic missile flew 620 miles at a maximum altitude of about 3600 miles He says the altitude suggests that the missile was likely launched on a high angle he says depending on the weight of a warhead to be placed on the missile that the weapon has a range exceeding 9320

North Korea United States Japan
Southeast Asia leaders kick off ASEAN summit in Cambodia

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last week

Southeast Asia leaders kick off ASEAN summit in Cambodia

"The U.S. Japan and South Korea have found a unified response to North Korea's nuclear and ballistic missile program as the leaders met on the sidelines of the East Asia summit in Cambodia President Joe Biden met separately with Japanese prime minister fumio kishida and South Korean president Yun sui before all three sat down together to discuss North Korea Biden declared that the three way partnership is even more important than its ever been when North Korea is stepping up its provocations both Yun and kishida discussed the ongoing displays of aggression by North Korea which has fired dozens of missiles in recent weeks I'm Karen Chammas

North Korea South Korea Fumio Kishida President Yun Sui East Asia Joe Biden Japan Cambodia U.S. Kishida Biden YUN Karen Chammas
North Korea launches ICBM that apparently failed and 2 short-range missiles

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 weeks ago

North Korea launches ICBM that apparently failed and 2 short-range missiles

"North Korea has fired an intercontinental missile above Japan's eastern waters Alarms blared from public cloud speakers as Japanese fishermen rushed back to shore in northern Japan North Korea's latest test is one of a barrage of weapons demonstrations that many believe will lead to a nuclear test soon The ballistic missiles test which was followed by two short arranged missiles was condemned by the north's neighbors including a strong statement by Japanese prime minister fumio kishida The continuous launch of ballistic missiles is outrageous and absolutely intolerable The Biden administration has worn North Korea against

North Korea Two Short Arranged Missiles Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida Northern Japan ONE Biden Administration Japan Waters
North Korea keeps up missile barrage with suspected ICBM

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 3 weeks ago

North Korea keeps up missile barrage with suspected ICBM

"Japan says North Korea has fired more missiles over Japan I'm Lisa dwyer North Korea continued its barrage of weapons tests firing several missiles including a suspected intercontinental ballistic missile that forced the Japanese government to issue evacuation alerts and temporarily halt trains Japan says the missiles landed in the Pacific Ocean presidents were told to go inside firm buildings or go underground The launches came a day after North Korea fired more than 20 missiles That's the most it is fired in a single day ever North Korea has ramped up its rhetoric concerning its nuclear doctrine authorizing pre emptive nuclear attacks with a variety of loosely defined crisis situations U.S. and South Korean officials say North Korea may up the ante in the coming weeks with its first detonation of a nuclear test device since September 2017 I'm Lisa dwyer

North Korea Lisa Dwyer Japan Japanese Government Pacific Ocean U.S.
We Are Living in a Society of Minority Privilege

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:01 min | 3 weeks ago

We Are Living in a Society of Minority Privilege

"Although we hear AD nauseum about white privilege. The fact is we are living in a society of minority privilege. Now, minority privileges too broad a term because not all minorities are included in minority privilege. Jews are a minority, but they don't have minority privilege. Asian Americans are a minority. In fact, they're a smaller minority than either a blacks or Hispanics, but they don't have minority privilege. Minority privilege is reserved for a really three groups. Blacks. Native Americans and Hispanics. Now, universities claim that they have to engage in racial preferences. Because that is the only way to produce roughly proportional representation. What the Harvard lawyer told the Supreme Court. He wants a Harvard that looks like America. Not a Harvard the things like America, not a Harvard that reflects the intellectual diversity of America, not a Harvard in which let's say Republicans and Democrats are equally represented among the students or on the faculty, not a Harvard where there's religious diversity, and so for example, there would be evangelical Christians represented, let's say at their purport. No, no, no, no, no. Harvard's concern basically is on primarily the race front, but they're also big, of course, into gender and sexual orientation. Now, why is it important to have a Harvard that looks like America? Let's think about it. You've got a lot of areas of American life that don't look like America. There are parts of America, Silicon Valley doesn't look like America. If you go to Silicon Valley, you have a huge number of Asian Americans. In fact, by and large, if you look at all the different types of restaurants and companies like Microsoft, it seems like this is just like little Asia. You got like Chinese restaurant over here. You've got Indian restaurants over there, Japanese sushi over here, reflecting the population of people who work there.

Harvard America Supreme Court Silicon Valley Microsoft Asia
"japanese" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

05:07 min | Last month

"japanese" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"And the Japanese were very arrogant about the difficulty of learning their language and their reading and writing of it. And the Japanese Army sent a lot of stuff in the open. Meaning without even taking the time to code it, just straight Japanese, thinking that, oh, there's not going to be anybody in that none of the marines here. I need a GMO. Are going to know what we're saying. You know? Well, wrong. Because we had these military intelligence teams over about usually ten or 12 nisei, who were listening to the radios who were interrogating prisoners who were there. But again, we didn't want to make that well known. So it was not something that was advertised or written about or boasted about or anything. And so Tom stayed in this school for about another year and taught some other students who then were deployed into the Pacific. And then we follow him in the book in terms of egos to all of these various battles, some of the really iconic battles that we know about. I mean, these guys were everywhere, these say they were an EOG, but they were in Burma. They were in Okinawa. They were at Leyte. They were everywhere. And we really didn't know that. And many, many, many decades without knowing that. And that's what I chose to write about in bridge to the sun. But when Tom is on that chip, getting that surrender from the country of Japan, you know, he's sad for the people of Japan that he knows that they have been bombed and they've really suffered. He's angry at the Japanese military for what they put their own people through, let alone some of the things that they did on the battlefield. And so he was one of, as it turns out, we have these pictures, of course, of on that ship when Macarthur's taking the surrender.

Japanese Army marines Tom Leyte Okinawa Pacific Burma Japan Macarthur
Japan, Australia upgrade security pact against China threat

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | Last month

Japan, Australia upgrade security pact against China threat

"Japan and Australia have signed a new bilateral security agreement to reflect the deteriorating security outlook for their region driven by China's increasing assertiveness The upgrade of the joint declaration on security cooperation was the major outcome of Japanese prime minister fumio kushida's meeting with its Australian counterpart Anthony albanese in the West Coast city of Perth albanese says the two nations have grown closer to ensure the security and stability of the area Our commitment to consult each other on contingencies is a natural step in our efforts to support the security and stability of the region Japan says its self defense forces will train and take part in exercises with the Australian military in north Australia for the first time I'm Charles De Ledesma

Fumio Kushida West Coast City Japan Anthony Albanese Albanese Australia China Perth North Australia Charles De Ledesma
"japanese" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

06:11 min | Last month

"japanese" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"Max Verstappen won the Japanese Grand Prix, Max Verstappen is a two time world champion. There's been nothing normal about this season, and there was nothing normal about today for those of us that have been up many many hours were recording this on Sunday afternoon. And for some of us, it was official day oft is today looking at you, Alex, very lucky to have you on the podcast because you've had a more chill day not doing our coverage. And we're joined by one of our colleagues as well. Irwin jaggi from our Dutch team. Now for those that don't know what our sport is part of motor sport network, a bigger organization than we cover motor sport around the world. And so we're going to come to you first Erwin, first, thank you for joining us on the podcast today. Hillary is my pleasure. Hey, your man is double world champion. What's the atmosphere like at home? Yeah, I think everywhere else everybody was pretty confused right after the race. What was the situation exactly? But yeah, amazing double time world champion. I think we didn't expect it at the start of the race. I think after two laps, it seemed pretty grim and like the race wouldn't continue. Yeah, here we go. Absolutely. And now you've been covering it obviously covering him from a Dutch perspective all year. Tell us about max fever, our guys who came over and from auto sport and motor sport network and covered your race this year said that the atmosphere was incredible, but what's it been like generally covering max this year, the battle with Ferrari rather than Lewis Hamilton this year? Yeah, it's been a pretty different season than we saw last year, of course. And I think because of that, maybe it was less intense. Last year, it went down to the wire. We had lots of incidents between Lewis and max the title was decided in the last race, even in the last lap. So that was, yeah, that was pretty epic, of course. And this year we saw a bigger difference between Charles and max. After the first couple of races, it seemed pretty obvious that around summer break it was pretty obvious that max would become world champion at some point. So yeah, a very different season and also people needed to get up really early today to see it, which is different than having a race on Sunday afternoon. We get together with your friends who watch it rather than getting up really early and just washing it downstairs by yourself, I guess. Absolutely. Absolutely. I should mention this as well, by the way, I've mentioned Alex. We are joined on the podcast that I by Luke Smith and Alex, because it's been a crazy day. I'm all confused, bad, bad podcast, host intro. I will come to you guys for questions actually to win Alex I'll come to you first. Anything you want to ask our Dutch colleague? Yeah, I have a very specific question for Erwin. I'm afraid it is a slightly flippant one, but Martin, you mentioned Luke and I are going to the Dutch Grand Prix. And the incredible atmosphere at Sanford and basically got 99% of the fans there supporting one driver, right? The supermax song has been stuck in my brain ever since and I'm actually glad it's what I have to say now. It's one of my favorite songs. So I want to know what is your feeling on that song? Do you like it? Is it irritating? What is the actual reaction to it in its home country? Oh, wow, this is super Mexico. Yeah, I remember last year actually, they were playing it as max was getting in the car for the company right before the start of the race. And it seemed a bit awkward for him in itself to experience that. We have a song dedicated to him playing over the track speakers while he was getting a car. What I like it, it's not my kind of cup of tea, but my son rice likes a lot. He knows the lyrics is four year old and fortunately it is a swearing bird in it. Which is pretty bad. Lots of sweat, lots of swearing. Yeah, that's a good point. I like it even more for that. I'll be honest with you. I would add on that that that's the second time today I've heard a friend of mine with a young child saying their young child is a big fan of the super Mac song. Another friend of mine put in a group chat this morning saying, oh, my three year old has just heard supermax for the first time and declared it the best song ever, so maybe it's something that resonates well with the kids. I don't know, but yeah, I mean, I guess that sort of from a general sporting perspective. What does max done for Dutch sports? Like, is there any bigger Dutch superstar in sports right now than max? And they've got a lot of excellent sort of Dutch footballers and things like that, but does anybody get close to max's sort of, I guess, popularity and status right now? At this time, no, I think max is the biggest sporting star in the Netherlands right now. And even when he came up in Formula One, when he won his first Grand Prix back then, our national stock team was doing pretty bad and Knox was gaining traction in Formula One. So right at that moment, Mexico became very popular and it's been growing ever since really. Just last week, the moment when max became champion and Abu Dhabi was voted the most popular TV moment of the past year with past 12 months, 5 million people were watching it on television. So yeah, just shows how popular maxis does max the same as last year, do something either at a big public event or a park or on a stage where loads of his fans can turn, turn out, maybe after the season or something. Do you know what's planned? I know there was talk about something like that last year, but max isn't really a person who likes those kind of things. So last year, we didn't saw such a thing. I think we will see such a thing this year. He did get decorated by the king of the Netherlands right before the Dutch Grand Prix. So there was already something, but I don't think there will be a public event where there will be where we see celebrating with fans or something like that. There wouldn't be any celebration until after Abu Dhabi anyway, because it is in the rules that they have to do the FIA prize giving because technically Red Bull could be thrown out of the entire championship of max's results an old. So sorry to be in the real world. Celebration, but there is Formula One. There is a procedure, a lot of them hilariously followed unfollow today. Everything is provisional until he gets the trophy.

Max Verstappen max Alex Irwin jaggi max fever Erwin Lewis Hamilton Luke Smith Hillary Ferrari Lewis Sanford Charles Mexico Luke Martin rice the Netherlands Knox
N. Korea launches missile toward sea after US-SKorea drills

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last month

N. Korea launches missile toward sea after US-SKorea drills

"North Korea has reportedly test fired another missile I'm Ben Thomas with the latest South Korea and Japan are both reporting a possible launch South Korean military says North Korea fired a ballistic missile towards its eastern waters early Sunday but offered no further details The Japanese coast guard is warning ships about falling objects and urging them to stay away The launch would be North Korea's 6th round of weapons tests in two weeks It comes hours after the U.S. and South Korea wrapped up a new round of naval drills off the Korean Peninsula's east coast These involving the USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier I'm Ben Thomas

North Korea Ben Thomas Japanese Coast Guard South Korea Japan Korean Peninsula U.S. East Coast Ronald Reagan
US, Japanese and South Korean warships perform missile defense exercise after North Korean tests - CNN

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last month

US, Japanese and South Korean warships perform missile defense exercise after North Korean tests - CNN

"North Korea has flown 12 warplanes near its border with South Korea as a south reacted by scrambling 30 military planes The highly unusual incident has come just hours after North Korea fired two ballistic missiles into the sea the north war planes consisted of 8 fighter jets and four bombers which flew in formation by the border South Korean officials believe they conducted anti surface firing drills South Korea responded with 30 fighter jets and other warplanes of their own though they didn't engage in any clash with the North Korean aircraft I'm Karen Chammas

North Korea South Korea Karen Chammas
 N. Korea sends missile soaring over Japan in escalation

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

N. Korea sends missile soaring over Japan in escalation

"A ballistic missile has flown over Japan I'm Lisa dwyer North Korea has fired another ballistic missile this time over Japan the Japanese prime minister's office said at least one missile fired from North Korea flew over Japan and was believed to have landed in the Pacific Ocean South Korea's joint chiefs of staff said they also detected a launch of a ballistic missile that was fired towards the north's eastern waters the launch is the 5th round of weapons test by North Korea in the past ten days in what was seen as an apparent response to military drills between South Korea and the United States North Korea views such drills as an invasion rehearsal The missiles fired during the past four round of launches were short-range and fell in the waters between the Korean Peninsula and Japan Those missiles are capable of hitting targets and South Korea

North Korea Lisa Dwyer Japan South Korea Joint Chiefs Of Staff Pacific Ocean United States Korean Peninsula
South Korean President warns North over nuclear program - CNN

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

South Korean President warns North over nuclear program - CNN

"North Korea has fired two short-range ballistic missiles the fourth round in a week The move has prompted strong condemnation from its rivals as he attended a parade of military might to Marcus country's armed forces day South Korean president June condemned North Korea's weapons program If North Korea attempts to use nuclear weapons it will face a residue overwhelming response by the South Korean U.S. alliance and our military Strong words could enrage North Korean leader Kim Jong-un who has alleged that June's government was led by confrontational maniacs and gangsters South Korea Japanese and U.S. Military said they detected the two North Korean missile launches which occurred from North Korea's capital region

North Korea South Korean U.S. Alliance South Korea Marcus Kim Jong UN U.S.
 Officials: North Korea fires suspected ballistic missiles

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Officials: North Korea fires suspected ballistic missiles

"Officials say that North Korea has fired more ballistic missiles I'm Lisa dwyer with the latest The Japanese defense ministry says that North Korea has fired more suspected ballistic missiles and that they are analyzing the details Japanese media reports say the missiles are believed to have landed in the sea of Japan The launch would be the third this week following the visit by vice president Kamala Harris to South Korea North Korea has significantly advanced its missile technology in recent years that placed both the United States and its allies South Korea and Japan within striking distance This year North Korea performed missile test more than 20 times a record number as it refuses to resume long

North Korea Lisa Dwyer Japanese Defense Ministry Kamala Harris South Korea Japan United States
FDR, Woodrow Wilson Were Racists

Mark Levin

01:10 min | 2 months ago

FDR, Woodrow Wilson Were Racists

"FDR really didn't lift a finger For blacks in America Or barely Lifted a finger That's the truth And wouldn't take on Other bigots in his party It's the same thing with Asian Americans Japanese Americans and specific He had said things had written things in 1923 24 25 2060 folks I do my research That's what I do Mark what do you do for a hobby That's what I do And then the back benches can clean up with their pick up the crumbs But that's the facts He wrote viciously About Asians that Asians and Europeans couldn't mix Shouldn't mix You didn't hear this did you Didn't hear this On Ken burns documentary did you Maybe there ought to be a Mark Levin documentary

America Mark Ken Burns Mark Levin
Leo Terrell: The FBI, DOJ Were Weaponized Against a Pro-Life Activist

The Dan Bongino Show

01:46 min | 2 months ago

Leo Terrell: The FBI, DOJ Were Weaponized Against a Pro-Life Activist

"Because you know what you're talking about and you've seen both sides of the political island invaluable skill You're also a lawyer I opened up today's show discussing the FBI and the weaponization of the FBI Now you're literally a civil rights attorney It's not figurative This has to bother you I mean the whole idea of civil rights And I'm not necessarily comparing the two because one was far more severe but the targeting of Americans based on superficial characteristics race or religion The internment of the Japanese Jim Crow slavery there's a history in this country that you know that I know that is a history we should talk about But the weaponization of law enforcement to attack those people for the superficial characteristics results right now in people's disgust Thankfully so But it's kind of strange Again that's severe But on a lesser level now the targeting of people for their political beliefs Leo perception is turning into reality here as the indicators start to pile up based on the targeting of that pro life activist by the FBI this weekend That this is a real thing political targeting We can't have a constitutional republic if it's allowed to continue You are absolutely right This is to fear I mean you expect the law to be our last key cornerstone of impartiality Let's be very clear The FBI the Department of Justice has been weaponized Everyone in the world knows what they did to that pro life activist A case that was easily dismissed They are cine a signal to people who disagree with the democratic platform that we're going to go after you and they're trying to deter people like you me the average citizen who has a different opinion Dan from the far left and they're using the FBI and the FBI is a Willy participant That's scary

FBI Jim Crow Department Of Justice DAN
AJ Reminisces About Dating Michelle Brando

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:05 min | 2 months ago

AJ Reminisces About Dating Michelle Brando

"Now I gave you a bunch of Brando stuff the other day. I obviously am fascinated by him. I'd be lying if I said, I didn't, I'd be lying if I said part of the reason why I dated Michelle, his daughter, who was beautiful, gorgeous. But part of the reason was, if her last name was Michelle pinsky, or Michelle Obama, I wouldn't have ran after as quickly. But to know that that's Brando's daughter and the fact that she was conceived while he was making The Godfather with some Japanese woman that he had a had a shine to. I had to go after her. And we had a great time and she was a great chick. She's married now with a little daughter. She's great. We talk all the time. But me being the guy that first let her see her father's movies, blew me away. I felt that was like a cool thing in my life to turn on Brando's daughters to his movies. And one of the first shows I did a couple of years ago. Maybe it was too soon for the crowd I have now, but many of you probably didn't hear, but when Michelle and I were dating, and she wouldn't care that I tell the story. We go back to my house and, you know, we're messing around. And back then, the FX channel was running The Godfather marathon. They would play it all day. So one day we're hanging out and I said, good, the godfathers on, you gotta watch your father's movie. He's the reason why a lot of us move down to LA in the first place. We all wanted to be Brando. You're like, okay, I'll watch it. I'm watching godfather. And after a while we stop fucking around, we start making out of the couch, whatever stop getting into it. And then we take it to the bedroom. And I put the bedroom TV on, and that also has The Godfather. And the sounds very low. Michelle starts to do her thing for me, and she stops and she says, you know, I can't do this. And I'm like, why? And in the back rugged hero father going, you know, look how they messed up in my boy. And she goes, I can do it, I'm about to do for you, but I can't hear my father talk behind me. And I never dawned on me. How it must have felt for her to hear a father talking behind her while we were messing around.

Brando Michelle Pinsky Michelle Fx Channel Michelle Obama LA
Japan's former leader Abe honored at divisive state funeral

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Japan's former leader Abe honored at divisive state funeral

"Japanese prime minister fumio kushida has paid tribute to his predecessor since to Abe as a man of courage and a sincere and compassionate person at the state funeral for the assassinated former leader In his eulogy kushida says history will remember Abe more for his achievements than for the duration of his period in office and that Abe would have been able to act as a compass for Japan for another two decades at least dozens of foreign dignitaries including vice president Kamala Harris and Indian prime minister Narendra Modi were among the 4300 attendees Meanwhile hundreds of people marched peacefully to state their opposition to the event some saying the legality of a state funeral was dubious I'm Charles De Ledesma

ABE Fumio Kushida Kushida Indian Prime Minister Narendra Kamala Harris Japan Charles De Ledesma
"I don't think he's bluffing": Zelenskyy says Putin's nuclear threats "could be a reality"

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

"I don't think he's bluffing": Zelenskyy says Putin's nuclear threats "could be a reality"

"Spokesman has expressed the country's grave concern regarding Russian threats to use nuclear weapons At a press conference in Tokyo chief cabinet secretary here are cars who matsuno says as the world's only country to have suffered nuclear attacks we strongly demand that the threat or use of nuclear weapons by Russia should never happen He also announces an additional ban by the Japanese government of the export of materials there may be used for chemical weapons to 21 Russian organizations

Matsuno Tokyo Cabinet Japanese Government Russia
Don't Mess With the Numbers

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:36 min | 2 months ago

Don't Mess With the Numbers

"United States had a choice. They could have made Japan starve. They could have done firebombing. Both of those would have resulted in horrific casualties among the Japanese and of course fleets of kamikazes headed towards our fleet. Here are the Okinawa death tolls that doctor Kennedy puts in victory at sea, which I was unfamiliar with. 77,000 Japanese troops died on Okinawa, a 110,000 if you add in the Okinawa conscripts. Another take and another 10,000 died in the mopping up. A 149,000 civilians died in Okinawa and 12,000 U.S. servicemen were killed. Can you imagine my father was in the flotilla off of Japan for the southern island first faint? I'm glad he didn't have to go aboard her. I would not be talking to you today. Doctor Kennedy, can you imagine what the casualty counts would have been if Japan had to be invaded? So the U.S. Army and the Department of Defense were doing some calculations some estimates about what the potential total number of casualties would be in, say, the first three months or so of struggling onshore and fighting their way through the mountains in lower Japan against fanatically organized resistance and the numbers were not pretty. Some people thought that the numbers calculated were just far too large at the Japanese would fall early after the first strikes on land, but they couldn't be sure about that. And

Okinawa Japan Southern Island Doctor Kennedy U.S. Kennedy U.S. Army Department Of Defense
"japanese" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"Was more animosity instigated between America and Japan. Of course, there were quite a few Japanese restaurants serving Japanese food in America, but it was generally in little Tokyo's and Japan towns, AKA, Japanese ethnic enclaves, and the American public stopped frequenting those restaurants as tensions rose. Thus, the popularity of sushi and Japanese restaurants faded with the white American population. Jumping forward, after World War II, there was still hatred towards Japanese Americans, so it wasn't until the 1960s that Japanese food started to rise in popularity. Before the war, they required a few Japanese people that ran western or Chinese restaurants, but Japanese cuisine didn't become well known until afterwards. It was around the middle of the 1960s when Americans started to visit Japanese restaurants any sukiyaki. The public was fascinated by the making of sukiyaki at the table. Eventually, other cooked dishes like tempura, shabu shabu and ramen became more popular. Fun fact, in the 1960s, in Portland, a Japanese restaurant that mainly featured sukiyaki on its menu served about 400 guests each evening. One reason for the rise in Japanese food was actually the result of Japanese war brides. The arrival of these women to America increased soy sauce sales and other Japanese foods. Eventually, products were diffused all over the U.S. since war brides settled all over the U.S. with their husbands. The release of the Japanese from the internment camps at the end of World War II also added to the dispersion of Japanese throughout America. Japanese foods ended up in more remote areas, or areas without a ton of Asians, like Alabama, and Mississippi. The spreading of Japanese ingredients and products met sukiyaki and other famous Japanese dishes became more commonplace. Another big wave of Japanese products gaining fame and notoriety in the U.S. was the selling and creation of instant noodles. Japanese instant noodles arrived in the U.S. in the mid 60s and were sold for about ten to 20 cents each. The demand for Japanese foods and the increased interest in other Japanese dishes from the American public meant the introduction and popularity of arguably the most famous Japanese dish, sushi. Fun fact, overseas business trips and temporary transfers of Japanese businessmen in the 1960s and 70s was another reason for the increase in Japanese food in America. These businessmen would take their American colleagues to sushi restaurants. Their arrival also meant an increase in demand for Japanese food and ingredients in general. Sushi, perhaps the most popular or well-known Japanese food in America, although ramen is probably a close second now. Sushi was a street food in Japan starting in the 8th century, but it didn't really appear in mainland American restaurants until the late 1960s. Colorful restaurant opened in LA's little Tokyo sometime between 1964 and 1966, and it became extremely popular. The meals were created to order and served over the counter. It was a real sushi bar. There are some claims that sushi restaurants opened as early as 1950 and that may be true, but it wasn't until kofuku that American palettes became more shall we say open to the idea of eating raw fish, Kawai fuku really catered to Japanese businessmen and also their American coworkers. After the success of kawu fuku sushi restaurants began to open up outside of little Tokyo and sushi gained popularity. Especially with Hollywood celebrities, Tokyo Kai Khan was one famous restaurant that opened soon after. It was owned by a food conglomerate and it was a very different vibe than colorful. Khufu ceded a few people out of sushi bar and on the other hand, Tokyo seated 300 in the main dining room, and it served more than just sushi..

America Japan Tokyo Portland Mississippi Alabama kawu fuku sushi restaurants LA Tokyo Kai Khan Hollywood
"japanese" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"So in these stores, the most common Japanese foods sold were canned goods. One of the oldest surviving nikkei stores named anzan, in Portland, Oregon, was established in 1905, and the main food items they sold were canned. Common canned foods like mirror, AKA pickled vegetables, or kamaboko, AKA, steamed fish cake, sold well to the small but thriving Japanese community in the area. Canned foods were necessary too, because most of the first Japanese in America were laborers who were part of the work camps at lumber mills or in railroad construction. Groups of Japanese workers would buy wholesale canned goods and vegetables, and it needed be canned for transportation or for storage. Fun fact, the importing of Japanese foods in everyday items from Japan for Japanese immigrants was known as the takuan trade. The taekwon trade was fairly popular and records from the 19th century show that Japanese working in Hawaii imported sake along with other items that had long shelf lives, like soy sauce, miso, and other dried foods. By the way, takuan or takuan suke is pickled daikon radish. And it's believed that the importation of Japanese goods became known as the takan trade because of the distinctive smell. It also kind of became a symbol of Japanese food in America since there wasn't a ton of available Japanese foods in the 19th century. The Japanese food trade was a very profitable business. So in 1910, there were 242 grocery stores, 21 trading firms, 42 tofu shops, 36 confectioners, 35 fish shops, two soy sauce breweries and four noodle factories owned by Japanese Americans in the U.S. and this is excluding the Japanese population in Hawaii. Over the years, there were fairly big jumps. For example, from 1908 to 1917, the number of import export trading firms increased from 6 to 34. It's estimated that in Portland and Seattle, there was a Japanese merchandise store for every 100 or 200 Japanese American residents. Canned foods that were available in the early 1900s are still found today. And many Japanese Americans still eat certain canned items. Fun fact, some popular canned Japanese foods are different in Japan, like fuku ginzu, a condiment of pickled vegetables that often would include daikon, eggplant, lotus root, and cucumber. The Japanese American version utilizes more soy sauce and is sweeter in taste, whereas the fuku ginzu found in Japan is red and less sweet. Sushi actually was trendy in the very early 1900s. Megan Howard states in sushi cookbook that one of the earliest mentions of sushi in America actually appeared in 1904 in the Los Angeles Herald. The article detailed a lunch throne by ferndale Higgins, where sushi was served and it became synonymous with high.

anzan America Portland Hawaii Japan Oregon Seattle Megan Howard sushi cookbook Los Angeles Herald ferndale Higgins
"japanese" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on Broken Record

"More over time as a recording artist. What has been your biggest pinch me moment up until this point? There's so many things that happened this year that are totally unreal. I mean, the first one was The New York Times Best Seller list. That was that's something that I'll always be that now. You know, I get buried with that, which is incredible. That was the first huge thing of the year. Playing 5 nights at union transfer in Philadelphia. We sold out 5 nights at the venue where I used to work the coat check. And my old boss Shawn acne had the coat check a big co check painted sign that that's called Michelle's honors code check now, which is incredible. And yeah, Jeff tweedy covering Coca-Cola Indiana was really a major pinch me moment. Wilco is the perfect band. They are what I aspire, my band to walk in the footsteps of they're just a classically great and everyone loves them and when I wrote Kokomo Indiana and we were coming up with a string arrangement for it. We had a moment where we were like, is this too close to Jesus, et cetera? I mean, this is so inspired by just like the elegance of that arrangement and when I wrote posing for cars, I was like, I want this solo to feel like the solo in at least that's what you said. And so to see one of my songwriting heroes like cover my song was really wild and really, really pinch me special. Yeah, that's incredible. Yeah, three days from now I'm gonna be covering Jesus, et cetera with him at ACL. So that's like my big that's why I'm in Austin early, so I'm really excited. But yeah, I've been practicing. I know Jesus, et cetera, I'm like, listen to that song since I was a teenager. And I actually walked down the aisle and my wedding to she's a wilco song. But she's excited. It's like the biggest will go song and I love that song. But even still, I'm like so nervous to like, what if I forget? I thought you don't get nervous before gigs. I weirdly do now. And I get really nervous about doing anything on other people's stuff. Because if it's my own thing, I don't really care about messing it up because it's just me, but if I'm doing something for someone else's band, I get really nervous about it. Or even just like, I was thinking like I get really nervous about even just like sustaining a syllable for the right amount of time. I don't want to change the melody at all. Or I don't want to say like so instead of this or you know what I mean? Even small changes that are so negligible. I get really anxious about tampering with someone else's work in this way that I don't. I don't care if I like it. Isn't that part of it? Is it that okay to sort of slightly change it internalize it and I'm sure it is? I mean, when he covered Kokomo, he definitely changed the melody and I thought it was like endearing sits him, you know? And it's fun. But as a young one being invited to do this huge thing, I want to do it perfectly and sometimes that'll really psych me out in this way that I don't get as nervous about for my own shows. So are you guys going to be singing it together? You like trading off verses or how is it going? I actually don't know. I have rehearsal in two date on Wednesday and I guess we'll figure it out there. That was like texting Jeff tweedy and I was like, I'll sing the chorus with you or maybe treat versus. And he seemed to really want me to kind of take it over. He's like, oh, people are tired of hearing me sing my songs. And I was like, no, they're not, okay? But yeah, we'll see what happens. I don't know. That's so cool. Yeah. So ultimately, when you think about your career and where you are now and what's happened, just really over this past year, how big do you want to be? I think that my mentality is like, I'm gonna push as far as I can go. Just out of curiosity of how far we can go. Like, how would I even be in control of that? I have to just do my best and I'm curious about making it as big as, you know, I could do this. DIY thing that does where it's just him. And he does all his own press and booking and management and all that stuff. But there's also like a curiosity that I feel like of just how far can it go, you know? I never thought I would be in a bus. I never thought I would be playing 5 nights at union transfer. I never thought any of this stuff. And we're far beyond my wildest ambitions, even as a 16 year old girl that knew nothing about the music industry. I never, ever thought that I would make it this far. So I kind of just I'm always going to write music that's interesting to me. I'm always going to follow principles that are meaningful to me, but I also am very curious of just like, well, I'm not going to shy away from it getting bigger. Cool. Well, thank you so much for taking the time today to talk. It was so much fun connecting. I've been completely immersed in your world for the past month. So it's really nice to talk to you about it. I really appreciate it. This was so thoughtful and I really enjoyed my time here. Thanks to Michelle's honor for the insightful view into her creative evolution. You can hear a new album jubilee, along with our favorite Japanese breakfast songs, have broken record podcast dot com. You can follow us on Twitter, at broken record. Broken record is produced with help from le arose, Jason gambrel, Martin Gonzalez, Eric Sandler, and Jennifer Sanchez. With engineering help from Nick chaffee, our executive producer is Mia Labelle. Broken record is a production of pushkin industries. If you love this show and others from pushkin, consider subscribing to pushkin plus. Pushkin plus is a podcast subscription that offers bonus content and uninterrupted ad free listening for four 9 9 a month. Look for pushkin plus on Apple podcast subscriptions. And please remember to share rate of wheelus on your podcast app. Our theme musics by Kenny beats, I'm Justin Mitchell..

Shawn acne Jeff tweedy Indiana Wilco Kokomo Coca Michelle The New York Times Philadelphia Austin Jason gambrel Martin Gonzalez Eric Sandler Jennifer Sanchez Nick chaffee Mia Labelle Twitter pushkin Apple
"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

18:50 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"Can't imagine Damon not wanting to have you on. Oh my God, that would be like a career. Have you ever had any interaction with him? No, but I am friends online with their live bass player. Okay. But he's very sweet and he's a big Japanese breakfast fan. To the point where he was like, can you write down be sweet to me baby on a piece of paper so I can get it tattooed in your handwriting? And I was like, wow. Did you do it? I haven't sent it, but I'm like. I have really bad handwriting, but yeah, I love that, man. I hope I get a call sometimes. Yeah. And the other thing is pretty hate machine, which is one of my favorite records. Did you listen to the new Halsey record? No, but I know that I will, and I know that I'll probably like it because he's never really put up anything that I don't enjoy. Have you listened to the Hollywood? Yeah. It feels very pretty. That's perfect. It's really exciting when you hear a producer's voice in that way. Yeah. And certain changes and obviously all of the sequencer stuff. I mean, it's just amazing that production can have that kind of voice. I mean, you were like that too. There's so many things about that fucking record. It doesn't get old to me. It's aged magnificent. It feels completely timeless and modern. Yeah. A lot of those decisions that he was making and that kind of voice, it's very much in this huge pop rock record that's out now. It sounds fantastic. And you said something as well that you were fascinated about the idea of locking yourself away to make a record. Is that not how you make records anyway? I picture you. I guess. I haven't done that kind of dangerous mentally dangerous. It's like pull all the chase out of it. Yeah, I mean, when I was younger, I had like, you know, not anything as fully formed, and I've definitely grown a lot as a composer. Producer since then, but I was just talking to my husband about how I would love to do that again. If only to just get the raw source. How you made the first record sort of going down to the chef? Yeah, yeah. I mean, but I think having a concentrated period of time are you like, don't leave until you have a record where you that was like more casualties. You know, like I'm going to be going down there to write some stuff. We'll see what happens, but to go into a space for like ten days and be like, I'm gonna leave with an album. Yeah. Is really exciting to me. And yentl. And told you, I want to talk about Barbra Streisand. Yeah, my mom loved Barbra Streisand, loved the movie lentil. And I think it's like a really underrated musical. It's just about a young Jewish woman who wants to study the tall mood on a quest for knowledge and so she cross dresses as a man. Now hearing you say it like that. It's like tootsie meets fiddler on the roof or something. I have not seen Tutsi and I've been reading that's on my list of movies. They made a pretty cheesy, like a little broad musical that. I mean, I'll go see any cheesy musical because I just like are you musical fan? Have you thought about participating in a musical? I'm kind of actually working on right now. Well, for the stage, but I don't want to jinx it so I'm not going to say, but yes, I was never growing up. I was never a musical theater person, but now I just maybe it's just having moved back to New York after being away for so long. I'll just see anything. Me too. I bought tickets to Broadway in October. It went up to see David Byrne. American utopia. I watch it on the plane just fell so hard and love that when I saw that the tickets went back up, I was like, I must. Yeah. I must go. I also thought, oh, I wonder if she's ever played shows in Korean then I saw something where you say you ended your last or was that the first show that you'd ever played in Korea? Yeah, we've played two shows in Korea. But that must have been kind of insane and emotional and that's how the bookends. Yeah, the book ends with the show and soul, and it was like wild to just, you know, that's another thing that I just never anticipated. I never had even the imagination to foresee me playing there. In the book, I talk about I was telling my aunt who's there, things are going really well. We played Coachella. She was like, sure, sure, you know. And then when I told her, you know, we're playing a show and so I'd love for you to come. She had like my cousin called me and she was just like, you know, my mom's really excited to see you. We're just curious who pays you? Is there like an office or something like that? And I was like, oh, you know, we get the money from the door and there's a promoter who looks a show and, you know, she's like, okay, and so she came to the show, and I was like, how many people? There's like probably like 500 people here and I was like, oh, like any other email this is my huasa, which is like the Korean word for like company or office. I was just like, this is like make a living. It was a really sweet moment. And it was just wild to see, you know, the city where I was born where my mom grew up and all of these kids, 'cause my mom's photos on the album on the vinyl. And all these Korean kids leaving the show into the night, the streets of Seoul with my mom's photo and this big square. It was surreal. But yeah, I don't know if you've heard of shinjin kyung. He's like this. We talked about him. Yeah, it's amazing. Actually, just the snippets that they played of his music when you mentioned him. I was like, I was like literally went on disk to order. Yeah, you should listen to the song. There's a song that's like 6 minute song called henny by this woman named Kim Jong mi. Who wrote the song for this woman. This incredible folk singer. And it's just this very slow orchestral build with this looping acoustic guitar. And I would love to hear your take on it. It's like so striking. You know, I had gone to this vinyl bar. Due to beat cafe in Japan in Tokyo. Is it a vinyl bar? Yeah, it's like it's like a bar where like a lot of musicians go to hang out. I'm not sure I've been told so many wonderful places like that in Tokyo, but I don't remember the name. Since Shibuya, there's kind of like a similar equivalent in Seoul where there was all these all these musicians go to this place called Jung jungle, which is this vinyl bar and soul when we were there early on bridges was actually his crew. Yeah, I went there and I never really listened to much Korean music and so much of what we think about when we think about Korean music is obviously KPop. But there's also this very rich 60s kind of like funk pop scene. And our promoter was telling us about this guy Shinji khang is almost like a sort of filled specter type without the mental illness and wrote for all these amazing girl groups from the 50s to the 80s and it's kind of like I think a recluse who just like this incredible psychedelic rock guitar player. And so we played as a song and we were all drunk and just floored. You know, it's just like so beautiful. And then the next day I went to like hang out with my aunt and my husband was telling you, oh, have you heard of Xinjiang? We just learned about the sky and just like, how do you know about that guy? Right. You're a mom and I used to sing the song by the pearl sisters called coffee hang on that was one of his songs. And then yeah, the book ends with us singing not to ruin it for you but the book ends with us like singing a shinjuku song together and karaoke that they used to sing together when we were kids. It was such a crazy thing because I never knew when my mom was ever even really into music. Yeah, I mean, obviously, created a huge, huge country, but even going around Thailand and places in Indonesia and getting the 60s records like there's this band called the gimbals from Indonesia that yeah, I mean, now there have been so many compilations of psychedelic funk in these. And like city pop is having this really cool city pop is amazing. And city pop is not that far sonically from some of jubilee, like just really slick 80s, but very groovy, always like something cool going on with the percussion. Totally. Yeah, I mean, I think that we were hesitant to claim that, but it was certainly something that Jack and I were into, and be sweet. There's this another Xinjiang song called boomerang that's performed by the bunny girls and I think it was like an 80s like city pop type of bob that was from what I recall from that session I had played this very upfront plucky baseline that I just was like, I want to do something like this. And then Jack came up with this incredible baseline that is such a enormous part of what makes that song great, I think. Just for people who might not know explain what city pop is. I honestly don't know if I feel like you could maybe do it. It's like 80s. It was sort of like almost like was it? Was it just in Japan? It's like 80s funk. Like the 80s Japanese equivalent of yacht rock. So it's a little more moved on technology wise because it's the 80s and not late 70s, but it has that same basis of quite complicated R&B jazz steely Dan like that chord family with really slick production really lovely melodies. And it's like dancy, right? Cat power you talk about who's a big influence. She which is another person who famously kind of like locked herself into a room and came out with moon pics. Was that an earlier record? Was that like before the greatest? Is that okay? I think that that album is about her breakup from Bill Callaghan and she was like somewhere in the south in this house and he was like, maybe off on tour, and she was like freaking out alone and wrote this incredible haunting record. She has this incredible voice, but also just like, her earlier records are maybe a little bit more like low fire or just it felt accessible for me as a young woman that I could make an album like that. I discovered her it was like playing in the background right when the greatest came out and that's the one she went and recorded in Memphis with all the great musicians. Phenomenal. I was just remember ask someone, hey, what's this playing in the background? I literally thought they were going to say some 70s rare soul thing. They're like, that's cat power. And I remember that record feels like within your yeah. Yeah. Yeah, right show guy. But yeah, that's me. But cat power. Do you ever feel like you do hate that? I have grappled with it so much. You still like put me on edge and people say that, but now I'm just like, it's of course I'm retrograde. I mean, I think that there's a saying that my therapist likes to say or maybe it's my sister. I was so surprised as my therapist sometimes. But if it's hysterical it's historical. If you're getting so fired up, then there is something deep down that you're being a little bit just like can't pick your voice and obviously like it works for you. You know? Like I was reading George Saunders new book at swimming upon in The Rain, which is this book about Russian literary masters like Chekhov and turgenev and Google or whatever. And he was talking about he's like examining the form. And he's like talking about he wanted to write in this very sparse gruff Hemingway kind of way. And just wasn't working for him and then he wrote a joke on a piece of paper one time and heard his wife laughing from the other room. And he was like, I didn't want to be. Right. Funny, short story, George Saunders guy, but I just am. And to a certain extent, you can't really control what works for you. Even if you want to be like sparse masculine cool guy writer. Yeah. And your voice is like, just serves the thing. I mean, it's crazy for me because I would love to have George Sanders voice. I think many writers would love to be a funny, smart like quippy guy, but it's great to hear that he just has to accept that that's who he is in a certain extent. It's funny that so many people would love to be in your producer and known for this huge like iconic hits. But there's part of you that just like, I don't know if I want to be retrograde or whatever. Yeah, I think that anytime I rebelled against it intentionally, is always sort of a disaster. When my record version, which was sort of my breakthrough record that had valery and some other records on it came out and it was this huge thing. And the cool press like hated me the NMA was like, I was like, back on the enemy it was a magazine and it meant something. I was like public enemy number one. Yeah, they hated me in England because that whole album was covers of songs by radiohead the jam, the Smiths, really sacred cows and pop indie world, especially really English things. And it was so wildly popular here it was a bit of a novelty and I was known as Amy Winehouse's producer, but there I was having like top 5 hit off the top 5 hit and it was just like, I would have hated me. It was that critical master you're just like, you're forcing everyone to make an opinion about it because it's just omnipresent. And then for my second record, I was like, I'm not going to do any more. I'm just going to do sense. And there's songs on that record that I'm really proud of what I'm not proud of is that I agreed to be on the cover of the NME smashing a trumpet. I was trying to disown something so violently that was something that was at one point. And it was because they like to recognize, can we do it'll be fucking hilarious, you know, whatever. And yeah, like I said, there's things on that record I still like, but yeah, so now I think it comes with a little bit of being settled into age and realizing what your voice is like you said with the George saw on this thing that I do. I don't mind. And if I want to try something occasionally that's not that I do it and it's probably not even a successful because I think I am better. I don't love the fucking sounds of the 70s. I don't yearn for the emotionally. They didn't mean anything to me growing up. It's just literally the sound. It excites me. And probably a lot of things too. Are you working on a new record now? Uh, no. Okay. No. I'm in this interesting place where I like for the last 5 or 6 years I've always had three projects going at once. And then all of them came out in the same year. I had the soundtrack this record this book. And that was always the plan I was always kind of working and thinking about them and now I'm just like an empty vessel. I have no idea what my path is now really. Because you would have been on tour maybe otherwise, right? Yeah, I mean. I mean, we still will be on tour, but I just, I've always had something I've worked towards. I don't know if you're like this, but I'm never like, I'm not someone that is continuously working. It's kind of like on music at least. I have to turn on turn off. Okay. And so I don't know what my direction is. And it's hard right now because it feels like I'm at some kind of peak or I hope I'm not. But it's impossible to not feel that way where I'm like, well, it's all downhill. Yeah. But I'm sure a lot of musicians feel it's so frustrating because I feel like after the first record, your sophomore album is just like, oh my God, I have to avoid the sophomore slump. There's so much pressure. The third one will be so easy. And then you hit the third one and you're like, oh, but this is where it's really supposed to culminate with who I am as an artist. It's a statement. It has to be bombastic. The fourth one will be easy. And then you get to the fourth one and you're like, what am I supposed to prove now? I never really get no relaxing at any point in time. Okay, awesome. Yeah. Thank you for this. Yeah of course. So great to chat. Such an interesting intelligent talented creative engrossing force. It was such an interesting chat too I could have talked for another hour, but she had a heart out somewhere to go or something. It's amazing too to think that yesterday at 8 a.m. I knew nothing about Japanese breakfast and the talents of Michelle Zhang and her writing. And now I do. And my brain is the better for it. Take me out with the fade in. Thanks again to Japanese breakfast for taking the time to talk with us. A special fader thank you to our Grammy and Oscar award winning host Mark ronson. Please visit the fader dot com slash podcasts to read the original cover story and check out a playlist of artists mentioned in this episode. If you like the show, please share it and review us on your favorite podcast app. Please join us next Monday to find out which of your favorite artists will be uncovered next. Executive producers rob stone and John Cohen for the fader podcast network. Talent booking, Robert English. Producers, Alex Robert Ross, and Matty Russell Shapiro. Directed by Daniel Nevada and produced by the fader and association with dot NYC. Engineered and mixed by David Rogers Barry. Theme music by DJ premier. For fader uncovered merchandise, please visit shop dot the fader dot com. Thanks and see you next week. All that time at the wine store is keeping you away from your real life at the studio, the party and the after party. The prisoner wine company delivers bold and intriguing wines directly to your door, so you can stay focused on what's important. As an official sponsor of uncovered for a limited time, take 20% off and get shipping included on the star studded prisoner lineup by using code uncovered at the prisoner wine company dot com slash uncovered. When you order from the prisoner wine company, you're not just getting a bottle. You're getting a statement piece worthy of a spot on your mantle. But this is not for pretension. This is wine for creators and people with great taste. The prisoner collection features a one of a kind Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, and Pinot Noir. All made in the same iconic style as the prisoner red blend, the bottle that changed the game 20 years ago when the prisoner winemaker's first set themselves apart from the rest of the industry with their innovative blending techniques. And you know, if a meticulously crafted zinfandel is more your thing, check out saldo, which is made with grapes curated from over a hundred vineyards. Finally, there's unshackled, the latest line from the prisoner wine company. Made with California's best grapes for all to enjoy. Remember, take 20% off and shipping included on wine from the prisoner wine company with code uncovered at the prisoner wine company dot com slash uncovered, offer valid on first time online orders only for U.S. residents of legal drinking age through December 31st, 2021. Rebate requests from alcoholic beverage retailers wholesalers or anyone suspected of submitting fraudulent requests will not be honored or returned. Limit one offer per household name or address. For more information, contact customer service at the prisoner wine company dot com. Other exclusions may apply, please enjoy our wines responsibly..

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"Amoeba video, which was interesting because there was no I read. Yeah, I literally. Thank you for spending so much time with me. I woke up at 8 a.m. yesterday and I had never heard a note of music and now I could write a dissertation that I enjoyed it 'cause there's a couple of things that I definitely wanted to talk about Nine Inch Nails. But when I said the thing about collaboration, and you said that you love the gorillas. I was like, if the gorillas ever make another album, I can't imagine Damon not wanting to have you on. Oh my God, that would be like a career. Have you ever had any interaction with him? No, but I am friends online with their live bass player. Okay. But he's very sweet and he's a big Japanese breakfast fan. To the point where he was like, can you write down be sweet to me baby on a piece of paper so I can get it tattooed in your handwriting? And I was like, wow. Did you do it? I haven't sent it, but I'm like. I have really bad handwriting, but yeah, I love that, man. I hope I get a call sometimes. Yeah. And the other thing is pretty hate machine, which is one of my favorite records. Did you listen to the new Halsey record? No, but I know that I will, and I know that I'll probably like it because he's never really put up anything that I don't enjoy. Have you listened to the Hollywood? Yeah. It feels very pretty. That's perfect. It's really exciting when you hear a producer's voice in that way. Yeah. And certain changes and obviously all of the sequencer stuff. I mean, it's just amazing that production can have that kind of voice. I mean, you were like that too. There's so many things about that fucking record. It doesn't get old to me. It's aged magnificent. It feels completely timeless and modern. Yeah. A lot of those decisions that he was making and that kind of voice, it's very much in this huge pop rock record that's out now. It sounds fantastic. And you said something as well that you were fascinated about the idea of locking yourself away to make a record. Is that not how you make records anyway? I picture you. I guess. I haven't done that kind of dangerous mentally dangerous. It's like pull all the chase out of it. Yeah, I mean, when I was younger, I had like, you know, not anything as fully formed, and I've definitely grown a lot as a composer. Producer since then, but I was just talking to my husband about how I would love to do that again. If only to just get the raw source. How you made the first record sort of going down to the chef? Yeah, yeah. I mean, but I think having a concentrated period of time are you like, don't leave until you have a record where you that was like more casualties. You know, like I'm going to be going down there to write some stuff. We'll see what happens, but to go into a space for like ten days and be like, I'm gonna leave with an album. Yeah. Is really exciting to me. And yentl. And told you, I want to talk about Barbra Streisand. Yeah, my mom loved Barbra Streisand, loved the movie lentil. And I think it's like a really underrated musical. It's just about a young Jewish woman who wants to study the tall mood on a quest for knowledge and so she cross dresses as a man. Now hearing you say it like that. It's like tootsie meets fiddler on the roof or something. I have not seen Tutsi and I've been reading that's on my list of movies. They made a pretty cheesy, like a little broad musical that. I mean, I'll go see any cheesy musical because I just like are you musical fan? Have you thought about participating in a musical? I'm kind of actually working on right now. Well, for the stage, but I don't want to jinx it so I'm not going to say, but yes, I was never growing up. I was never a musical theater person, but now I just maybe it's just having moved back to New York after being away for so long. I'll just see anything. Me too. I bought tickets to Broadway in October. It went up to see David Byrne. American utopia. I watch it on the plane just fell so hard and love that when I saw that the tickets went back up, I was like, I must. Yeah. I must go. I also thought, oh, I wonder if she's ever played shows in Korean then I saw something where you say you ended your last or was that the first show that you'd ever played in Korea? Yeah, we've played two shows in Korea. But that must have been kind of insane and emotional and that's how the bookends. Yeah, the book ends with the show and soul, and it was like wild to just, you know, that's another thing that I just never anticipated. I never had even the imagination to foresee me playing there. In the book, I talk about I was telling my aunt who's there, things are going really well. We played Coachella. She was like, sure, sure, you know. And then when I told her, you know, we're playing a show and so I'd love for you to come. She had like my cousin called me and she was just like, you know, my mom's really excited to see you. We're just curious who pays you? Is there like an office or something like that? And I was like, oh, you know, we get the money from the door and there's a promoter who looks a show and, you know, she's like, okay, and so she came to the show, and I was like, how many people? There's like probably like 500 people here and I was like, oh, like any other email this is my huasa, which is like the Korean word for like company or office. I was just like, this is like make a living. It was a really sweet moment. And it was just wild to see, you know, the city where I was born where my mom grew up and all of these kids, 'cause my mom's photos on the album on the vinyl. And all these Korean kids leaving the show into the night, the streets of Seoul with my mom's photo and this big square. It was surreal. But yeah, I don't know if you've heard of shinjin kyung. He's like this. We talked about him. Yeah, it's amazing. Actually, just the snippets that they played of his music when you mentioned him. I was like, I was like literally went on disk to order. Yeah, you should listen to the song. There's a song that's like 6 minute song called henny by this woman named Kim Jong mi. Who wrote the song for this woman. This incredible folk singer. And it's just this very slow orchestral build with this looping acoustic guitar. And I would love to hear your take on it. It's like so striking. You know, I had gone to this vinyl bar. Due to beat cafe in Japan in Tokyo. Is it a vinyl bar? Yeah, it's like it's like a bar where like a lot of musicians go to hang out. I'm not sure I've been told so many wonderful places like that in Tokyo, but I don't remember the name. Since Shibuya, there's kind of like a similar equivalent in Seoul where there was all these all these musicians go to this place called Jung jungle, which is this vinyl bar and soul when we were there early on bridges was actually his crew. Yeah, I went there and I never really listened to much Korean music and so much of what we think about when we think about Korean music is obviously KPop. But there's also this very rich 60s kind of like funk pop scene. And our promoter was telling us about this guy Shinji khang is almost like a sort of filled specter type without the mental illness and wrote for all these amazing girl groups from the 50s to the 80s and it's kind of like I think a recluse who just like this incredible psychedelic rock guitar player. And so we played as a song and we were all drunk and just floored. You know, it's just like so beautiful. And then the next day I went to like hang out with my aunt and my husband was telling you, oh, have you heard of Xinjiang? We just learned about the sky and just like, how do you know about that guy? Right. You're a mom and I used to sing the song by the pearl sisters called coffee hang on that was one of his songs. And then yeah, the book ends with us singing not to ruin it for you but the book ends with us like singing a shinjuku song together and karaoke that they used to sing together when we were kids. It was such a crazy thing because I never knew when my mom was ever even really into music. Yeah, I mean, obviously, created a huge, huge country, but even going around Thailand and places in Indonesia and getting the 60s records like there's this band called the gimbals from Indonesia that yeah, I mean, now there have been so many compilations of psychedelic funk in these. And like city pop is having this really cool city pop is amazing. And city pop is not that far sonically from some of jubilee, like just really slick 80s, but very groovy,.

Barbra Streisand Damon Korea David Byrne Hollywood Seoul Coachella Jung jungle Tokyo henny Shinji khang Kim Jong New York Japan Xinjiang Indonesia Thailand
"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"Was songs that other people didn't take, but I know. That's what B suite was. I thought I was going to be giving it to someone else. Right. And then when we were finished with it, I was like, I love the song. I was like, this back pocket single I had for like two years, three years. Maybe that would be interesting as well for you to actually make the beat and the music and send it off to somebody else that you like to do the top line thing. You completely. Yeah, I mean, I don't know if I feel like as competent or confident as a producer in that sense to do that. But I am really interested for the next record and two very different things. One where I just completely produce it myself and one where I work with just like fucking like 8 writers and producers on things. That's one thing that I never understood was just like seeing the credits on a huge pop song where they're like 8 riders and they're like, how is that possible? Yeah. Sometimes it's because they've used an interpolation or a sample from a song that already had four riders or something, but yeah, when I look at that too, the songs are like crazy when you look at some of the ones you're like 16 riders like. And then someone tries to make a meme like Bohemian Rhapsody one rider like to compare the two songs or like that is some kind of statement on their merit. And it's just like I think especially as a woman in music, it was always really important to me to be like, I am the force behind this, but I think that it's just a very different time where it's like you see all of these fantastic, huge pop songs now that have a bunch of writers and producers on it. It's like, well, the more brains the better. Right. I'm torn in this path now. It's just like, I think that there are certain things that you can do when you are the sole producer writer on something. And you have this vision that's so singular and only you can figure it out when you're in a room by yourself and you have endless hours to tinker and not be judged by someone who's like waiting to move on. But then there's also something really spectacular that can happen from a bunch of greats in a room with coming with different ideas and all even just the idea of a writing group or the more perspectives telling you if something is great, the better it's going to be. Yeah. In a way. And I think it's also like all our music is so beat focus whereas doing some drum programming on a Michael Jackson song in the 80s or 90s certainly when it got you credit. Now we listen to music because maybe it's got this crazy snare drum or like a beep sound in the background that's like the air candy that brings us in. So like a DJ snake or somebody Diplo who has these drums of doom and brings them in like they get publishing because they're an equally valid reason of why people like the song or something. It's hard for me because I do come from a little bit of an old school mentality like that just like, well, that's arrangement. I basically cut myself out of publishing sometimes because even when we were writing, maybe it sound like rehab. I was like, well, change it to an a minor because it should be more jangly there or something. For me, that's like, maybe I have this lofty image of myself, but that's something that Quincy Jones would have said in the middle of a session, right? I don't necessarily need 25% of the publishing for that. But now I kind of wish I had it. It's sort of crazy when you look at the credits to a song like sicko mode and you see over 20 writers. But that is the postmodern songcraft world that we live in. You throw in a reference to an old tribe called quest lyric, maybe an old biggie sample, then you also have to clear the song that biggie sampled in his song that you sampled. And sicko mode is amazing. It's a mini epic, so there's a couple of producers that worked on the beat. Is Travis Scott cheating? Of course not. I mean, the song is undeniably a classic, and it's the better for having all these elements. But I also see why it's easy for an old school raucous snob to take shots and say, Bohemian Rhapsody was just written by one person or Eleanor Rigby by two. Although we do all know that that's a Paul song. Even when we sat down to write uptown funk, Bruno was like, hey, we've been doing this crazy jam live in our shows and we throw some lyrics to Trinity at James over the top of it for fun. And that was sort of the jump off point for uptown, and we were very happy to give Trinidad his publishing for helping inspire our tune. Plus, I'm a DJ, like all I have is songs going around my head all the time. So if I'm working on a song and I think of a cool hook to sample from an old rap tune or an old lyric throw in, I can't help myself, and I'm also happy to credit those original creators. Yes, of course it hurts sometimes to see your sliver of the song pie get smaller and smaller, but it is all in the name of a better song. I was surprised at such a dominant singular force who can write produced and do everything by herself like Michelle's honor, shared this magnanimous view on the modern creative process. But then again,.

Travis Scott Michael Jackson Quincy Jones biggie Eleanor Rigby Bruno Trinity Trinidad Paul James Michelle
"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

06:56 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"New thing that we've never even done before. Have you got to do any shows yet? Do you have them? Yeah, we went on tour with us. Oh, great. A couple of weeks ago. We did a two and a half week run and next week we're going to do 5 weeks. Where was the first show? The first show was in Silver Spring, Maryland, like outside of D.C. at the fillmore. I was the first time I'd played a film more. Which was crazy because I remember seeing a DVD of the yeah yeah, yes, play the fillmore in San Francisco. And so like that out of that room was like really exciting. That was actually the biggest show that we've ever the biggest headlining show that we've ever played. But yeah, I mean, it was like it was strange because we were coming into toro during the honeymoon period of COVID where it was like, it's over, you know? We were vexed and there's nothing to worry about anymore and we get to go back to our livelihood. But then like a week into it, it was the delta variant and getting masks and vaccine proof in place. And now it's just kind of like, I don't know what the future is going to look like. I don't know when this is ever going to come to an end and if shows are even the right thing to be doing. I imagine not only was it your first show, but I'm sure it was probably like most people in that crowds for sure, like I'm just trying to get a sense of like the energy was just like electric in this way or were you just like it felt great I feel like I felt like shy a little bit. I don't know. I don't really have much of a the banter. Well, no, I'm fine with banter, but I don't like leading the charge on a major communal issue. It's difficult for me to have confidence because I'm always thinking about so many different perspectives of the thing. I didn't feel right to give a speech I just wanted it to be an enjoyable evening where we just ignored the elephant in the room kind of. But yeah, I felt like, you know, my tour stamina was definitely majorly impacted by like a year and a half off. Of just being around 9 people all the time in a bus or like, you know, having to talk to a large group or just I used to be able to do multiple things on tour, like a lot of the book was written on tour, like in my downtime, and this was just like survival. I have to just do the one thing. I just don't have the capacity to do multiple things right now. I think a lot of us are still just getting used to getting back to work. Yeah, I had my first DJ gig and I don't really play as many shows. I mean, I used to do 5 gigs a week, but a year and a half off of something that I've done at least 200 times a year since I was 18 years old. I really was sort of having not an existential crisis because I knew I was going to do it, and it was probably going to be okay, but I was just writing myself with the fact that it's going to kind of suck. And I was like over practicing and there's something bad also about overpowering. It was his first show for like a DJ game. Oh, DJ. And I came off and I kind of thought it was terrible. I thought they were all going to pat me on the back and be like, it's okay. It's been a while. I thought I was going to get that and everyone was like, that was amazing. I think people the standards are much lower because they're just like a loud sound exciting. It's true. And I think that yeah, everybody was excited. I think it wasn't nearly as bad as I thought it was. And actually, yeah, my first session back in the studio with somebody who I had them at before was kind of like a big star. I nearly canceled three times like the week before because I'm like I haven't been in I probably don't have any idea. How does that kind of session? I can't even imagine. I mean, I guess I have some insight into that world, but yeah, it was with lizzo. We'd never worked together before. She's a giant star. She's extremely talented. She's I can tell she's a creative force as well. And I was just like, what am I going to do? I don't have the fucking crazy drums. I don't have the thing that everybody shit sounds like within huge 8 O 8s and things like I'm going to go in and what if I just sit at the piano and I pick up the guitar and like no core, like no interest in progressions come out? But do you have chord progressions at the ready? Are you just sitting there see what happens on the day? Well, I had just been so cold and rusty through COVID because I'd been in an air-b-n-b for the first 6 months in England. I was like, I'll finally learn able ten and I'll get learned that shit and I just I'm glad I learned it and taught myself it, but I will never be as good at able tennis people that started on that. And I was starting to hate my music because I do need. Is it a pro tools right here? Sorry. What do you work on? Well, I just miss having all my outboard gear and weird effects it to put things through that that might make one sound that inspires me or there's something maybe because of it's how I came up with sitting in an upright piano will sometimes inspire me more and something better will come out than a midi keyboard or just any of this old gear, probably because I'm used to it. It's not so much a crutches. It's like, I think it's just part of my DNA. So I was already hating all the music that I was making. And then I was about to go into the session with this big, you know, star and then I was like, well, I'll go four hours early, and I'll just try and fucking get out a couple little rough ideas, so at least when she comes in there's like four things hopefully she'll like one of them. And then it worked. It was fine. And I actually surprised myself, and I was like, oh, this is I love doing this. This is still the thing that when it locks into place that I'm probably supposed to be doing. I started doing this podcast during lockdown and other shit 'cause I was like, maybe I'm funneling out of music into the guy who makes music to the guy who talks about music. That's fine. I'm sorry to turn your podcast into my nose. It's really interesting to eat. There's a lot going on that has changed everyone in this industry is feelings about music, I think, because it's just very different. What we do requires being in a room with other people or a lot of people. I don't know. I think a lot of us are grappling with what? There's so much unknown of just like, what is our purpose right now? Yeah. I've always had this very pure feeling about art and music that, you know, it is the most important thing. And it was the first year where that really faltered and I was like, I don't know if it's the most important thing. There's so much going on in the world that it doesn't really feel like my little song is very important. Yeah. And I think that we just do a very different kind of thing. We contribute in a very different way, but it's certainly reliant on being able to survive first and coloring the world in this way that makes it enjoyable. But it was the first time that I think I really questioned what I was doing. And did you have an idea where their thoughts in your mind of what you should do instead or where you kind of just like devote my entire life to climate activism or volunteering to take care of people without housing or what I mean? Or get involved in politics. But.

Silver Spring fillmore lizzo toro D.C. Maryland San Francisco tennis England
"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"It's some of the more conventional alt rock elements that make her music really stand out to me. We'll be right back in a moment. This episode is brought to you by HP plus. In a world full of smart devices, shouldn't your printer be smart too? It is with HP plus. These printers know when they're running low. So you always get the ink you need delivered right when you need it. Plus, you save up to 50% on ink. So you can print whatever you want. As much as you want, any time you want. That is pretty smart. Get 6 free months of instant Inc when you choose HP plus. Conditions apply, visit HP dot com slash smart for details. So was it quite a guitar record until you got with Ned and started adding the samples of it's not like I was some like fucking indie rocker upon kid, but I do sometimes lament the lack of guitars in any kind of cool music. It's like almost impossible to make something cool now and of its time and have guitars in it. You either have to be doing something really interesting and new with the thing or you just have to be so fucking cool yourself and interesting that just by nature of you being of the time. I did love that about even though your music has all these other things. What were your first loves? It seems like guitars, and that's quite an important thing that you've stuck to through your. Is that like an Oregon thing? Is that just like what you love? Yeah, because I grew up in Eugene, I grew up with Pacific Northwest India raw. What is that? Very vulnerable, kind of confessional lyrics with dynamic, softy, guitars. And who were some of the best Elliot Smith and death cab for cutie, we were really into modest mouse built to spill and granddaddy and so all the K records bands like mount Erie and microphones and we're going back to the 90s and early 2000s, were there any way to answer contemporarily sort of doing it at the time you did it or is everybody listening to this older generation of music? Well, I feel like modest mouse and death cowper like coming out with records and my teens and so that was what I was really into. So when you put out the first record, was there a moment that the show started get bigger, people are hitting you up, however it is social media. It was there a moment that you're like, oh, something's clicking in. Yeah, I mean, I think there was a you know how it is it's like there's a series of moments that happens. I have exceeded all of my grandest ambitions at this point in time. But we literally started touring in a Honda Odyssey minivan. Our first North American tour was 5 weeks opening for mitsuki in a minivan with a little turtle top where we put all of the merch. And even then I was like, something is happening. Because it was the first proper North American tour that we were on. We were getting paid $250 a night, and I was like, this is great. We're doing it. And then from there, it was just like slowly getting bigger. And I remember being on that tour and being like, if I ever get to wear mitsuki's at now as a headliner, selling out music hall of Williamsburg with our name on the marquee, I've made it. I can just retire. And then you get there and we did that maybe like a year and a half later. And as soon as you get there, you're like, what's next? Yeah, of course. So in the fader, you're just sold out tonight at what's the one in San Francisco. The great American music hall or something, I think that's the time. Yeah. Yeah. And you say an interesting quote, actually, I mean, you say a lot of interesting shit, but you're talking about how you have no chill in your sort of laughing about it and slightly apologizing for your energy. But you say something that I think a lot of people know, but maybe don't know how to either say it in the right way or like to pretend that they're modest or humble. You say, I'm aware I have this magnetism in this energy that when I'm in a room, yes, I'm aware of it and sometimes it's great and sometimes I like it and sometimes I'm like a little bit embarrassed of it. But I like that because I think most people are like I think that I'm sure Lady Gaga was aware she's sitting in a room like she can not be normal. And it's not just because she's famous. I think people who do something really magical on stage. It's not like that's the only part and there's something somewhere else in your body. Yeah, I mean, I don't even think that you have to be famous to have that. I think I just have always been a clown. You know? I mean, I think my mom was like that too, or she had this kind of energy where she was just chatty and social and unembarrassed and confident with who she was. And just had a way of connecting with people in a room and not everyone. I don't know. I've seen it's an extra so now are you feeling embarrassed overly modest 'cause you don't think that you have an extra, I do think that the people that I've worked with to keep bringing up, but the Amy's and those people, they don't necessarily court that attention, like you said, you don't have to be famous. There's just there's some kind of unquantifiable energy around. I mean, I certainly hope so. But I also feel like part of that is just, you know, I've never shied away from being the center of attention. It's almost like come fairly natural to me to be like a clown. You know, even in after school, activities were always just like leading some kind of tirade. I remember doing an interview with pitchfork and she was talking about reading my book and she was like, when you're talking about starting out in music, you never talk about being nervous. And I don't really remember ever feeling that way. In a weird way, like I feel more nervous about where I'm at now and proving that I deserve to be here than when I first started out because it was just like who cares. This is me and this is my creation and I think it's amazing and I want to share it and that's the path. You don't have that moment even a lot of people have the 5 minutes before you go on stage like those crazy nerves. I do, but I feel like I had exciting, you know. I mean, you would be like sociopath if you never felt anything. No, no, I have to have the worst. I mean, even going out before DJ gig it could be 300 people. It could be 10,000 at a festival. Vomited nervous. I mean, I've learned to control it a little bit because I realized that some of those are just impostor syndrome issues or whatever you want to label. That's incredible that you have impostor syndrome. Yeah. And that's another episode. I mean, even in that fader cover, you say you're a shark. You had a lot of anxiety and depression that you dealt with from adolescents on. So you just had to always keep busy and keep. Making things. Yeah, definitely. It's weird to hear this back. But yeah, I feel that's true. I feel like that's probably a lot of creatives where you just feel like I need to make something. Yeah. Otherwise I will just dwell on festering thoughts. Yeah. And luckily, you're good at a lot of things. I mean, actually, I love your videos. Thank you. Is savage? What's it called? Savage good boy. Savage good boy. Is that the most recent videos or okay. I've been rewatching the entire Sopranos because my wife has never seen it. So it's so good. Every day we watch at least three hours of Michael imperioli. So to suddenly having really not seen him, he's frozen in my mind as like the year 2000 Christopher multi. And you're a video. He looks so good. He looks amazing. And he's still the same beautiful sort of Italian like a fucking marble sculpture face, but white hair, beard, like a much different imperial. First of all, what was the.

HP mitsuki instant Inc Elliot Smith mount Erie Ned music hall of Williamsburg Pacific Northwest great American music hall Eugene Odyssey Oregon Honda India Lady Gaga San Francisco Amy depression
"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"Hope or was it always just sludge? I mean, I think that we kept it going because we thought we were just paying our dues. And I think then in a way, I was. By the time Japanese breakfast started to take off, I felt so prepared of just like little things of like what to do when your pedals are fucked up and how to not freak out if, you know, just like things to avoid. We were just smart about it by the time that it started working out. Did you feel like also that you liked watching a lead vocalist adjuster? We haven't done any of these really in person. I know I wanted to thank you. I just really wanted to see your studio and I feel like my Internet is always like fucked up, so I don't want to do it soon. But I'm a huge fan. So I wanted to meet you. When I found out that I got to do this, I was like listening to them irresponsibly. Thanks. That's very sweet. Yeah, this is so much fun to do this in my actual studio walk in and see you looking at cents and gear. So when Japanese breakfast started to gain this popularity in acclaim, did you at least feel like you'd earned it a little because of all the times that you had spent in these other things sort of slogging it out on the road? Yes. Absolutely. Yeah. I felt like a late bloomer, but I was really grounded by the time that things started happening for me. I was able to build a really good thing whereas I think that if it had happened right away for me, I would have taken it for granted. Yeah. For me, that moment happened a little later in life I was ready 31. I think you are how old 24? Oh gosh. I was like 26 when psycho pump came up, I think. So yeah, I definitely thought that my career was I had been knocking at it for ten years, maybe even like 13 counting 18 years old when I got my drum machine making demos. And at 31, I'd had a that came out that sold ten copies. Also, a lot of people that I really like that was sort of my peers are hard to even believe, but Kanye later on danger mouse just were skyrocketing. And I was like, and I had to just look at it and not in some really sad solving myself to sleep. I was like, maybe I'm not as good at this as I thought I was and maybe I love journalism actually, like you said, there was a lot of things I was doing music for Hyundai commercials in Japan just to keep the lights on. And I just was like, well, fuck it. If I'm not good enough to sort of make hits I might as well make the music that I like. And I just started making shit that I liked, and then I made this record version, which at the time I was making and then I met, obviously, Amy Winehouse and Lily Allen and people who had enormous amounts of talent. But I think it was because I was just like, well, if I'm never gonna make a hit, I might as well make the shit that I like and there's something about they call it what the power of surrender. Do you think oh my gosh, yeah, I've never heard that, but that is absolutely what happened to me. I mean, after my mom died, I was like, this is the sign that it's over. I was already floundering from after I got out of college to like 25 in this band. And I was like, you know, this is a sign you're 25 years old. It's time to grow up. And after my mom died, I moved to New York to get a job. And advertising or literally was out to just get a job doing whatever it took to make money. Yeah. I know your must be so exhausted talking about your mom and you just wrote a book about it, but just for people who might not know the full story because it is quite woven and we don't have to overdo it, but this story that the book is about the grief of losing your mom who you're extremely close with. And that really happened in between these two bands, right? Yeah, so I moved back to Eugene Oregon where I'm from in 20 14 and my mom had a really aggressive stage for cancer and I lived there as a caretaker for 6 months and after she died. I lived there for another 6 months helping kind of pack up the house. And my one quiet insular thing that was separate from just the slog of helping my dad pack up this house was I would go to this little shed at the bottom of the property, my parents lived out in the country. And I would write songs about what had happened because I just didn't know how to communicate with other people, which is odd because I'm very open book chatty gal. And I just didn't know how to talk to people about what had happened. And so this was my way of communicating that to myself or sorting through it. And I just had no ambition at all of this record that I was making in this cottage. It was just for me. And then over the next year, I worked on arranging it. I had a friend Ned eisenberg, who had an apartment and crown heights, and I would just go over there and the two of us would mix it after I got off of my 9 to 5 job. I would drive in rush hour traffic to crown heights. And he would work on the songs in FL studio and we would a brilliant producer and originally we were just going to be mixing it, but he started adding all these samples and synth lines to things I had recorded in Oregon. And then I just thought, you know, I'm going to trick a small label to put out this record and I sent it out to ten very small, not even like known indie labels. And no one wanted to put it out except for this very small label and frostburg Maryland called yellow K records that was funded by the skies vape shop in prospero, Maryland. I told them a friend I'm not going to tour. I've done that. It's not going to happen for me. I have this 9 to 5 job. I just want to press 500 copies on vinyl. And over the next ten years, maybe we'll slowly sell them. Yeah. And then he was like, okay, I'm gonna hire a PR person. I was like, why? You know, there's your waste of money. And I actually didn't in the press release, I didn't tell anyone that it was this record about losing my mom, but I had put her photo on the cover and had been very open in the interviews that followed. Is this the first full length? This is the first. And so I think because I had surrendered and decided that this was never going to happen for me, because it was like. Oh no, now it's your time. Yeah. It's strange because listening to it and knowing a little bit about your story just from reading that fader cover. It's deceptively joyful in some ways like I thought that record it combines so many things I love. It has the synthesis these amazing maladies. It's just like a swirl of sound because everything's kind of just like distorted the right amount where it's just bleeding into each other. You can't tell what instruments doing. Like my bloody Valentine's like the go team. It's like a lot of shit that I really love and I probably should go back and read the lyrics at some point because I was just like, oh, this is like, I wouldn't say fun. That sounds right, but I always am a little bit like melody and beat first and then like lyrics second, but that was the record that you were really channeling your grief and what was going on with your mom too. Most of the songs on there. Some of them are old songs that we kind of can't. I think the first thing that struck me about psycho pump was the guitars. I just assume because this is some super cool alternative band with the sci-fi name that it would be some sort of eccentric post electronic kind of thing. And I guess there's some edict in my head that guitars have stopped being cool. We've run out of ways to make them interesting. And now since and program music at the dominant force in alternative music, whatever alternative music means. You get these indie bands following all over themselves to reinvent themselves to sound like new R&B, and I find it all a little exhausting. So when I heard psychopomp in the guitar, I was like, fresh. I mean, maybe it's the kind of old guy I mean, but I do miss guitars. And I'm not even really a guy. But an instrument is really only as cool and progressive as the person wielding it. And the songs that it's being used to play. So it makes sense that in this reinvention of shoegaze and indie part through Michelle's owners lens, it does feel vibrant and exciting because she is vibrant and exciting. I came up listening to bands like lush. My bloody Valentine and Sonic Youth who made wonderfully inventive music with guitars by playing with sonics and tunings. And I feel some of that here. As Zhang music progresses, the production and sonics do evolve. But inversely,.

Ned eisenberg Lily Allen Amy Winehouse skies vape shop Kanye Eugene Oregon Hyundai Maryland crown heights Japan frostburg prospero New York cancer FL Oregon Michelle sonics Zhang
"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

"Of ESPN college football, ESPN, the ESPN logo and ESPN college football are registered trademarks of ESPN incorporated. Yesterday I kind of woke up and this is the first time I was like, oh, I fucking love this. No, I read the cover article first. Then I listen to the first album. I was like, wait, I've been missing this in my life for 5 years. I get combines. A lot of things I really love and it's great. And the second and third record. And then I saw that you wrote a New York Times Best Seller. So by four p.m., I'm riding my bicycle to mcnally Jackson to get a copy of the book. I actually called the bookstore. I was like, do you have a copy of crying in the H 5 and the guy? Kind of snicker down the phone as if I'd called tower records that name and like, do you have Guns N' Roses appetite for destruction? He's like, yeah, we wrote a few copies of that. So I just had such a Japanese breakfast day. And then by the end of the day, like most New Yorkers I was scooping buckets of water out of my basement. Oh my God. I'm Mark ronson, and this is the fader uncovered podcast. In this interview series, I'll be speaking with some of the most influential and groundbreaking musicians in the world. From genre defining stars to avant garde trailblazers about their lives and careers. Each episode will be rooted in these musicians iconic fader cover stories and institution that over the past two decades has told artist stories like no other. The podcast is the chance for us to talk about the past present and future, reflecting on their breakthroughs, diving into their lives when they're covered hit shelves and discussing what the future might hold now. And it's an opportunity for me to speak to some of the artists I most admire. This.

ESPN mcnally Jackson football New York Times Mark ronson
"japanese" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Japanese Prime Minister Yoshida Sudha support levels hitting a record low just a few days before the start of the Olympics at Baxter has news from the 9 60 newsroom in San Francisco at Yeah, right, Brian, these are dismal numbers he's had to deal with Covid to criticize vaccination effort. Unpopular Olympic Games just because of cost and his numbers show discontent. Latest NHK poll taken in the last few days shows only 33% support. And that is down 4% points from last month. This is very near what as referred to in Japanese politics as the danger zone of below 30% side. Note. US first lady Jill Biden will go to Tokyo for the opening ceremonies. Russia linked Ransomware gang Revel has seemingly vanished from the dark Web. Bloomberg's William Turton says it's too early to tell exactly no. And this group went underground and decided to run and hide or as these groups sometimes and very often do they re brand, But you know when there's a little bit too much attention, they kind of Go under for a little bit, And then they'll come back under a new name Now, Williams says They already did that in 2019. It could also be law enforcement who took them down. So while we wait, we're buffering buffering buffering. US. The storm over voting rights has cut a path from Texas to Washington, D. C. President Joe Biden says passing congressional law now U. S is imperative to fight. The all on assault on free and fair elections, assault on democracy. An assault on liberty. Assault on who we are, Biden says Congress needs to act now The Texas saga unfolds with Democratic members of their legislature fleeing the state to make sure there isn't voting quorum to pass its new voting restrictions. Legislation. State representative Rafael A. Chia is one of those members. We said We are going to kill. Any undemocratic efforts in the state Legislature, and if that meant leaving the state we were going to do it. Texas Legislature has voted now to have those Democratic members are rested. NIH supported research team has found that the people who received both doses of the Pfizer biontech vaccine held hallmarks of a strong, persistent immune response against SARS covid to that could be protected for years. But the director Dr Anthony Fauci, on CNBC said today Well, it's really too early to tell that the real question that is being examined right now. Is what is the durability of that protection? Does it wane off? And if so, how soon And if you do do a boost? How high do you get the response? So now, Fauci says, What is known is that 6 to 8 months out, it is still very effective, but the efficacy will be subject to variance in any case in San Francisco. I'm Ed Baxter. This is Bloomberg. Brian. Thank you. Our guest is market Patel, senior portfolio manager at Wells Fargo Asset Management Market. The market reaction to this CPI report was somewhat muted today. Part of that was because some of these components are seen as temporary. And I suppose partly as Doug mentioned, investors know the Fed is committed here to being patient. But there's another element, which is I would imagine some investors are confused. You know, they're worried about a slowing economy has represented by yields his slow or one that's too hot to handle. Well, I think the numbers today the inflation numbers were high at the upper end of expectations. But what really limited that was the negative unemployment numbers and the information on wages, which really suggested again as their underlying weakness. And I think those those things went back and forth. Treasuries faded with lower yields, and they moved up a little bit, too, You know, in the day around 1 42, but still well within the trading range. I think investors are perplexed and I'm not sure what signal except Well, absolutely, and they're getting multiple signals the whole time, and it was so much fed speak coming out. And, uh, I guess you know, there's there's so much noise to be going through. But you know, the bond market is telling us one thing. Margie and the equity market another would you agree? Well, yes, but I think the bond market is reacting to the reality that the Fed has is keeping short rates very low, and also, they essentially are bowing all the long Treasury sucking up all the supply for long duration Treasurys, and that's keeping an anchor on long rates. And so there's really no way for investors to express higher inflations. Slower growth, higher growth, anything like that. So I think that it's really an off signal. And the question is, can the Said, Really get out of the corner that they paid and solve into with these very, very low rates. So you've got these fed presidents like Jim Bullard and Robert Kaplan calling for for tapering, Bullard said he'd started right now. Do they have the ear of the chair or not so much? I. It's really hard to say There are lots of actions to say, why are they.

Rafael A. Chia Ed Baxter 2019 William Turton Robert Kaplan Jim Bullard Doug NIH Biden San Francisco Congress Brian Anthony Fauci Bullard Williams Fauci NHK 6 today Olympic Games
"japanese" Discussed on VelociPodcast

VelociPodcast

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on VelociPodcast

"But it's not that bad. It's just noisy and it takes about twenty minutes or i'm sure maybe there's longer ones stuff but you just lay there and try to ignore the noise. They put headphones on you with music but the noise drowns out the music almost immediately so that was almost pointless. I almost would have rather had them not put on the headphones with the thing and just put on headphones that you know white noise or trenton counseling or something. That wasn't as bad as i was led to believe it was going to be. I got a very interesting thing. It looks like the same as a tube like a cat scan but they fill you up with stuff that's gonna make your bones joints glow so this is some kind of medicine or juice they put in you. Having had a fever for weeks at a time when they put it in my arm it was cold and it felt really good and that was a weird feeling. Because i could feel it. Spread throughout my veins from my body. Lincoln went through my left arm and they went through the like down my chest and i actually feel it's sort of getting into my legs and stuff then put me in the machine and this was one of the more interesting experience. I have no idea what's going on. They've explained it to me and japanese. I've only got vague understanding of what they've said to me so in the machine and all the stuff that was cold a few minutes after they've turned the machine on starts to heat up which is very uncomfortable and i think i now have a sense of what the beginning of being microwaved feels like now. Never got to the point where it was painful and i complained. Be honest about that. But like when the inside of your body starts to get hot unexpectedly that is a surprise and it's a bit of a shock and i'm sure they told me was going to happen but i missed it. The guy who runs the machine came out and check the screen multiple times and he seemed very confused about what he was seeing inside my body. Now i didn't take that to mean anything for all i know. That's really they come out and check the machine multiple times but he did have a confused look on his face and i don't think anyone had told him about my body because that wasn't the stuff they were concerned with..

about twenty minutes one japanese minutes Lincoln
"japanese" Discussed on VelociPodcast

VelociPodcast

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on VelociPodcast

"I didn't realize that and he just starts poking and it's like you gotta go to the hospital like now So i go. I like hobble back home. I head into my house and i call a taxi and what i need to go to the local hospital. I live in a small town. The hospitals not very big but he the doctor silver fox. He calls a head. He's like i know there's a guy there he's like a knee dude He'll check this out. At least he knows what he's doing and they'll know you're coming so that day i get an attacking roll up to the hospital the hospital. I have to do another cova test. You're not allowed to go into the hospital with a fever without taking a koets. This is to pcr tests in two days. This isn't costing me anything. That's actually the bit that may be again Our american listeners need to pay attention to socialize. Medicine has meant that. I've had multiple pcr tests in multiple days. And i've not actually paid any money because they're like this is something we have to do so the burden shouldn't be on you. It should be on the tax payer. In general i get to the hospital and they're expecting me so then i go in enemy doctor. Sketch your smartwatch. You will notice. There's a theme for the rest of the doctors naming Dr silver fox. Overwhelm me with his gorgeous. Dr sketchers smartwatch wasn't really as impressive. But he was clearly a good doctor so he's taking a look at my knees like a guy. We need x ray this This is weird. And i'm like okay man. You know whatever you gotta do so now. They're thinking my favorite being caused by whatever's causing the inflammation in my knee they x. ray and they find there's a big lump in there is some sort of calcification and he's like worse case scenario. We're going to have to go in there and dig this out. That might be what's causing it actually. Worst case scenario we might have to replace your knees. I'm not happy about this. But i was kind of resigned to it because this is something that happens to people when they get older again. I've sort of abused the my knees to extremity that other people haven't having done judo for thirty years. It's not like at nc this coming. So i wasn't happy about it. But i was kinda resigned to it. He's like we wanna take some fluid out of your knee and test. It see what's going on. So i'm like okay. Yeah let's Let's let's do that so didn't hurt. I mean they just stuck a needle in. I didn't watch The stuck a needle and took some juice out and tested it and they like We don't need to go in there. So that's a big relief but also we don't know what this is. This is maybe some kind of like crazy arthritis or rheumatism or something. So we're going to send you a specialist so you come back in a couple of the specialist now this whole time. We're talking now four or five days. I'm not actually getting any medication or anything. Because they don't technically know what's wrong so they don't wanna give me something that makes it worse but that means my condition is essentially just deteriorating. And what i was actually thinking. The whole time was like this in nature. I am now getting to the point where it's becoming difficult to walk. I have a fever. That's recognizing so worn out. And.

four silver fox thirty years five days two days judo american
"japanese" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

"Ozaki banacci machine go stories on gay issues paying stories wakabayashi funny stories and yoki bochy which agreed star. I get a feeling that nashi means stories. And yeah so excuse are pronunciations. I'll say that. Now because there's a lot of japanese throughout this and we are definitely not well-versed in machado got. I'm going to butcher some shit in and of course there are a number of supernatural stories. Some which we'll discuss today that discussed creatures such as yokoi monster spirits. You'll get into more later. Tango which are heavenly dogs and utes which are ghosts just a few oh urinary. Da along with the country's religions a lot of historical texas also basis for japanese folklore thalji for many many years like most cultures. A lot of these stories are passed down through oral tradition Storytellers would travel from village to village telling the stories along with providing illustrations of the sales. Oh okay that's fun. yeah One of these historical tax was completed in eight twelve Common era eight twelve called the koji. A records of ancient matters the kogi contained stories of the world's creation The origin of the gods in japanese emperor ancestry just for an example according to the koji in the beginning heaven and earth were formed from a permeable whose life then emerged from the earth. While in the heavens three deities appeared followed by two others which became the separate heavenly deities after them came to seven generations of the ages of the gods to singular deities and then came of that came from a substance floating us and five male and female couple deities. Wow in addition to jiechi there was also new hungry or not hunt sake. Critical of japan that was completed in seven twenty common era that in addition to myths and also is attributed to helping establish the genealogy of the imperial family. I did not hear any mention of Venus creating all of them. What eloquent tear felony. So yeah happy science. He created all of this shit. I keep thinking like at least the us creating thing. It just sounds to me like a metaphor for semen could be the like in there to just proper to talk about it. So it's the who's One thing that i learned. I thought his co. As in japanese culture everything in nature has a comey which is a deity or spirit which has resulted in a huge pantheon in which some claim there are millions of different commies sunol millions of dot. Communists is nice in regards to deities. the two. most important are easily. Doggy and his sister is of course to have created the islands of japan. And many of the gods and goddesses in addition to all the major deities and spirits there are also a number of minor deities called tango ten. You are mischievous deeds. That are said to be part. Human and part bird that live in trees in the mountainous areas and often played tricks on humans. But don't like to be tricked themselves One of the creatures that came from the buddhist tradition is that of the which is said to be more a more threatening group of spirits. They are portrayed as large horned demons that can transform into either both both humans or animals. And you've probably seen the masks. You see those often. Yeah the only can be invisible can steal human souls and are often associated with bad things such as death and disease Japanese folklore mythology is quite important to the japanese culture which can be seen in how it's represented in art drama literature and so on speaking of literature. Japan has quite an extensive literary history and has been credited in creating. The first novel called the tale of gingy. The first novel ever..

first novel texas Venus both today earth two others seven generations two Japanese Japan japan three deities Ozaki banacci tango ten eight twelve five male Doggy One One thing
"japanese" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"japanese" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

"A pride and proud there have different multiple meanings. You're like a sweet little sentiment. And then he got ruined so anyway This is a full episode. Yes and i think it's going to be a good one so every other week. We're going to bring you a full paranormal topic. We have lots of stories information. And then i'm actually. I'm excited for believers skeptic portion of this where we debunk or. Excuse me while we believe in. Chris burbs denver. Because i wouldn't sure if there was going to be an eat unique debunks considering the topic. But i didn't think about that. Yeah so first of all all say it now. So if you're wondering about the whole pod. Yeah that i just said and then you heard a little sound effect at the beginning of sounded different. Yeah we are now part of a network called the pod baath network which promotes a small group of weird spooky in just plain odd podcast so we can find them on twitter. Instagram or just look up pod moth network or go to pod moth dot network for more information. We were super excited about that. And you're going to be hearing some Maybe some ads or commercials and our episode of our partners into very nice. Go check him out. Yeah absolutely so back to our show so topic. This week is going to be a lot of fun. It's going to be a lot of fun we've seen like we were talking about our top episodes of last year and this kind of came about as a result i could loose result because we saw that folklore from different areas. People seem to enjoy that. Yeah and there was a main that i posted that was about in japanese culture. If you if you can't fall asleep then that according to folklore you're gay. Yeah that's what kind of spot this episode. So if you didn't know we are talking about Japanese folklore basically and there is so much so much we didn't even scratch the surface like it's ridiculous like we actually kind of stuck to one just sub topic folklore. So that's why we could branch out into multiple episodes. I think we plan to because this is some wacky shit crazy so with that drinks. I don't want to because you telling me at dinner that you're embarrassed. Well you must had a mishap. I had a mishap. Let me just go in and go. Yeah okay so you actually nailed it. I was trying to get so. I went to fries..

twitter last year Instagram This week Japanese Chris burbs denver japanese first pod