17 Burst results for "Japan Korean Australia"

"japan korea australia" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:43 min | Last month

"japan korea australia" Discussed on KCRW

"It's 807 at KCRW. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Sarah McCammon. It was like the first day back at school, seeing all your old friends again. That is how UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson characterized President Joe Biden's first NATO meeting, at least according to NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization held their summit in Brussels yesterday, and Biden delivered one big message to NATO partners. Everyone in that room today understood the shared appreciation. Quite frankly, that America is back. Biden now turns his attention to a bilateral meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, where the two are expected to talk about nuclear stability, arms control agreements and cyber attacks, among other issues. On Wednesday, Evo do older was U S ambassador to NATO under President Obama and he joins us now. Ambassador Daalder welcome My pleasure. I want to begin with China. NATO came out with a strong shared statement about the security issues that country poses. Let's hear what NATO Secretary General Stoltenberg said yesterday. China's growing influence and international policies presents challenges to alliance security. How will the alliance address those challenges when some members will also want to keep their economic ties with China? Well, it's important that NATO focused on China as a challenge and characterized Russia as a threat a threat to its security that needs a direct response. When it comes to China, it is trying to rule raised the awareness of China's presence globally but increasingly also in Europe, and that there is a need for the alliance and the 30 members of that alliance. To work together to meet that challenge to have common approaches and common policies on cyber, which is an issue that the Chinese are involved in to be aware and share intelligence and information about where the Chinese maybe acting militarily and as necessary, build up the capacity to respond. Should China and in the future. Come to threaten the security of the North Atlantic area, which is what NATO is all about. What do you expect to see when it comes to NATO's efforts to check China's military power? Well, I think what we'll see is first and most importantly, a strengthening of NATO's partnerships with critical Asian democracies. Japan, Korea, Australia and other countries. These partnerships exchange information allow for interoperability of the armed forces that When there are military operations, they could work together. All of these countries had forces and capabilities deployed in Afghanistan, for example, so that's one way the second is that intelligence about the Chinese in growing Capability will be shared among the NATO allies and third if and when the Chinese, uh our approach militarily in the in the European region as they do that we have a capacity to respond, should they in one form or another. Decide to use military force. And finally, there is the whole area of cyber and new technologies, which are directed both against Russia, but also against against China, having the capacity to detect cyber intrusions, defending cyber systems and if necessary, responding Cyberattacks is as applicable to China as it is to Russia. Right. And on that note, How do you think NATO should respond to, you know a massive To invoke its most solemn obligation what President Biden called the the sacred It could be a cyber response. It could be a cyber defensive response or offensive response. Or indeed a military response again, depending on the damage that such an attack would inflict on NATO countries when it comes to a cyber response, though, how equipped as NATO to deal with that to do that, given the technological capabilities of Russia and China? So NATO itself doesn't have much of a cyber capability. But that's how NATO operates its individual nations that contribute military capabilities. And then operate under an integrated command structure so NATO doesn't actually have any ground forces. Germany or the United States or the UK will provide those forces under the NATO command structure to operate and so in the case of cyber, the same would be the case the United States or the UK Two major cyber military and capabilities would be able to use their forces in response to an attack say in a country that doesn't have That capability and do so in a coordinated manner and under the direction of the NATO political authorities. Regarding Russia. I want to quickly play with, Stoltenberg said yesterday. Our relationship with Russia is at its lowest point since that Cold War and Moscow's aggressive actions are a threat to our security. Briefly about 30 seconds, what progress has NATO made toward addressing Russian aggression? Very significant progress since 2014. It's deployed forces into the Baltic region and further east. It created the command structure and, most importantly, it is enhanced its capabilities. For seven years running, it has increased defense spending significantly to provide for the capacity to defend its NATO territory against the potential attack from Russia. I've been speaking with former U S ambassador to NATO. Ivo Daalder. Thanks so much for taking the time. My pleasure. Now in the president of the United States meets Vladimir Putin. There are people in Belarus who hope that he will bring up their country. Alexander Lukashenko, the president of Belarus, has been cracking down on opponents to his regime since last summer. That's when mass protests broke out in the country that borders Russia. There were disputes over the results of the presidential election, and many people are still living in fear of their own government. NPR's Lucian Kim has more Not so long ago, the image of Belarus was of a peaceful, if not slightly boring former Soviet republic run by an eccentric leader named Alexander Lukashenko. Now. Belarus, squeezed between Poland and Russia is more isolated than ever, and Lukashenko is persecuting anyone who goes against him. Svetlana, a retired music teacher and grandmother in the town of Gomel says people now joke that Belarus is even farther north than North Korea. We're only using her first name because fit Lana has already been detained for her activism. And fears prosecution to press what its features that uh, that's true for what's happening in Belarus is a catastrophe, she says. We're living under the conditions of a real fascist regime. Just a year ago, Atlanta thought her country was finally on the path to democracy. An opposition candidate names Atlanta Titian Oscar was barnstorming her way through Belarus..

Sarah McCammon Steve Inskeep Alexander Lukashenko Brussels Lucian Kim Ivo Daalder Wednesday 2014 30 members Belarus Biden Svetlana Cold War North Atlantic yesterday Europe Lukashenko seven years NPR News Lana
"japan korea australia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:32 min | Last month

"japan korea australia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Late on Friday. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Sarah McCammon. It was like the first day back at school, seeing all your old friends again. That is how UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson characterized President Joe Biden's first NATO meeting, at least according to NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization held their summit in Brussels yesterday, and Biden delivered one big message to NATO partners. Everyone in that room today understood the shared appreciation. Quite frankly, that America is back. Biden now turns his attention to a bilateral meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, where the two are expected to talk about nuclear stability, arms control agreements and cyber attacks, among other issues on Wednesday, Yvo de older was U S ambassador to NATO under President Obama and he joins us now, Ambassador Daalder welcome My pleasure. I want to begin with China. NATO came out with a strong shared statement about the security issues that country poses. Let's hear what NATO Secretary General Stoltenberg said yesterday. China's growing influence and international policies presents challenges to alliance security. How will the alliance address those challenges when some members will also want to keep their economic ties with China? Well, it's important that NATO focused on China as a challenge and characterized Russia as a threat a threat to its security that needs a direct response. When it comes to China, it is trying to rule raise the awareness of China's presence globally, but increasingly all certainly in Europe and that there is a need for the alliance and the 30 members of that alliance. To work together to meet that challenge to have common approaches and common policies on cyber, which is an issue that the Chinese are involved in to be aware and share intelligence and information about where the Chinese maybe acting militarily and as necessary build up the capacity to respond, showed China and in the future. Come to threaten the security of the North Atlantic area, which is what NATO is all about. What do you expect to see when it comes to NATO's efforts to check China's military power? Well, I think we'll see is the first and most importantly, a strengthening of NATO's partnerships with critical Asian democracies. Japan, Korea, Australia and other countries. These partnerships exchange information allow for interoperability of the armed forces that When there are military operations, they can work together. All of these countries had forces and capabilities deployed in Afghanistan, for example, so that's one way. The second is that intelligence about the Chinese and growing capability will be shared among the NATO allies in third, if and when the Chinese, uh our approach militarily in the in the European region as they do that we have a capacity to respond. Should they in one form or another decide to use military force. And finally, there is the whole area of cyber And new technologies, which are directed both against Russia, but also against against China. Having the capacity to detect cyber intrusions, defending cyber systems and, if necessary, responding to cyber attacks is as applicable to China as it is to Russia. Right. And on that note, How do you think NATO should respond to? You know a massive cyber attack on an ally in the future? Well, it depends a little bit on the extent of the damage that such an attack inflicts. But NATO is prepared to invoke its most solemn obligation, but President Biden called the the sacred obligation of Article five, which is that an attack against one is an attack against all so if there were massive cyber attack NATO could respond at and in a way in a manner of its own choosing. It could be, um, cyber response. It could be a cyber defensive response or offensive response, or indeed a military response again, depending on the damage that such an attack would inflict on NATO countries when it comes to a cyber response, though, how equipped his NATO to deal with that to do that, given the technological capabilities of Russia and China? So NATO itself doesn't have much of a cyber capability. But that's how NATO operates its individual nations that contribute military capabilities. And then operate under an integrated command structure so NATO doesn't actually have any ground forces. Germany or the United States or the UK will provide those forces under the NATO command structure to operate and so in the case of cyber, the same would be the case the United States or the UK Two major cyber military and capabilities would be able to use their forces in response to an attack say in a country that doesn't have That capability and do so in a coordinated manner and under the direction of the NATO political authorities regarding Russia. I want to quickly play with Stoltenberg said yesterday. Our relationship with Russia is at its lowest point since the Cold War. And Moscow's aggressive actions are affected to our security and briefly about 30 seconds. What progress has NATO made toward addressing Russian aggression? Very significant progress since 2014 it's deployed forces into the Baltic region and further east. It created the command structure and, most importantly, it is enhancements capabilities for seven years running. Has increased defense spending significantly to provide for the capacity to defend its NATO territory against the potential attack from Russia. I have been speaking with former U S ambassador to NATO. Ivo Daalder. Thanks so much for taking the time. My pleasure now in the president of the United States meets Vladimir Putin. There are people in Belarus who hope that he will bring up their country. Alexander Lukashenko, the president of Belarus, has been cracking down on opponents to his regime since last summer. That's when mass protests broke out in the country that borders Russia. There were disputes over the results of the presidential election, and many people are still living in fear of their own government. NPR's Lucian Kim has more not so long ago, the image of Belarus was of a peaceful, if not slightly boring, former Soviet republic. Run by an eccentric leader named Alexander Lukashenko. Now Belarus, squeezed between Poland and Russia is more isolated than ever. And Lukashenko is persecuting anyone who goes against him. Svetlana, a retired music teacher and grandmother in the town of Gomel says people now joke that Belarus is even farther north than North Korea. We're only using her first name because Atlanta has already been detained for her activism. And fears prosecution press. What this situation that, uh, after all, for what's happening in Belarus is a catastrophe, she says. We're living under the conditions of a real fascist regime. Just a year ago, Atlanta thought her country was finally on.

Steve Inskeep Vladimir Putin Sarah McCammon Alexander Lukashenko Lucian Kim Brussels Biden Ivo Daalder Belarus 30 members Wednesday Lukashenko Cold War North Atlantic Svetlana 2014 yesterday North Korea Gomel Europe
"japan korea australia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:07 min | Last month

"japan korea australia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thank you very much for your continued support. Sixties along the coast seventy's around debate of the upper eighties, Far inland today, much warmer tomorrow. 92 today. For example, in Fairfield, it warms up to 13 Tomorrow. Sacramento today warm, hotter tomorrow 91 today up to one Oh two for Wednesday. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Sarah McCammon. It was like the first day back at school, seeing all your old friends again. That is how UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson characterized President Joe Biden's first NATO meeting, at least according to NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization held their summit in Brussels yesterday, and Biden delivered one big message to NATO partners. Everyone in that room today understood the shared appreciation. Quite frankly, that America is back. Biden now turns his attention to a bilateral meeting with the Russian President Vladimir Putin. Coming up on Wednesday, Evo doled ER was U S ambassador to NATO under President Obama and joins us now, Ambassador Daalder Welcome to the program. My pleasure. I want to begin with China. NATO came out with a strong shared statement about the security issues that country poses. Let's hear what NATO Secretary General Stoltenberg said yesterday. China's growing influence and international policies presents challenges to alliance security. How will the alliance address those challenges when some members will also want to keep their economic ties with China? Well, it's important that NATO focused on China as a challenge and characterized Russia as a threat a threat to its security that needs a direct response. When it comes to China, it is trying to rule raise the awareness of China's presence globally but increasingly also in Europe, and that there is a need for the alliance and the 30 members of that alliance. To work together to meet that challenge to have common approaches and common policies on cyber, which is an issue that the Chinese are involved in to be aware and share intelligence and information about where the Chinese maybe acting militarily and as necessary, build up the capacity to respond. Should China and in the future. Come to threaten the security of the North Atlantic area, which is what NATO is all about. What do you expect to see when it comes to NATO's efforts to check China's military power? Well, I think what we'll see is first and most importantly, is strengthening of NATO's partnerships with critical Asian democracies. Japan, Korea, Australia and other countries. These partnerships exchange information allow for interoperability of the armed forces that When there are military operations, they can work together. All of these countries had forces and capabilities deployed in Afghanistan, for example, so that's one way. The second is that intelligence about the Chinese growing capability will be shared among the NATO allies in third, if and when the Chinese, uh Our approach militarily in the in the European region, as they do that we have a capacity to respond. Should they one form or another decide to use military force. And finally, there is the whole area of cyber And new technologies, which are directed both against Russia, but also against against China. Having the capacity to detect cyber intrusions, defending cyber systems and, if necessary, responding to cyber attacks is as applicable to China as it is to Russia. Right. And on that note. How do you think NATO should respond to? You know a massive cyber attack on an ally in the future? Well, it depends a little bit on the extent of the damage that such an attack, uh, inflicts, but NATO is prepared to invoke its most solemn obligation, but President Biden called the the sacred obligation of Article five, which is that an attack against one is an attack against all so if there were massive cyber attack NATO could respond and in a way in a manner of its own choosing, it could be a cyber response. It could be a cyber defensive response or offensive response, or indeed. Military response again, depending on the damage that such an attack would inflict on NATO countries when it comes to a cyber response, though, how equipped is NATO to deal with that to do that, given the technological capabilities of Russia and China? So NATO itself doesn't have much of a cyber capability. But that's how NATO operates its individual nations that contribute military capabilities. And then operate under an integrated command structure so NATO doesn't actually have any ground forces. Germany or the United States or the UK will provide those forces under the NATO command structure. To operate. And so in the case of cyber, the same would be the case. The United States or the UK two major cyber, UM military and capabilities would be able to use their forces in response to an attack say in a country that doesn't have That capability and do so in a coordinated manner and under the direction of the NATO political authorities. And Moscow's aggressive actions are affected to our security and briefly about 30 seconds, what progress has NATO made toward addressing Russian aggression? Very significant progress since 2014. It's deployed forces into the Baltic region and further east. It created the command structure and most importantly, it is enhanced its capabilities for seven years. Running is increased defense spending significantly to provide for the capacity to defend its NATO territory against the potential attack from Russia. I've been speaking with former U S ambassador to NATO. Ivo Daalder. Thanks so much for taking the time. My pleasure now in the president of the United States meets Vladimir Putin. There are people in Belarus who hope that he will bring up their country. Alexander Lukashenko, the president of Belarus, has been cracking down on opponents to his regime since last summer. That's when mass protests broke out in the country that borders Russia. There were disputes over the results of the presidential election, and many people are still living in fear of their own government. NPR's Lucian Kim has more not so long ago, the image of Belarus was of a peaceful, if not slightly boring, former Soviet republic. Run by an eccentric leader named Alexander Lukashenko. Now Belarus, squeezed between Poland and Russia is more isolated than ever. And Lukashenko is persecuting anyone who goes against him. Svetlana, a retired music teacher and grandmother in the town of Gomel says people now joke that Belarus is even farther north than North Korea. We're only using her first name because Atlanta has already been detained for her activism. And fierce prosecution press. What is, uh, what's happening in Belarus is a catastrophe, she says. We're living under the conditions of a real fascist regime. Just a year ago, Atlanta thought her country was finally on the path to democracy. An opposition candidate names Atlanta Titian Oscar was barnstorming her way through Belarus. Challenging Lukashenko and attracting record crowds. Yeah, thank you that.

Steve Inskeep Vladimir Putin Sarah McCammon Alexander Lukashenko Ivo Daalder 30 members Belarus Wednesday Brussels Biden Lukashenko Lucian Kim tomorrow yesterday North Atlantic seven years Fairfield Sacramento 2014 Europe
"japan korea australia" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:33 min | Last month

"japan korea australia" Discussed on KCRW

"67 and you're with KCRW. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Sarah McCammon. It was like the first day back at school, seeing all your old friends again. That is how UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson characterized President Joe Biden's first NATO meeting, at least according to NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization held their summit in Brussels yesterday, and Biden delivered one big message to NATO partners. Everyone in that room today understood the shared appreciation. Quite frankly, that America is back. Biden now turns his attention to a bilateral meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin coming up on Wednesday. Evo Daalder was U S ambassador to NATO under President Obama and joins us now, Ambassador Daalder Welcome to the program. My pleasure. I want to begin with China. NATO came out with a strong shared statement about the security issues that country poses. Let's hear what NATO Secretary General Stoltenberg said yesterday. China's growing influence and international policies presents challenges to alliance security. How will the alliance address those challenges when some members will also want to keep their economic ties with China? Well, it's important that NATO focused on China as a challenge and characterized Russia as a threat a threat to its security that needs a direct response. When it comes to China, it is trying to rule raised the awareness of China's presence globally but increasingly also in Europe, and that there is a need for the alliance and the 30 members of that alliance to work together to meet that challenge to have common approaches and common policies on cyber, which is an issue that the Chinese are involved in. To be aware and share intelligence and information about where the Chinese maybe acting militarily and as necessary, build up the capacity to respond. Should China and in the future come to threaten the security of the North Atlantic area, which is what NATO is all about. What do you expect to see when it comes to NATO's efforts to check China's military power? Well, I think we'll see is first and most importantly, a strengthening of NATO's partnerships with critical Asian democracies. Japan, Korea, Australia and other countries. These partnerships exchange information allow for interoperability of the armed forces that When there are military operations, they can work together. All of these countries had forces and capabilities deployed in Afghanistan, for example, so that's one way the second is that intelligence about the Chinese growing Capability will be shared among the NATO allies and third if and when the Chinese, uh our approach militarily in the in the European region as they do That we have a capacity to respond, should they in one form or another decide to use military force. And finally, there is the whole area of cyber and new technologies, which are directed both against Russia, but also against against China, having the capacity to detect cyber intrusions, defending cyber systems and if necessary, responding Cyber attacks is as applicable to China as it is to Russia, right And on that note. How do you think NATO should respond to you know a massive cyber attack on an ally in the future? Well, it depends a little bit on the extent of the damage that such an attack inflicts. But NATO is prepared to invoke its most solemn obligation of, but, uh President Biden called the Sacred obligation of Article five. Which is that an attack against one is an attack against all. So if there were massive cyber attack, NATO could respond at a in a way in a manner of its own choosing. It could be a cyber response. It could be a cyber defensive response or offensive response, or indeed. Military response again, depending on the damage that such an attack would inflict on NATO countries when it comes to a cyber response, though, how equipped his NATO to deal with that to do that, given the technological capabilities of Russia and China? So NATO itself doesn't have much of a cyber capability. But that's how NATO operates its individual nations that contribute military capabilities. And then operate under an integrated command structure so NATO doesn't actually have any ground forces. Germany or the United States or the UK will provide those forces under the NATO command structure to operate and so in the case of cyber, the same would be the case. The United States or the UK two major cyber Military and capabilities would be able to use their forces in response to an attack say in a country that doesn't have that capability and do so in a coordinated manner. And under the direction of the NATO political authorities. Regarding Russia. I want to quickly play with, Stoltenberg said yesterday. Relationship with Russia is at its lowest point since that Cold War and Moscow's aggressive actions are a threat to our security. Briefly about 30 seconds, what progress has NATO made toward addressing Russian aggression? Very significant progress since 2014. It's deployed forces into the Baltic region and further east. It created the command structure and most importantly, it is enhanced its capabilities for seven years. Running is increased defense spending significantly to provide for the capacity to defend its NATO territory against the potential attack from Russia. I've been speaking with former U S ambassador to NATO. Ivo Daalder. Thanks so much for taking the time. My pleasure. Now in the president of the United States meets Vladimir Putin. There are people in Belarus who hope that he will bring up their country. Alexander Lukashenko, the president of Belarus, has been cracking down on opponents to his regime since last summer. That's when mass protests broke out in the country that borders Russia. There were disputes over the results of the presidential election, and many people are still living in fear of their own government. NPR's Lucian Kim has more Not so long ago, the image of Belarus was of a peaceful, if not slightly boring former Soviet republic run by an eccentric leader named Alexander Lukashenko. Now. Belarus, squeezed between Poland and Russia is more isolated than ever, and Lukashenko is persecuting anyone who goes against him. Svetlana, a retired music teacher and grandmother in the town of Gomel says people now joke that Belarus is even farther north than North Korea. We're only using her first name because for Atlanta has already been detained for her activism. And fears prosecution to press who this teachers that, uh what's happening in Belarus is a catastrophe, she says. We're living under the conditions of a real fascist regime. Just a year ago, Atlanta thought her country was finally on the path to democracy. An.

Vladimir Putin Sarah McCammon Steve Inskeep Alexander Lukashenko Lucian Kim Brussels Wednesday Evo Daalder North Atlantic 2014 30 members Ivo Daalder Biden Belarus Cold War yesterday Gomel Lukashenko North Korea Europe
"japan korea australia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:25 min | Last month

"japan korea australia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Sarah McCammon. It was like the first day back at school, seeing all your old friends again. That is how UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson characterized President Joe Biden's first NATO meeting, at least according to NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization held their summit in Brussels yesterday, and Biden delivered one big message to NATO partners. Everyone in that room today understood the shared appreciation. Quite frankly, that America is back. Biden now turns his attention to a bilateral meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin coming up on Wednesday, Evo doled ER was U S ambassador to NATO under President Obama and joins us now, Ambassador Daalder Welcome to the program. My pleasure. I want to begin with China. NATO came out with a strong shared statement about the security issues that country poses. Let's hear what NATO Secretary General Stoltenberg said yesterday. China's growing influence and international policies presents challenges to alliance security. How will the alliance address those challenges when some members will also want to keep their economic ties with China? Well, it's important that NATO focused on China as a challenge and characterized Russia as a threat a threat to its security that needs a direct response. When it comes to China, it is trying to rule raised the awareness of China's presence globally but increasingly also in Europe, and that there is a need for the alliance and the 30 members of that alliance. To work together to meet that challenge to have common approaches and common policies on cyber, which is an issue that the Chinese are involved in to be aware and share intelligence and information about where the Chinese maybe acting militarily and as necessary, build up the capacity to respond. Should China and in the future. Come to threaten the security of the North Atlantic area, which is what NATO is all about. What do you expect to see when it comes to NATO's efforts to check China's military power? Well, I think what we'll see is first and most importantly, is strengthening of NATO's partnerships with critical Asian democracies. Japan Korea Australia And other countries. These partnerships exchange information allow for interoperability of the armed forces that when there are military operations, they can work together. All of these countries had forces and capabilities deployed in Afghanistan, for example, so that's one way the second is that Intelligence about the Chinese and growing capability will be shared among the NATO allies and third if and when the Chinese are approach militarily in the in the European region, as they do That we have a capacity to respond, should they in one form or another decide to use military force. And finally, there is the whole area of cyber and new technologies, which are directed both against Russia, but also against against China, having the capacity to protect Cyber intrusions, defending cyber systems and, if necessary, responding to cyber attacks is as applicable to China as it is to Russia. Right And on that note. How do you think NATO should respond to you know a massive cyber attack on an ally in the future? Well, it depends a little bit on the extent of the damage that such an attack inflicts. But NATO is prepared to invoke its most solemn obligation of, but President Biden called the sacred obligation of Article five, which is that an attack against one is an attack against all. So if there were massive cyber attack, NATO could respond at a in a way in a manner of its own choosing. It could be a cyber response. It could be a cyber defensive response. Or offensive response, or indeed a military response again, depending on the damage that such an attack would inflict on NATO countries when it comes to a cyber response, though, how equipped as NATO to deal with that to do that, given the technological capabilities of Russia and China? So NATO itself doesn't have much of a cyber capability. But that's how NATO operates its individual nations that contribute military capabilities. And then operate under an integrated command structure so NATO doesn't actually have any ground forces. Germany or the United States or the UK will provide those forces under the NATO command structure to operate and so in the case of cyber, the same would be the case the United States or the UK Two major cyber military and capabilities would be able to use their forces in response to an attack say in a country that doesn't have That capability and do so in a coordinated manner and under the direction of the NATO political authorities. Regarding Russia. I want to quickly play with, Stoltenberg said yesterday. Relationship with Russia is at its lowest point since that Cold War. And Moscow's aggressive actions are affected to our security and briefly about 30 seconds, what progress has NATO made toward addressing Russian aggression? Very significant progress since 2014. It's deployed forces into the Baltic region and further east created the command structure and most importantly, it is enhanced its capabilities for seven years. Running is increased defense spending significantly to provide for the capacity to defend its NATO territory against the potential attack from Russia. I've been speaking with former U S ambassador to NATO. Ivo Daalder. Thanks so much for taking the time. My pleasure now in the president of the United States meets Vladimir Putin. There are people in Belarus who hope that he will bring up their country. Alexander Lukashenko, the president of Belarus, has been cracking down on opponents to his regime since last summer. That's when mass protests broke out in the country that borders Russia. There were disputes over the results of the presidential election, and many people are still living in fear of their own government. NPR's Lucian Kim has more Not so long ago, the image of Belarus was of a peaceful, if not slightly boring former Soviet republic run by an eccentric leader named Alexander Lukashenko. Now. Belarus, squeezed between Poland and Russia is more isolated than ever, and Lukashenko is persecuting anyone who goes against him. Svetlana, a retired music teacher and grandmother in the town of Gomel says people now joke that Belarus is even farther north than North Korea. We're only using her first name because for Atlanta has already been detained for her activism. And fears prosecution to press who this situation. Uh, catastrophe. What's happening in Belarus is a catastrophe, she says. We're living under the conditions of a real fascist regime. Just a year ago, Atlanta thought her country was finally on the path to democracy..

Steve Inskeep Vladimir Putin Sarah McCammon Lucian Kim Alexander Lukashenko Brussels Biden Wednesday North Atlantic Ivo Daalder 30 members Cold War Belarus Lukashenko yesterday seven years Gomel North Korea Svetlana North Atlantic Treaty Organiza
"japan korea australia" Discussed on NPR's World Story of the Day

NPR's World Story of the Day

06:03 min | Last month

"japan korea australia" Discussed on NPR's World Story of the Day

"It was like the first day back at school seeing all your old friends again that is how. Uk prime minister. Boris johnson characterized president. Joe biden's first nato meeting at least. According to nato secretary general jens stoltenberg the north atlantic treaty organization held their summit in brussels yesterday and biden delivered. One big message to nato partners. Everyone that room today understood this shared appreciation quite frankly that america is back biden now turns his attention to a bilateral meeting with russian president vladimir putin coming up on wednesday yvo dolder was us ambassador to nato under president obama and joins us now ambassador dolder. Welcome to the program. Mercosur i want to begin with china. Nato came out with a strong shared statement about the security issues that country poses. Let's hear what nato secretary general stoltenberg said yesterday. China's growing influence on in national policies presents challenges to alliance security. How will the alliance address those challenges when some members will also want to keep their economic ties with china while it's important That nato focused on china as a challenge and characterized russia as a threat a threat to its security that a direct response when it comes to china. It is trying to raise the awareness of china's presence globally but increasingly also in europe and that there is a need for the alliance and the thirty members of that alliance to work together to meet that challenge to have common approaches common policies on cyber which is an issue that the chinese are involved in to be aware and share intelligence information about where the chinese may be acting militarily and as necessary build up the capacity to respond should china in the future come to threaten the security of the north atlantic area which is what nato was all about. What do you expect to see. When it comes to nato's efforts to check china's military power. Well i think we'll see. Is i m most importantly a strengthening of nato's partnerships with critical asian democracies japan korea australia and other countries these partnerships exchange information allow for interoperability of the armed forces That when there are military operations they can work together. All of these countries had forces and capabilities deployed in afghanistan for example. So that's one way. The second is that intelligence about the chinese In growing capability will be shared among the nato allies in third if and when the chinese approach militarily in in the european region. They do That we have the capacity to respond. Should they in one form or another decide to use military force and finally. There's the whole area of cyber and new technologies which are directed both against russia but also against against china having the capacity to detect intrusions defending cybersystems unnecessary responding to cyber is as applicable to china as it is russian right and on that note. How do you think nato should respond to a massive cyberattack on an ally in the future. Well it depends a little bit on The extent of the damage. That such an attack inflicts but nato is prepared to invoke its most solemn obligation but a president biden call to the sacred obligation of article. Five which is that. An attack against one is an attack against also if their word and massive cyber attack nato could respond at an in a way in a manner of its own choosing. It could be cyber response. It could be a cyber defensive response or offensive response or indeed a military response again depending on the damage that such an attack would inflict nato countries when it comes to cyber response. Stow how equipped is nato to deal with that to do that. Given the technological capabilities of russia and china so nato itself doesn't have much of a cyber capability but that's how to operates it's individual nations that contribute military capabilities and then operate under an integrated command structure. So nato doesn't actually have any ground forces. Germany or the united states or the uk will provide those forces under the nato command structure to operate and so in the case of cyber the same won't be the case the united states or the uk two major cyber military capabilities would be able to use their forces in response to an attack. Say on a country. That doesn't have that capability and do so in a coordinated manner and under the direction of the nato political authorities regarding russia. I want to quickly play what stoltenberg said yesterday. All relationship with russia is at its lowest point. Since the cold war and moscow's aggressive actions are affected to our security and briefly about thirty seconds. What progress has made toward addressing russian aggression very significant progress since two thousand fourteen that's deployed forces into the baltic region and further east. Did it created the command structure and most importantly it is enhanced its capabilities for seven years. Running is increased defense spending significantly to provide for the capacity to defend its nato territory against the potential attack from russia. I've been speaking with former. Us ambassador to nato yvo dolder. Thanks so much for taking the time. My pleasure this message comes from..

Boris johnson Joe biden biden europe yesterday vladimir putin yvo dolder wednesday Nato brussels thirty members first today second russian both obama european Germany dolder
"japan korea australia" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

04:54 min | 3 months ago

"japan korea australia" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"View Taiwan in a very similar way that they've you Hong Kong, which is part of their autonomous region, part of China, and so I don't think we should be surprised whatsoever if they start treating Taiwan similar to Hong Kong. The question becomes right. We've been talking about how challenging it's going to be for the United States. I mean, China also needs to be cautious here, right if they push things too far if they really have Terrible things happening with the weaker population that actually become public. Right now. It's all just hidden because they don't allow any reporters in that region. They have that happen if they really pushed things on Taiwan. It's also possible that they do you know, mobilize Western countries against them, and which point you know that becomes a concern for China. It's not a big deal. If the U. S alone takes issue with China, or Korea or Japan do But if the U. S. Japan, Korea, Australia, Germany, Southeast Asia, Germany All you know, mobilized against China in some way, shape or form then that does become problematic for them and does potentially shift behavior. But I would stress that I have seen. I have noticed at least a pretty big shift in messaging coming out of China. Really over the last few months here coming out of the pandemic where it's you know, it's gone from Oh, yeah, we'll try and work with you, too. No, we won't be pushed around anymore. Yep, That's the message that I'm hearing from China the stage and that's that's frightening. That's concerning. Yep, it does raise the issue of you know, we we were rely, and we learned this during the pandemic. We rely on way too many things coming out of China, whether you're talking about medical equipment medical devices. Now the this computer chip shortage you go to try to buy a car today and you say I want order a brand new Ford F 1 50. You may or may not be able to get that vehicle. Forget about the price. Just the chip shortage and China has their arms around the chip business much more than in the United States, so they're going to feed themselves first. Obviously. Yeah, I hesitate to say that China has a much firmer grasp on this that if if this were again it's in Taiwan. Which is this, you know, depending on how you look at it, this autonomous region or do not even e guess more independent than an autonomous region in the way that Hong Kong is. I don't think that China has their arms around it. You know, in any Huge way, shape or form and I don't think they're really getting priority on this stuff. I think you can say that about countries like Japan we've seen the Toyota has a much has had a much easier time coming across semiconductors for their vehicles than the United States has. But this is the competition right now. It's you know, the Chinese manufacturers versus the U. S manufacturers. And, Yeah, it's creating huge shortage has actually surprised to see. I don't know if you dove into the numbers, Barry, but We mentioned earlier in the show. We got the march reading of C P I and it was up. It was up 2.6%, year over year, 0.6% month over month in particular energy lead the way What? I was surprised he was. There was no vehicle inflation yet none whatsoever. It came in 0.0% for new vehicle sales. The price is apparently the shortages air there were seeing, you know, for GM all having to shut down manufacturing plants, But the pricing hasn't come through now. I will point out chucker. Maybe you remember the number wasn't the Median sales price forever. Maybe the average sales price for a car and the fourth quarter like over $40,000. I want to say it was like 43 is something crazy like that, So I mean, it was already in a really high point, I think is the is the message to be sent here. But I'd be very surprised of the next six months. If you don't see that ticking up that median sales price inflation on new vehicles I've got to assume is going up. We have seen it in the secondary car market. That was up. I think 2%. Month over month for used cars. So yeah, there's the semiconductor shortages. You know, the auto industry is the big one, because there's only a few big players, but go talk to a home builder right now. They can't Sell their homes because they can't get permits for those homes because they can't get appliances to go in those homes. You can't get in occupancy permit if you don't have a refrigerator, and you can't get a refrigerator right now, right? That's why I know that it is and you know, you look at these issues and we talk about them somewhat jokingly, but the fact that matter is a lot of these chips. Shortages, their national defense issues and national security issues. Same thing with aluminum production. Same thing we learned with medical equipment, right? We couldn't get masks here because they were all being produced overseas and It's it's problematic. I think we have to look, I hope our government It looks at things a little differently going forward because you don't want to be relying upon your enemy.

Toyota 0.6% Barry F 1 50 Hong Kong 2.6% Ford 2% GM today 0.0% China United States Southeast Asia over $40,000 43 fourth quarter Germany next six months Australia
"japan korea australia" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

06:32 min | 3 months ago

"japan korea australia" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"It's time for the financial exchange with Barry Armstrong and Mike Armstrong in November of last year, the United States decided to go a different direction. Politically speaking Take the Chinese were expecting that, huh? Maybe the Biden administration will not be quite as cantankerous is the Trump Administration. Turns out Michael they their hopes were dashed because these two countries, United States and China no better getting along today than they were a year ago. Yeah, I think that was. The message that was taken from the Alaska meeting is that the public support for the push against China is there and it's going to be continued under the by administration, you know, And I think that should be the message we take until proven otherwise on the Chinese side of good. I don't think we should underestimate the message that they are sending to the United States. I have seen this in a few different Manners. You're coming out of the Chinese propaganda machine and it Z messages this year, we will not be pushed around. We're not going to be this quiet developing nation anymore. We are going to very directly try and you know, spread our influence. And anyone that takes problem with that is going to have a problem with with China, and I think a few moves that we've seen this year really spelled that out. It hasn't been moves against governments but mainly moves against companies where Hmm. And Nike, for instance, in their commentary about the Muslim leader population treatment in China, Um You got put out there and Chinese government clamped down on it very quickly and really, really put a hurt to those companies intentionally and said they're not going to do business here. I think that all of us and United States particularly we need to be prepared for what I think is going to be the most difficult period of time in U. S China relations in history. The next stop is Taiwan. As far as I can tell, this is probably going to be a big big focus both strategically for the United States. And for China. Um it it'll be. It'll be really, really interesting Tow Watch here as China Is spending billions of dollars every year to expand their influence, you know, invest in infrastructure in other developing nations, and try and you buy those countries to their side of the story here, and the question is, did they push they push so far that they mobilized the US with its allies to push back? Or do they are they able to do so under the radar in a way that you know does not get the EU concerned about Chinese relations does not get the UK and Canada and Mexico And you know other Western democracies spark They're concerned to the point where they actually take action. Here s so I think, you know, post pandemic. This is going to be the big story of 2021. Beyond Are we Is the United States doing anything to build a coalition with countries like Canada, Japan. India would be you know, India is also another country. That's right in the crosshairs of China and on opposite sides of the trade. Yep. Biggest democracy in the world, India, you know, certainly seen as a threat shares your pretty close borders with China and, um, yeah, yeah, The United States has done a lot of I think I would consider it soft stuff. Toe, push the allies on their you know. Meetings frequently with Japan, Korea, Australia, India. Those have all existed. But the fact of the matter is, you know, relations with those countries are Rocky right now, let's call that what it is right? We we spent the last four years doing trade battles with a lot of these countries, Japan, all of the European Union. We've been picking picking trade fights with them, and I think the United States is going to have to Yeah, I think we're gonna get pushed into this position where it's the United States probably can't take on China and all of its allies alone, right? If we just push, you know, push big tariffs on the Chinese. It's not going to impact their economy to the point where it actually matters. If they're going to want to actually counter the Chinese efforts, it's going to require The you know relationships with their allies and even some countries that we probably find problematic for a whole bunch of reasons. Right in the Middle East. What are we gonna have to do in the Middle East to Sure up those relationships and make sure that it can be counteracted against China. I think that's incredibly important. But China needs the Middle East oil more than we do. Yes, maybe we can get by with you know, South American, Mexican and North American oil. Chinese Can't They have to have Middle Eastern oil and they're they're playing ball. I mean, they have a very cozy relationship with an enemy nation in Iran, you know, and that becomes like a proxy. For for China. If you're right, the relationships between and and it's you know, it's hard to delve into it. Topic this complex and in a two hour show, but These these relationships are problematic and you know, we we point out about the religious persecution that goes on in China with the leaders. But the Chinese are quick to point out. You know the problems that we have with racial injustice here in the United States, so Yeah, Of course not. Something is going to start a story that's gonna go away anytime soon. Yeah, So I mean, I am keeping an incredibly close eye on Taiwan. Given the semiconductor shortage across the globe right now, I've got you've got to assume that the Chinese government looks at that, as strategically as the United States does, all right. I think we said that 70% of semiconductor manufacturing happens on Taiwan, Uh, 50% of the global supply of some chips are made by one company. Taiwan Semiconductor's And you know the question The For anyone that hasn't studied. You know, China is Taiwanese relations over the last 100 years. It's It's pretty fascinating. But you know the Chinese government at least and you know traditional party members of the party. View Taiwan in a very similar way that they've you Hong Kong, which is part of their autonomous region, part of China, and so I don't think we should be surprised.

Mike Armstrong Barry Armstrong Michael Nike 70% 50% Middle East European Union Trump Administration 2021 EU Iran this year two hour two countries today a year ago Middle Eastern Hong Kong November of last year
"japan korea australia" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

The CSIS Podcast

05:31 min | 10 months ago

"japan korea australia" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

"Eighty one percent of the thought leaders plurality a large plurality. The public said work the problem with our allies and partners. Seventy four percent of our allies and partners said that if you take out Southeast Asia, which is a little more neutral in US China conflict to include Western Europe Japan. Kailua. Overwhelmingly the view in those countries among pharmacy thinkers was we have to work with the Americans. So that's an important takeaway because what it says is the devil's in the details to be sure but there is a convergence on the China problem in the World China is uniting us not dividing us at least among the major democracies in the world, and that's an opportunity we are not taking advantage of. So I WANNA get into some other findings but for you that's gotta be the real takeaway from this it means we need to plural lateral is multilateral approach. The trick is that when we start getting into specific issues, what should we do about five G. which we do about train, which you about technology there's a lot of convergence, but there are big differences and so a lot of this is going to be kind of coalitions around issues. So I could imagine, for example, a pretty broad coalition with Western Europe, Japan Korea All of which ranked human rights as a very high priority and respondents said, they were willing to take considerable risk to themselves to advance human rights. That's not whether governments are in a way the advantage of the thoughtless as they can say things, governments can't say out. Loud. So there I could see a fairly broad coalition to coordinate on how we approach Xinjiang Hong Kong Tibet on other issues like technology, which we can talk about more which we ask a lot about. There was very broad consensus that countries should block walkway. Advanced Industrial Economies. The respondents said, we don't want him. But when it comes to issues of export controls, we have a very strict entities list where we don't allow the export of components to walkway much more division. So on something like that, you probably need a coalition that looks more like, Japan Korea Australia Taiwan Europe it'd be hard harder to get a US Europe agreement on data and digital issues and technology. So this is not a NATO. The conclusion is not we have team USA to deal with China, it's issue specific the coalition's change. It's going to take retail diplomacy and a lot of persistent groundwork, but the coalitions are out there. So you you make policy recommendations in this report and I WANNA get to those in a second but with this specific thing, I think we need to talk by right now what does this information tell you? How does it inform policy recommendations that you're gonNA make so it doesn't tell you what the government of Japan of the government of France will do on something like human rights necessarily. But it does show that fifty some Japanese thought leaders who we know are influential in the public space and slightly smaller number of French public intellectuals who were influential are saying emphasize human rights. We ask on a scale of one to ten how much risk should we take in the US or in France or Japan to advance human rights and we specifically asked about categories, Xinjiang Tabet Hong Kong. And dissidents within China. And the French and Japanese respondents had a higher response than Americans, the Americans were high including the business community and the mean was I close to seven, but it was even higher in France and Japan. So it tells you is their.

Japan US China Japan Korea Australia Taiwan E Xinjiang Hong Kong Tibet Xinjiang Tabet Hong Kong France World China Southeast Asia Western Europe Europe Kailua NATO USA
"japan korea australia" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

04:59 min | 10 months ago

"japan korea australia" Discussed on Venture Stories

"We'll see whether he gets it out for your be or a minus when it's ultimately result but this is a very serious problem we chat similarly a I think a lot of people are not paying attention threat posed by hot in a very glad that the administration is A. I think it's very controversial because there's a lot of users of both these products in any time the government is interfering with usage of popular products. There's going to be some short-term push, but it's a little bit like the economic trade off we were discussing before their benefits of using these products to American consumers. However, in the long term, we may be much more jeopardy if we don't take action sooner rather than later India obviously started a very. A blanket ban realistically on Chinese APPS in the Indian market and his Jacobs pointed out this guidance fall. Lots of people would have said Oh my God you know the country can never do a democracy could never do that democracy should never do that. India recognizes the military threat posed by the Chinese government is unwilling to allow. To be blackmailed, threatened in manipulated by China, and I'm glad that they that president in the United States is absolutely just as at risk maybe not directly militarily but certainly, our allies in Taiwan, the free people in Hong Kong are absolutely exposed in potentially longer terror people in Japan. Korea Australia are our jeopardy as well. Just want a second all the things that that Keith Sidon I think I completely agree that the steps of the Indian government took do set a good precedent and and do make a lot of sense because there are some serious because of China's doctrine of civil military fusion there are some serious issues with allowing the company that's collecting GPS data clipboard data, and as you know, you're a lot of your listeners. Now, clipboard data means that that includes everything. You're copying and pasting on your phone and the APP which for a lot of people that includes emails and passwords a lot of accounts..

India China Indian government Chinese government Keith Sidon Hong Kong Jacobs Korea Taiwan United States president Japan
"japan korea australia" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:05 min | 11 months ago

"japan korea australia" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Bathroom? Probably not your unit and I'm not sure it is the latest invention out of Japan. Public restrooms where the walls are made of glass. Now the idea is for you to be able to see how clean it is before you use it. And then as soon as you enter and lock the door, the glass fogs up giving you privacy, which all sounds like a great idea until something malfunctions and we all know how that tends to happen. At the very worst possible moment. You and I have talked about how we both love to travel, though, have you? Have you been to Japan? I have. Actually, I was I served in the air Force Heather for almost a decade. Not quite. It was really fun. I was a pilot and we used to get based or do they call rotations? Out of Okinawa, Japan, Korea, Australia, and it was wonderful. So my my mission. My area of responsibility was the Pacific and so As a young man. I spent a lot of lot of time in Asia. Well, it was really fun until Desert Storm, at which time I got to visit the Middle East. They called it the sand box, So I had a little time in the sand box, but a lot of time in Asia. And really interesting, really, really fun. And I'll tell you that that with financial planning what I believe is we've worked really, really hard to accomplish our goals. I mean, retirement is not about I always for most people is not about sitting in front of a TV set or or eating cans of beans and itis about enjoying yourself and having fun and And my family were passionate about travel. My wife was a flight attendant off just for four or five years, but enough to get a taste of it. Our Children, we all travel a cz. You said I was a Pilot for major airline, So I went from the air Force as a military aviator, a jet pilot to the airlines and in the airlines. I mostly flew South America and Europe. So I've had the pleasure of the two parts of my life traveling quite a bit, and it's a bug. It's a ball there is Yeah, and culturally. It's so wonderful to open your mind in your hearts to other people and other ideas. If you're going to learn so much. It also helps us with our finances. Be financial advisors because it brings understanding, and that's very important as well. Now, here's something really important that I'm passionate about. Is helping you meet your goals. And you know you're not working hard like I said, to sit at home and turn the air conditioner off to save money, And that's right. That's right. That's not the life we want. I want you to be able to travel, play golf. Whatever it is, you have to do. Go fishing and have the boat you want. We've worked hard. To enjoy the fruits of our way, and we want to do it in a way that's really smart and wise. And so one of things we do. Heather is all of our clients. In fact, all our wisdom hers. If you want to.

Japan Asia Pacific air Force Middle East Heather golf South America Okinawa Europe Australia Korea
"japan korea australia" Discussed on a16z

a16z

10:47 min | 1 year ago

"japan korea australia" Discussed on a16z

"Full disclosure where investors in descript and it democratises. The editing of podcast. Because you can essentially edit audio like a word doc but the main point here is that I do think music should be treated very differently than cog lately I got to me like it's audio with spoken-word Yep versus sunk. Yeah so I guess. We're we're agreeing on just to recap the definition of podcasting. It is audio. It could potentially be learned including books if not in a content perspective than to Nick's point than even a distribution and and and business model perspective But we agree that music should be treated differently and Islam. Dominator here is spoken word. Those Ashley the doll study. Which is the sort of an annual survey conducted by Edison? Research announced their latest results earlier. This afternoon. The most interesting thing is that there were increases in both audiobooks and podcasting surpassing hat significantly. Large League this year but audible on audiobooks like after a couple of years of being flat it's been increased again and. I think that's a really interesting question because I don't quite think of a structural reason why it would be the case. Other than ever tethered effect. In addition to that you have all kinds of really easy to set up wireless speakers at home they also make it more easy Alexa. Yeah to consume this kind of content. It reminds me of like What people say about the kindle and Romance novels it helps sales increase because it made people more willing to buy and consume it because nobody will judge the judgment side interesting for me. It's actually ease of access because I used to be really embarrassed to admit this publicly I used to subscribe to the Harlequin Romance on demand. Service where you've got like the books a month and you'd pay like eleven dollars or I can't remember what it was because I always been a huge eater of romance novels as a very nice lightweight thing to do but what the analogy to podcasting what to me. I think it's more ease of access around better hardware on demand. Get it quickly. So speaking of the data and you mentioned that the Edison Research Study came out today and that sort of the definitive And longest running survey of digital media consumer behavior in America. At least but I hear a lot of mixed messages. See like people say this stat and that stat of context. So why don't we just do a quick pulse check on what are the key stats nickname you recap for us what the key stats are big trends to know are here so? I think there are a couple of big takeaways here. One is when it comes. Just the familiarity of the notion of podcasting and this doesn't mean people who heard the words actually know what it is. It's officially hit seventy percent of Americans and when it comes to the number of people have actually try it out. Podcasting you know. Maybe they've instagram of it. But he just tried to lease it's gone over. Fifty percents about estimate one hundred forty four million Americans retention rates are sort of like really interesting like monthly passes and it's also went up. It's now thirty. Two percent of all Americans up from twenty six from last year. It's a pretty big leap. I mean just. That's one third. That's a lot. Yeah and there's also a really interesting slide in here should be eating of the increase to spotify. There is a stat here that shows a most listeners. Areas between the ages of twelve twenty four monthly podcast went up to fifty percents and so There's there's a lot going on I think currently such a moment of flex its It's a little unclear what the structural pillars are anymore. I think he's one of those things where we're just. GonNa look back as to figure out where return. So what's a high level recap on that summary of the stats? The high level is that does passer has seen an unprecedented growth for a long time. Podcast growth has been steady and slow and now if he was like taking some sort of a leap and so I feel like this past year has been at the moment where it's tipped into some form of mainstream that's fantastic so potentially a quote inflection point as people like to say in the business the usage of podcast and the consumption of has risen dramatically in the last year or two. But what always shocks me. Is that the revenue that podcast generate. Still such a small amount given how many hours people are spending consuming this kind of content so there is out there from the. Ib that caveat being it was funded and financed by the Constellation of podcast companies. That puts the number at around six hundred million plus plus this past Last year and is projected to keep growing. Of course once I is issue and it largely has to do with the fact that podcasting is that technology hasn't quite caught up to the net kind of works in terms of dynamic and it doesn't allow like heavy increases in inventory and spouse inventory in way that a lot of advertisers are now accustomed to getting from you know marketplaces like facebook. And then even even that like from an advertiser standpoint. You're paying per download 'cause you you aren't getting like these per listen metrics back so from the advertising standpoint it's it's still really hard for them to measure the Roi from sponsoring podcast. Yeah and that's why historically you've seen a bunch of the activity along advertising from dark response advertisers because they have a secondary metric of conversions on promo codes and whatnot and what they're able to finance that the conversion rates are good. But when it comes to something like a brand advertiser or an advertiser that needs to land impression on a consumer over five ten year period. They need to know that they're hitting the people that they're hitting. There are a lot of women's right now to standardizing what even a listen means and this will become increasingly complicated as spotify and Dora everywhere. I mean right now. You don't know if it's A. Is it a download? Is that click? Is it open? Is it a fee? I mean who the fuck knows. How long does your lesson to right the engagement? I care so that's actually what I care most about as a creator because when I was at wired chart beat changed me as an editor and I need to know where people drop off that as a number one things. I don't know if you've been no this nick. We were in the lunch. That for when spotify launched their first move into podcasting in twenty fifteen they selected us part one of their media outlets because our podcast was one of the very few that covered tech and a thoughtful way. And the reason I was so excited about spotify because I didn't really have much of a podcasting audience back then. Yeah was they showed me this really beautiful dashboard. That showed you the potential and where people drop off. But you don't get from all the other. Podcasts are distributed this delimited because not all of our listeners. Are Listening spotify right now. Eight hundred eight during a bunch of different APPS and Iot tunes by the way also announced this. I think what last year James Boggs announced that you can actually have Drop off their rolled up more granular in episode analytics. And I'd push back on though as like. I don't actually think advertisements are the only way you can monetize podcast wholeheartedly. I feel really really strongly that because even as someone who consumes podcast ads are extremely annoying to listen to and this is where I look at other business models. That are working in Asia for podcasts. That I think could vary much. Translate here so a couple of points on that. It's a situation which there are behaviors in internet usage in gaming in media consumption in China Japan Korea Australia Malaysia Singapore. That doesn't occur here. Maybe through a path dependency reasons maybe through Sort of Technical Zhoushan reasons. Yes we've already seen a really healthy growth of the number of podcasts using Patriot as maybe not a primary but a strong supplementary business bottle of chocolate houses. In example of this there are a bunch of podcasts collective civilized in on on For this and there's also like slate plus being a central model to slate as a digital media publisher that also heavily next thing. But I've always wanted to lack of data conversation interesting because whether or not Advertisers feel confident in the measurement. And what the data is trying to reflect in terms of reality. The rule continued to spin and like people do end up paying like converting as a Promo Code and so there is a strong sense. That podcasting is a very powerful driver of consumers and it's a powerful advertising even though we're not able to tell specifically how many people that get hit in terms of just the analytics and so this is senior along a lot of people that you know the analytic side end up driving too much of compensation and ends up dictating the behavior of creators and publishers. In a way that might end up being you know unhealthy or intuitive to the relationship to the list. The Creator Hamath. I think is like yes. Analytics may skew. What kinds of content? They put out and how they engage with their audience but like really analytics is just a nicer way of saying revenue because at the end of the day or analytics are a reflection of how many how many listeners. You're getting right and thank. I don't agree actually completely agree with you from a business perspective but as a creator the analytics tell me about community and one of my favorite talks on the early days of resurgence of podcasting was Marco are ment gave a talk. I was at exit. Exo In two thousand thirteen. And it was basically about the resurgence of podcasting the early signaling that and podcast as a movement. Because what's really unique for the first time when you think about the first wave of podcasting with all the indy bloggers. We now have brands podcasting. And sometimes they're not actually looking for direct revenue through that it's a way to really connect intimately with your audience. I mean it's essentially a movement wrought by audio so I mean there are types of content. Where where it's not about monetization For a lot of creators I do think revenue is one kind of proxy for how much value there providing their listeners. And I also think that we're in such such baby phases of how podcasters should be able to monetize like honestly. They shouldn't be having to ask their listeners to go to other sites to pay them like Oh yeah we feed in-app I mean this is where the platforms. We're going to start rolling out. Subscriptions I think some are GonNa roll out like other ways of paying for packages or bundles of content. And I think that's when you're going to see craters really unleash like much better content where they don't have to focus on mainstream audiences but they might focus on smaller audiences that are willing to pay for that so actually. I'm really fascinating. So the concept of analytics is being sort of like proxy for revenue. Here it's strange because I've always viewed analytics as you know a certain kind of representation of reality and it just happens that advertisers at this point in time are really reliant on certain expectation of a kind of analytics in order to discern weather immediate product effective in a way that they wanted to be. And there's this larger conversation about platforms in general you know switching metrics or tweaking metrics or in some cases ballooning them in order to control and manage that narrative and relationship with the appetizer. Now I completely agree. Analytics matters for an advertising mall..

spotify Edison descript Nick Alexa Ashley facebook Large League Edison Research Study Asia indy China Japan Korea Australia Ma James Boggs editor America Marco publisher
"japan korea australia" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

11:45 min | 1 year ago

"japan korea australia" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Tena is they've created a surveillance state that would make or well in one thousand nine hundred four looks simple and they are and what they are doing in terms comes in this is so much different than what even the Soviets did. They were offering a some level of economic aid but mostly just we're gonNA give you this ideology China's sankt linked countries around the world will Belton wrote others. We'll build your roads. We're going to here's our model of state-sponsored capitalism but here's what you live in a repressive estate. Here's this way where you can control all of your people from a centralized situation. That isn't pretty darn. Attractive share model. That's out there point one point two two I think America and the kind of using technology and here's knowledge from China from China and and technology from China from companies that older allegiance so Communist Party and companies that why would you ever buy wall way in any case because into the day China does not have rule of law independent judiciary so your recourse is that Bo so what what happened is that I think America the West and we actually heard heard this mostly originally from Japan Korea Australia you know neighbors of China is that most of the technological innovation over the last seventy years. If it wasn't the American venit it was invented in the other democratic regimes and then the United States set the standards set the rules of copy and coughing and they are we had we benefited so much from setting the rules and protocols but nobody really factor that in all of a sudden we've got a competitor with plenty plenty of intellectual capital where they've skipped the first steps because they either borrow or intellectually steal the product and they're saying hey we we not only want to compete. We want to set the standards and then let's take five G. next generation wireless they want to set the pattern and and we have always had literally had the point of what we don't really care who becomes the winner in the private sector because the market will sort it out. We're suddenly against a country with a totally different set of rules incredible economic power and I even have my republican colleagues saying let's take again five G. for a moment where you everything everything on the Internet of things all the driverless cars the things that we say will come out. Just world will have to ride on five G. and if that is Zeh system that has Chinese equipment that at any moment in time because it's not like wall. We've got a back door today but since this is a software driven system and China says says next week next month on that next update by the way sticking this malware it you can't protect yourself against that so our notion that we can let the market decide. I don't know whether that will work anymore. We may need and I got Republicans that agree with me on this to put literally billions of US dollars ars maybe in conjunction with our allies into certain technology champions because in the five G. space you got wall way then you've got Ericsson Nokia Okay and Samsung Swedish Finnish and Korean they don't have the economic heft to go against China Inc who can can come in with pretty good equipment and one hundred and forty percent financing that at price points that are way below because they're so subsidized allied with other Denver's might be something having borders. There's a need for a twenty first century industrial policy that we've not done before we were so far behind the bar on five G. because we we never thought that China would flood zone with engineers on the standard setting bodies something that American companies used to do in the eighties nineties right but and we're we're suddenly going against a technology leader company that couldn't keep up none of them not well Eric's those traditional original switch companies. You know five G. is more software base their QUALCOMM CISCO others there may be even a need for some kind of combination with one for those traditional telecom companies with certain other vendors. There's some thinking going on now that is radically different than even six months ago and part of the in a normal White House on an issue like this there would be someone in charge on five Geeta coordinate. Yes the government reports there is not there is a good group of people from state and defense and FCC and yes NSA trying to work together but it is not a high enough priority and we're going to get our lunch eaten and this happening because this thing just finished this happening in five G. could also happen as you said Karsh intelligence it could happen and facial recognition. Could it happened in quantum computing so this model of going against China or at least having an alternative to China ink model. We need to play out and plan for today so we don't end up in the same position where you are in five G. and that's this year. We want to win a Cold War on facial recognition. That may not be a war to win but we may want to at least yeah if it's going to be out there because I don't see any way the level of facial recognition is already out there. We're GONNA make this absolute ban right. There ought to be some entity that we believe has has some level of privacy protection. Absolutely I would say that would be a five G. and a quantum computing. That's really where there may be a I. There may not be a single company the thing with five G. That's a little bit different is yes. No matter what your commission you gotTa have one anchor tenant right. There is an cars. It's it's very interesting like we're. We're that's going in. Who's going to dominate that area again? China seems to be robotics certainly automation Shen the China China is like we spent seven hundred billion bucks on defense. I didn't were buying way too much twentieth century stuff reinvesting in a lot of legacy systems China. I spent two hundred fifty billion bucks on defense and they realize you know it's not be just build a mill. They've got a really good cyber. They've got a lot of stuff in space where we're a potentially vulnerable but that five hundred billion dollar difference China's investing in investing in all of these technologies not to be a follower but to be the standard standard-setter in economically defense which will be which will be way conflict is an admiral and he was saying this is where they're going to win the the cyber fight is really outmatched. Dod's got to be willing to say okay we get this and and that means we may need to take a big chunk of that seven hundred fifty million bucks in redeployed everybody at Dod says we get this but then when we say okay which chip are legacy systems which plane ship town and they come to Senator Warner of Virginia where there's lots of bases and what did you say where you may need need the equivalent of a BRAC process that says you know we're GonNa make this major readjustment or not because you can't simply take all of our existing testing and then layer on all these new needs or we're going to spend nothing on education and infrastructure and Brian Right well. That's the problem I mean. Politics is always the problem. It's in some ways. China's got a good because they can just now ending up as someone who's an entrepreneur. One of the one of the arguments from tech is then then we have to be this big if we're going to meet the challenges of content which we didn't even get of of policing content and hate speech if we're GONNA get to the challenges of quantum this that's that's that we have to be this big. That's their argument and I I'm sort of like the way we win is not by by innovation which a large controlled economy just doesn't attack can't do in the same way that the reason that we've gotten we've gotten is because of how innovative and small and limbo this country and democratic countries have been. Do you think that matters. I think this is a absolutely you know entrepreneur and I'm much longer than a politician but it's it's a gnarly problem. You know it's like we want to promote this innovation but I think if you lose the expert on. Ai You listen Beijing now smells also time in America growing up you know points out nee I that the country was the most data the country with the most compute power and the competent country and I'm sure on this third point he makes it's not the most innovative engineer it's who's can throw the most mass behind the problem is going to win that battle. You know he's got some valid points points here so we are going to need you. In the past. We've always relied upon the fact that by being the economy will set the standards no matter which private sector company emerges and whether they're small or big in some of these areas in technology take more size almost always wins right and who who has the most data may win means that this notion that we're GONNA be scrappy. Entrepreneurial Startup only may not be the full answer. That's why I think you've got a lot of folks who a year ago would never think oh my gosh America or America with allies ought to be thinking about even governmental investment to make make sure we've got somebody that can have both technology and financing alternative to a country like worldwide company like Walmart so this is. This is a big big issue. Is there anything that's haven't technology. That hasn't had the government. There hasn't the space program and now the space program fascinating Lee is being innovated by private people. which is you know mark? I'm sorry sorry Jeff bezos and Elon Musk or leaving that to them. I'm finding disturbing. Lots of the government is not leading in that there are are you fifty other space companies right that are in the business and we've taken launch cost down. Small facts is a huge one of the things on space always may be crazy the deeper I got into I thought you know did nobody on the American government ever see James Bond movie bad guys would always send a laser beam up to blow up the satellite and we have these big big old big one of my Senator Angus King said we've got this big floating cows in the sky and nimble that you really exquisite capabilities but all you can employ them up ordinarily easily so let's move to small. Let's come we that has been our strength. We need to reinforce that but there are going to be places says and I don't fully by the by any means particularly the platform companies that they gotta have this is. They've got right now right but are there ways that we can introduce more competition into into the market so somebody who's smart wants to get in could actually rise as well. What would you do if you're not to? We're GONNA come back and we've talked about Amazon. We haven't talked about all kinds of things car things like that but but if you're not doing right now let's finish. What would you go into I would I think there's going to be huge transformation in space in terms serve small sats and the ability to be competitive against some of the legacies? I think unmanned systems whether it's driverless cars whether it's drones is is going to be a revolution that were rival the one I was involved in terms of wireless technology. those are areas. Were you do need some scale but I I think the pretty darn hot climate change knowledge is what I do because that's the world's next trillionaire. Yes I mean I think on climate change you. There seems to be some growing consensus. We need to go to a carbon tax. I mean cap and trade and regulatory system. Only I actually think AH carbon tax the rest of the world would follow and it would would accelerate the movement in within within the the climate change debate..

China America China China United States Tena China Inc Communist Party Belton QUALCOMM Zeh Bo Japan Korea Australia White House FCC Brian Right American government
"japan korea australia" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

13:52 min | 2 years ago

"japan korea australia" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Warner. Well, thank you, Judy. Thank you for that introduction. Looking forward to our discussion. Now that is a about ten minutes for Senate time about ten minutes. Right. But it is a look forward to our conversation. I also say to honor for me to be here canceling formulations, and with Moscow family, family got a chance to meet the kids, a great tribute to Moscow and his service of the council is service to our country. I want to talk about today. And this, obviously, was cyber deals with. Security. I'm gonna take a slightly different Vento and talk about this subject of which for. Probably two thousand eight going forward. I guess, for a long time, I had what I would view as pretty traditional conventional views. About China from both. I think was shared by a lot of members in our policy committee. A lot of folks from the business community as a former venture capitalists, I looked at China, as a rapidly modernized and country with one point three billion people with wising incomes, and expectations and mostly saw paternity. I think I saw what a lot of folks that rising China, China that had been brought into the WTO China that was part of the world order. Would be good for the overall world. Order there would be places where we would be competitors, but more likely partners, but I have to say a few years, particularly the last three years, four years and many, many classified briefings later, I have fundamentally shifted my viewpoint. I believe that president. She starting with his major consolidation of power in two thousand fifteen and twenty sixteen reasserted the communist party's dominance, in China across all fields of business society, the military and he is now using that consolidated power to bring about both state and civil society to actually propose a role in view of China than with dominate the world. And that Donna nation would lead to a diminishment of US power and influence. The Chinese government uses all the traditional tools of the state to exert influence. An expanded military presence, and we seen that I'm sure we'll talk about it in the South China seas and aggressive, deployment of espionage steal secrets. And we saw some of that decline after his meeting with President Obama back in two thousand fifteen timeframe, we've unfortunately, seen a dramatic increase sense that, but we've also seen come out of China is more creative mechanisms that take advantage of the authoritarian model to force Chinese companies, researchers and others to act on behalf of the communist party. All this has set the stage for the Chinese government to aggressively display every lever of power to service, the state, and at the same time, export the openness of our society to take advantage and to take economic advantage. I believe this is many ways the challenge of our time, also put a caveat here that I think, is extraordinarily important my challenge. And I believe our beef is. With the communist party of China, and the president Xi regime, China is a great nation and a great people. And as we've see right now. The pushback in parts of China when we see the pushback going on right now in Hong Kong against some of the forces in Beijing when we see the concerns raised by may Chinese about the incarceration imprisonment of at least a million if not two to three million dollars. The concerns about the Chinese government are felt all across the region intelligence committee, vice chair Senator Mark Warner terribly important as I go through this, the rest of this presentation are questions that we continue to reaffirm. The concern I have is with the communist party and the government, and I am deeply concerned that we don't allow this to turn into in our country, a diminishment of the contributions, made by Chinese Americans made by Chinese nationals, and others. We do not need any form. We pay repeat the pension Chen case, the took place in, in the early eighties in Detroit. So with that caveat, I'd like to think about. In where we go from here. I again with the focus on technology. We've lived in a world in many of us in this world in this room have lived in a world, that still can remember Sputnik. I would argue that's what Nick was the last moment. When America's technological supremacy was really questioned and kind of jolted America into action. Kenny, charged us to put a put a man on the moon, and we changed our academic, institutions, we change our our research areas. We changed our military industrial complex. And we were successful in that context space, and I would argue that moment time virtually every major technological advancement, what was the transistor, whether it was computing where it was in telecommunications field in the wire in wireless was around the internet was around social media, all of these innovations have either been American or western lead. And even if they weren't American. We ended up setting the standards and by setting the standards by having the world's largest economic power that ability for us to set the standards while the rest of the world sometimes would complain about us setting the standards by setting the standards that meant the rest of the world had a default position a large economies. So we had a single governance rule around a lot of technology. I don't think in many ways that we as a nation of fully appreciated all of the economic. Political and cannily, just kind of social benefits that our country. Enjoyed by being the technologies that are in the standard setter, in many ways. That is all grabs right now. I see this firsthand in the in the competition for five G and for those who are not technology nerds in the room five jeez. The equivalent of in wireless next year ration- of moving from radio to television. An enormous enormous. Opportunity, and China is basically employing the tactics that we used to employ China is doing providing a vendors with a hundred twenty percents and more financing their flooding zone with with engineers in terms of the standard setting bodies, and in many ways, what is happening in five G could very well happen in artificial intelligence in quantum computing, in a host of other areas. If America doesn't try to reassure reassert its investments and technology and willingness to set the standards. I also believe that what we're seeing as well as not only China, make these moves, but their coupling that with a ability to actually manipulate and use western companies in ways that are frankly, fairly confounding we've seen western companies in an effort to try to get access to the Chinese market make sacrifices on electoral property. It makes sacrifices on business practices that would they would make to get to get into no other market in the world, and we're starting to see now companies who made that inference into China to decades ago, start to rethink as they see Chinese state owned enterprises pop up next to their facilities where we see a forcing sharing of intellectual property, obviously. The People's Republic of China is trying to use this new enhanced power as a way to build economic dominance. I believe, not only in China, but around the region, what we've also seen is China's been able in the technology field to do something that, quite honestly, I don't think most of us in the west that was possible, and that was to us, and regulate the internet, I remember famously Bill Clinton in the late nineties said any government that would try to regulate the internet. That'd be like nailing nailing jello to the wall. Well, the truth is China has shown the able to use the powers of the internet to be able to use the powers of tools, like we chat, facial recognition, the collaboration between the Chinese tech companies and the Chinese government to build a surveillance state, that would make George Orwell blanche. And I think I think we are still trying to grapple with that. And what we have right now is the Chinese government, basically trying to now take their successes and expo. Oy. And basically offer them to other regimes around the world. They offer three-part plant one, they offer a chain form of government to other repressive regimes to they offer a belt wrote initiative that offers traditional twentieth century economics financing for countries are open and free. Increasingly they're offering this technology driven repressive state model to actually regimes like in Pakistan, Ethiopia, Venezuela and elsewhere. Quite honestly, one of the things that of great concern to me, as we go through this, this recognition of what China's been able to do the Chinese government's been able to do it bothers me, a great deal when we sometimes see American technology companies who, who have no problem working with China, on development of their Social Credit system or surveillance tactics. And some of those same companies than having challenges working with the American defense establishment, that is something that I think we need to examine and frankly, has some honest conversations with some of those companies. So where do we go from here? Three areas that I would. Leave you with before we get into our conversation. I we need to sound the alarm and over the last year. Because I, I've had so many of these briefs and the evidence, I think, has become so overwhelming, I've gone to the intelligence community, and said, simply terrifying, or scaring members of the intelligence committee to give us this information classified briefings. You are not. We are not doing our job. If we don't find ways to classify more information and get it out to American business American policymakers, American academia, so I've started series of roadshows, we've done now eleven of them where I always take a Republican Senate partner, usually Senator Rubio, or Senator Burr, and along with either director or deputy director of national intelligence senior levels from DHS FBI, and our counterintelligence center, and bringing groups of business leaders capitalists, academics to really kind of share a one day, classified, reading, reading some of the challenges that China presents, and some of the tactics they use to try to, to advance their government's interest. So we need. To set warnings out in a better way. Second. We need a short term strategy, and for that short term strategy argue over the next couple of years and here, I think we need a lot of work. And frankly, I have seen very little articulate development from the administration on that short term strategy. I would acknowledge that the Trump administration has done the right thing these China in saying the status quo was not working. But if the status quo is not working. He's got an offer an alternative. And I would argue that the challenges of an emerging China have been not only countered the United States, but frankly have been counter all of the west in many ways, the countries that I raised the challenges around China before they were fully recognized here in this country, Japan Korea, Australia. So there was a moment in time, when I think we could have built a grand international coalition of gone to China and say, China, your great nation. You'd be one of those powerful countries in the twentieth century. But you've got to play by the rules and instead of building that grand coalition. The administration. It's called Canada a national security threat. Not the kind of plan that we ought to have. So the third thing I think we need is the need to make sure that particularly as the administration moves forward that we don't confuse trade issues with national security, issues, the president, I think, has launched this trade war without building the international lines as needed without, I think, articulating clearly, what is goals are, but what particularly concerns me as recent comments, where he's indicated that the administration's appropriate actions, I would argue around wall, way might be a trading ship and our trade dispute with China. That would be a disaster. We've finally starting to make some progress with our allies in terms of raising the very legitimate concerns about wall way and other Chinese telecom providers into five Jerry, if that were to be traded away as a trading ship. They. The ability for our intelligence community. The ability for our technology community to have any credibility on a going forward basis would be extraordinarily diminish. We have to be concerned about that. To areas on legislative front short term that I think we need to continue. Explore one, I've been a strong supporter of the safest reform called firma. I think we may even need to take a broader look there because there are certain tactics. The Chinese entities are now using in terms of venture.

China Chinese government communist party of China South China president communist party Senate America United States Warner. Vento Moscow Senator Mark Warner Judy Donna nation WTO Hong Kong Beijing Obama
"japan korea australia" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

12:07 min | 2 years ago

"japan korea australia" Discussed on KGO 810

"I'm John bachelor. This is the John Batchelor show. I welcome my colleague, Mike of Laos of Johns. Hopkins were looking at the turmoil in Europe around the British government's intent intent to follow through with the will of the people voted to leave the European Union. Some years pass it the delays have to do with the inter-party rivalries and the unhappiness with Theresa May the leader of the Tories who are in majority in the in the parliament. However, the larger story is also one of metaphor once upon a time amendment. George Orwell wrote a book nineteen Eighty-four reflecting on the gloom of the period. This is right after the second war, although Orwell had been unhappy with your for some decades, the nineteen Eighty-four metaphor made Britain into what was called airstrip one. That's what it was called. It was a dystopia in romance. The landscape was much reduced and people worked in large ministries that did or did not rewrite history depending upon the orders from about above. They were also lead routinely to hey sessions at the ministry of love where depending upon the day, you were either at war with East Asia Eurasia never to my memory where you will war with Oceanian the other the the other power of the earth because they've stripped one was part of oceanic Michael very good evening to you in an economist column. Most recently the writer brought forward the fancy idea that Great Britain with Brexit is attempting to be airstrip one to break away from Europe and to join with with Otani, which includes the new world plazas, the colonies, Australia New Zealand the colonies of Spain the. Colonies Portugal that would be Latin America and in that proposal by saw way for us to join this with our investigation for some months now, the possibility of a of a new American civil war that we're fragmenting into pieces and one of the pieces. The large piece is nationalist is red is anti globalist is rural and looks with great favour upon airstrip on joining with us, certainly Donald Trump. The president of the United States has said once they get rid of Brussels. That's the European Union. We want them here with us right away. Boris Johnson who is seen as the likely replacement at the head of the conservative party for Theresa May has said openly that he will immediately. Once Brexit has done hard. Brexit are soft Brexit join with the United States Michael's. My question to you is is. Is this metaphor of oceanic satisfactory for the United States satisfactory for those of us who he to nationalism will that will that provide the security and at the same time national identity that we yearn for good evening to you. Michael good evening, John. You have just raised to Graham, world, dynamics, power, movements shifts. That are essentially convergent that are congruent and one of those dynamics is the revolt of people against kind of global elitism that they feel is robbing them of their belonging in terms of identity and way of life. And this we see in Europe in the in the United States of very powerfully. And it is unfortunate. I think and this is one of the reasons that Orwell's vision may actually come to pass it conversion convergent with the other great world dynamic, which is the rise of China, and the creation of a kind of your life in order that if successful would would attend to entangle in its web Europe the Middle East and and Russia. And create an alternative world. And in the face of the alternative world that that is emerging in front of us. There is both a strategic need and a deeper emotional cultural need for the United States to renew itself for the future to become at once of more capable of offering kind of cure of vision of of of semi world order while also creating within that base a sense of what it's all about in other words, its meaning its purpose. And of course, that is what is so desperately sought by people today, especially as you see in Brexit and also in the election of Trump. It's kind of a longing that will not be swayed by returning to the old. Business as usual, which so many Americans feel was was grinding them down into the into the dust. So I if you can take these two aligning dynamics it to me, it it definitely presages the emergence of of a very different world order, and frankly, a world order in which the US is able to orchestrate a kind of Similac room or a mirror of all wells Otani, at least in in Rajya, political terms is not a a week or poor outcome for the US doesn't marginalize the US in mckendall terms as as you've suggested, but rather create a completely co equal and alternative world that is really quite self sufficient and in many ways better prepared for the challenges. Is that are coming our way environmentally and economic right? No more World Cup. No more sheriff on the beat no more. No more of that. We're responsible for Europe's defences. We certainly see that NATO is failed Germany will not live up to its obligations. And I believe that we can now see the end years of NATO, whatever turns to know more dealing with Brussels as if it's our co e quote vessels can pay for itself. But Michael I drive back to airstrip one. This is a column in the new economy. The most recent talking about the Brexit, the hard Brexit is who say we're done with this. We don't need to deal with your opinion. We're out of here and may go to the devil with you. We're going our own way, the economist observes that these people the Tories are dominant here, quote have a powerful ideology one that is contemptuous of metropolitan elites suspicious of. Hoity toity institutions and proud of British national identity, Michael that sounds exactly like what's going on in America. I just American national identity the suspicion of elites we've talked about it at length. It doesn't have to be read lead or blue elite just elites a metropolitan elite the urban elite the suspicion of hoity toity institutions. I believe we I believe we can just list them and start with major media. We have no patience for it. So what is being observed in Britain and step one is what we've been thrashing about here for the last several years since Trump was election elected. It's this. If mother Britain has either recreated us, or we're just in parallel universes. Well, there's a shared lineage here going back in its historical problems to World War Two, and it it is a limit a feeling of shared. I. Sanity between the English speaking nations that emerged frankly in World War Two and to look at World War Two you can see that the war was a kind of realization for both Britain and the United States Britain shook off of all of the vision of it being a appeasement oriented in decline of. Slice between different classes, and it it shouldered a great war effort way beyond what it thought itself capable of along with Canada and Australia and the rest of the empire and joined with the US and the predominant experience of World War Two was shared effort between the British empire in the US, which you saw North Africa in Italy and in northern Europe after d day, and that was an extraordinarily powerful kind of fraternal. Experience of bonding mutual sacrifice and transcendence all the rest, and that's still there. Plus, if you're British the the great realization achieve by British people in World War, Two was fighting against the great evil. The other Germany and from World War Two, partly what will one but mostly World War Two. The British have never been. Able to overcome the sense of of distance between themselves and termi and the idea that has sort of reared its head most recently that Germany would somehow lorded over Britain in the EU was I think one of the major awakening. That has occurred in British culture today where this is all set in in terms that have had eight roots in history. And this is also to the US because the people who supported Trump at the people who fought and died in the last twenty years of war, and they're the ones where the proudest of their fathers and grandfathers participation in World War Two. And and in contrast blue America has almost no connection to the historical roots of American greatness. And instead even a derogate they they have nothing, but contempt for the idea of the nation that somehow nationalism in terms of American patriotism is no different from white nationalism. And they've said that in articles in the nation and everywhere across the media. So you have a a kind of a base. Here. And I think more than just a kind of a basis a strong foundation for a natural kind of unity of English speaking nations along with Latin America, Japan and Korea. And I think there there is not simply the kind of shared memories and sense of of mutual identity from the past. But also an awareness that states on the rim of your Asia, like Japan Korea, Australia, have to stick with the US absolutely to avoid becoming tributary states vassal states of China. This isn't about 'isolation ISM. And when we come back, I'm going to use an example, most recently, how the national identity in.

United States Europe Michael Britain George Orwell Donald Trump European Union Theresa May Germany John bachelor Brexit NATO Brussels Latin America America Mike
"japan korea australia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"japan korea australia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"John Tucker, Bloomberg newsroom, it is Bloomberg business flash. Would they win the US cash market was closed in honor of the former President Bush global markets were left reeling. Fellow yesterday. Steep sell off in New York over three percent declines for the major averages, but nerves appear to steady after the commerce ministry and China's invasion is going to start to quickly implement specific items withers consensus with the United States since going to push forward on trade negotiations. The stocks Europe six hundred index that's slumped one point two percent. But that was a lot less than the three point two percent. Plunge recorded by the S and P five hundred yesterday futures for the benchmark gauge advanced in the US today. Stocks falling in Japan, Korea, Australia and Hong Kong et China's currency gave up some of its more recent. Surge. Big Palladini UK edge tires investors. Digested that legal. Vice of refined Minister Theresa May's brings a deal once again, we had German. Dax of one point two percent of footsie at London up one point four or the CAC in Paris up one point four percent that he Kate closed down about half a percent. We check the markets every fifteen minutes throughout the trading day right here on Bloomberg radio. John Tucker that is a Bloomberg business flash. John Tucker with a Bloomberg business. News flash right here on Bloomberg radio. The nation has caused today. But tomorrow, it will be back to work and one of the elements.

Bloomberg John Tucker United States China Theresa May commerce ministry President Europe New York UK Dax Hong Kong London Kate Japan Korea Paris Australia two percent fifteen minutes
"japan korea australia" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"japan korea australia" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Stake by only having enrichment if they had gone further and actually tested a bomb and tested missiles that could reach the american mainland then they would get a deal with the united states the united states also would be hearing to this is a very very dangerous development not to say that we shouldn't have to deal with the north koreans but not at the expense of killing the existing deal that actually is working what do you think about that colonel about what incentive messages the current sort of dualtrack sends oh i agree with treaty if our sitting in tehran right now whether our leading the our g c or our our the i toll or indeed president hunting i would come to the same conclusion the way to beat the united states is to build a nuclear weapon then negotiate and i would start forthwith colonel what do you see as the consequences if the us were to pull out of this deal given that it's negotiated with a bunch of other countries including russia china and some of our closest allies i think we continue to put real ruptures in the transatlantic link i think we continue to send signals to our allies in the pacific japan korea australia new zealand there were no longer trustworthy and i think we start a situation that will fold as tree to indicated right into bb netanyahu in have ignore lieberman's plans and that is for the united states to take ron on change the regime there and keep the region destabilized because as long as it's destabilize then neither the persians nor the arabs can get together against israel treat a where do you think mattis is on this i think matt is came in mattis has a history of being quite hawkish on yvonne he got fired from the obama administration because he actually wanted to have a small confrontation with iran he believed that is small war would actually be necessary to push back iranians i think he has kind of changed is my not in the sense that he's a fan of the nuclear deal or did he's changes mind about the is i think is changes mind because he's fearful of the united states being at war with a country like iran when the commander in chief is name.

yvonne israel australia pacific japan korea china russia iran obama administration united states matt mattis ron lieberman netanyahu president tehran