18 Burst results for "Janice Joplin"

"janis joplin" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on KTOK

"After her death Janis Joplin's album pearl is released and goes to number one the single me and Bobby McGee also tops the chart bill withers it's number three with a single eight no sunshine from his debut album produced by Booker T. Jones in March of seventy one Carole King releases her first solo album and scores two number one singles I feel the earth move and it's too late and U. K. progressive rockers Jethro Tull have a top ten album on both sides of the Atlantic with act along in April the temptations topped the charts with just my imagination that there are number one in the thirteenth top ten single three dog night have their second number one single with joy to the world and the rolling stones album sticky fingers is released including the number one single brown sugar listening to her radio for more from nineteen seventy one coming up go ahead do you phone the police department's let's see how that works out for you I will talk about it this afternoon at five with me Lee Matthews on the drive news radio one thousand Katie okay this is the Glenn Beck program I can not believe we have this guy on just based on his last name cotton what does that make you think of you think anyway we have we have.

Janis Joplin Bobby McGee Booker T. Jones Carole King Jethro Tull Lee Matthews U. K. Katie Glenn Beck
Texas venue that launched Janis Joplin's career set to close

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Texas venue that launched Janis Joplin's career set to close

"Janis Joplin was a college student in the sixties when she launched her career at Threadgill's a converted gas station in Austin Texas the restaurant has been closed since early this month an owner Eddie Wilson who report all re opened the place in nineteen eighty one says Threadgill's will not be re opening after the pandemic lifts

Janis Joplin Threadgill Austin Texas Eddie Wilson
"janis joplin" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on KTOK

"After her death Janis Joplin's album pearl is released and goes to number one the single me and Bobby McGee also tops the chart bill withers it's number three with a single eight no sunshine from his debut album produced by Booker T. Jones in March of seventy one Carole King releases her first solo album and scores two number one singles I feel the earth move and it's too late and U. K. progressive rockers Jethro Tull have a top ten album on both sides of the Atlantic with act along in April temptations topped the charts with just my imagination that there are number one in the thirteenth top ten single three dog night have their second number one single with joy to the world and the rolling stones album sticky fingers is released including the number one single brown sugar keep listening to her radio for more from nineteen seventy one coming up Monday morning one thousand Katie okay with Matthews on Oklahoma's first news latest on the coronavirus Jamie Mansell who is.

Janis Joplin Bobby McGee Booker T. Jones Carole King Jethro Tull Matthews Oklahoma Jamie Mansell U. K. Katie
"janis joplin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"When you read it. As when she kind of in some ways it was inevitable in some ways it wasn't but when she shoots heroin for the first time it's just like Oh that led her down the path that little to me to her death. It's hard to see otherwise. Yeah it's it's a horrible horrible problem problem in lots of her heroes. You know Billie holiday and a lot of the jazz players got into heroin and there was this horrible kind of romantic kind of idea. Yeah about heroin. And of course she really got into it when she did leave big brother and was trying to for the first time. Be A bandleader which takes it's a Lotta work to learn how to instead of being a member of the band to run the band to hire the players to be in charge plus write new songs doing a whole new stall music etc and there was so much pressure She was getting tons of media attention and so she started just kind of going into that blanket of numb numbness of heroin. And Yeah it's so many musicians musicians. I mean look at Eric Clapton. Keith Richards Dwayne Allman. I mean there were so many people from that same period that horribly fell into the same trap and the same time as much as there are things that when you look at it seemed to lead in the direction of while she would have been pretty downcast at that point in her life. There's an awful fight with her mother were mother says I wish he never been born which aches and she was very upset about the death of Jimmy Hendrix which people don't realize that didn't know each other super well well but they had a real sort of affinity for each other tight and so you can say. Oh Jeez you know. Things were bearing down on her at the same time. What actually really happened as you clearly tell us she just had the wrong kind of heroin? She did dose. That was four. What's usually would have? But she had China White. I think a very pure kind of heroin. There was a total axe. Yeah it was kind of like the whole federal thing today and horribly you know Janice had a drinking problem for sure and drinking alcohol. Alcohol is much worse on the voice than drugs heroin so basically she was trying to cut back on the drinking. She loved her band. She loved working with her producer. Paul Rotschild I think she was co-producing record with him. She had a lot yeah Pearl. She had a lot of input and things were going well for her but awfully she was trying Weiner self off the drinking sadly she runs into her dealer at the hotel. She was staying in Los Angeles and she ended up by herself beginning. This really pure dose of China white just had come into the country for the first time it was I think something like eight people. Od that same night that she did on the same heroin so horribly. That's what ended. Her life was just an awful accident and they also didn't have the kind of rehabs they have now. Yes she'd been clean for about four or five months so of course we're tolerance was much lower as well so yeah it was just. She didn't have really a great support system to stay clean some of the people in her life who who had helped her clean up around at that time and again she was by herself. There was no one there to revive her. It was so pure. I don't know maybe they couldn't have who knows but Yeah it's awful and usually she would mainline heroin again. She just relapsed so she was just skin popping so which it's a little bit less of an effect than say the way she had back in the past and her junkie days and this has been today's wrong stone music now. I'm Brian. Hi Holly George. Warren warn author of the excellent new bog orphee Janice life and music. It's task Japan of course and be sure to check that out. We will be back next week here at Sirius Awesome Volume Channel One zero six in the meantime we are podcast. Download us as a podcast. Subscribe to us as a podcast. Every your podcast maybe leave us a nice review and I tunes always appreciated the meantime as always thanks for listening.

heroin Janice Eric Clapton Jimmy Hendrix Billie Keith Richards Los Angeles China White Sirius Paul Rotschild Weiner Warren Japan China Dwayne Allman Holly George
"janis joplin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Which is what we're going to be talking about? Today is Osso two time grammy nominee and the longtime editor of Rolling Stones Book Division and a lot of books came out of that job. He asked over forty bucks over the years from photo books Anthologies of writing from the magazine. Kazini going back to the earliest issues to all kinds of rock and roll reference books the Rolling Stone Encyclopedia Rock and roll album. Guide elsewhere. The history of rock and roll. We did it all. Aw and you wrote biographies of Alex Chilton and Gene Autry. So this is your third biography but this book Janice her life and music is is a real accomplishment I think the highest compliment. I can pay to. It is by the end. I was dreading what was coming as I was was reading the last one hundred two fifty pages and then for the first time. This is someone who died before I was born. I never mourned her until I read this book and after I finished the book I was really really sad for a while. You know. It's her life is in some ways a tragedy in some ways. Not How do you see that. Well yes I mean she. She died way too young. I came to love Janice myself working on this book and interestingly I was alive when she was around down but I was just a wee lassie living North Carolina and basically Pearl posthumous album. That came out in seventy one was the first Janice album that I got and and I didn't know that much about her. As far as her own path her own journey as a musician as an artist. I of course read some books along the way. And she created such a vivid persona this image that I bought hook line and sinker this kind of Blues Mama and this kind of this flash of talent and and energy and then poof she was gone like a comet but going back and learning about her over actually quite a few years going back to when I was out rolling stone and got got to participate in conferences of the Rock Hall of Fame About Janice I decided wow you know there's so much about her I don't know and I really want to understand. Janice the person listen but also Janice the musician because I had never really gotten a sense of that from the other books so luckily for me I got to meet people. Close goes to her her bandmates people that worked with Chet Holmes who took her to San Francisco for the first time back in sixty three before big brother and the Holding Company and I was able to go back and meet friends of hers from High School and Learn about her youth in her evolution as an artist looking to find out about music and things like that that it took her on her journey out of Port Arthur Texas so yes. I'm always sad. I still tear up sometimes when I'm reading my book myself when we lose her but the the thing about genesis is she made a lot of tough decisions and she was fearless and she knew what she was doing. She knew she was taking a lot of risks. So I really do not want her to come across as a victim in my book. I mean. We're the victims because we lost our but she made those choices and you know sadly it was an accidental overdose. That took her out when she was only twenty seven hour. Among the many things I was struck by is the extent to which Janice was pushing pushing boundaries for a young woman in any era but especially her era and it actually reminded me weirdly of ethnic Curtis's recen- in Bio of Lou Reed where you learn. How ahead of the time? He was where people in high school were just like. This guy is insane and it was in some ways very similar because these were people who were literally ahead of their time they were ready to create the next generation the next era but she was already living it although from her perspective perspective. She was a Beatnik so she was in previous era. But what surprised you. Most about how far she pushed it even by the time she was eighteen years old. Yeah it's interesting. You bring up the Lou Reed book by Anthony Curtis Because I did read that book and loved it and I thought there were some real connections and the persona of both Lou Reed and John I mean I think Lou himself was also very much inspired by the beats early on and there was that whole idea of for Janice when she was fourteen years old she read on the road. Jack Kerouac when it was published fifty seven and his whole concept of beat being kind of beaten down you know outsider Outcast but still trying to experience life experience the dark corners of life away from that post World War Two optimistic like you know the white picket fence and everything you know the husband wife and two kids and the dog that kind of idea of life and Janice at such a young age really glommed onto the idea. The beats soon. After that she discovered the blues she.

Janice Lou Reed Beatnik grammy Kazini Rock Hall of Fame Alex Chilton High School Jack Kerouac Anthony Curtis North Carolina Gene Autry Chet Holmes Holding Company Port Arthur Texas San Francisco
"janis joplin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Yeah yeah so she really liked to put it out there for people to learn about her heroes house and a lot of them were women is also important to note how many women as you point out were inspired by Janice yeah mix and a million other people from stevie Nicks to Alicia Lisa Keys. I mean that's pretty cool. A wide range of different styles of artists have been inspired by the different facets of Genesis Artistry. Now when you get into genesis drug abuse and her self destructiveness some of it seemed to be powered by a real sort of existential depression. She she called the cosmic blues. Her father had a similar thing he called it. The Saturday night swindle. What was that well? Her Dad was pretty much a fatalist and told told her when she. I was Kinda down and out in San Francisco about sixty four or something like that. Hey look you know in ain't never gonNA get any better you know in Janice. She had that fifties optimal you know you work hard and you get better and then you'll be happy one day and basically his kind of existential show anx was no matter how hard you work. You think you're going to get the Saturday night to go out and have fun. Well guess what that's GonNa suck too you know you're gonNA wake up with a hangover the next day and feel like Shit Shit so Janice realized that no matter how much success she was going to have there's always going to be maybe disappointment loneliness emptiness other holes holes in her soul that you know as much as she wanted to be successful and wanted to be a rockstar. That wasn't gonNA fill that part. So yes she called the Cosmic Osmond Blues on this one of my favorite songs that she wrote Cosmic Blues which is on her first solo album I got to mow cosmic blues again. Mama which came out fifty years ago this year. I can't believe that use a in another moment. That caused dredd when you read it. As when she kind of in some ways it was inevitable in some ways it wasn't but when she shoots heroin for the first time it's just like Oh that led her down the path that little to me to her death. It's hard to see otherwise. Yeah it's it's a horrible horrible problem problem in lots of her heroes. You know Billie holiday and a lot of the jazz players got into heroin and there was this horrible kind of romantic kind of idea. Yeah about heroin. And of course she really got into it when she did leave big brother and was trying to for the first time. Be A bandleader which takes it's a Lotta work to learn how to instead of being a member of the band to run the band to hire the players to be in charge plus write new songs doing a whole new stall music etc and there was so much pressure She was getting tons of media attention and so she started just kind of going into that blanket of numb numbness of heroin. And Yeah it's so many musicians musicians. I mean look at Eric Clapton. Keith Richards Dwayne Allman. I mean there were so many people from that same period that horribly fell into the same trap and the same time as much as there are things that when you look at it seemed to lead in the direction of while she would have been pretty downcast at that point in her life. There's an awful fight with her mother were mother says I wish he never been born which aches and she was very upset about the death of Jimmy Hendrix which people don't realize that didn't know each other super well well but they had a real sort of affinity for each other tight and so you can say. Oh Jeez you know. Things were bearing down on her at the same time. What actually really happened as you clearly tell us she just had the wrong kind of heroin? She did dose. That was four. What's usually would have? But she had China White. I think a very pure kind of heroin. There was a total axe. Yeah it was kind of like the whole federal thing today and horribly you know Janice had a drinking problem for sure and drinking alcohol. Alcohol is much worse on the voice than drugs heroin so basically she was trying to cut back on the drinking. She loved her band. She loved working with her producer..

heroin Janice Alicia Lisa Keys Mama Genesis Artistry stevie Nicks Eric Clapton Jimmy Hendrix dredd San Francisco Keith Richards Billie China White Dwayne Allman
"janis joplin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

13:28 min | 1 year ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"I'm in the studio with Holly George. Warren author of Sixteen Books Most recently Janice her life and music. which is what we're going to be talking about? Today is Osso two time grammy nominee and the longtime editor of Rolling Stones Book Division and a lot of books came out of that job. He asked over forty bucks over the years from photo books Anthologies of writing from the magazine. Kazini going back to the earliest issues to all kinds of rock and roll reference books the Rolling Stone Encyclopedia Rock and roll album. Guide elsewhere. The history of rock and roll. We did it all. Aw and you wrote biographies of Alex Chilton and Gene Autry. So this is your third biography but this book Janice her life and music is is a real accomplishment I think the highest compliment. I can pay to. It is by the end. I was dreading what was coming as I was was reading the last one hundred two fifty pages and then for the first time. This is someone who died before I was born. I never mourned her until I read this book and after I finished the book I was really really sad for a while. You know. It's her life is in some ways a tragedy in some ways. Not How do you see that. Well yes I mean she. She died way too young. I came to love Janice myself working on this book and interestingly I was alive when she was around down but I was just a wee lassie living North Carolina and basically Pearl posthumous album. That came out in seventy one was the first Janice album that I got and and I didn't know that much about her. As far as her own path her own journey as a musician as an artist. I of course read some books along the way. And she created such a vivid persona this image that I bought hook line and sinker this kind of Blues Mama and this kind of this flash of talent and and energy and then poof she was gone like a comet but going back and learning about her over actually quite a few years going back to when I was out rolling stone and got got to participate in conferences of the Rock Hall of Fame About Janice I decided wow you know there's so much about her I don't know and I really want to understand. Janice the person listen but also Janice the musician because I had never really gotten a sense of that from the other books so luckily for me I got to meet people. Close goes to her her bandmates people that worked with Chet Holmes who took her to San Francisco for the first time back in sixty three before big brother and the Holding Company and I was able to go back and meet friends of hers from High School and Learn about her youth in her evolution as an artist looking to find out about music and things like that that it took her on her journey out of Port Arthur Texas so yes. I'm always sad. I still tear up sometimes when I'm reading my book myself when we lose her but the the thing about genesis is she made a lot of tough decisions and she was fearless and she knew what she was doing. She knew she was taking a lot of risks. So I really do not want her to come across as a victim in my book. I mean. We're the victims because we lost our but she made those choices and you know sadly it was an accidental overdose. That took her out when she was only twenty seven hour. Among the many things I was struck by is the extent to which Janice was pushing pushing boundaries for a young woman in any era but especially her era and it actually reminded me weirdly of ethnic Curtis's recen- in Bio of Lou Reed where you learn. How ahead of the time? He was where people in high school were just like. This guy is insane and it was in some ways very similar because these were people who were literally ahead of their time they were ready to create the next generation the next era but she was already living it although from her perspective perspective. She was a Beatnik so she was in previous era. But what surprised you. Most about how far she pushed it even by the time she was eighteen years old. Yeah it's interesting. You bring up the Lou Reed book by Anthony Curtis Because I did read that book and loved it and I thought there were some real connections and the persona of both Lou Reed and John and I mean I think Lou himself was also very much inspired by the beats early on and there was that whole idea of for Janice when she was fourteen years old she read on the road. Jack Kerouac when it was published fifty seven and his whole concept of beat being kind of beaten down you know outsider Outcast but still trying to experience life experience the dark corners of life away from that post World War Two optimistic like you know the white picket fence and everything you know the husband wife and two kids and the dog that kind of idea of life and Janice at such a young age really glommed onto the idea. The beats soon. After that she discovered the blues she discovered some lead belly records. And then after that Bessie Smith they just totally turned her around as far as what music could be now. She grew up at a time when you know the early rock and roll little. Richard Chuck Berry Fats Domino. She heard some amazing music driving around around in you know she was in the Gulf coast area of Texas and they used to call it Doing the triangle going from Port Arthur to Beaumont to orange. Just listen listen to the radio. Smoking cigarettes drinking beer. You know and she was really a fan and she was also a very very curious Korea and wanted to find more this music the lead belly and the Bessie Smith which those records were really hard to find in the nineteen fifties. So she started seeking out that kind of music but but she didn't consider herself a singer. She was born with a beautiful soprano voice that she use in the church choir and the Glee Club and school and everything but it was only after she started trying trying to work with her voice and seeing a different way with more guts and with more rough edges to it fast when she really started to find herself as a singer and she wouldn't have done that. I don't think it hadn't been for like Louis kind of going outside. The norm of what her typical Roth culture was in port. Arthur taxes axis in the nineteen fifties. There's a moment when she for the first time breaks out into the first version of that voice and it was actually imitating. Data is took off. Yes she was. I was really drawn to African American voices and she discovered a no debt or record. Now Oh Donna was trained. I think she was even an opera singer like like Janice she could sing. All different kinds of Music Janice called it her kind of Mule Skinner Blues type of Sand with what Janice was drawn to but again you know this there was so much amazing music going on in that period that part of the country that I think she really glommed onto but she would actually go up to radio stations at night to try to meet the DJ and like find out about the records. And can I get some coffee and stuff like that because she was just obsessed but she thought going to be an artist. She wanted to be a painter. She was quite talented artistically but when she started singing for an audience basically by the time she enrolled at ut for awhile in Austin Texas in nineteen sixty two and started getting that feeling of the audience feedback when she sang performing with this little Combo called the waller our creek boys that really set her on her path to become a performer as well as a singer. And that's one of the things you emphasizes while an interview. She would kind of propagate gate this myth that it was all kind of an accident and she fell into it. There actually was a long period of training and studying that led her to develop her Stalin. Voice Worse yes. She was the perpetual student of music and she was still doing that. You know when she recorded Pearl in nineteen seventy. She never wanted to just kind of stay with one sound or one style of music. She was driven to continually evolve as an artist. Sing different styles of music. Different musical Kohl backing again. She tried to make it early on after she left Austin and sixty three as a blue singer doing some original. She'd already started writing writing songs herself. She learned to play on a harp. She was teaching herself guitar. And so she went out to the Coffee House scene in San Francisco. And actually I rub shoulders with the people like your Macau Conan and Jerry Garcia. Who of course later a few years later they'd all be the king and Queen of the counterculture and Haight Ashbury and all that but She did that for a while so I mean. She was constantly evolving as an artist but also working really hard to and yeah. I totally always bought her myth that she's just like all all about the field. ABC You know and just going out there and do letting it all out and just kind of almost like just kind of came out of her and that was really not the case. It was a lots and lots hardwork and effort on her part that trip to San Francisco. The first one is one of the places where I said. Wow this was an incredibly brave young woman because it was so Outside of the norm for that time and she was taking huge risks and then she did very quickly she ended up. Pretty horrifyingly ended up a very I serious speed at it with terrifying speed. Yeah Yeah it was an actually. Brian believe it or not. That was actually her. Second Time Hitchhiking The San Francisco. She I went when she was eighteen. Eighteen years old hitchhiked. She was living out in Venice. Beach trying to be a beat neck. And so she hitchhiked up to San Cisco when Kinda just hung out checked out the scene and everything and then took the bus back home to Texas but yes when she really went to try to make it. It's hard for us to imagine now because there's such infrastructure now if you want to build audience and go out and perform but here she was all alone. A young woman nowhere to live sleeping on floors sometimes slept on the floor. The Coffee House where she he performed making you know five or six dollars maybe usually pass the hat kind of things and speed was everywhere in North Beach in the summer of that period of the early sixties. And she yeah she fell into that and you know in the beginning she and some of her friends were doing it because it just like taken can pep pills which she had done in college even they were very widely available in those days and then she went from that to methamphetamine and horribly ended up injecting it so she definitely pretty much wrecked yourself at that point and by nineteen sixty five. She had really won a lot of fans with her voice but by then then she was really sidetracked by you know she was down to like eighty eight pounds and had to go back to Austin and oh I went back to Port Arthur and was kind of nursed back to health family and then eventually she ended up performing in Austin again. There's a harrowing moment. When in the early dissolution she fell into? There's a sign up at a club club. I think in San Francisco said do not under any circumstances give money to downs Joplin or something like that which is like Yikes. I mean that shows how far she went so fast and again you have to remember how old she was you know. She was still in her early twenties at this point so she was just this kid she really had for the first time in her life. All these wide open possibilities to just go out there and you'll be beat so She did that and it really scared heard her though she knew how close to death she had come and when she did go back home she totally straightened up. She actually transformed into this taxes. Axes college co ED. Commuting to Lamar Tech in Beaumont Texas wanted to be a sociology major. Fortunately for me she wrote amazing. Oh my my God. These letters that she wrote to this horrible cad conman boyfriend that she had who was supposed theon say she like seventy or eighty letters over about three or four months and they're just so self analytical they're funny they describe her life with her State of mind her family. I mean it's it's literally like I got in her memoirs something getting to read all those letters which were in like a family archive the D.. Allowed you access to know those letters. Yeah she later wrote home to her family a lot when she ran off again and sixty six. She told her parents. She was going to Austin for the weekend. She really moved back to San Francisco so of course they were horrified fight because they thought she was going to end up like she had the first time and so she wrote home a lot of ladder so yes the family shared those with me. These letters thank goodness. The guy the one good thing about him being such a con man horrible guy was that he sold the letters so I was able to find lots of them through some dealers who handle rare manuscripts scripts and letters who very kindly gave me scans to read. I found some on the Internet from other auction houses. Who have them up for sale? And I think the family we had a couple that they had actually purchased over the years so I was able to track down a lot of them and also she wrote letters to some of girlfriends that I was able to track down so luckily luckily she left this amazing paper trail. You had really strikes me that It's going to be a lot harder..

Janice San Francisco Lou Reed Bessie Smith grammy Austin Texas Port Arthur Beaumont Texas Alex Chilton Coffee House Holly George Kazini Austin Texas Anthony Curtis Warren Richard Chuck Berry Gene Autry Jack Kerouac
"janis joplin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

10:56 min | 1 year ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"One very ambitious from the beginning big brother was kind of this cool you know freaky you know hanging out improvisational band but they were not it was all about feel with them they were not these precise musicians that hi to play every part perfectly every time Janice on the other hand she had that perfectionists mindset when it came to her music she wanted to be the best singer she wanted to be perfect she was the first one in the recording studio and the last one to leave she worked really hard to be as good as she possibly could Dan she was also a restless soul when it came to her music she didn't WanNa stay with just one style when sound of music and also be outing the way she was the Banshee Wail that she developed with Big Brother and the holding company that really was not sustainable that was going to record voice so she wanted to sing with more nuance and and she liked jazz she likes Broadway show tunes You know she wanted to try lots of soul music sick or NB there are a lot of things that she wanted to do that she was worried that big brother and the holding company either couldn't or wouldn't want to do so it be came just a matter of time before she finally did leave the band so she gets a new band the cosmic Blues Ben and so during the period when she's recording with the cosmic blues band and she separated from the ban that she knew so well that she was so close to be brother and the holding company what's happening in her personal life when she was out on the road constantly backed up by what became known as cosmic Blues Band Jan US started turning to heroin as a way to just kind of numb herself from all the pressures and the fear of what was like being a solo artist at that point time in her career again she was still very much a focal point of media articles about her all the time mm-hmm and she had developed this whole you know hard-drinking blues mom image that she had so this was a secret vice of hers that she picked stop unfortunately it was heroin was pretty prevalent. no-one really realized the time and so she gradually got addicted to heroin eighteen sixty nine and she kick heroin before going back to it she tried to kick heroin a few times she finally did almost for good in nineteen seventy right about the time she had put together a new band which became called 'til Boogie band and she she she got off heroin for awhile actually by going to Brazil for Carnival and I mean it's so hard to it was a massive rock star she was hitchhiking around in Brazil for awhile totally cleaned up really love the feeling of being clean and back to her old self again sadly she relapsed when she got back to California and then finally she quit in the spring of nineteen seventy and she stayed off of it for about four five months until tragically she relapsed again while recording Pearl in Los Angeles got a very strong dose very pure like what's happened horribly in recent times with fennel and things like that it was much more pure than she had ever used before and sh- her tolerance was down she was ourself overdosed died October fourth nineteen seventy how does Janis Joplin's music sound different to you now what's really struck me as I dove into genesis music was all the different styles and different announced that she could make her voice I guess I just thought she just kind of started singing chooses full-blown singer and it just came out that way but what I've realized working on the book and doing all the research and listening to tons of music is how she worked with her voice how she would purposefully evolve and change your style and how she could sound so different depending on what the songs were what was and you know also just tax nucle- what she could do just you know things like being able to hit like three notes at once you know just her technical prowess I've learned about and it just didn't wasn't just a natural talent that she had she worked really hard to become that good of a singer but you know it sounds like a journalist asked her about it was like well it's all about feeling it was way more than that for her she really tried to hide that side of hers she didn't want people to know how hard she worked just like she tried to hide the fact that she was a total bookworm and read books all the time I mean when I read the letters that she wrote to her parents that's learned so much about the Real Janice that we didn't know about from just her persona on the image that she created she would write her parents with these rip shins of what it's like you know over dubbing or double tracking her vocals or what the mixing process was like she was getting all technical on all that kind of stuff she was fascinated by the recording process she loved it and then again I realized that she was a real scholar of music she worked hard to find records to analyze the records and that was a big surprise for me to learn how much work she put into it and how long she spent working on this to become the singer that she was Holly George Warren thank you so much for talking with us while this has been so much fun thank you Terry a highly George Warren's new biography of Janice Joplin is called Janice her life and music.

four five months
"janis joplin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Window DOT COM in some cases grandma man mm-hmm the film no one what does single.

"janis joplin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Holly George Warren Welcome back to fresh air thanks so much for having on me again so why do you why do you and so many others consider Janice Joplin the first woman Rockstar and I presume say Rockstar we're eliminating like rock and roll where we're eliminating girl groups we're talking about like rock rock yes Janice Joplin broke down a lot of barriers come the woman that she was in the nineteen sixties when at that point in time there weren't too many women taking center stage not only onstage in the recording studio but even as as far as a point of media attention and Janice created this incredible image that went along with her amazing vocal ability her talent and also her live performance which was very very different than most of the women that can before for people who I've seen her live or on film or video how is her live performance different what made Janice really different is alive perform summer is that she connected with her audiences by tapping into her deepest feelings and there was this authenticity that came across it wasn't just standing up there singing she was basically emptying out her gods through that amazing voice of hers and touching her audience members like they had never been touched before I've talked to people who saw her back in nineteen sixty six sixty seven and they talk about it does if it was yesterday especially women I think because she was able to express deep down emotions shamed appointments hurts that I think a lot of women in her audience couldn't express themselves and Janice was not only just singing to them she singing for them and I think that kind of deep connection was very very unique that time she was very sexual onstage but as an in the way that you would imagine she wasn't wearing like sexy clothes she wasn't like revealing a lot of her body like onstage so what was it about her that had so much sexual energy in her performances. You can look to two major influences that Janet has had that I think affected her sexuality and the way she expressed it on stage one was of course the Great Bessie Smith whose lyrics China's new by heart she started out singing bessie Smith songs way before we ever saw her these images of her with big brother and the holding company she started performing I see Smith songs in around nineteen sixty three and those kind of lyrics of sexuality of sexual longing sexual betrayal those vary much informed Janice his own songwriting and the songs that she chose to sing the other major influence was Otis redding she was a he huge Otis Fan until the day she died and she got to see him perform live three nights in a row at the fillmore back in nineteen sixty six and it transformed her because he was a very sexual performer and he was able to emit this heat on stage that Janice herself I was able to do through her own Way of manifesting these feelings that she had while seen this these songs and yeah I mean Janice herself she compared singing onstage to having an orgasm she blew some journalist minds when she used that expression that she it was a very sexual experience for her and the world of rock in the late sixties was very much a a male dominated world in the studio and in the Music World do you think that she faced a lot of sexism when she was was a performer in spite of on her way to stardom or or after she reached it Janice was one of the boys she considered herself the boys and she kind of was outside that gender role playing at the time that was pretty much dominant in our culture but it once she was a public figure the press would of course be amazed by her vocals and critics would be talking about what a great singer she was but they were often seagoing out her body parts and talking about her physical appearance in a way that of course you know male singers rock singers were really not getting that kind of attention from the press also she really had to bus down barriers was to be able to have control to do what she wanted to do because she loved being in Big Brother and the Holding Company for example the band with whom she catapults did to fame but she was such a restless of spirit as far as a musician goes she wanted to keep it exploring different sounds different kinds of music and when she did that it was really awful in that the boys club of music critics just Kinda raked over the coals for dropping her band and going on own and they tried to say she was selling out and going Showbiz and I don't think other artists like Eric Clapton who left and plenty of bands too by different sounds I don't think they got that kind of personal attack that Janna Scott one of Joplin's most famous recordings is boil and rain and that was a cover of a song that was written by originally recorded by big Mama Thornton so what's the array behind how Janice Joplin I heard that song or how someone in her band I hear that song and how she decided to record it it is so poetic that Janice breakthrough song would be written by Big Mama Thornton Ball and chain because as a teenager of course who like many who saw elvis us on Ed Sullivan Show Janice loved Elvis loved hound dog but then she went to the length and we don't even know how she did it but somehow she found big Mama original version on of Duke records out of nearby Houston Texas of Hound dog which was very different from Elvis's it was it had a lot got more Heat to it and you know fast forward what ten years later nine hundred sixty six so janice was with big brother and the holding company any big Mama Lo and behold was living in the bay area performing at a Little Club so Janice and her bandmates went down to see her perform and she does this Penn Song Ball and chain they were blown away Janice started writing down the lyrics to the song on a piece of paper they're sitting in the club they went backstage age got to meet Big Mama and literally ask for permission for them to start covering the song and she said sure as long as you don't mess it up now and They did dave gets the drummer used to say they big brother is the song so I thought it would be interesting to hear the big authority recording and the Janice Joplin recording back to back so we can hear something of you know what influence Janice Joplin and how she made it her own so he there's Big Mama Thornton followed by Janice Joplin and both of these recordings were made in nineteen sixty eight.

Janice Joplin Holly George Warren Janet ten years
"janis joplin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from NPR sponsor and Y J women's jeans that come in sixty six sizes from double zero to twenty eight not too plus n short too tall visit ny dot com slash NPR and get fifty dollars off your first purchase of fifty dollars or more from whyy Ns Joplin we talked with Holler George Warren Who's written a new biography of Joplin Japan was an icon of sixties counterculture a Rockstar when rock was aboard this club George Warren says Joplin liked to give the impression that her music was just emotion pouring out of her but she worked hard at her singing for years before becoming famous she really tried to hide that side of her just like she tried to hide the fact that she was a total bookworm and she wanted people to think she was just this vessel also talk with Kathryn Hahn who's known for her roles and transparent parks and recreation and bad mom's now she starring in the new. Hbo as Mrs Fletcher and Justin Chang reviews the new film the Lighthouse starring Robert Pattinson and Willem Defoe the following message comes from our sponsor Cast David Cohen Comcast Senior Executive Vice President helped launch their Internet essentials program and believes in the power of bringing the Internet to people without access an eight years we have been able to connect more than eight million low income Americans to the Internet and begun to make a difference enclosing the digital divide and getting people trained and comfortable with the Internet to learn more go to comcast corporation dot com slash Internet essentials. my guest is the author of a new biography of Janice Joplin called Janice her life and Music Holly George Warren writes quote Joplin's coffee Fidel musicianship brash sexuality and natural exuberance locked together to produce America's first female Rockstar Janice never compromised her vision and she wasn't afraid to cross boundaries musical cultural and sexual as we look back at pivotal moments in nineteen sixties rock history she is usually they're the Monterey pop festival the vibrant Haight Ashbury scene in San Francisco the streets the clubs studios of Gritty New York City Woodstock doc unquote Joplin's brief life was ended by a heroin overdose in nineteen seventy when she was only twenty seven her final Album Pearl was released posthumously how George Warren is also the author of the road to Woodstock and biographies of Alex Chilton and Gene Autry. She's on the nominating Maria the rock and Roll Hall of fame and teaches at the State University of New York at New Paltz let's start with a track that was Joplin's commercial breakthrough with her Band Big Brother a holding company this piece of my heart recorded in nineteen sixty eight.

Janice Joplin Joplin Holly George Warren comcast State University of New York NPR Senior Executive Vice Presiden Janice Hbo New York Alex Chilton Kathryn Hahn Haight Ashbury Robert Pattinson Willem Defoe Japan Monterey
"janis joplin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Ooh you're behind laugh ooh hollow uh Aww uh some came alone Graham online an opponent in Missouri the film what does single little aw living.

"janis joplin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

10:50 min | 1 year ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Holly George Warren Welcome back to fresh air thanks so much for having me again so what are you why do you and so many others consider Janice Joplin the first woman Rockstar and I presume when we say Rockstar were eliminating like rock and Roll we're we're eliminating like girl groups we're talking about like rock rock yes Janice Joplin broke down a lot of barriers to become the woman that she was in the nineteen sixties when at that point in time there weren't too many women taking center stage not only onstage in the recording studio but even as as far as a point of media attention and Janice created this incredible image that went along I'm with her amazing vocal ability her talent and also her live performance which was very very different than most of the women that came before for people who haven't seen her live or on film or video how is her live performance different what may Janice really different as a live performer is she connected with her audiences by tapping into her deepest feelings and there was this authenticity that came across she wasn't just standing up there singing she was basically emptying out her gods through that amazing voice of hers and touching her audience members like they had never been touched before I've talked to people who saw her back in nineteen sixty six sixty seven and they talk about it as if it was yesterday especially women I think because she was able to express deep down emotions shame disappointments hurts that I think a lot of women her audience couldn't express themselves and Janice was not only just singing to them she was singing for the and I think that kind of deep connection was very very unique that time she's very sexual onstage but it wasn't in the way that you would imagine she wasn't wearing like sexy clothes she wasn't like revealing a lot of her body like onstage so what was it about her that had so much kind of sexual energy in her performances you can look to major influences that Janice had that think affected her sexuality and the way she expressed it on stage one was of course the Great Bessie Smith whose lyrics Janice Newbie heart she started out singing bessie Smith songs way before we ever saw her these images of her with big brother and the holding company she started performing Bessie Smith songs around nineteen sixty three and those kind of lyrics of sexuality of Sexual Longing Sexual Betrayal those very much informed genesis own songwriting and the songs that she chose to sing the other major influence was Otis redding she was a huge fan until the day she died and she got to see him perform live three nights in a row at the fillmore back in nineteen sixty six and it tran is formed her because he was very sexual performer and he was able to emit this heat on stage that Janice herself is able to do through her own way of manifesting these feelings that she had while seeing this these songs and I mean Janice self control she compared singing onstage to having an orgasm she blew some journalists minds when she used that expression but you it was a very sexual experience for her and the world of Rock in the late sixties was very much a a male dominated world in the radio and in the Music World do you think she faced a lot of sexism when she was a Mer in spite of on her way to stardom or after she reached it Janice was one of the boys she considered herself one of the boys and she kind of was outside that gender role playing the time that was pretty much dominant in our culture but that she was a public figure the press would of course be amazed by her vocals and critics would be talking about what a great singer she was they were often seeking out her body parts and talking about her physical appearance in a way that of course you know male singers rock singers really not getting that kind of Attention from the press also she really had to bus down barriers to be able to have control to do what she wanted to do because she loved being in Big Brother and the Holding Company for example the band with whom she catapulted to fame name but she was such a restless of spirit as far as a musician goes she wanted to keep it exploring different sounds different kinds of music and when she did that it was really awful in that the boys club of music critics just kind of raked over the coals for dropping her band and going off on her own and they hard to say she was selling out and going Showbiz and I don't think other artists like Eric Clapton who left and plenty of bands to try different Sam sounds I don't think they got that kind of personal attack that Janna Scott Jess Joplin's music idols include bessie Smith Than Big Mama Thornton other blues and rhythm and blues singers but she was born in Texas in Port Arthur Texas at a time when it was still segregated how is she exposed to black music and how did she find records that she might not have heard on the radio because Janez came of age in the mid fifties fortunately in that golden age of early rock and roll she went nuts over Chuck Berry Little Richard There was some great records that she could listen to driving around they used to call it doing the triangle where she lived port Arthur Texas they would just drive every night from Port Arthur to Beaumont to Orange Texas listening to the radio also Beaumont had some great or NBC station that played black music which Janice loved I mean the great ivory Joe Hunter was from Beaumont so she was fortunately exposed to music like that on the radio and then she discovered lead belly and lead belly just changed her head around the lyrics the sound of his voice you know Janice took her own vocals for granted until she discovered lead belly she just thought Oh anybody can sing soprano like you know she sang in the Church Choir Glee Club but when she heard lead bill elise force she wanted to experiment with roughing up her sound and making it more raw and she was a mimic she could you know she discovered Odeta who had kind of the round tones and she started trying to sing like Oh data on her records but she was mostly inspired by lead belly until she discovered of course betsy Smith and then that was all she wrote one of Janis Joplin's most famous recordings is ball and chain and that was a cover a song that was written by originally recorded by big Mama Thornton so what's the story behind how Janice Joplin I heard that song or how someone in her band I hear that song and how she decided to record it it is so poetic that genesis breaks through song would be written by Big Mama Thornton Ball and chain because as a teenager of course who like many who saw Elvis on Sullivan show Janice loved Elvis is loved hound dog but then she went to the length and we don't even know how she did it but somehow she found big Mama Thornton's original version on of Duke records out of nearby Houston Texas of Hound dog which was very different from Elvis's it was it had a lot more heat to it and fast forward what ten years later nine hundred sixty six or so janice was with big brother and the holding company big Mama Lo and behold was living in the bay area performing at a Little Club so Janice and her bandmates went down to see her perform and she does this self penned Song Ball and chain blown away Janice started writing down the lyrics to the song on a piece of paper they're sitting in the club they went backstage got to meet Big Mama and literally ask for permission for them to start covering that song and she said sure as long as you don't mess it up you know and They did gets the drummer used to say they big brother rised the song so I think big Mama Thornton and Janice Joplin recorded Boylan chain at about the same time be cuss if I'm not mistaken one Janice heard big Mama Thornton Performance Thornton hadn't recorded the song yet that's correct is not available on record and win it I think I did come out it was on a very tiny label I mean at this point big Mama Thornton had her star had kind of fallen as far as the record industry has so the version that most people heard became the version that big brother and the Holding Company did at the Monterey Pop festival in June of nineteen sixty seven which was really their breakthrough performance but they had started doing that song I guess they'd been on it for probably about eight or nine months before they did it at Monterey pop in it kind of gradually evolved as they did it you can hear it on some bootlegs and things like that and here well you know a little bit different but Janice just dug into the phrasing of that song the they slowed way down and it just had this heavy intensity to it that was the perfect vehicle for genesis vocal abilities and also her ability to tax into those deep emotions and let them come through her voice so I thought it'd be interesting to hear the Big Mama Thornton Recording and Janice Joplin recording back to back so we can hear something of you know what influence Janice Joplin and how she made it her own so here's Big Mama Thornton followed by Janice Joplin and both of these recordings we're made in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight girl.

Janice Joplin Holly George Warren nine months ten years
"janis joplin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"A new biography of Joplin Joplin was an icon of sixties counterculture a rock star when rock was a boys club George Warren says Joplin like to give the Russian that her music was just emotion pouring out of her but she worked hard at her singing for years before becoming famous she really tried to hide that side of her a new HBO Series Catherine The Great Starring Helen Mirren as the Eighteenth Century Russian empress that's on Fresh Air guest is the author of a new biography of Janice Joplin called Janice her life and Music Holly George Warren writes quote Joplin's confident musicianship Brash Sexuality and natural exuberance locked together to produce America's first female Rockstar Janice never compromised her vision she wasn't afraid to cross boundaries musical cultural and sexual as we look back at pivotal moments in nineteen sixties rock history she is usually there the Monterey pop festival the Vibrant Haight Ashbury scene in San Francisco the streets the clubs and studios of Gritty New York City Woodstock unquote Joplin's brief life was ended by a heroin overdose in nineteen seventy when she was only twenty seven her final album Pearl was released. Pasta Roll Hall of fame and teaches at the State University of New York at New Paltz let's start with a track that was Joplin's commercial breakthrough with her band big brother and the Holding Company piece of my heart recorded in nineteen sixty eight.

Joplin Joplin Joplin Janice State University of New York Holly George Warren New York Helen Mirren George Warren HBO San Francisco heroin Catherine The Great America Holding Company Woodstock
"janis joplin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The song book a W. NYC and of course Janis Joplin and summertime in the summer time of nineteen sixty nine fifty years ago exactly this time of the year the first weekend here it is they had no idea what they were going to do when August sixteen seventeen rolled around it's amazing as we look back at Woodstock exactly how little was planned or things were planned that had to be changed up at the last minute or things were improvised on the spot like the guy that we know that were interesting characters in the whole Woodstock story there's wavy gravy there's chip monk a nickname obviously but the guy was the lighting and technical director at the last minute wait a minute we don't have an MC chip you do the announcements so what kind of role that way will depend to some of the music that was emblematic of that time the widest generation gap ever I dare say it the it was a sharp contrast that nineteen sixties as an era alone could have supported I don't know if any of the time would have broken under the pressure of it here is a song that nat king Cole's saying when he was just a take almost just a little guy with a bunch of friends charming piano playing guitar strumming no expectations other than let's go have fun and make music that would become a superstar but before those days when it was just for laughs Carmen McRae.

W. NYC Janis Joplin Carmen McRae Woodstock technical director nat king Cole nineteen sixty nine fifty year
"janis joplin" Discussed on Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

"Band, the Grateful Dead providing entertainment along with several other performers. Her sister boyfriend, enclosed friends all came to pay their final respects to the rock and roll legend. And celebrate her backstage exit to the afterlife. Janis jumped in brought up half blues voice from Texas to San Francisco slight Dedic seen was she went from a lonely drifta to an unforgettable seep stock going up. She had a close bond with family. I did nineteen sixty seven she brought them ounce to San Francisco to see the summer of love concerts, and it truly kicked off Korea as a powerful and emotional Sosa. Less time family. So John is was in nineteen seventy once you're poor Tofte to attend to ten year high school reunion when she died in the fall of nineteen seventy has this Laura was only twenty one brother, Michael seventeen vice devastated by the loss of that beloved big sister together, they have kept him alive and continue to jointly. What show her state fullness fifty years? Row critic Lillian Ruxton summed up her influence with these words Janis Joplin publicly expressed the feelings and evenings of the goals with the electric generation. To be women yet. He co two men to be free yet a slave to real love to reject every day to convention and yet get back to the basics of life. Yes. Hostelries fos the bright. But you took a piece of of our hearts, which he died on top of the fourth nineteen seventy and room number one hundred and five at the landmark hotel in Hollywood in the end memories of some superstars may fade away. But true bookstores like Janis Joplin never die. Death, by misadventure was produced by cosmic media and written by me JC Nova are supernatural team of co hosts includes the talented at Duardo Fahey in London. Tom dre, our master numerology just and paranormal investigator in LA, Paul Robinson. Madge, I and musician Marin and myself, I'm a psychic astrologer and paranormal investigator in Los Angeles. And San Francisco this episode was recorded at Robinson studios Marin, California and also at union recording studio in West Hollywood,

Janis Joplin San Francisco Robinson studios Marin investigator Lillian Ruxton Los Angeles Hollywood Tofte Madge Tom dre Paul Robinson Sosa Korea Laura Duardo Fahey Marin California Texas John London
"janis joplin" Discussed on Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

"Rumors respecting across the media had Janice been killed by some jealous guy by notorious drug dealer, even by the CIA or had she killed herself over someone because she had always been so self destructive each new theory had its informed proponents and each one was equally. Groundless fueling the curse of the deadly twenty seven club many years later, the book going down with Janice written by her former lover Peggy Caserta, she recounted the twenty four hours leading up to the singer's death. She claimed both Genesis fiancee Seth Morgan and her had stood the singer up that night for a plan. Threesome. However, later Caserta would admit in an interview with culture magazine that Joplin had been clean in the time leading up to her death. That is until she ran into a drug dealer, delivering dope to Caserta in the hotel lobby where she later died. Caserta claims. Janice had walked out of her hotel room to get cigarettes and ran into George in the landmark lobby this chance encounter, but proved to be fatal one when she came back to room to get high less than twenty four hours later, the singer would be dead. Although the coroner's report stated otherwise Caserta still believes Janice did not die of drug overdose. But a fatal trip she told the magazine. She tripped and fell Honey, I'm positive of it, which makes one wonder was Peggy Caserta there..

Peggy Caserta Janice drug overdose culture magazine CIA Seth Morgan Joplin George twenty four hours
"janis joplin" Discussed on Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"janis joplin" Discussed on Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

"Among the twelve hundred journalists covering the festival was music critic, Robert crisco who was then writing for Esquire magazine would later till NPR about Janice. I very much remembered her. Plane in the sunshine, and everyone was really not just exalted, but kind of flabbergasted at how intense it was like a lot of musicians at the time chaplain was trying to sing like a black blues musician Chris cows says most were not convincing Janice on the other hand blue audiences away with her raw emotional voice, Janice once said plane is just about feeling Joplin said it isn't necessarily about misery. It isn't about happiness. It's just about letting yourself feel all those things already have inside of you. But are trying to push his side because they don't make for polite conversation or something. But if you just get up there, that's the only reason I can sing because I can get up there. And I just let all those things come out. By April nineteen sixty eight Janice in the big brother and the holding company were in New York to record cheap. Thrills for Columbia. Big brother had some trouble in the recording studio. Janice, didn't like the vibe and felt New York had made everyone aggressive San Francisco's difference. She told writer net and tough in the New York Times. I don't mean it's perfect, but the rock bands. There didn't start because they wanted to make it they dug getting stoned and playing for people dancing, but we have to do learn to control success cheap..

Janice New York Robert crisco New York Times Joplin Esquire magazine Chris cows NPR Columbia writer San Francisco