20 Burst results for "Janet Mock"

"janet mock" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"janet mock" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

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"janet mock" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"janet mock" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"And being.

Courtney Act on How Drag Helped Her Find Her Trans Identity

Homo Sapiens

03:16 min | 1 year ago

Courtney Act on How Drag Helped Her Find Her Trans Identity

"Perhaps courtney was almost a performance thing at the beginning of your career but now it's sort of like why would it be performance because she is also you. Yeah i guess it's that thing where with lots of labels and things. These days which i personally have found very helpful in understanding who i am but i think now that i've understood. I'm not completely. But i've i've got the large chunks. That pestered me for most of my teens and twenties out of the way i just kind of feel like me and so i think that's something beyond the physical packaging and the superficial decoration of that. Which is just like the core essence of who i am and and how my sexuality and my gender and my identity overnight to that which i feel really comfortable about but i think like drag was assigned post that the fact that i was drawn to drag the fact that i did drag in a world where it certainly wasn't a normal thing Was always sort of like a signposted. Sort of the bigger question about my identity and it's always been like this flag that has drawn attention to the concepts of gender and identity and will the words the words around have become. They've always been there. They've sort of been our fingertips for the past five years in a way that they just weren't before right. Yeah it's so weird. How language can empower and labels can empower someone. Because in the beginning. I was a boy who did drag and there's is nothing funny going on. It was just a costume like a police. Van would put on a police uniform and go to work mine. Was this more. Glamorous and the only other option at that time was to be trans. And i didn't identify with that because i think it was filled like a lot of people with a lot of i had a lot of internalized transphobia. I think In my early days. Because i had received a lease negative images and messages. Just as i had internalized homophobia and themm phobia arab. You know all of these sorts of things these messages that we with And then over. The years is the language has developed as the stories have felt in pop culture with Trans people the transit civility has probably been one of the biggest things has allowed me to accept who i am although i identifies trans. It created a space where i was able to actually ask myself those questions and answer them. Honestly because i was seeing amazing transplant and transparent in pop culture like laverne cox janet mock and angelica ross and chaz bono and jenny boylan and capable in saint louis books and things i'd read and i was like oh well. Being transparent is valid in beautiful wonderful. And i was no longer scared of the idea of being a transparent and so then i was able to actually look at it. I was like oh actually i think i secretly thought that i was transfer very longtime because those only two options and i didn't feel like i was a man so therefore i must be a woman and actually as it turns out. I don't feel like that. I just feel like me.

Courtney Laverne Cox Janet Mock Angelica Ross Phobia Jenny Boylan VAN Chaz Bono Saint Louis
Taylor Swift and Janet Mock to be Honored at 31st Annual GLAAD Awards for LGBTQ Advocacy

Colleen and Bradley

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Taylor Swift and Janet Mock to be Honored at 31st Annual GLAAD Awards for LGBTQ Advocacy

"Taylor swift and writer director producer it Janet mock will be honored at the glad to media awards for their advocacy for LGBTQ issues the pop star will receive the vanguard award which is presented to allies who have made a significant difference in promoting accepting of LGBT Q. people Moscow is best known for her work on the FX series pose will receive the media professional ward to be honored at the glad media awards in Los Angeles in

Director Producer Moscow Los Angeles Taylor Swift Writer Janet
"janet mock" Discussed on The Read

The Read

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"janet mock" Discussed on The Read

"Damn, yes. This is she started off. Got all their books. Talking about how everybody needs to mind their own fucking. Girl. We see struggling over here bitch, please. Come sit down for you. Don't try to convince happy because we see right through though we know you too, damn well, horrid. Horrid, man. I mean I love that song, but wouldn't talk on this and just terrible guys. Welcome back to the Reid I am to savage. And I am Janet mock. And it's funny that you say that. Yeah, I had a feeling she might have, you know, popped up on the show this week, per for one huge reason so bucks this week is going to miss Janet, Mark author director producer, Babich, Chuck Hester, Tina spoon. Oh, yeah. All of those BFF's. So if you haven't heard Janet mock his just closed in overall deal with net flicks. This makes her the first black trans woman to establish overall deal with a major studio, period. This is so amazing to me and I don't know drills are watching pose bitch. You better be like if you aren't catch up your bit late straight TV and proof that she's got the recipe. Yes. So congratulations to Janet. She said that she's working on a half hour drama in college series, and it's on the night, even kept very hush. Is I'm just excited because like. In the midst of all of the ridiculous, like I don't know. I I get confused between epidemic. Pandemic pandemic is like an illness. Right. I think so actually, don't know the development, whatever there's look at. For black trans women in this country. It is like it should be an emergency. You know, like there should be far more coverage and standing up and things are done for our trans sisters. Yeah. Because the, the right in which they're being murdered is just on believable and has been for the for the longest time. Right. But she said here in this video that eighty four percent of Americans say, they don't know or work with transfers in so something like this can be, you know, it could be something that can introduce people to their world and hopefully, build more empathy. And people who have who are literally ignorant and have no idea about what they go through. And hopefully can start more of a movement in like protecting. Yes. Argyros. Is just ridiculous. What's going on? So shout out to Janet mock you are the just everything just every single damn thing. And I already know you are absolutely gonna kill this worldwide content on Netflix, girl. Like this guy is the limit and looked up an epidemic occurs. When it's like local a disease that more people are getting the normal. So what's pending a pandemic is an epidemic that happens worldwide, so epidemics are like a local are the one of them applied. Well, no, 'cause I think you know it's probably a pandemic but it's definitely an epidemic in America. I don't know what the word is. Oh. Also related to diseases. But the point is that it's a fucking crisis crisis. Okay. Perfect fucking crisis in the rest of us needs to do something about it period. You know. You know,.

Janet mock America Netflix Reid Chuck Hester Tina spoon director producer eighty four percent
Janet Mock makes history with Netflix deal

Lori and Julia

00:27 sec | 3 years ago

Janet Mock makes history with Netflix deal

"And janet mock is making history she directs the f._x. show pose and she produces it a well she signed a deal with netflix making her the first transgender woman to call the creative shots at a major content company she has three or multi million dollar deal giving netflix exclusive rights to her tv series and i look option on feature film project that show post so good which is free season three f._x. renewed that one oh they did renew it for third season yes

Janet Mock Netflix Million Dollar
"janet mock" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"janet mock" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"Of course are the ways in which you right and become an intellectual and not just about things that affect you about the world, your consciousness starts growing. Once you become a college student, and can we talk a little bit about those those years because you were secretly writing to and then you had a wonderful therapist who suggested why don't you keep with the writings? There is a ten. Yes. And it's it's it's a great book, and I won't give him most of it away. But can we talk about your development as a mind and as a writer? Got out of myself, at least in terms of like, you know, how I felt in my body. I started sharing my body. And then also just expanding the way in which I thought about all the things that was going through at the time. And so I think one of my first relationships was probably the first space in which I started telling stories about their experiences that were very that. I had just had like having this boyfriend sharing, you know, who I was kind of the first points in which I was actually exploring myself, and what I thought and what I thought about what I went through and the people in my life. And so that's kind of what started me writing in grad school. I think moving to New York City, which just was a calling ever since I watched Felicity. Can't can we we wind a little bit to talk about how you got to New York. And why you wanted to get to New York other than Phyllis? Why did I just I felt like it was a place where you can be yourself? I felt it was so big that no one would pay attention to me. Good luck. Great. Is it seemed like the perfect place to just kind of blend in? I think there was also the sense for me to is like growing up on this small island. There was only like two degrees of separation and so because I transitioned through high school and middle school. Everyone knew that I was trans. And so that became the leading magic. Magic about before even came into a room. Yes. And so I was so contained by my history. I'm by people's remembrances of me when I was a boy writer when I'm presented as a boy. And so it was like a great escape for me to go to New York. And there I made the decision not to be open about being trans. And it was freeing to be like another young person figuring out who I was and being student loan debt and going to NYU. What were you majoring of journalism? And what was it that you thought that you could do as journalists of that you couldn't do let's say as a fiction writer where you're just not drawn to fiction. I it will trade number one could make money a journalist there's jobs for that whereas fiction writer, it was like how am I supposed to fort doing this? And so for me was practicality, and I was like I can work at a fashion magazine and eventually become a features editor or something. That was my my dream in my goal at the time. But something happened. You started to write celebrity pieces to support yourself. But that got very tired very quickly. That wasn't so much. You can read about engine, Lena, Julie and her children. You started to do something was it with the support of this therapist. This idea of writing about yourself. He told me he was like you should keep going with that. Because I would sit in here, and I would sit in that room with him. And just talk about all of these anxieties that I had at the point. I was like in a relationship with this guy. And I was thinking about leaving that relationship. And I thought maybe I can't leave it because who else is gonna love me because I'm trans like once they find out that I'm trans and not gonna wanna be with me. And I had all these pathologies in my head that I had learned from the world that I grew up in that I was not deserving and worthy right of love and affection and all this stuff. And so. I was in therapy to unlearn all of that..

writer Felicity New York New York City middle school Julie NYU Phyllis editor Lena two degrees
"janet mock" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"janet mock" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"Please. Trans. I've been living to this. That is the greatest thing ever. That's what it was. It was just a space play just made it seem. So just easy. You just make a choice. This is what you do. And then you do this next. And here's these other girls that you can meet, and here's other examples of people. I remember. Saved. Yeah. Yeah. How to be safe? And then she just had this network of people that she knew. And so she she introduced me to drag queens, and she introduced me to transmit who performed and drag clubs, and I remember I would have these kind of these breakdowns and stuff. It's because someone said something about me at school. Are Wendy was just so dismissive of it like she just she not tolerate that at all. And she was just like why do you care so much about what people think she just constantly challenged me in that way? And this is middle school, you know, and so this sense of self like, she became the foundation onto which I found self confidence and selfish ordinance and certainty in who I knew I was versus what everyone else was telling me that I should be whether that was at home or at school, or with teachers, she was the person that was just like you need to be sure about who you are like why would you wanna be wobbly about that? Why would you even let that be open to debate because the emotional transition happens way before the visible? What was happening to you emotionally in terms of transition. I knew very after meeting, Wendy, I knew very early on about the idea of medical transition like she you take Premarin and then you go onto shots. And then you have whatever surgeries you wanna have like I knew that like one two three done right in. So for me. It was always something that I was planning toward I didn't know how would economically able to afford it just to be aware here their conversation addresses, the sex work, the Janet was drawn into when she was very young. It might not be suitable for everyone one of the sort of how heroin sections of. You're the first book certainly is getting the money to pay for the transition. Tell me tell us about what was necessary for you to pay for it. Yeah. For us. You know, there was this block called merchant street, which was in downtown Honolulu. It's where the girls worked. They were engaged in sex work in the sex trades. For me. It was I remember I went there when I was fifteen when I was able to go out at night time, and we would just go and hang out with the girls, and like talk to them and see them, and they were these glamorous goddesses who to me were just so at first I came in very much like my national junior Honor Society had on which was like I couldn't ever do what they do. That's disgusting, or you know, all these puritanical views that I had in my head about what it meant to use your body. You're only asset in the world. That's not taking care of you to really take care of yourself right inside. Remember, I was given an opportunity with this woman Cheyenne, and she had this regular who had basically, you know, outgrown her was you know, whatever and he pulled up and saw me, and he was like I want her. And I remember the sense of like looking at myself. And again, the same like distance from like this experience about to happen to me. Then also thinking about the different kinds of ways and alternatives that are gonna Pat and at this point I wanted to graduate shots. And I knew that my mom to at that time was struggling with addiction in co-dependency and her relationship, and so home was very unstable. And so the way in which I wanted to feel stable was to take control of my body. And so I knew that by doing this sixty dollar hand job that I would be able to have two months of hormones, right? And so I remember making that decision to get in that car and at fifteen years old to do this and to continue to do this with this man for the next two years of my life in that was my way into sex work another pillow. Puerta the parallel to that story about the body is the story the mind and one of the things that is so impressive..

Wendy Honolulu Honor Society Puerta Janet Pat heroin Premarin fifteen years sixty dollar two months two years
"janet mock" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"janet mock" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"And she had a another fiance, and she was very happy in her in her world until they broke up. And then we were back in contact old were you when you went to Hawaii twelve what was happening to you into. It's well, I was starting to feel very I don't like to say the word trapped. But I was feeling very very tightly contained in my body. I found myself doing these taking these. Risks and making these social experiments in the sense of like starting to come up with new identities. So I had kisha who was very near. And dear to me, and he started out talking on the phone two, boys. And then kisha wanted to go out into the world and start experimenting. Remember once? I went out as kisha I had long curly hair at the time as a as a tween, and I started this flirtation with this boy who was just like deeply in love with at my cousin's house and one day he came over, and he knocked on the door and asked my aunt, and my father was there, and he asked for kisha, she has long curly haired at it on the quiches and live here. And then my dad quickly put to into together. And that's what led to Tim, cutting my hair eventually in. So I think a part of me was seeking out a space in which I could be freer and that spacious happened to come in. When my mom sent for us to come back to Hawaii, and she had a lighter touch around all of that. Stuff. She had a higher, quote, unquote tolerance for my generation conformity. And I was able to meet new friends, and that's when like the Queen of life came in which was my best friend, Wendy really was these savior for me in your books gender. Is so philosophically handled. And I was so moved by what you were saying terms of society being fixed thing, and that you had tried to adhere to that for some time before you met, Wendy, and she asked if you were my home. I'm so glad that I pronounce it properly who and tell tell the folks with that means well who is at needed Hawaiian identity in term label for people who live outside of the gender binary largely. Folk who in our loosely, I guess western translation would be like trans women in. So anyone that was outside of the male female kind of binary who lived outside of that. And so for me are member in the seventh grade, my hula teacher was a Mahim Lofa. You You had had Hulu Hulu lessons. lessons. I know. Yeah. And so like, the fact that, you know, the department of education in Hawaii hired a trans woman like my everyday life just was changed and shifted. I didn't have to look to law and order or ace Ventura pet detective or silence of the labs the trans people represented. They were part of my every day. I had hula lessons three times a week after school and so cool. Why was this person? That was just she took up space, and she hate to use that term she'd normalized, you know, gender nonconformity and being being different in that sense. And then I met my best friend Wendy who clocked me at the playground in which is like bitch. What you try to do here like? We can turn this buzz cut into a Halle Berry. Do if you want, you know. We can remix this. So she gave me like I was twelve. I just got so lucky that within the first few months of being there. I found this best friend who had this like, you know, this hallway of femininity in her home. I always her as a Queen. She very much saw her as a goddess. That's her. When a respect her identity. But she was windy. She's a year older than me in the same grade because she's a little slow. In terms of books. He could read, but she couldn't read..

Wendy kisha Hawaii Halle Berry Hulu Tim Mahim Lofa Ventura one day
"janet mock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:31 min | 3 years ago

"janet mock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Writers musicians, inventors leaders in government and policy and today, you'll hear three of those conversations with creative. People pushing the envelope in three very distinct fields. We'll hear from boots Riley who directed the satirical film. Sorry to bother you. And from Chris Hayes host of MSNBC's program all in, but we'll start with the writer and trans activist Janet mock mock made her name with the bestselling memoir called redefining real nece, which is about her childhood growing up trans in Hawaii and Texas, she writes about gender, sexuality identity and self discovery. The book one uphill of awards and in the last few years mock wrote another book host the podcast never before and contributed to the FX drama pose which takes place in the LGBT ballroom scene in. One thousand nine hundred eighty s New York staff writer Hilton all join Janet mock in October twenty eighteen to talk about directing writing and growing up. I thought I would start by declaring that there are two Hawaiians that have changed my life you and Bette midler. And any state that can produce the two of us. Okay. By me. So I wanted to for those folks who haven't seen or Reggiana's folks rathers redefining realness and surpassing wellness, it's really quite extraordinary story. Tom tell us a little bit about those first years in Hawaii and also it's a very complex marriage that your parents had. Yeah. So I think in order to understand where you're going. We need a little bit about where you're coming from. Yeah. My dad Sablan man from Texas. He joined the military he joined the navy, and he got stationed his first duty station was in Hawaii where he met my mom who was a civilian working in civilian service on Pearl Harbor naval naval base where he was stationed. She's a native Hawaiian woman. They got married had me, and my brother Chad. And there was some at least it seemed like a semblance of marital bliss in the beginning. My father loves himself, and he loves women. So he went out and sought out pleasure. And the way that he wanted to outside of the commitments he made to my mom, which broke her heart, which led her to a lot of heartache, and I remember when I only memories I remember them being in the same room as a write about it in my first book as my mom my mom's attempting cry for help by slashing her wrists. Yes. And so that sort of dysfunction was the normal for me growing up. There's a really extraordinary section in your first book where your father takes you to Texas, and you're exposed to a kind of Christian fundamentalism really that had affected his life. What was that? Like. For you, especially since you were already feeling gender difference. In the world. My father definitely took on the role of, you know, I'm your father, and you are my son. And therefore, it's my responsibility to correct you. Right. So all of your your feminine ways. I need to berate them out of you police them out of you. So he was like the number one container in that sense. His job was to contain me. And so when my mother and father split up, the first thing, my mom did was send her two sons with their father. Did you did she feel that she was investing in their future? Masculinity. Kind of I think I think also think that she was also looking for a new life, and I new start by sending her two young children to go live with their father was a way for her to have a break from having four children. So she can take care of the older too. And then let us go to be with our dad, which was his responsibility to take care of us in that way. And that was very wrenching for you. Because you were very close. Obsessive? My. How did it work out that you that to your mother after time I think I think my godfather who was my my father's navy buddy came to visit us install how we were living. And he contacted my mother, and my auntie Joyce it as well. She found her in the phone book. I know very old school. They called her up. And I remember I remember OJ was being chased in the Bronco. Yes. When this has happened. Like, I remember the moment when I talked to my mom, and I was on the phone with her as this like madness was going on and television, and every also is paying attention to this. And the greatest headline in my life. Was that my mom is like reconnected and talking to me and saying that I'm gonna come send for you all how long had you been away almost six years. Yes. And almost six years without contact to why was that contact tonight? I don't think it was denied. I think well, my father moved around a bunch because once a girlfriend was tired of him, then he moved on to another girlfriend usually a long list of single mothers who took us in and like became surrogate. Mothers to us. And so I think that my mom lost contact. I think my mom also has to take responsibility for not really prioritizing. These two children that were very out of sight out of mind to her. So she was like this is your father's turn. And I'm going to go live my life, and she had another baby. And she had another fiance, and she was very happy in her in her world until they broke up. And then we were back in contact. How old were you? When you went to Hawaii twelve what was happening to insides. Well, I was starting to feel very. I don't like to say the word trapped, but as feeling very very tightly contained in my body. I found myself doing these taking these risks and making these social experiments in the sense of like starting to come up with new identities kisha who was very near and dear to me, and he started out talking on the phone two, boys. And then kisha wanted to go out into the world and start experimenting. So I remember once I went out as kisha I had long curly hair at the time as a as a tween, and I started this flirtation with this boy who I was just like deeply in love with my cousin's house and one day he came over, and he knocked on the door and asked my aunt, and my father was there, and he asked for kisha because she has long curly haired at it under the quiches and live here. And then my dad quickly put together, and that's what led to him cutting, my hair eventually. And so I think a part of me was seen. Taking out a space in which I could be freer and that spacious happened to come in. When my mom sent for us to come back to Hawaii. And she had a lighter touch around all of that stuff. She had a higher, quote unquote tolerance for my gender nonconformity. And I was able to meet new friends, and that's when the Queen of my life came in which was my best friend Wendy do really was the savior for me in your books gender. Is so philosophically handled. I was so moved by what you were saying in terms of society being fixed thing that you had tried to adhere to that for some time before you met, Wendy as she asked. If you were my home. I'm so glad that I pronounce it properly. Who and tell tell the folks with that means, well, Ma who is a native Hawaiian identity in term a label for people who live outside of the gender binary largely. Folk who in our loosely, I guess western translation would be like trans women in. So anyone that was outside of the male female kind of binary who lived outside of that. And so for me, I remember in the seventh grade my hula teacher was Hoover. He'll love you had who lessons. I know. Yeah. And so like, the fact that, you know, the department of education in Hawaii hired a trans woman like my everyday life just was changed and shifted. I didn't have to look to law and order or ace Ventura pet detective or silence of the labs. Transpeople representative. They were part of my every day. I had Hulu lessons three times a week after school, and so clinical why was this person? That was just she took up space, and she I hate to use that term, she'd normalized gender nonconformity and being being different in that sense. And then I met my best friend Wendy who clocked me at the playground in which is like bitch. What are you trying to do here? We can turn this buzz cut into a Halle Berry. Do if you want. You know, we can remix this. She gave me like you. I was twelve I just got so lucky that within the first few months of being there. I found this best friend who had this like, you know, this hallway of femininity in her home. I always her as a Queen. She very much SARS as a goddess. That's her. Respect her identity. But she was Wendy. She's a year older than me. In the same grade. Slow. In terms of bucks. We read, but she couldn't read. She was very much. She was so big. Yes. Like she had a when I met her. She had a green, Bob. She wore like super high socks with like the stripes on them with like rolled up soccer shorts and like a tight top and was just like her backpack bouncing around the campus. And so because she was so big I could just hide behind her eyebrows. No one really noticed. I started wearing eyeliner. No one really noticed because Wendy was always doing more five steps ahead of me. And just so much more brazen. And so that was contagious to have a friend who didn't care so much about what people thought, and I'm not the only girl that she did this to like she literally was the passage like the underground railroad was. Transitioning..

Wendy Hawaii Texas kisha Janet mock Bette midler Chris Hayes Riley Reggiana MSNBC Tom New York soccer Pearl Harbor naval naval staff writer navy SARS
"janet mock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:23 min | 3 years ago

"janet mock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With as China's how to dress. We should cover ourselves and keep our voices other than that. Everybody is living their own life, even shoddy the man who fights ISIS alongside the US says most of the people he knows he joined ISIS aunt terrorists. They're motivated by local reasons like to fight other militias in the Syrian civil war, and he subscribes to the common conspiracy theory, but the claim that ISIS is a global threat is a cover story, though, Blinn how this is for the media. There are things that are said on TV. And then there are things that happen under the table. The real reason the US is in Syria. He thinks is for the control of land and oil US officials have repeatedly denied claims like these in a statement to NPR a spokesperson said the US mission in Syria is to achieve the enduring defeat of ISIS and the US says it tries to avoid civilian deaths. But his fighting a ruthless enemy that hides among civilians, but Syrians in this camp. Don't believe that reasoning. And the man who lost his four year old girl. Dula Bodry says this matters because if locals don't support the war is just going to create more extremism. Clubmen? Our children must few the word day. What's normal for children to see that bodies? Now, they stab over dead bodies picking up the limbs with us young children picking up limits. This drives reason because the stoop speaker fear, and he says someday the fear will be replaced by anger reached Sherlock, NPR news, northeast, Syria. It's been more than two weeks and protesters continued to fill the streets in Sudan, they were spurred by the government's announcement that it was ending food subsidies prices for things like bread and fuel skyrocketed now demonstrators who've been met with live bullets and tear gas say they want President Omar ambitious years nearly thirty year reign to end he says, he's not going anywhere. It's Meryl Kush is a Sudanese American journalists based in DC he joins us now. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you. So why don't you just breakdown for us? What these protests are about and why they're happening. So these protests started on December nineteenth in the northern city of Atbara mostly by high school students who went to school found that the price of bread had tripled for the breakfast. And just started to protest and the same thing happened in other towns outside of Khartoum, and then moved to Khartoum it was ignited basically by the high prices of bread. That there's been political discontent in the country for longtime sold a number of issues altogether of piled up and people are protesting both economic and political issues issues of freedom so issues of conflict civil parts of the country dissatisfaction with the idea that supporters of the president might amend the constitution 'til down to run again in twenty twenty. I think all these issues have contributed to a great deal of frustration street, and what's been the president's reaction so far to these demonstrations protests before and twenty eleven two thousand twelve and twenty thirteen the reaction has been quite violent. The government. Also acknowledges says that it does realize that the cost of living has become very high for most Sudanese and says that he will try to increase or will increase the minimum wage and take measures to improve the economic situation. What does that mean that they're doing those things? Carrot-and-stick approach the government officially says that it is not against peaceful protests. Okay. But it alleges that there are elements of military militant rebel groups that have caused destruction. And that it is using force against that. That's what the government says true. Not from what we know not not from activists that we've spoken to how much of the country is with these protesters. So I'm seeing a lot of reporting on the actual demonstrations. But is this do they have the support of most of the country? That's a good question. And it's hard to assess. I think it's relevant that it started outside of Khartoum outside of the capitol. And especially in a town like better that is in the state, which is considered a stronghold for the ruling party Sudanese professionals have started organizing as well as political parties web withdrawn from the official coalition government and supported the protesters. So it does seem the there is wide spread support throughout the country among activists and politicians so what's different than two thousand twelve and two thousand thirteen what makes these protests different in two thousand eighteen two thousand nineteen twenty eighteen was specially a very difficult year for many Sudanese. Many had hoped that the lifting of US sanctions in October twenty seventeen would bring in foreign investment would make the economy better. It did not for a number of reasons when I was in Sudan, then twenty fifteen one dollar was equal to about ten Sudanese pounds in the back market. Mid December twenty eighteen pound was eighty pounds to a dollar. So the price of the skyrocketed it was just a very difficult year. So again, it's just deep sense frustration that people have reached rock-bottom journalist is mile cushman's. Thank you for being with us. Thank you. You're listening to weekend edition from NPR news. In the last fiscal year. The army fell short of its recruiting goal by six thousand five hundred people in part, it's driven by the fifty year. Lows in unemployment numbers often young recruits join when they don't have a job prospector money for college. And so the army's getting creative about selling itself shifting its focus from places that traditionally fillets ranks conservative parts of the country for Regina through the south and into Texas to twenty two left leaning cities across the country like Boston Seattle and San Francisco joining us now to discuss this new strategy is General Frank move the head of the army recruiting command drama. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much for taking the time to have a discussion about this topic. So why don't you start by telling me what's the thinking behind this strategy? It's a pretty big pivot. It's a huge pivot. So with us not making mission last year. We wanted to truly look at some of the issues that were going on to try to accomplish the mission for this year. And we started with how we were recruiting. Calling the Z generation on the phone doesn't work anymore. They wanna meet us online. I find out one. If are we bought that's just probing them for information. Or are we are real person? And once that dialogue starts online. Then it leads to a discussion on the phone, and then that leads to an interview, and it all starts with providing information about, you know, the army's got one hundred and fifty different jobs. There's the GI Bill when they get out to pay for college all the different benefits for serving the military, but has to start with reaching the generation on the digital plane. So when you're shifting to these urban areas is there anything you're doing specifically to talk to urban minorities about this, especially at a time where the military's being leaned on at the border, and that could sometimes seen as part of a politicized racially motivated fight between the administration and his opponents. Yeah. No. You know, the recruiters talk about the opportunities that exist in the army all the different specialties all the different training, the qualifications that you get while you're in the army, and what you leave with in urban spaces among women among minority communities who must ask questions about issues of racism and sexism in the military. What do your recruiters say to those questions? I'm sure they tell stories that are very positive. I mean because you know, we don't hear about it. So they tell their army story essentially, but there are stories where certain communities are treated differently at times. And I'm just wondering how how they allay those fears and how they say you are also welcome. Yeah. I'm not going to put words in their mouth. But I would I would suspect that they say how would you do it? How would I do it? There is a very very low percentage of those incidents or events that occur. But no this that it's one team and if any of that occurs. It is immediately addressed by the chain of command because one we want to create a safe and secure environment and dignity and respect for everybody in the United States army. So that is pervasive throughout the commands. The other thing is, you know, the military's been mired in wars for a lot of this generation's lives. Right. Iraq, Afghanistan, the longest running war. Is it a difficult sell because if there is real danger for young people that will be going out there to possibly die for their country? You're right. That's out there. It's a very small percentage that are one participating in to that participate in direct combat operations alone. Right. There's risk in anything. But it's all a risk in terms of being part of the direct combat fight. So what's the number you need to reach this year? We're still working on that it won't be seventy six thousand five hundred which was our mission last year. I think it's going to be a lower number General Frank move of the army recruiting command. Thank you so much. It's been my honor. And pleasure and thank you for the time. This is NPR news. Next time on the New Yorker radio hour, author and activist Janet mock on growing up transgender in Hawaii, the fact that, you know, the department of education hired a trans woman like my everyday life was changed and shifted. I didn't have to look to law and order or ace Ventura pet detective or silence of the lambs trans people represented Janet mock next time on the New Yorker radio hour tonight at seven on ninety three point nine FM WNYC. WNYC.

army US government NPR Khartoum ISIS Syria Sudan China General Frank Dula Bodry United States army president Atbara Meryl Kush Janet mock
"janet mock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"janet mock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It. That's definitely present. That's wild. Yes. Is amazing. Thank you so much for coming in today. Thank you so much Francis. It was really better. Hey, give you is the CEO of muscian data. Now, are you using airborne co-ord- Masa or just the Masa? Flour called mistaken can find in the grocery store. We have a great recipe for fresh tortillas. You can make it home from the chef Alex Deepak, you can find that on splendid table dot org. Coming up. Here. You are with this beautiful sauce chili sauce with tomatoes, garlic and chicken, and you've got a tray full of tortilla chips that you've made and this will feel strange if you've never done it before. But you need to drop those chips into the SaaS and stir them in that's Tucker Shaw on the best reason to turn your chips Saudi Sheila Cuba's, I'm Francis lamb. And this is the splendid table from APM American public media. Next time on the New Yorker radio hour, author and activist Janet mock on growing up transgender in Hawaii. The fact that, you know, the department of education hired a trans woman like my everyday life was changed and shifted. I didn't have to look to law and order or pet detective or silence of the lab. Trans people represented Janet mock Dick's time on the New Yorker radio hour tonight at seven on ninety three point nine FM WNYC. On January eighth more than one million Florida felons can officially registered to vote. My biggest concern is I don't want seven supervisors of election coming up with their own way to the holiday this person eligible, but is the state ready to roll out the law that voters passed in November, I'm tansy Nevada. And that's next time on the takeaway, weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine FM. This is the splendid table from APM American public media the show for curious cooks and eaters Francis lamb. Thank you. When I was in high school in suburban New Jersey my cousin,.

Francis lamb APM American Janet mock Alex Deepak New Jersey CEO Tucker Shaw tansy Nevada WNYC Flour department of education muscian Sheila Cuba Florida Hawaii Dick
"janet mock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:31 min | 3 years ago

"janet mock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Writers musicians, inventors leaders in government and policy and today, you'll hear three of those conversations with creative. People pushing the envelope in three very distinct fields. We'll hear from boots Riley who directed the satirical film. Sorry to bother you. And from Chris Hayes host of MSNBC's program all in, but we'll start with the writer and trans activist Janet mock mock made her name with the best selling memoir called redefining real nece, which is about her childhood growing up trans in Hawaii and Texas, she writes about gender, sexuality identity and self discovery. The book one uphill of awards and in the last few years mock wrote another book host the podcast never before and contributed to the FX drama pose which takes place in the ballroom scene in. One thousand nine hundred eighties. New York staff writer Hilton all join Janet mock in October two thousand eighteen to talk about directing writing and growing up in more. I thought I would start by declaring that there are two Hawaiians that have changed my life you and Bette midler. Any state that can produce the two of us. Okay. By me. So I wanted to for those folks who haven't seen or read China's folks rather redefining realness and surpassing wellness, it's really quite extraordinary story. Tom tell us a little bit about those first years in Hawaii and also it's a very complex marriage that your parents had. Yeah. So I think in order to understand where you're going. We need a little bit about where you're coming from. Yeah. My dad is a black man from Texas. He joined the military he joined the navy, and he got stationed is first duty station was in Hawaii where he met my mom who was a civilian working in civilian service on Pearl Harbor naval naval base where he was stationed. She's a native Hawaiian woman. They got married had me, and my brother Chad. And there was some at least it seemed like a semblance of marital bliss in the beginning. My father loves himself, and he loves women. So he went out and sought out pleasure. And the way that he wanted to outside of the commitment. He made to my mom, which broke her heart, which led her to a lot of heartache, and I remember when my only memories, I remember them being in the same room was a write about it in my first book as my mom. My mom's attempting cry for help by slashing her wrists. And so that sort of dysfunction was the normalcy for me growing up. There's a really extraordinary section in your first book where your father takes you to Texas, and you're exposed to a kind of Christian fundamentalism really that had affected his life. What was that like for you, especially since you were already feeling gender difference? In the world. My father definitely took on the role of, you know, I'm your father, and you are my son. And therefore, it's my responsibility to correct you. Right. So all of your your feminine ways. I need to berate them out of you police them out of you. So he was like the number one container in that sense. His job was to contain me in. So when my mother and father split up, the first thing, my mom did was send her two sons to go live with their father. Did did she feel that she was investing in their future? Masculinity. Kind of I think I think so, but I also think that she was also looking for a new life and a new start. So by sending her two young children to live with their father was a way for her to have a break from having four children. So she could take care of the older too. And then let us go to be with our dad, which was his responsibility to take care of us in that way. And that was very wrenching for you. Because you were very close. Obsessive my mother, how did it work out that you that to your mother after time I think I think my godfather who was my my father's navy buddy came to visit us install how we were living. And he contacted my mother and my auntie Joyce did as well. She found her in the phone book. I know very old school. They called her up. And I remember I remember OJ was being chased in the Bronco when this has happened. Like, I remember the moment when I talked to my mom, and I was on the phone with her as like madness was going on and television, and everyone else is paying attention to this. And I think the greatest headline in my life was that my mom is like reconnected and talking to me and saying that I'm gonna send for you all along had you been aware almost six years. Yes. And almost six years without contact to why was that contact night? I don't think it was denied. I think well, my father moved around a bunch because once a girlfriend was tired of him, then he moved on to another girlfriend usually a long list of single mothers who took us in and like became surrogate. Mothers to us. And so I think that my mom lost contact. I think my mom also has to take responsibility for not really prioritizing. These two children that were very out of sight outta mind to her. So she was like this is your father's turn. And I'm gonna go live my life, and she had another baby. And she had a fiance. And she was very happy in her in her world until they broke up. And then we were back in contact. How old are you? When you went back to Hawaii twelve what was happening to you. Well, I was starting to feel very. I don't like to say the word trapped, but as feeling very very tightly contained in my body. I found myself doing these taking these risks and making these social experiments in the sense of like starting to come up with new identities kisha who was very near and dear to me, and he should start out talking on the phone two, boys. And then kisha wanted to go out into the world and start experimenting. So I remember once I went out as kisha, I had long curly hair at the time as a as a tween, and I started this flirtation with this boy who I was deeply in love with my cousin's house and one day he came over, and he knocked on the door and asked my aunt, and my father was there, and he asked for kisha, she has long curly haired at it under the quiches and live here. And then my dad quickly put to into together. And that's what led to Tim, cutting my hair eventually, and so I think a part of me was seen. Seeking out a space in which I could be freer and that spacious happened to come in. When my mom sent for us to come back to Hawaii. And she had a lighter touch around all of that stuff. She had a higher, quote unquote tolerance for my gender nonconformity. And I was able to meet new friends, and that's when like the Queen of my life came in was my best friend, Wendy really was savior for me in your books gender. So philosophically handled. I was so moved by what you were saying terms of society being fixed thing, and that you had tried to adhere to that for some time before you met, Wendy, and she asked if you were my home. I'm so glad that I pronounce it properly. Who and tell tell the folks with that means, well, Ma who is a native Hawaiian identity in term label for people who live outside of the gender binary largely. Folk who in our loosely, I guess western translation would be like trans women. And so anyone that was outside of the male female kind of binary who lived outside of that. And so for me, I remember in the seventh grade my hula teacher was Hoover. He'll love you had Hulu lessons. Live there. I know. Yeah. And so like the fact that, you know, the department of education in Hawaii hired a trans woman. Mike, my everyday life just was changed and shifted. I didn't have to look to law and order or ace Ventura pet detective or silence of the lambs transpeople represented. They were part of my every day. I had Hulu lessons three times a week after school, and so clinical why was this person? That was just she took up space, and she I hate to use that term, she'd normalized gender nonconformity and being being different in that sense. And then I met my best friend Wendy who clocked me at the playground in which is like bitch. What are you trying to do here? We can turn this buzz cut into a Halle Berry. Do if you want. You know, we can remix this. So she gave me like older, you I was twelve I just got so lucky that within the first few months of being there. I found this best friend who had this like, you know, this hallway of femininity in her home. I always saw her as a Queen. She very much saw herself. As a goddess. That's her. Want to respect your identity? She was oldest Wendy she's a year older than me. In the same grade because she's a little slow. In terms of bucks. She was very much. She was so big. Yes. Like she had a when I met her. She had a green, Bob. She wore like super high socks with like the stripes on them with like rolled up soccer shorts and like tied top dislike her backpack bouncing around the campus. And so because she was so big I could just hide behind her eyebrows. No one really noticed. I started wearing eyeliner. No one really noticed because Wendy was always doing more five steps ahead of me. And just so much more brazen. And so that was contagious to have a friend who didn't care so much about what people thought, and I'm not the only girl that she did this to like she literally was the like the underground railroad. I've transitioning..

Wendy Hawaii Texas Janet mock Hulu kisha Bette midler China Chris Hayes Riley MSNBC soccer New York Pearl Harbor naval naval staff writer navy writer
"janet mock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"janet mock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"When we come back. We talked to someone who did work for Trump in the White House. He sees this as if we acknowledge it's a problem, then we're going to have to deal with it. What we have to deal with it. There's an incredible economic costs to this next up on reveal from the center for investigative reporting NPR. Hi, I'm Alison Stewart host of all of it on WNYC, the daily live show at the intersection of culture, and the culture next week on all of it will catch up with Sebastian younger on his latest book and the closing of his bar, the Chelsea institution the half king plus Nali with superstars nausea and the history of aluminum metalized polyethylene taffy late, but you know, it is glitter. Spoiler alert all glitter as you all good things. Come from jersey. Don't miss all of it. Weekdays at noon on WNYC. Next time on the New Yorker radio hour, author and activist Janet mock on growing up transgender in Hawaii, the fact that, you know, the department of education hired a trans woman like my everyday life was changed and shifted. I didn't have to look to law and order or ace Ventura pet detective or silence of the lambs who the trans people represented Janet mock next time on the New Yorker radio this morning at ten on ninety three point nine FM WNYC. From.

WNYC Janet mock Alison Stewart Trump White House NPR Nali nausea Ventura department of education Hawaii Sebastian
"janet mock" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"janet mock" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Crusades was only thirty four years old when MSNBC took show to primetime making him the youngest prime time host on a major cable news channel in the five years since it went daily, Chris Hayes also found time to launch a podcast and to write a book about racial inequality in America called a colony in a nation. All in with Chris Hayes deals with deep and even wonky discussions of politics policy, and like his colleague, Rachel, Maddow. Chris Hayes doesn't make any pretense whatsoever of objectivity is sharp critic of the president. And almost all of what he does. But Hayes is also willing more than willing to get personal. And how he talks about covering the news, and he spoke in twenty eight teen with New Yorkers Andrew Marantz about the toll of producing a daily news show in the era of Donald Trump, the nature of the job that I have right now and the nature of the news right now means that you're constantly locked in this. This weird kind of what's I don't know the right word like it's like a digital roller coaster or something or like an amusement park ride where like you're constantly getting sensory input and having sensory and semantic responses to it, which is also part of what makes it weird like, I don't care about the outcomes in the news. So when things happen that are bad, I feel bad and that emotional responses just part of a whole variety of responses that are intellectual and professional and journalistic is by the way, not to stop you. But there is a school of journalism that says you're not supposed to feel good about about it. And I sort of envy people that are in that position and some level because I think it would be less emotionally draining. It feels sometimes like the adrenal system of the body is going all the time. And I also worry that that's like slowly eating away. My ability to think. Like, I definitely think I'm getting stupid. I think we were all getting stronger. Despite my very, very, large abrasion..

Chris Hayes Donald Trump MSNBC Maddow America Andrew Marantz Rachel president thirty four years five years
"janet mock" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"janet mock" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"It made history for assembling. The most. Trans actors series regulars. There's five trans women of color who are the centers of the show in addition to the magnificent, Billy porter. And so our show is really so anyway before that he requested a meeting with me, I flew to LA I met with him on this Ebersol Jay when she was directing and he told me right away about pose. He told me what he wanted from me which was to move to LA and right on the show, and you should come. It's going to be fun. And that was our meeting, really. And then three weeks later, I was LA, and I started working on the show and as a writer and the writer's room you ever worked on the dramatic for before when he hundred you, I was very dramatic. But. No, I hadn't. And I always thought that maybe I would adopt one of my books for the screen in some way. And that's how it would get my in industry never knew that I would be hired as a writer and then quickly promoted to producer doing the pilot. And then we said that you you'll get to direct the script that you wrote as well. Let's let's look at the. Please John it's derogatory debut. Pose you gonna leave him. Children. Another before the life. Maybe that's the problem. The problem is my husband is a weak man who lies I let him lie. His lies. I may keep pretending pretending that all I ever wanted was to be MRs STAN bones. He's still love him me too. Did he ever tell you? He loved you. Yes. Do you think love me and love you have the same time? What were you doing in that big hall with all those gay men and drag queens? That's my home you live there. No, Honey my community. Me familiar with how could a woman be dragged clean transsexuals? I don't believe you. Thank you. Compliment, you know. That's impossible. I mean, STAN would never never do that your woman. One hundred percent. Prove it. What you want to see my dick? Yes. I'm sorry for what I did too. And I'm you to talk. And not down juries. I'm not bothered by any part of way, except that. Everything I can't have in this world is because of the. Thing now. If you wanna see William muscle last, you should look..

Ebersol Jay LA Billy porter MRs STAN writer John it William producer One hundred percent three weeks
"janet mock" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"janet mock" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"And so the way in which I wanted to feel stable was to take control of my body. And so I knew that by doing this sixty dollar hand job that I would be able to have two months of hormones, right? And so I remember making that decision to get in that car and at fifteen years old to do this and to continue to do this with this man for like the next two years of my life, and that was my way into sex work. A mother polo put of the parallel to that story about the body is the story of the mind and one of the things that are so impressive. Of course are the ways in which you right and become an intellectual and not just about things that affect you about the world, your consciousness starts growing. Once you become a college student, and can we talk a little bit about those those years because you were secretly writing to and then you had a wonderful therapist. Oh, who suggested why don't you keep with the writings, very resistant? Yes. And it's a it's a it's a great book, and I won't give him most of it away. But can we talk about your development as a mind and as writer, I think once I got out of myself and least in terms of like, you know, how I felt in my body. I started sharing my body. And then also just expanding the way in which I thought about all the things that was going through at the time. And so I think one of my first relationship, so it's probably the first space in which I started telling stories about. Their experiences that were very that had just had. And so like having this boyfriend and sharing, you know, who I was kind of the first points in which I was actually exploring myself, and what I thought and what I thought about what I went through and the people in my life. And so that's kind of what started me writing in grad school. I think moving to New York City, which was a calling ever since I watched Felicity. Okay. Can we we wind a little bit talk about how you got to New York. And why you wanted to get to New York other than Phyllis? Why did I just I felt like it was a place where you can be yourself? I thought it was so big that no one would pay attention to me. The good luck. It was great. Is it seemed like the perfect place to just kind of blend in? But I think there was also this sense for me to was like growing up on this small island. There was only like two degrees of separation and so because I transitioned through high school and middle school. Everyone knew that I was trans. And so like that became the leading imaginative about before I even came into a room. Yes. And so I was felt so contained by my history. I'm in by people's remembrances of me when I was a boy, right or when I presented as a boy. And so it was like a great escape for me to go to New York. And there I made the decision not to be open about being trans. And it was freeing to be like another young person figuring out who I was and being in student loan debt and going to NYU. What were you majoring of journalism?.

Felicity New York New York City middle school writer NYU Phyllis fifteen years sixty dollar two degrees two months two years
"janet mock" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"janet mock" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Of transitioning. That is the best. Have to please. Trans. I've been living for this. That is the greatest thing ever. That's what it was. It was just a space of play. And you just made it seem. So just easy. You just make a choice. This is what you do. And then you do this next. And here's these other girls that you can meet, and here's other examples of people. I remember. So how to be saved and how? Yeah, how to be safe? And then she just had this network of people that she knew. And so she she introduced me, the drag queens, and she introduced me to transient who performed and drag clubs, and I remember I would have these kind of these breakdowns and stuff. That's because someone said something about me at school. Are you know, Wendy was just so dismissive of it like she just she did not tolerate that at all. And she was just like why do you care so much about what people think she just constantly challenged me in that way? And this is a middle school. You know? And so like this sense of self like, she became the foundation onto which I found self confidence and selfish ordinance and certainty in who I knew I was versus what everyone else was telling me that I should be whether that was at home or at school, or with teachers, she was the person that was just like you need to be sure about who you are like why would you wanna be wobbly about that? Why would you even let that be open to debate will because the emotional transition happens way before the physical? What was happening to you emotionally in terms of transition. I knew very after meeting, Wendy, I knew very early on about the, you know, the idea of medical transition like she you'd take Premarin and then you go onto shots. And then you have whatever surgeries you want to have like I knew that like one two three done. Right. And so for me, it was always something that I was planning toward I didn't know how would I could nominally be able to afford it. We're listening to the writer Janet mock talking with Hilton all's just to be aware here the conversation addresses, the sex work, the Janet was drawn into when she was very young. It might not be suitable for everyone. One of those sort of how heroin sections of your book, the first book certainly is getting the money to pay for the transition. Tell me tell us about what was necessary for you to pay for it. Yeah. For us. You know, there was this block called merchant street, which was in downtown Honolulu. It's where the girls worked. They were engaged in sex work in the sex trades for me, it was I remember I I went there when I was like fifteen when I was able to go out at night time, and we would just go, and like hang out with the girls, and like talk to them and see the, and they were these glamorous goddesses who to me were just so I I came in very much like my national junior Honor Society had on which was like I could never do what they do. That's disgusting, or you know, all these puritanical views that I had in my head about what it meant to use your body. You're only asset in the world. That's not taking care of you to really take care of yourself. Right. And so I remember I was given an opportunity with this woman in Cheyenne. And she had this regular who had basically, you know, outgrown her and was you know, whatever, and he pulled up and saw me, and he was like I want her. And I remember the sense of no looking at myself and again the same like distance from like this experience about to happen to me. Then also thinking about the different kinds of ways and alternatives that are gonna pad and at this point I wanted to graduate shots. And I knew that my mom to at that time was struggling with addiction in co-dependency in her relationship. And so home was very unstable..

Wendy Hilton Janet mock Cheyenne Honor Society Honolulu heroin Premarin writer
"janet mock" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"janet mock" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"I don't like to say the word trapped, but as feeling very very tightly contained in my body. And I found myself doing these taking these risks and making these social experiments in the sense of like starting to come up with new identities. So I had kisha who was very near. And dear to me, and he started out talking on the phone two, boys. And then kisha wanted to go out into the world and started experimenting. I remember once I went out as kisha I had long curly hair at the time as a as a tween, and I started this flirtation with this boy who I was just like deeply in love with my cousin's house and one day. He. Came over, and he knocked on the door and asked my aunt, and my father was there, and he asked for kisha like, oh, she has long curly hair. Did it under the quiches and live here? And then my dad quickly put to into together. And that's what led to him cutting my hair eventually in. So I think a part of me was seeking out a space in which I could be freer and that space just happened to come in. When my mom sent for us to come back to Hawaii. And she had a lighter touch around all of that stuff. She had a higher, quote unquote tolerance for my gender nonconformity. And I was able to meet new friends, and that's when like the Queen of my life came in which was my best friend, Wendy. Do you really was the savior for me in your books gender? Is so philosophically handled. And I was so moved by what you were saying in terms of society being fixed thing, and that you had tried to adhere to that for some time before you met, Wendy, and she asked if you were my home. I'm so glad that I pronounce it properly who and tell tell the folks with that means, well, my who is that needed Hawaiian identity in term label for people who live outside of the gender binary largely. Folk who in our loosely, I guess western translation would be like trans women. And so anyone that was outside of the male female kind of binary who lived outside of that. And so for me, I remember in the seventh grade my hula teacher was a Mahim Lova you had Hulas. Yeah. I know. Yeah. And so like, the fact that, you know, the department of education in Hawaii hired a trans woman like my everyday life just was changed and shifted. You know, I didn't have to look to law and order or ace Ventura pet detective silence of the lambs. See trans transpeople represented. They were part of my everyday I had the lessons three times a week after school and so cool. Why was this person? That was just she took up space, and she I hate to use that term she'd normalized, you know, gender nonconformity and being being different in that sense. And then I met my best friend Wendy who clocked me at the playground in which is like bitch. What are you trying to do here? Like, maybe we can turn this buzz cut into a Halle Berry. Do if you want, you know, like, we can remix this. And so she gave me like a old. I was twelve I just got so lucky that within the first few months of being there. I found this best. Friend who had this like, you know, this hallway of femininity in her home. I always saw her as a Queen. She very much saw herself. As a goddess that's her I wanna wanna respect her identity, but she was a little windy. She's a year older than me in the same grade because she's a little slow in terms of books. You could read, but she couldn't read. He was very much. She was so big like she had when I met her. She had a green Bob she wore like super high socks with like, you know, the stripes on them with like rolled up soccer shorts and like tied top and was just like her backpack bouncing around the campus. And so because she was so big I could just hide behind her. So my eyebrows. No one really noticed. I started wearing eyeliner. No one really noticed, you know, because Wendy was always doing more. She's always five steps ahead of me and just so much more brazen. And so that was contagious to have a friend who didn't care so much about what people thought, and I'm not the only girl that she did this to like she literally was the passage like the underground railroad was..

Wendy kisha Halle Berry Hawaii Mahim Lova Ventura soccer Bob one day
"janet mock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:51 min | 3 years ago

"janet mock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Next time on the New Yorker radio hour, author and activist Janet mock on growing up transgender in Hawaii, the fact that, you know, the department of education hired a trans woman like my everyday life was changed and shifted. You know, I didn't have to look to law and order or and pet detective or silence of the lambs. The trans people represented Janet mock next time on the New Yorker radio hour tomorrow morning at ten on ninety three point nine FM WNYC. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning for two years now. Republicans in Washington have always had the power to make the first move. They controlled the White House and both houses of congress yesterday. Democrats gain the power to make a move. They passed a Bill to reopen. The government it included no funding for President Trump's border wall. Nancy Pelosi speaker of the house for the second time did not sound inclined to compromise when she spoke with reporters situation that you would accept dollar of wall funding a dollar. One dollars. An morality. It's not who we are as a nation. And this is not a wall between Mexico and the United States said the president is creating here. It's a wall between reality and his constituents Pelosi spoke as new lawmakers from both parties walk the capital getting their pictures. Taken many women many people of color combat veterans, many others. I mean that ceremony parts of the government are still shut down. And the Republican Senate is not even expected to vote on that house measure NPR's. Domenico Montanaro has been following all of this. And he's with us. Hi, Dominica dollar and a dream. Steve all you need. It's all you need. How different does Washington field. This morning. You know, it is very different because Nancy Pelosi and Democrats are back in power for the first time in eight years, and Pelosi's, you know, a master tactician, she's somebody who's been through the legislating, you know, back and forth for many years. She knows how this game is played. And she feels like and other Democrats feel like they're riding a wave of momentum coming off the two thousand eighteen election's, which were largely a rebuke of President Trump, and they show no signs of wanting to give in to the president and give him even that dollar perhaps a dollar, but not much more than that for a wall. That no the president said Mexico would pay for and the and they're not well, this is the way that Pelosi framed this first day, let's hear some more of the new speaker of the house two months ago, the American people smoke and demanded a new dawn they called upon the beauty of our constitution. Our system of checks and balances that protects our democracy remembering that the legislative branch. Is article one the first branch of government co equal to the presidency, and to the judiciary, although the checks and balances mean, the Democrats would have to presumably compromise at some point wouldn't they? Yeah. I mean, it's the same thing as when President Obama was president you had John bainer is speaker of the house. You know, the fact is this is divided government. And yes, congress the and the presidency are Coequal branches. But that doesn't mean that Democrats who only control half of one of those branches can get everything they want. Also, we should mention that for a couple of years now or even a little more President Trump has had overwhelming power to make the news all he has to do is tweet or make a quick statement to reporters and he dominates the headlines day after day after day yesterday. We had a situation where Democrats were in a position to be the ones making news because they were taking control. Now's representative. So we went through the day. The president didn't have the spotlight and then abruptly late in the afternoon. He stepped to the. Electorate at the White House briefing room. Let's listen to some of what he had to say. I have never had so much support as I have in the last week over my stands for border security for border control, and for frankly, the wall or the barrier. Okay, speaks up for the wall. They're dominica. The president says the wall has support he says the people of our country want a wall is that correct? Well, it's just not true. I mean, the fact that he wants to say that this is the most support he's had you know, he may be getting lots of feedback and lots of reaction. There are certainly tens of thousands of people who will show up to his events who are supporters of his and given that kind of feedback. But when you look at the polling, the confluence of polling has shown that more people blame the president for the shutdown than Democrats and heading into this more people than not a majority, in fact in our polling showed that they wanted the president to compromise rather than shut the government down based on a wall. We hear number of Republican lawmakers doing something interesting when they talk about this to medico they will say the American people want border security, which may well be true. But then what they're debating is a wall, which does a lot worse in polling, doesn't it? That's a great Washington trick conflict one thing to make your point about something completely different. Yeah. I mean, the fact is when you look at polling people do say, they want border security. They do say. They want to stem a tide of immigration that's illegal to the country. But that doesn't mean that they necessarily want to pay billions of dollars for a wall along the border. In fact, they say they don't want to have to have taxpayers spend billions of dollars for a physical barrier. You know, this time there are obviously pieces of the border that are fenced that do have walls and the president brought people out yesterday to say that that works in certain places, and no doubt it works in certain places. But even the president himself has gone back and forth saying that it's not maybe necessary in every part of the border, very briefly. What are the Republicans who still control the Senate saying about all this law right now, you've got at least some cracks in the Senate because you have to Republicans from Colorado, and from Maine who are up for reelection twenty twenty who are saying keep the government open without this border wall. Fight the medico thanks for the update really approach. You're welcome. This NPR political editor Domenico Montanaro. It's tough to measure how much the government shutdown as affecting the economy, but we know markets, don't like instability. And there is a whole lot of that right now yesterday stock prices once again took a steep dive, the standard and Poor's five hundred index was down nearly two and a half percent. And the Dow Jones industrial average fell even more as NPR's Jim zarroli reports a grim profit warning from apple has left a lot of investors worried about China's economic growth on Wednesday afternoon apple announced news that sent a chill through Wall Street. It said it made a lot less money during the last three months of the year than it expected. The news caused Apple's shares to fall more than ten percent yesterday. It's worst one day performance in six years and because apple is such a huge company. Now, that's an all of the major indexes down to. But economists Linda limb of the university of Michigan says what happened in the market yesterday wasn't just about one company. Not just apple. Well, and it's not just smartphones. It's what it reflects of the second largest economy in the world apple warned that it was hurt by slowing growth in China. And if blame that impart on trade tensions, Washington and Beijing have been slapping tariffs on each other's imports. But limb says the troubles facing China, go beyond trade. China's economy is slowing due to its own domestic dynamic limb says China is a more mature economy now and mature Connie's don't grow as fast as developing ones. But China has also been hurt by the downturn in countries that does business with throughout Asia and Europe these were points alluded to yesterday outside the White House by Kevin Hassett who chairs the council of economic advisers. Make no mistake the Chinese economy is on a path that we haven't seen in decades. That's something that will affect companies try to pass it said, it's not just apple that's been affected in an unusually Frank statement, he said. Said that a heck of a lot more companies that do business in China will probably issue warnings about slower prophets in the weeks to come companies such as GM and Caterpillar have already expressed concern about China has it went on to say that the slowdown is actually a good opportunity for the US. He said it gives US negotiators more leverage in the current trade talks. There's a lot of room for positive game in the Chinese negotiations. And I think the fact that their economy is having trouble right now shows that our policies have been effective in getting the table, but Mary lovely professor of economics at Syracuse university points out that the China's slowdown can also hurt the US. It seems to me that it also shows that there's a great deal at stake here for the American economy, a number of US companies now make as much as ten percent of their revenue in China, including McDonald's, Starbucks and Intel and lovely says these include a lot of very big and innovative companies that also have large. Workforce's inside the United States in a global economy. She says they're likely to be affected by what happens in China. And I think it's kind of glib to be talking about warnings about future sales as bad for China, but not bad for the US. Yesterday's big market selloff suggests that a lot of investors understand that and for now, they're responding by pulling their money out of stocks. Jim zarroli, NPR news, New York. Sorry to tell you that. Herb Kelleher the co founder of Southwest Airlines and a pioneering businessman died yesterday. He was eighty seven Kelleher was probably the most recognized person in the airline industry yet. A big personality. He settled disputes by arm-wrestling. He went on TV with a bag over his head above all he burnished the brand of a no frills airline. We should settle disputes here by Lincolnshire thinking, well, maybe not the bag probably interfere with a microphone anyway before all of that. Herb Kelleher was a lawyer in Texas and a nineteen sixty seven a client approached him with an idea for a low-fare airline that would serve just three cities in Texas. Didn't take long for Kelleher to embrace the idea. Maybe you know, like a minute. That fast. No it was longer to that. I was just joking. That was Kelleher in two thousand sixteen in an interview with guy Roz on NPR's. How I built this podcast. We told the public affects us that you could fly the lower fair. But if you paid the higher fair will give you a free bottle of whiskey.

president China President Trump NPR United States apple Herb Kelleher White House Nancy Pelosi Steve Inskeep congress Domenico Montanaro Rachel Martin President Obama Washington Mexico Janet mock WNYC