14 Burst results for "Janet Frame"

"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

07:23 min | 5 months ago

"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

"No problem. I am what I haven't done. The only thing I want to is beat you up. All right, landed in the same spot for our first category, I like it. Okay, let's see what happens with best lead performance. There's a chance we'll agree here, but I think we're gonna diverge. We've got Karen colston, as K in sweetie, Carrie Fox and an angel at my table. Holly Hunter, of course, in the piano. Nicole Kidman, portrait of a lady, Kate Winslet, holy smoke, Meg Ryan, in the cut Abby Cornish bright star or the lone dude Benedict Cumberbatch for the power of the dog. Who got your award? The lone dude indeed. I like that. So yeah, slack chatter suggests with Sam that this is coming down to two options. Highly hunter. In the piano and Kate Winslet as Ruth. Winslet absolutely bewitching in this movie. As we talked about, partly because similar to ruffalo, there's an element of danger here. I mean, if he's the bad boy in some way, she's maybe the bad girl in this scenario and in this case I really get it. She's fantastic in holy smoke. I would add cumberbatch as equally deserving of consideration right alongside those two. And I'm wondering, I'm really curious to see if that's where you're going to go at them. I'm going with hunter, no surprise to anyone for reasons I'll get into when I talk about my favorite campion scene. You know, it's just I'm all in on that performance, but I can respect either a Winslet or a cumberbatch pick. Which one of those two did you go with? Yeah, it was tough because not only were hunter and Winslet and cumberbatch. Probably my top three, I strongly considered Nicole Kidman and I really like Meg Ryan and in the cut as well, another surprise for me over the course of this series perhaps because like a lot of people, I maybe couldn't quite handle on that first viewing seeing a new type of Meg Ryan and now of course, the more mature critic that I am, Josh, I could just appreciate the performance as a really good performance. I also really like that Cornish a lot more than you did, I think, in bright star. And even Carrie fox should be in the running. So you can't go wrong. You can not swing any dimension. Yeah, in this category. But I am going Winslet for holy smokes. We devoted a fair amount of time to her performance in her character when we discussed that movie. And that way, again, that she embodies like ruffalo, those contradictions and those complexities. There is a naivete to her and an innocence to her that seems totally believable and at times she also suggests she's got a wisdom and just a worldliness that allows her to take over control in that film. Also, an incredibly sensual performance. And that's something she uses to her advantage against Harvey Keitel's character and something else I know I said during our discussion of that movie. We don't get really any backstory on that character. We meet her in that opening, that great opening to the Neil Diamond song where we see what she was like before she became part of this cult. And that's enough. There is enough Justin Kate Winslet's performance to give us everything we need to know about what kind of daughter she was, what kind of person she was, what she was seeking, what is absent in her life? It's all there, I think, in the character she portrays, even though campion doesn't devote time to it. She doesn't need to Winslet gives us everything we need to know. Indeed, I love it. I'm never going to complain about more appraise given to Kate Winslet. You like about me. Do you like my personal view or do you like my breast best? All right, Ruth, right now I like your breasts. It's just the way it is. You can't stop me from having sexual thoughts about you. Not yet. And what do you think? What are your thoughts? They're private. Well, not the other night. That was it for you. A bit revolting. So that brings us to our favorite campion moment. And a lot of times there's overlap in this category that we always do with any series, something that defines the filmmaker or the set of films for us. And overall, our best scenes or moments. But this category really is about getting at the heart of what we think Jane campion's work is all about. And I thought I'd bring in some reinforcements, Josh, there was a big profile recently of Jane campion in The New York Times Magazine. And the author says this. The piano offers a blueprint to campion's creative preoccupations. The feminine confronting the masculine and exchanges marked by both violence and desire, the use of landscape to evoke psychological states, mothers and daughters, family units struggling with feelings of love, alienation and betrayal. Her films and her one foray into prestige television top of the Lake have in common a series of traumatized heroines in confrontation with terror, desire and the sublime. Domestic spaces are full of intimacy and danger, sex blows life wide open and starshine or devastation, the threat of violence glimmers around the edges of daily life irradiating it. Do you think there's anything missing there from that paragraph? Oh man, that's good stuff. Who was that? That covers it. Jordan kissner, I believe it's the writer. I will verify that in case I'm wrong. Nice. Yeah, I think and here was where I instinctively went, though my winner, I don't know, we can debate whether it falls into this category, but I went with insert shots that capture those very things. I just thought back to, I think this was unique to her as a filmmaker, where she would drop in her movies, images, not needed, unnecessary, for the narrative, the plot, whatever, but just little things she caught, or I don't know, maybe planned that just evoke the exact thematic emotional psychological experience of what we're watching. So angel on my table. Here are some of my nominees. Angel at my table. When the adult Janet frame returns home, after the death of her father, we get a quick close up of her stepping out of her pumps, into her father's boots. I don't remember how long it lasts. Maybe it's more pronounced and it's like 20 seconds, but in my memory it's like a three second almost insert shot. Portrait of a lady. We both cheated on this one Adam. That slow slide into slow motion that we get when one character smells a flower that's been given to her and another character notices how much she's how much she's investing and smelling that flower and can't be an employee slow motion bright star, the butterfly on the handle of the door as it turns and power of the dog, the paper couple of them in here, right? The paper flower that Peter, the college aged son makes, and that fill really abuses. You could say in a couple of ways..

Winslet Meg Ryan Kate Winslet cumberbatch Karen colston Carrie Fox Abby Cornish Nicole Kidman ruffalo campion Carrie fox Holly Hunter Benedict Cumberbatch hunter Ruth Justin Kate Winslet Jane campion Josh Harvey Keitel Neil Diamond
"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

08:57 min | 5 months ago

"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Thank you so much for giving me a character in an experience that was so difficult to say goodbye to. Except that I don't have to say goodbye to it because everybody is everybody's now and that is such a gift. And Michael Neiman. I definitely consider the piano to be a gift. That's Holly Hunter accepting her best actress Oscar back in 1994 for her performance in Jane campion's the piano. Winning an Oscar, pretty big deal, Adam, but sort of pales in comparison to winning what are we calling these? Again, I think it's the we are the champions, right? Is that where we settled? We are the champions. And I thought I had some pretty good name options, but then we started hearing from our listeners, Andre kiddo, Charlottesville, Virginia, longtime listeners said when Josh mentioned the pianos as a possible name for the awards it made me think of the ivories, maybe someone can think of other possible connections, but it has a nice ring to it. It does, but then a few more came in, amber Noel said, grand campion chip. It can't be chip Gran final, something along those lines. And we also heard from Austin in Omaha, who said, while this suggestion for an awards title is almost nothing to do with any of Jane campion's films, I feel that my autocorrect has been forever altered due to my letterbox reviews of her films and having to consistently change champion back to campion. It's catchy and for whatever reason I feel like Harvey Keitel's PJ waters from holy smoke my personal favorite film thus far would appreciate it. I certainly enjoyed this dive into a filmmaker. I had zero experience with preceding this review and I look forward to catching up with the power of the dog. Austin ads that he looks forward to the podcast every week, even when Adam shirts the responsibility of catching up with what the rest of us went through with eternals. And he's looking forward to our picks for campion's champion. So we just simplified a little bit what amber and Austin were putting down and homage to Queen. We are calling this, we are the champions. Some good old fashioned brainstorming, right? That's it. We have come to the end of our campion, overview, our chronological series devoted to all 8 of her feature films, including her latest, the power of the dog. We'd like to end all of the series we do, whether it's devoted to the work of a single director, like the zoo reviews or it's a marathon devoted to a certain genre or maybe a single great movie year with some awards. Really just to reflect on the series as a whole. And evaluate what we appreciated most for this overview. We're going to share our favorite lead in supporting performances our favorite scenes and our camping moments as well as our favorite films. I don't know if you did this or you already posted it on letterbox, but I've got my ranking as hard as it was. And so we can do our camping overview list one down to 8. Before we do that, any major takeaways from this overview any surprises, Josh? Yeah, you know, I have that ranking too, and as I'm looking at it probably, and I shouldn't have been surprised by this. I kind of expected this, but in the cut is a film I was mixed to negative on as a lot of people were when it came out and now it's jumped up to a really strong tier in her filmography. So that's probably the biggest surprise for me coming away from this overview, I would say. Yeah, my reappraisal and appreciation of in the cut as well as, of course, my reappraisal and appreciation for the piano were the surprises for me of this series. A quick recap of the films we covered, sweetie, her 1989 debut, an angel at my table, the 1990 biopic about New Zealand author Janet frame, followed by the piano, her 1993 Oscar winning breakthrough. That was followed by the portrait of lady campion's adaptation of the Henry James novel, then we did 1990 9s holy smoke with Kate Winslet and Harvey Keitel. In the cut from 2003 with Meg Ryan and Mark Ruffalo, 2009s bright star about the relationship between poet John Keats, my man, John Keats, and Fannie Braun, and yes, the new power of the dog. We will start as we usually do with our favorite supporting performance. I'll give you some of the nominees here, Josh and see if I have collected what you think are the best options. Going in order, sweetie, gave us the title character, played by genevieve lemmon. I think you could also maybe throw Tom likes into the mix as Lewis. The piano, not only had Harvey Keitel, but Sam Neill and Anna Paquin, Oscar winning, Anna Paquin, the portrait of a lady, formidable here with John Malkovich, Barbara Hershey Martin Donovan, holy smoke, had Harvey Keitel in the cut. Mark Ruffalo, bright star, the pig, the Paul Schneider is. And the power of the dog offers Kirsten Dunst. Jesse Plemons and Cody Smith mcphee. I think it came down to these four. You tell me if I'm wrong. Lemon for sweetie. Maybe paquin for the piano and then ruffalo versus Martin Donovan. Where did you come out? Well, is it weird that my instinct was to only consider men? I mean, what's with this campion? Like always giving short shrift to the men. I don't get it in her movies. So I kind of thought I could go completely the other way and choose one of her more likeable male characters. Because there aren't a ton. Not that they're all villains. They're all complicated, but she does have two really likeable ones. You mentioned one of them. Martin Donovan's fading puck Ralph from the portrait of a lady and then wish us keats in bright star. Maybe that's more of a lead. I do feel like Abby Cornish is the lead there, but you know, it seemed truer to her work to choose one of her most complicated male characters. If you're going to go that way. And so I did go with Mark Ruffalo's detective malloy in the cut. Now generally, I got to say, I don't understand or go for the bad boy, appeal. And I think even more so when those qualities suggest a potentially abusive relationship and I think that's at play here because malloy for much of the running time, you think he's one of the suspects of these murders that have taken place. So that's, you know, makes him a little dangerous, but man, watching this movie again with more experience with campion's work, whatever it is, ruffalo is managing. This complete honesty about what he wants for Meg Ryan's fanny, what he's willing to give her, but then also combined with a really scary anger and a hostility. It just worked on me. I got it. I mean, I got the appeal for Annie, and thankfully I'm just revisit. Yeah, I got in the cut a little bit more. As I said, it's the champion title where my feelings shifted the most. They definitely shifted on the performances here, not only Ryan's, but ruffalo's as detective malloy. So that's where I'm going with my best supporting performance pick. Well, first, I'm glad that you did include Ben whishaw because I somehow overlooked him. And I think he at least needs to be in the running for best supporting. Probably not best lead performance, though you're right, I think that's arguable. I think Gabi Cornish certainly is the star of that film. I really did struggle between Donovan and ruffalo and there was a part of me that wanted to give it to Donovan just because he's a really underappreciated actor who I didn't even know was in this movie. It's one I hadn't seen before. I remember liking him and a lot of how Hartley stuff and he pops up as a character guy in some different films. Of course, over the past few decades. But watching him play that character who really is the only kind of sympathetic warm character in a film that's just filled with snakes. Portrait of a lady is really refreshing. But I think I ultimately went like you with Mark Ruffalo just because I think it had a bit of a higher degree of difficulty. Meaning Donovan, he's dying from the very beginning of the film. And you know he's inherently a good person, so of course he sympathetic. Even though I do think he gives him some complexity, I think he's a very easy character to like and Mark Ruffalo really is someone, especially as we see so much of that movie through Meg Ryan's characters, eyes and her perspective, he's someone we are a little bit scared of, but someone we are a little bit attracted to and ruffalo doesn't overplay anything, but he also doesn't underplay anything. There is, as you said, a real directness to him. And that ability to be someone that we can be a little bit scared of, but then at the same time, feel like maybe somehow they really should be together and you want them to be together. That's enough of a high wire act that I was really surprised even though maybe I shouldn't be by anything Mark Ruffalo does. I was surprised.

Harvey Keitel Martin Donovan Oscar Jane campion campion Michael Neiman Mark Ruffalo Andre kiddo amber Noel Josh ruffalo John Keats Holly Hunter Adam Austin Anna Paquin Janet frame lady campion Fannie Braun Meg Ryan
"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

05:42 min | 5 months ago

"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

"And his brother really doesn't have anything to say back to him and he calls him out on that, that he can't put two words together. And then he trots off on his horse and then just stops and turns suddenly and looks back at him. And just what that look, that's all you need. It's the only way in that moment he can properly express his disdain for his brother. And it's funny we were talking about, of course, west side story last week on the show and Ansel Elgort and his presence. And I was way more forgiving of it, let's say, or in favor of it, then you were because of the way I believed that just through his physicality in his presence that the men of the other gang would maybe be afraid of him that the men within his own gang would look up to him and that they would listen to what he said. Well, how about the moment here after that dinner where Phil stands up and every single immediately guy except his brother immediately gets up and without a word follows him out the door. That is all he has to do to signal that it's time to go and nobody questions it for a second. And you do as an actor have to be able to inhabit that for us to believe that. And there to be no sense of falseness to it whatsoever. And there's just no falseness. Other than maybe the accent, I'm not, I'm not totally convinced or sure what cumberbatch is doing there, but I forgave it pretty quickly because the rest of it feels so authentic and so just commanding. Yeah. You mentioned plemons a couple times there and just want to quickly touch on him. He doesn't have all that many scenes, fades a little bit to the background as the movie goes on, but he plays against cumberbatch's presence so perfectly, I think, because he doesn't just kind of wilt before Phil, but George is you just get a sense he's an entirely different man and manly this means something. This is all part of the exploration of what does it mean? What is masculinity mean here? Because it struck me that George is just as confident. But what he does is, let's go back to the movement. He moves softly. He moves leisurely. He has the confidence, but it's thoughtfully held that he's considering. Should I go this way? Or should I go that way? Let me think about this. Let me give this some consideration. And maybe I'll actually do it in a bath because, you know what? Baths are nice. It's civilized to take a bath and then Phil comes striding in. Like, what do you do? And they have a great argument later about Phil stinking, you know? And I just love how plemons plays off this. And I think he and dunst have a couple of nice scenes together as well. I really curious to hear what you might have done performance at them because we've alluded to this at the start of the show how strange it feels to have really a male lead in a campion film. And I think that was part of why I didn't initially as I was watching know what to make of dunce rows. I feel stronger about it now that I've had plenty of time to think about it and sit with it. But in the moment, it was just so jarring to have, again, a female character in his supporting role. And I think particularly rose being, I would just say, not one of the indomitable campion women, not Kate Winslet's Ruth, or highly hunter's Ada, but even Carrie foxes Janet frame, but maybe something along the line of Nicole Kidman's Isabel or Meg Ryan's franny, who are women who are a bit adrift and unsure of where their place is. Did dunst work for you? Yeah, dunce definitely worked for me. I agree with you that there is something for lack of a better word odd about watching a campion movie and not have the major female character and she is really the only major one here, not push back to not take on that kind of Holly Hunter and the piano type persona or Kate Winslet and holy smoke. And be a little bit stronger. And yet, I guess that that didn't bother me so much, Josh, because overall, I liked the layer she brought to the performance. And I think because you're just in a way asking for a different type of movie then. This is one in which that battle. That psychological battle is Paramount. And it's what really haunts this entire movie. And I think there is something that duns kind of gets at the score gets at this a certain ethereal quality. There is something almost Supernatural. Just almost Supernatural about cumberbatch's presence. And his ability to so unnerve her. The moment she steps foot in that house. She knows who he is. She knows how he is. And she knows that he is going to treat her with contempt. But it's almost like she becomes powerless the moment she steps foot in that house. And I guess I'm willing here to forgive that character's lack of lack of control or lack of strength because it seems like that's what can't be in here is most interested in exploring is that exact dynamic when you have someone with the power that cumberbatch's character has and how and how overwhelming and all encompassing that can be and how you how you then do survive in that type of scenario. That's a good way to put it. This is the story being told and to insert a quote unquote champion heroin or leave female character in here would have just disrupted everything that's going on. And I do think dun springs, it's sort of like this slowly sinking tragic sadness that weighs down increasingly on her as the film goes on, that's entirely appropriate..

plemons cumberbatch Ansel Elgort Phil Phil stinking George Kate Winslet Janet frame dunst franny Meg Ryan Nicole Kidman Holly Hunter Isabel Carrie Ruth hunter Josh Paramount dun springs
"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

06:02 min | 6 months ago

"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Last night. I was floating above the trees. With my lips connected to those of a beautiful figure. Whose lips? Who they my lips? We get back to our Jane campion, overview with the trailer for 2009s bright star. This overview is a chronological look at all 7 of campion's features in anticipation of her upcoming the power of the dog. That comes to theaters later this month. Bright star came 6 years after campion's previous film, which was in the cut. In the cut had been both the critical and box office failure 1990 9s holy smoke hadn't fared much better before that. Having revisited all of her films now, filling in some blind spots. I think we agree Adam that Jane campion has made zero bad films. I don't think either of us have come, come out negatively on any of these. No. We have not. In the cut and holy smoke, definitely better than their reputations. Now set in the year 1818 bright star is about the last three years in the life of poet John Keats and it explores his relationship with Fannie bronn. Keith is played by Ben whishaw, born by Abby Cornish. The film returned campion to the romantic period picture. The kind of film she'd had her greatest success with if you think about the piano and the portrait of a lady. Of course, as with those films, calling this a period romance, a little bit misleading as campions portrayal of male female relationships along with the accompanying sexual and power dynamics are always complicated. They definitely are here. Bright star opened in September 2009 and though it never played on more than a couple hundred screens. It was her biggest box office success since the portrait of a lady. It was also nominated for an Oscar, though for costume design, not for campion's writing, or direction. In addition to wish shot and Cornish, the movie also features Carrie Fox, as fanny's widowed mother, fox returns from campions and angel at my table where she played the lead character Janet frame, Paul Schneider, also appears as keats best friend, Charles Armitage Brown. Keith's best friend and a foil of sorts, the villain, if you will for Fannie Braun. On last week's show, I mentioned that Sam had noted my review of this movie back in O 9 on like episode two 89 of film spotting. And I said, I had no recollection of it. That's because it was not reviewed on episode two 89. Now, if you go to our archive and you look at our star ratings, maybe I mentioned it or maybe I just wanted to log on the website that I saw it and really liked it because it is true that I gave it four stars out of 5 on the old film spotting site, but nowhere in that show run down. Is there listed anything about a conversation around this movie, which makes me feel a little bit better about my terrible memory, but back in 2009, you can reference a review that you wrote over at Larson on film dot com. You wrote it's a mystery as to why this gene can't be in period piece fades away rather than catches fire. In the end, the period trappings get the best of the director. She isn't able to transcend them the way she did with the piano. Now I'm just really hoping that you are going to wrap on the knuckles 2009 Josh Larson. I'm going to stop you right there and not allow you to paint me as a bright star hader because that is indeed not the case. I'd liked it a little less than you at the time. Definitely positive on it, then I think it was like a three out of four rating, whatever that's worth. And positive on it now. Intensely romantic. I'm going to start actually with one of the things I appreciated more about it this time around that I think I did then. And then I'll circle back to maybe what I still think are some of the limitations for it. I think I understand more why I had that reaction. It's less of a mystery to me this time around. But let's go to the costume design. This is not something we've talked about in depth. And this is the place to do it, right? Because as we've said, Fannie buran, Abbie Cornish character is a seamstress, but she's also a fashion designer. And so the dresses that she designs and where is our instrumental to her character and the costume designer here got the Oscar nomination, Janet Patterson. She worked with campion on the piano, the portrait of a lady and holy smoke. Think back to the piano, how this was such a key element for Ada, Holly Hunter's character, maybe one of the first three to 5 images that comes to mind for me when I think of the piano is Ada sinking into the mud and the way that gown that black gown billows up around her. Just communicating on its own. What this character is feeling. Now here, it's, of course, as I said, the defining element of Cornish's fanny buran, how about the colors that she wears repeatedly and talks about, right? They're always kind of jumping out from her dress or coat or whatever she's wearing. They intend to stand out as fanny Braun does in this society. She is not going to just accept where she's expected to sit. And what she's expected to learn about and love and who she's expected to love those collars are letting everyone know what you see is what you're about to get, right? I think of that one very early on. It's this explosive white collar that is above this red. It's almost like a jacket she's wearing, beautifully echoes the white skirt she has. But it's just so bold. And then even I don't recall offhand what the color is like on this dress, but that Christmas dress she wears. Made me think, it's just gorgeous. It's like this dark gold, but it has these transparent sleeves, and I could be totally wrong on this. I haven't had time to do the research. But I'm looking at this thing thinking that can't possibly be period. That just seems too incredibly modern. Yet completely fits the character. And then to go back to the Schneider character Brown, who you talked about being kind of the comic villainous foil. The first scene we see him in, how about those plaid?.

campion Jane campion Fannie bronn Abbie Cornish Carrie Fox campions Janet frame Charles Armitage Brown Fannie Braun Ben whishaw Keith John Keats Josh Larson Paul Schneider Oscar keats Cornish fanny Fannie buran Adam
"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

07:36 min | 7 months ago

"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Not the other night. That was it for you. A bit revolting. You're right. There are so many similarities to other campion, heroines that we've seen and there are nuances as well. And I think the key to the movie, I'm completely with you is Ruth. It is Winslet's performance. And there's something she's able to do physically that is so subtle with just sort of a, I can't even describe it really. A hardening of her demeanor or a softening of her entire essence. She can be a completely different person. Yeah. And there really isn't any more calculation to it. It's really something to watch an actress like Winslet pull this off. And I think what it is too, is that she's able to capture the sense of Ruth as a person who has a complete history and we understand that history, even though we actually have not seen any of it. And what I mean by that is that when we meet her and I want to talk about the opening of the film in particular. But when we meet her and we get sort of a shorthand version of her journey to enlightenment and that even when she comes back and we start to see some of the psychological battles she engages in with keitel's character, all of those things about using her looks using her body, her perception of herself as someone who is mean and cruel and who is seeking kindness and seeking the ability to be a kind person. That doesn't feel with Winslet like it's something the character is just saying in the moment. You feel like you know before the movie began exactly who this person was and what her struggles were and exactly what she's trying to overcome. Again, despite the fact that we don't actually see any of that take place. And that brings me back to that opening, which is this amazing use of annealed diamond song. Happens at least one other time in this movie. Another scene I love that we'll talk about Holly holy. And it seems like it's non diegetic and that we don't see anybody performing it in the moment, though it sounds like the sound quality itself comes off as if it is happening within the world of the movie. And then we finally do discover that it is emanating from the space and people are dancing to this song. There's a little bit of reverie at this party. But that's about three minutes and 50 seconds long. The beginning of this film, all edited to this song. And within it, despite the fact that we don't hear her say much of anything. And again, despite the fact that we really don't know who Ruth is. All we have to do is watch Winslet. Watch that group of women walk by. The group of Baba's followers who seem so happy. They seem like they've found an answer. And just looking at the way she looks at them, you know, how desperately she's seeking something like that. And you completely understand how she ends up being part of this cult. And all we're getting and all champions giving us really is, again, a couple minutes of looks like that and actions like that. And it's all we need. It tells the whole story of Ruth just in that four minutes. I even love how about the first shot we see of Ruth isn't her full body. It's her hands and some other people's hands on the roof of this bus as it's moving through India. And even that image, Josh, at least to me, felt so interesting and profound. It's as if at one moment they're beseeching or kind of yearning to the sky, but also hanging on for dear life, which kind of sums up the roller coaster of this movie pretty well. Yeah, one of those, they're a little longer than insert shots, but those little almost throwaway images that can't be and manages to grab that say so much. I also like how in that same sequence, you know, we're introduced. This begins with another obscured point of view shot. I don't think we've talked about this, but I've noticed it in a couple of films now. In this case, it's Ruth's point of view looking out of that bus. And seeing the street going by very similar, I could think of the one in an angel at my table where a young Janet frame is looking out of a train. And it's kind of like there's something in front of their field of vision that's blocking what they're trying to see. We've seen that a couple of times. So how about all of what you said is true about that prologue? And it's very rooted in real experience and getting us into psychology. But then we get that psychedelic moment after she is touched by the guru on the forehead. It's kind of I think her friend calls it freaky hypnotism that sequence. I mean, that is completely new sort of imagery than anything else we've seen really, where her eyes go the special effects used there and it's kind of, you know, that's totally new along with, as I said before, the broad comedy. And I'm with you on the family. I think, you know, it gets to be slapstick at some point. And I don't know if that works quite as well for me even on this second go around. There's a use of fast motion even comic fast motion. Yeah. But I do think maybe the funniest moment is that other use of Neil Diamond when we see PJ waters arriving at the airport. What a character introduction. That's the other scene I was thinking of. Both of them. And there's a deliberate symmetry in these characters as a movie really does become about their showdown and their transformations. It makes sense that we get this great introduction to her and we get a similarly great, very different, but a great introduction to keitel's character when he lands in Australia. Yeah, this is where the macho sexuality is so much a part of his character, right? He's putting his boots up on the luggage and kind of this show off position on the luggage rack as the suitcases come flying down. He grabs a luggage cart and spins it around. I think he sends it to a woman. It's like this. It's very rhythmic. There's something musical about it. He is dancing in that space. And we've seen that from campy in a few times. There are a couple other shots like that in this film. Even where it feels a little bit odd, but dogs barking at a moment when the people in the scene, the tension in the scene is very amped up and there's something rhythmic and musical about that shot as well. So just choosing to introduce us to keitel's character and have him be this man in black with the sunglasses, walking through the airport, looking kind of stoic, but stunning and impervious to anything that's happening around him and all those people struggling with those carts and he just walks up and with a flick of a wrist. Gets one of the carts and spins it to someone that's so good. There is also right before that. The only actually funny moment in this film. It's a visual joke and I love it. It's the only moment I truly think that works as comedy in the movie. And that's a transition from a scene with Ruth two keitel landing, and just before we see him getting off the plane, we just see like a boy's arm with a Qantas jet toy, moving it through the air and he makes the sound that we all make when we play with airplanes. And he just kind of then shoves it into like an army man on the table. And that's it. I don't even know who the boy is..

Winslet Ruth keitel Baba Josh Janet Neil Diamond India Australia Qantas army
"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

03:04 min | 7 months ago

"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

"And that is all there, but hearing about how a character has undergone a transformation. Even if you can see it versus actually getting to watch her transform, I think is the issue for me. I think that sort of once she gets married, the movie just kind of sets on this course where we're just all to understand that she has now turned and become this new this new person. This new entity that is no longer Isabel archer. And I wish I maybe was able to actually watch that transformation. Yeah, it's interesting because we talked with an angel at my table about how often campion chose to emphasize and give screen time to smaller moments in Janet frame's life and left some of the major moments like her book being published offscreen. And how that was kind of a plus because it altered the biopic in an interesting way and in a way brought us closer to the real day to today experience of its main character. But I think that maybe that was a similar strategy employed here to leave a lot of that transition, offscreen in that break. And I would agree with you. I don't know if it's exactly as effective and the journey overall might have been more rewarding if we saw some of the transition rather than the hard cut from one woman, essentially to the other. Yeah, another thing I like is how often they refer to her character by name. And that may sound, again, kind of obvious. Of course they're going to refer to her by her name and then later when she gets married, she has a new name and that's misses Osmond. But I think that this movie almost sets a record for the number of times characters refer to her by her name. It's as if it's always Isabelle archer, Isabel archer Isabel archer. And you hear that so many times that it then sets up that transformation into misses Osmond and you hear misses Osman a lot and it underlines very neatly, how that character we meet in the first part of the film is her own individual. She is Isabel archer. And once she becomes ensnared by Gilbert, and she is misses Osborne, nobody else in the film, Josh, until I believe the end of the movie, when she is finally regained her consciousness. She has come now back down to earth and she has become an individual again, talking to Ralph. She's had that epiphany that he refers to her as Isabel. That identity has been regained. Otherwise, the moment she becomes misses Osmond, that's who she is to the world and nothing more. Yeah, and I like how the hair hair design comes into play there too when she does regain that identity. There will be a few scenes where it's a little frizzier. It's a little more red than that kind of deep, dark auburn that it is when she's misses Osman. Absolutely. The portrait of a lady is currently streaming on Paramount plus. Next up is holy smoke. Now, Sam, he left out the exclamation point. I mean, Josh it's holy smoke. You know, we're fans of fluctuation here. It's a mother situation..

Isabel archer Janet frame Osmond campion Isabelle archer Isabel archer Isabel archer Osman Osborne Gilbert Josh Isabel Ralph auburn Paramount Sam
"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

06:30 min | 7 months ago

"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

"If he is to him because he was too perfect him. If you've really given orbiting his final answer, I'm rather glad. I don't mean I'm glad for you and still unless of course for him. I'm glad for myself. Are you thinking of proposing to me? What I mean is that I shall have the thrill of seeing what a young lady does who won't marry lord orbit. But I do think Kidman is really good here and what I like about her is that even as I said earlier, she's given dialog that explains a lot of the text in terms of her predicament as a woman in this era and what she wants and why she doesn't want marriage. And a lot of that is on the surface. Kidman doesn't just lean on that only. You know, there are a lot of subtle gestures and glances and just one of them. I think it's Viggo Mortensen after he's proposed again to her and she rebuffs him. And she just kind of sticks her foot out and kicks the door closed after him. And I like that little touch. I think it's a very delicate performance of little movements like that, which counteracts some of the literalness of the dialog. Well, we haven't touched on two sequences as we were talking about camerawork and some of the choices makes that I think are going to have to come up again when we do our overview awards. And we talk about our favorite camping moments or maybe the best scenes or moments overall, there are two contenders here Josh absolutely won, I would point to is the fantasy sequence that Nicole Kidman has, that while being very restrained, ultimately, it doesn't get very graphic, no clothes come off in this sequence. And yet it's pretty racy for a costume piece. And the way it's done, again, we'll use that word subtlety. She says goodbye to, I believe, is it the Viggo character? Is it Martin Donovan's character? I'm not sure. It could be Richard grant's character, too. Because all three of them are going to come back into the scene, right? But she says goodbye to one of them and she closes the door and then the camera just does some interesting little maneuvers and the next thing we know she's engaged in a tryst on the bed with all three of these men. There's no real noticeable cut. It's as if it just all kind of happens as if these three men who are clearly invading her her mind now are actually there in the space. Invading her space and are actually doing the things that she's thinking about them potentially doing to her and just the fact that it takes you a second to even fully understand what's happening as opposed to kind of the standard. Let's look at a close up of the character and zoom in while she starts to think in her mind about this fantasy. No, it's as if it just kind of unfolds almost supernaturally. It's really wonderful. Yeah, that's a good word for it. You're right. It's not only included simply because this is campion. What other filmmaker would include a moment like this. I don't remember, again, if there is some sort of imagination scene like this in the book in the novel, but even if there is probably something that would be excised immediately in the adaptation because it was a little racy. But campion includes something like this and then you're right. It's how she does it. Beginning, I think it actually starts with Kidman caressing her own face. It's a close up. And you're starting immediately you recognize, okay, she's going to show us that Isabelle has rejected these men, but it's not because she's sexless, right? I mean, she has the desire, and this is also pure camping, going to bring the excitement and danger of sexuality into it. And then we begin to understand, oh no, she's not in the room alone. She's actually with whoever shows up first. I forget. And then wait a minute. He's here too. And you know, it's just like, yeah, it's wonderfully handled, yeah. Yeah, it really is the other one, is the black and white sequence. Yeah, I think it's kind of a travel Montage. It is. And at first, when I'm jotting down my notes, I'm like, it's like a surreal newsreel almost. Maybe if something about the black and white that made me think of it in those terms. And then you know who nailed it? It's our producer Sam. He sent me a slack this morning and he called it Josh, it's it's Maya Darrin. It's pure. Yeah. Everything about that sequence. I was right with the surrealism or I was heading down the right path. But Sam said it has to be and it's funny. I will admit I have only then after that conversation with Sam, I Googled it real quick. I just Googled camping plus Darren and it's not by accident. And I stopped reading very quickly because there's another film coming up in this series that I saw some links about that basically argued that there is a very clear Darren influence on this other film. So it wasn't even this movie in particular, but I think Sam's on to something is we think back on that marathon we did where we looked at some of her shorts from the 30s, maybe the 40s, I think. There's no doubt that feels almost like a little Maya Darren movie that was plucked out and put in the middle of portrait of a lady. Absolutely. That is a great idea. I did think of the bunuel Dali un Shan andalou, which we also talked about in our Buddhism marathon. And because of that shot of, I think they're nuts that turn into malkovich's lips, talking like saying something to her right. So that made me think of shinano, but I think yeah, Darren is probably even a better touchdown. Yeah, that's a great, great find. I will say, in terms of my hang up, if I have one with this movie, it's how much happens to Isabel archer versus how much I suppose agency she has. And if you hear that and think, well, that's kind of the point. She gets married and loses all of that agency. Yes, I get that. I think I'm trying to find a nuance in there that is, we keep hearing about how she has changed. Everyone keeps telling us how she has changed. And I think we can look at Kidman in her performance and even her her costuming, their elements of her dress. There's a certain stiffness now to her she is hardened one character says she's gotten colder. How about her hair? It goes from her hair Janet frame ish frizzy red to much darker and more constrained..

Kidman Martin Donovan Richard grant campion Viggo Mortensen Josh Nicole Kidman Sam Maya Darrin Darren Isabelle Maya Darren Isabel archer malkovich Janet
"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

05:32 min | 8 months ago

"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Him so much that he has to leave like just her presence seems to upset him in a way that she's she's really intending and she does smirk in that way there is something devilish about it really is fun. You're absolutely right but later in that place scene where we know how the trick is being done. Because it's it's shown earlier but they're doing a play. I think it's bluebeard and it's all being done with shadows or yeah he part of it's been done with shadows and the mayor people watching actually are so upset by it. Believe it's real they attack it because it unleashes something in them emotionally something so viscerally that they. They can't help but react and respond to just as george does when she plays the piano as she herself does when she plays the piano or even when she plays it and people like nessie and morag here it and immediately want to dismiss it because it makes them uncomfortable so i love the scene like that and then i'll go to character details like the two or three times where we see sam neill combing his hair. I love it too. That i think every time we see him comb his hair he then immediately covers it up so maybe he never intended for anything but to always wear that hat but just the act almost the psychological act of a little bit of preening and printing. I need to get myself ready. It just makes him seem like this snivelling little kid who who has to keep his hair straight but then of course appropriate to his repressed character he immediately has to cover it up. He is all about hiding it right. And so the irony of that character. And i think neil's performance maybe goes under the radar here because of paklin and the fireworks. They're and hunter. But neil is so good and the irony of it is is that he is someone who is completely incapable of showing vulnerability despite the fact that every moment of his existence. He's vulnerable that is perfect. Way to capture. I think it's a great performance. As well and this is a character villainous but pitiable so pitiable and and seriously villainous. I mean you know he ends up being as i mentioned the true violator. How about that scene. Where he's he's clawing at eight In the mud among the tree roots it has a very like fairytale wolf feel to it. So he's dangerous there but he's also pitiable. Yeah neil is so good in your comment about the Thinking of as an artist. You know in how that hearkens back particularly to an angel at my table and janet frame so many things pop up here thinking about these two women together. There's they share a perception of mental illness right. How about when allister makes that comment about ada. I wonder if she's not brain affected right. She's playing the kitchen table. he can't fathom. Yeah yeah and eight is similarly. You know it's interesting because you could say. We talked about how janet was especially in the kerry fox sections of that film you know. She had her own sense of self but was crippled by being among people and in society and kind of gave herself into what society expected of her and ada is definitely more. She's not as compliant but she to gets carried along by this time in places expectations literally think about how she comes to the beach the madden lifting her above their heads right and so they they kind of share that in common though i do think ada has more inner resolve. I think about how to how to live within those constraints and then and then also you know what her limits might be in what they might not be. I do want to go back to that comment. You made though adam about the symbolism. Because i do think you're onto something there you know. You are initially tripped up about is the symbolism the first time you watched it seemed like is a kind of like you didn't say too obvious but be ended heavy handed. Yeah and that is you know. That's fair to say because you look at this and just say oh. The piano is her voice. Right and it is that obviously. I think that's true. But i think what it's interesting. What happens with that piano. The that i think as soon as we learned that she's mute and she plays the piano. Oh well that we have that right but once this thing comes out of its crate and we don't see it for a while. It's interesting how we. I see it on the beach at it's brought into our field of vision from behind the camera and loving so it's kind of lowered from the men carrying it onto the beach comes into our field of vision almost like it's this holy artifact. There's something it's like. The arc in raiders just to it in the crate and it isn't until it comes out of that craig and it suddenly opens up to this sort of i mean it. It's like a veracious symbol at that point. That really can mean so many things. It's her voice but it also represents her passed. It seems to me an image of depression. I think about one the moment. We're one of the minority people. Describe it as a coffin and ultimately what it struck me as being this time is that and the ending complicates this but it symbolizes. Whatever it is that keeps us alive during our existential struggle to left for ada it is. Yes a practical piano but is it is also this thing you feel that if you start to recognize possibly seriously depressed woman weather. That is because of her own mental health or the situation..

neil sam neill morag janet ada allister george hunter kerry madden adam raiders craig depression
"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

07:21 min | 8 months ago

"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

"She's doing she had just been hanging out with her niece. Younger girl been listening to. I think the twist right chubby checker. Or i think it's clever isn't version twist and and the niece's dancing and the niece has to go to bed so jeffrey alone in the backyard and she tries dancing herself and suddenly you see that bolt of an idea strikes and she goes runs back into her little camper starts typing away. We hear her say. I think it's like hush hush hush some of the words and she gets this smile on her face and you just think this is all this woman wanted. This extremely talented wanted is a safe space to be left alone to right. And i just love where this movie ends. It's so much better than where. So many bio pic with janet frame earning award and everyone stands up and applauding for her right. But it does the same thing. It does the same. Oh yeah yeah it does. And i think if i was going to include now a movie like an angel at my table on a top five list of movies about writers i would probably call out scenes like the ones where we get the discussion before she's quote unquote a writer before she's a published writer before she is actually known for it or getting paid for it she as a young girl is discovering. Words is just discovering the difference in a sentence or a phrase or any type of expression when you change a word and not only that. There's a scene. i love where i think. It's really the first example of this where she is exposed to poetry. She has an assignment at school and she to finish poem. She gets the kind of opening two lines. And doesn't she wanna say something like touched by the sky or touches the sky and sisters like tints. The sky is way more poetic. And the thing i really like about is. I don't know whether or not tense was a more popular phrase back in that time or that place or it was more commonly employed poetry or not. I know that the sister thinks it's more poetic. And whether janet thinks it is or not what's more important to. Her is the personal choice. That she thinks sounds. Best is the one she's going to go with and notably. The movie doesn't call a lot of attention to it. But we're paying attention of course as viewers after that conversation and how adamant her sister was that she uses tints that the next day when she reads it in class or gets read in class. It's touches i guess guy it's not ten. She stuck to her convictions. You went with the word that she thought was the right one to us there and i i appreciate that. I appreciated her admiration for words. And how important it was to her to pick out the right one to go with her her instincts there. I i love that. Because i actually thought tints was maybe better to needs right but but you're right like that's not the point of the and who knows the context tints was maybe more common. I mean that was kind of impression is like maybe this is what everyone would do but jan is going to do something else. Exactly exactly. I also wanted to mention and you alluded to this earlier. The performance by kerry fox as the grown janet frame. I really love this performance. And i think it's just because of how purely radiantly also at times terrifyingly expressive. She is she. She seems like someone who is feeling everything in every moment and hide it and can't hide it right it. Just it just comes out of every pore over body and it is there on her face and and that that distinction or the discrepancy between actual excitement and joy and genuine fear. It's sometimes hard to spot. And i think i think that makes sense for this character right. Who was always. I think walking that line. Yeah i i think you describe it well and it was interesting to hear you talk about the younger. Janet played by alexia keogh. Who was in that scene. We were just talking about writing the poetry. Because i got sense that yes. She stood out a little bit and partly because of this amazing like cumulus cloud of frazee. Red hair right. Yes so so. She's a target for teachers and other which also reminded me of sweetie. Yeah for sure So that's makes her stand out but you also get a sense that and the performance by this really great child actor gives us this sense that she thinks there might still be a place in the world for her. There's a there's a little despite what she experiences. There's still some confidence in that young janet. Yeah you're right and we cut and we get you know inbetween. We do get a few scenes during the teenage years with karen ferguson. But then when we do cut to carry. Fox ask janet as a young adult. It's really harsh because what we suddenly get. Is this woman who the way i read. It suddenly realizes. I don't know where i belong this whole system. That has been set up and again undercurrent primarily by men. There's no place for me. She is clinging to doorframes. She's in back rooms eating alone over a book. She just she just can't does not know how to interact. And i i would say you know. It's a very surface level. I guess performance but it has to be because people feel this way. And i don't think it's a case of acting big. It's how the only way people who have this level. Social anxiety can interact with the world. She she wears her unease honor sleeve and she feels her outcast status so deeply in her bounce and so i do think it is even though it's jarring to make that jump from these younger janet's who still have a little bit of kind of hope for what where they could end up to this older janet who has no idea where she might fit which speaks to the point of her. I don't wanna say like. I don't want to describe her as passive Entirely by being buffeted in the world because she does have that. There's that long sequence where she takes this scholarship to go abroad on her own. And that shows you. She goes to europe that there is somewhere in her in adventurous independent spirit. It's just you know again. The social contracts combined with her social exile. Make it difficult for her to do that and really. I came out of this movie thinking. What a miracle it was if this is true again. It's a dramatize bio-pic but if this is true to the experiences of janet frame what a miracle it was. She was so prolific. Looking at the number of you know novels. I was shocked. I wish i. I went to wikipedia. We all did and you go. The movie doesn't begin to even hint at the depth of her work. And all you know for someone who was experiencing life in this way to manage to create so much is is miraculous. Yeah an angel at my table is currently streaming on the criterion channel and it's available for digital rental next week we will get to campion's big breakthrough nineteen ninety. Three's oscar winning.

janet frame janet kerry fox alexia keogh jeffrey karen ferguson Janet jan Fox europe campion oscar
"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

08:43 min | 8 months ago

"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

"To think of how to locate why this felt so different from other bio-pics and you're so right like everything that the you know the the hollywood bio-pic would hit happens off screen. I mean there is. Yeah we're kind of calm. I was kind of confused as my second time. Seen it. but it's been a while so i didn't remember all the beats. I was confused and not quite sure. Her suicide attempt is just kind of referenced. It a another character and then suddenly we realize oh like we knew she was struggling. That's been clear in the details. Camping gives us in the performance. At this point it's kerry fox which is a very like raw nerve performance. I we'll we'll probably get into that but you know this character struggling but still it took me back like oh wait a minute like that happened similarly as you alluded to when she is in this hospital the psychiatric hospital for a number of years campion is paying attention to things. Like the dehumanizing shamelessness of the hospital gowns and then there's an offhand reference to the fact that oh she's been published oh she won a prize and at first. I was thinking. Because i've been so trained by hollywood bio-pics are where these gaps like. Why are we not this. Felt initially my instinct. Was this felt like a fall. Like the these are gaps. Then i realized. I wonder if what the film is doing is giving us these years. As janet frame may have experienced them this sort of fog of site jazz psychiatric care quote unquote and that. She was undergoing the losses in her family. That were. maybe it doesn't downplay her. We'll get to this. Because the ending i think and i this comes to a triumphant conclusion. That is such a model for how pictured ac that is all about her art so this movie does not downplay her art or how important that was in her life at all but it also as you said puts it in perfect context with everything else that has happened to her family and just her daily life in this hospital link. That is important to and i came to kind of appreciate that as this is almost more of a sense of if we don't always fully realized what has happened to janet frame this movie. It's because she doesn't always fully fully realize it herself. Yeah this is a woman who because of her social anxiety which makes her debilitating lee passive because of her gender which you know means that she's going to be manipulated by forces outside of our control. She finds herself in places she's been put rather than places she intended to go absolutely and the movie captures that you know. And that's what makes it feel a little destabilizing compared to a standard bio-pic. But i think might be true to as you said i have no idea but maybe you're too frames real experience. Yeah i mean. I think one of those transitions as well and of course we unpacked the movie. A little bit and we understand more about frames character and her diagnosis or misdiagnosis. This makes sense but even the revelation that she is mad that she needs to be. Institutionalised is portrayed in a way that is kind of shocking in its pedestrian. Nece or how mundane it is we. We've seen that she is. I think fair to say a little bit of an odd duck as a girl she she someone who stands out and she is someone who doesn't behave necessarily just like all of the other kids or even within the framework of her family but it's as if all of sudden the world decides that she needs to be put away she just she just kinda rolls with that kind of like the world decides. She needs to be teacher. She sets up to go to school. But o- obviously you should be a teacher. Yeah i think there are so many comparisons of other films dealing with artists and their dealings with mental illness. And again i'll note. The difference may be that they truly were mentally ill. And perhaps the suggestion here is that she really wasn't that it was a complete misdiagnosis. But we don't get kind of those typical cliche introductions of that madness the sense that oh this is definitely going to lead to her. Being hospitalized probably at some point or struggling her whole life just like all these other transitions. We've mentioned just one day like anything else just like going to school. She's in a hospital. Movie treats again with that kind of matter of fact now. So i think that is is interesting and is definitely a departure from the norm with this type of material but the other thing that stands out having just watched sweetie is the ways. This movie connects back to can't debut and you realize okay. This isn't just campion. And i don't know any of the history behind the making of this movie or why she accepted the project but sweetie was clearly as very personal film. We talked about the the note at the end of the film even and it was written and directed by her here. She's taking this material. Well this isn't just her as a hired gun or maybe finding something that seems like it's close to her heart. You're watching this film and recognizing again this appreciation for eccentrics for a woman who is an outsider. Just like sweetie not only sweetie but just like kay in sweetie. They're both eccentric outsiders. they're on the fringe they're outcasts. And that is who. Janet very much is like sweetie this film. The not only picks sex in a similar frank way like we talked about it a lot of ways. The movie is obsessed with sex just as sweeties. You know like it really. It drives a lot of the conflicts between characters in sweetie. Here we recognize. It is not only something. It's part of her her life as a young girl something that she's always kind of vaguely encountering but she's gone most of her life as she articulates being sexless. Just been wanting that type of connection and to feel what so many other people feel. So i'm thinking about sweetie the whole time and then of course what. I really realize josh. Is that an angel. At my table and janet frame seems to me the embodiment of sweetie. Her madness her type of madness her artistic temperament. Just if sweetie actually had the talent to back it up Janet frame ends up similar to maybe not the exact circumstances we see at the end of the movie sweetie josh. But she's going to end up exactly the same as sweetie a doomed tragic figure and instead she's a triumphant figure. but only. because i love your point. About how sort of passively she falls into so many of these things it really is just about where the world takes her who she encounters and she goes with it as opposed to her actively. Making those things happen but she has the ability. She actually has the writing talent to right herself out of her circumstances. Yes and that's what sweetie doesn't have so we're seeing. We're seeing a similar character in so many ways but with one key advantage that i think camping and gets to play with here a little bit. Can i cap off your comparison with sure. Where the i mean. They both end in the same place. A family members backyard. Yeah good point. And it's it's exactly the opposite ways you just described whereas sweetie ends in tragedy. And and i'm not i'm not trying to say it simply because we didn't have the same talent as frame but it's just how these pictures divert frame finds herself in heaven. Her version of heaven. She's living with a family member. This is her sisters her grown sisters backyard living with a family member who lobster cares for her but just leaves her alone. Just she's in this camper and she can have her and she can just right. And that's that's seen reminded me why i put. Actually this movie appeared on a top five list. I did movies about writers way back in two thousand thirteen and watching this again. I was like. That's why. I remembered i wanted this movie. Because that scene is such a perfect encapsulation of you know in my experience the joy of just writing your loan. You've got your space. You've got your thoughts. She's out in that backyard..

campion janet hollywood Nece kerry lee Janet josh kay frank
"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

06:45 min | 8 months ago

"janet frame" Discussed on Filmspotting

"An angel at my table a bio-pic about new zealand writer. Janet frame based on frames three-volume autobiography campion originally envisioned it. As a three part tv miniseries it was eventually combined into a single film with three actresses plain frame at different points in her life. Alexia keogh as a child. Karen ferguson as a teen and carry fox as an adult angel had its international debut at the venice film festival where it was rapturously received famously. Losing out on the festival's top prize to the outrage of the audience which protested the loss with shouts of angel. Sam our producer tells us about that in the film though won best international film prize at the chicago film festival. Where you know. We always know what we're doing. So that makes course frames life. As i'm sure we'll get into was filled with tragedy and suffering including the death of two siblings and eight years institutionalized in an asylum. There are a lot of places we could start josh. But as i hit play on an angel at my table a few days ago over on the criterion channel i was thinking about this being a biotech. Even if it's a bio-pic about someone. I've never heard of until seeing the movie and i know how much you tend to get irritated with pics and we we rail on them a little bit. And how conventionally these stories are often told. I'm dying to hear what you make of a jane campion biotech. Yeah great question. I mean you may have hit on something. I think it does really help. If it's someone who you're not familiar with maybe you don't feel like i know the beats that are coming so that might have helped a little bit. Here's the dilemma. With this movie. Adam is if you told me like right now that jane campion was going to make a bio-pic of someone who i was familiar with. I would kind of cy like. I don't want jane campion making a bio mom but if i have to watch a i mean i'd rather watch one by jane campion. I think that's the dilemma is sort of faced with an angel at my table. And and you know. There's no denying that this is more staid film than sweetie which is what we began with her debut where it was such a bolt of pure artistic vision right but i also think that maybe this dramatizes janet frames life in a way only campion. Could i think for me. At least we get so many poetically evocative details of what this woman's life might have been like that strike me as pure champion. We also get a lot of attention to the way just an understanding not attention like a intrinsic understanding of the way gender can function as a trap. And i think those are the things that for me elevated this from the genre constraints that usually even though it has some of them you know and maybe we'll get into this. I i think there are some points where you do feel the bio-pic constraints but campion manages to elevate the material above that which we should say it's also written. She's working from scripts here a not her own script but one by laura jones. Yeah that was something. I was very aware of as i was taking notes and seeing the opening credits and you say okay not only. Is this a bio-pic but this is in not not writing her own material as she did with sweetie. Are we going to see some kind of disconnect there we not really gonna see what we would maybe expect even after just that debut of champions vision and you alluded to this. I don't think there's any way you can say that an angel at my table is as bold visually as sweetie. I don't think it takes as many chances. I will go back to your comment about when you don't know the subject in the impact that has on you as a viewer. One of the things. I was thinking about and jotted down near the end of the movie is that i felt watching angel at my table that it would have been still just as interesting if the character we were watching wasn't actually famous was just a fictional character who lived life which may be another way of saying though what you said. Which is. that's almost the experience you have watching it because you do have no frame no pun intended no frame of reference for this character at all. You don't know those beats so it feels to you just the same as it would watching a completely fictional character on screen but i think that what does maybe elevate an angel at my table above common bio-pic fair are are two things one the way it does tie back to campion in her body of work which again. Even though i've seen some other films. I'm really going only off of sweetie last week because that is what's most prevalent in my mind and then the way at least in one major way. I think it departs from traditional bio-pics beyond just the the fame or notoriety of the main character and that's the suppose matter-of-factness with which campion portrays this artists. Not only their life but really their transformation into an artist here. I was just very struck. Josh by how everything in an angel at my table and it is a piece. That's divided into three parts as the original source material. Was it's a trilogy. I was struck. By how effortlessly we transitioned. Not only between those parts but between the transitions of her own life and what you would expect from a movie about a very well known or very prominent writer is for there to be those kind of aha moments. Yes the ones where where the character. Oh they put it all together. Or they're given their big shot and and the the book that's going to bring them all their fame and attention gets published. In all the trappings that come with at and all of those moments and there are moments that depict those types of experiences for the character but they are also downplayed and they are portrayed in exactly the same way all of her other life. Experiences are portrayed that they're just they're just part of life they're just part of the fabric of this woman's life and you don't even get the sense of how much work she's turning out how popular it necessarily is other than a few comments here and there. It's it's almost as if the thing that's supposed to be the most interesting thing about her. The movie is is in some ways not all that interested in which is which is the way her fame. Actually i suppose is expressed matter. Fact is such a great way to describe it..

campion jane campion Janet frame Alexia keogh Karen ferguson laura jones new zealand josh Sam chicago janet Adam Josh
"janet frame" Discussed on Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival 2019

Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival 2019

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"janet frame" Discussed on Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival 2019

"I lived around these parts once in a house with roses and the woman on quiet nights. You could hear the smash at scott's out on the beach below. We drank too much wine. Stop thinking of each other one night and a heavy snow. She kicked me out. And not sure whether i knew i was coming or going. I went by this place believing. I wouldn't be back. Charles brash to was a keen walker in the chattering streets who tied hold one of his books ambulance. Walking in one of the light poems from his posthumously published collection home ground in tons of mantra of dunedin street names. Great king fellow london openly steps. He tramps his streets into recognition and listens at dorm for the low. C wooden scourged sullenly heaving sounding where every street in whiskered bigots who planned the city holy terrain mental cradle of virtue wrote in laney and his magnificent dunedin. Parliamentary to purgatory. Janet frames dunedin is a city that takes no chances on sunday afternoons. Having been to church the people a good quiet with sober drips. At the end of their cold dunedin noses even the winds complicit in the city's respectability combing la- seagulls like dan rough out of the sky in cat spring however feline. Early hunger makes a six-year-old slum of a city that is rumored to be clean and in dunedin morning the stream always allowed grumbler after a feed of high country. Rain cannot keep its wide apron. Clean in the cold hub. James k baxter remembers and adolescent night of the soul lying awake on a bench in the town belt alone. Eighteen more or less alive lying. Awake to the sound of clocks the railway clark townhall clark and diversity clock genteel exact therion conscience and in a small own mixed flooding asks stuffy university authorities. Have you forgotten that your city was well founded and bastardry and half your eldest. God be thanked on the wrong side of the blanket for baxter. The mid twentieth mid twentieth centuries aid was on the one hand mausoleum bush respectability and on the other theater muhima in revolt at santa beliefs stream. And it's coverted course was a symbol of the natural forces repressed by the kelvin as of calvinism. The times peter old lived for a time in the early nineteen seventies on the banks of the leafs heard stream and respectable montgomery avenue and revisiting. The nostalgia heroes off down at fifty eight v eight beer bottles rolling in the back. Fumes pouring through the floorboards. It was there that the woman who wants..

mid twentieth mid twentieth ce James k baxter one night six-year-old london fifty eight Eighteen early nineteen seventies Charles brash scott peter old one of the light poems one of his books eight beer montgomery avenue sunday afternoons dunedin once God each
"janet frame" Discussed on Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival 2019

Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival 2019

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"janet frame" Discussed on Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival 2019

"Thank you next up. We have a poet. Visual artist publisher and translator roger. Hicken many of you know him through cold hub press. Today he'll be talking to us about the recently published work a town trod by poets. Please join me in welcoming. Br dunedin appropriately for new zealand city of literature. Same to crop up in poetry more frequently and more vividly than any other new zealand city or town. It has a temporal symbolic santer of many of the poems of janet frame james k baxter and peter alds. It's charles brash. Home ground city. That floats on the edge past century beat of breakers beyond white island last stiffened nothing it has baxter's southern town a hands breadth from antarctica. It has peter houses deep southern freeze. Montgomery avenue not thinks is tonight with the tampa. Expect to see icebergs floating harbour after this city of literature publication town trod by poets which features photographs and poetry by peter. All of a poem by mexican halio address to peter began as a paper presented. Two thousand sixteen center for the book symposium book and plice sauntering around the city trailing a string of quotations i meant to offer an impressionistic account of dunedin's presence in poetry with an emphasis on the poetry payrolls more than any other writer whose mapped the stories dunedin straits subtitled. Search for truth. Underneath and streets grew from a phrase in a poem of mine grim satori on dunedin streets dunedin having been the locus of my misspent youth. Not all of which i care to remember a backdrop to the adventure of suffering to paraphrase in loni for whom the city was an tip in mount third tory hill tree and tower by sunlight or stylized assembled into a sitting for something to take place in so what follows snippets from town by poets. The old wise journey on foot robert mcfarland right. The compact between riding and walking almost as old as literature award is only a step away from a story. Many of the dunedin poems of peter alds stories of or footnotes to his walks street after salt win street as good an example as any as bell. Now's park or two thousand eight in which he steps into a story in the imagined company of some local literary four years. Charles brash risk dallas. Ah read james k baxter and an ex-lover as he walks up high gaze towards the town belt nor west wind at my back stopped at bell. Now's park for a p and a clump of bush. Got sniffed out by a black dog took a seat on an antiquated bench to take in the view the ground hollowed at my feet by those. Who'd been before me watching. The surf roll into clear. Poets charles and ruth comparing peninsula visions. I am sky sharing egg and possibly sandwiches. Young couples shooting just starting out on life's moonlit journey..

peter alds new zealand james k baxter antarctica tonight Today four years janet frame robert mcfarland loni two thousand Montgomery avenue new zealand city peter charles brash mexican past century Charles brash couples roger
"janet frame" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"janet frame" Discussed on Power 106 FM

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