19 Burst results for "Janet Adamy"

Why Thousands of Millennials are Leaving U.S. Cities

WSJ What's News

03:51 min | 2 years ago

Why Thousands of Millennials are Leaving U.S. Cities

"Have you found yourself priced. Out of a city like New York are Houston latest data from the two thousand eighteen census shows. You might not be alone for the fourth straight year. People between the ages of thirty five and thirty nine have left cities with half a million people or more Charlie Turner has been finding out why from Janet Adamy me Janet in recent months the Wall Street Journal has reported on various migration trends such as young people moving out of New York City and millennials moving to the suburbs. The Journal has analyzed data on young people leaving the city's this from the census. What do the numbers show for the fourth year in a row tens of thousands thousands of young adults. This is millennials and the youngest members of Generation X. have moved out of the nation's biggest cities this was happening in New York Chicago Houston based in San Francisco Las Vegas Washington and Portland. There was of course pretty big influx of young people into cities after the recession and what this latest data data shows is that you know for a couple of years. We've had these disdain declines. There were questions about whether maybe it was just an anomaly of a couple of years or or if this millennial generation was finally starting to move into that next stage of life where they were getting married and buying houses and the big question was are living in a stay and be different than previous generations or are they going to uproot and move to suburbs for more affordable housing more space better schools and what we're seeing in this pattern suggests that as they do get older yes they are starting to act more like previous generations and lust like the kind of anomaly of urban dwellers they have been for for the much of this past decade and we're talking about numbers in the tens of thousands cities with more than half million people put together lost almost twenty seven thousand residents among the ages of twenty five to thirty nine this was last year and although this was. I guess half of the drop in two thousand seventeen and that's still a sizeable decline fine. I think the bigger story here is the pattern so a large batch of cities. Losing tens of thousands of people in the whole scheme of things is not that significant but we had in the middle of the decade. Was You know a pretty steady inflex for a couple of years and I think developers other real estate professionals schools employers to a certain extent have kind of been paying close attention to whether this remains a net inflow or a an outflow and the fact that it's four years of outflow starts to tell us that there's some different behavior going on even if the numbers aren't huge the drop laughter was driven by decline in urban residents. I guess older millennials thirty five to thirty nine. That's right among the youngest millennials in that that very oldest cohort of the Gen Z. That follows them. They are so moving into cities their numbers in the largest it just cities are are marginally positive but where the losses are really happiness. Urban residents aged thirty five to thirty nine again. That's the age at which you no. The people are oftentimes making the decision about where they're going to settle down. They are either you know well into or staring down decisions about schools and what we're finding. Is that that age. Group is a point at which people decide that they don't want to stay anymore and you mentioned schools aren't those basically the primary the reasons they don't like the schools in the big cities and also the cost of housing for the space that they're getting that's right housing costs in general appear to be the biggest factor her and that's in cities that are relatively affluent as well as ones that are struggling more interestingly the there were some research out of Boston. University that found in a study of mirrors errors that only thirteen percent said that the housing stock in their city fit the population's very well so there's a real mismatch between the kind of housing people want and the kind of housing housing that's available and said he's not it does appear to be the main

New York City Wall Street Journal New York Houston Janet Adamy Charlie Turner Boston San Francisco Las Vegas Portland Washington Thirteen Percent Four Years
"janet adamy" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Figures and other research show that about one in eleven Americans aged fifty and older lacks a spouse, a partner or a living child that amounts to about eight million people in the US without close kin the main source of companionship in old age and their share of the population is expected to grow. Here's Wall Street Journal news editor Janet Adamy Janet, this is unsettling. It's interesting, Gordon, what we found is that the baby boomer generation, this is a generation that really prize individuality. They were more likely to get divorced has fewer children than previous generations. And they had a spirit of they'd had a spirit of individuality. The end result. Is that now that they're getting into their older years, and they're retiring there, they are more likely to find themselves living alone without close family and kin. Those are often the biggest supports in later in later years. And we're finding that the rates of loneliness among baby boomers are higher than other generations, including the generation that's older than them the silent generation. Wow. No siblings. Kids nieces nephews to be supportive. What I don't understand. What's happening? I it's demographic factors. I mean, some of it is the the way that society in general has evolved, you know, the institutions like civic groups participation in organized religion, those things aren't as strong as they used to be good for the boomers. It really comes down to some of these life turkeys that they made earlier that, you know, probably not top of mind when you're forgoing having as many children, are you gave a divorce earlier. And like the dynamic win you age. It becomes it becomes more problematic. See reference religion. I there was a believe the guy you open the story with from Utah says you he's he's even stopped going to church, and that was offered lily some sort of social stimulation. Yeah. When one of the most interesting finding the relationship between health and loneliness, and there's a good bit a very strong research out there suggesting that it's the loneliness. Doesn't just make you feel kind of sad. It actually has concrete negative consequences for your health. Some of the researchers found that being lonely is as bad for you smoking up to fifteen cigarettes a day are consuming more than six alcoholic drinks a day even worse than being physically inactive in the case of this particular gentleman wanting that we find things go hand in hand that when your health, and you know, when you have we get less healthy, it also becomes you have a disincentive to go out and socialize and the Keith his Garrett of Danny minor. Who's at our story. You know, he kind of became of a negative cycle where his legs started to a shoulder. They can. So he wasn't doing this stuff as much and then he ended up spending more time, alone and becomes more only. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal news editor Janet Adamy. She's in the Washington DC bureau with a fascinating piece of metal the loneliest generation. When Americans more than ever our aging alone. How much does money have to do with this or they are they short on funds to travel or go out and do something? Well, what we find the real financial impact comes through the Medicare program that takes care of the elderly. There's a pretty good safe from AARP some Harvard, researchers that came out last year that found that the lack of social contacts among older Americans cost Medicare six point seven billion dollars a year dot mostly those from spending they isolated seniors spend more money on nursing facilities in them. And they get hospitalized. They are more expensive in the hospital. So I think the real financial impact comes from what you have to the system. It's not just the theaters themselves to where bearing this cost. It's really. The tax payers who are paying into Medicare. Which is what makes us a public health problem? It's not just CB. I think people often think of this is these individual cases, but because of the financial impact, it's really it's really more of a national problem, and we're seeing more attention to this. The Trump administration is trying to look away to union faith-based partnerships to better connect with. To better tap into senior. There are certainly many senior still do go to church in the ideas. Those seniors are going to those churches. Let's have those churches be the first point of contact. And to these people know another thing that jumped out at me and the store you began the one paragraph by saying among the most likely to lack close kin are college educated women, right? This is kind of an interesting finding because I think it has to do with this sort of the woman who comes after that who is she was in executive here in the Washington area. And she found that you know, now that she's an old like sixty she's had a real hard time finding a new partner Janet that is Wall Street Journal news editor Janet Adamy, twelve minutes. Now after the hour on this weekend. Geico presents eyewitness interviews with inanimate objects. This is Belinda Collins live on the.

Wall Street Journal Janet Adamy Janet Janet Adamy Medicare news editor partner Washington US Gordon Belinda Collins Utah Geico AARP executive Keith Harvard Danny minor seven billion dollars
The Loneliest Generation: Americans, More Than Ever, Are Aging Alone

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

01:54 min | 2 years ago

The Loneliest Generation: Americans, More Than Ever, Are Aging Alone

"They are more expensive in the hosp. So I think the real financial impact comes from what you have to the system. It's not just the senior that bearing this cost. Really? Essentially the tax payers who are paying into Medicare. Which is what makes us a public health problem? It's not just I think people often think of this as these individual cases, but because of the financial impact, it's really it's really more of a national problem. And we're seeing more attention brought to this. The Trump administration is trying to look at a way to use faith-based partnerships to better connect with. To better tap into seniors. Are certainly many senior still do go to church in the ideas. Those seniors going to those churches, let's have those churches be the first point of contact and reach out to these people know another thing that jumped out at me and the store you began the one paragraph by saying among the most likely to lack close kin are college educated women. That's right. This is a this kind of an interesting finding because I think it has to do with this sort of the woman who comes after that who is she was an executive here in the Washington area. And she's found that you know, now that she's sixty she's had a real hard time finding a new partner that's something. It's Wall Street Journal news editor Janet Adamy out of the bureau in Washington DC. It's twenty minutes in front of the hour on this morning. America's First News.

Executive Washington Dc Wall Street Journal Medicare Janet Adamy America News Editor Partner Twenty Minutes
"janet adamy" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on KTOK

"Choose a strategy for an unexpected data hack. One of the more common types of threats that we've seen lately is the ransomware attack where somebody gets into your network and eventually hold your data hop, and then says if you want to. Diene creek data. You have to pay our anthem Wall Street Journal reporter John camp on cities bracing for inevitable hacks. He's here in about twenty five minutes. About seventeen million members of generation Z are now adults and starting to enter the US workforce and employers have not seen a generation like this since the great depression. They are a scarred generation cautious and hardened by economic and social turbulence more from Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy Janet who are they demographic. We're talking about kids who were born around nineteen ninety seven or later up until probably just a couple of years ago, they came of age during the recession and a lot of during the period and a lot of other difficult events, you know, ages terror threats school shootings and also under this immense Clarence social media. And the result is a generation that is really kind of hardened in a lot of wisit reminds demographers the kids who were born came out of the great depression the silent generation. Yeah. That was an interesting comparison. How come well? There. Are there is a real craving for financial security? These kids are more interested in making money than any generation on record. Which is go. You know, these records that we know from survey data go back at least three generations, they crave financial security. Also, very risk averse less interested in starting their own business. And even on social behaviors fewer of them are trying alcohol getting driver's license and even having sex, and these teen rites of passage that we think of behaviors have decreased over the last couple of years. I understand being nervous about being an entrepreneur. Perhaps watching what their parents went through during the financial crisis. What what does that have to do with the social behaviors? Or is that some sort of trickle down to social behaviors are tied to the fact that kids are hanging out less in person because so much of socializing has moved to social media. It's new to not just text messages, but stop shot. Instagram, not Facebook because this is not a generation they use Facebook. But these newer platforms. That's socializing. And if you're not hanging out in person, there's you know, less of an opportunity to do some of these things that people have typically associated with teenage behavior in incidentally, what we really looked at is how this generation is coming into the workplace. So, you know, a lot of times people think your youngest worker as a millennial. Well, could you were born in ninety seven they're turning twenty one this year. So businesses are starting to hire these kids into professional jobs in for the noncolored drought. Some of these some of these young people have been in jobs for a couple of years now. And what we're finding is that you know, when you grow up on these things you are a little bit less comfortable with social interaction. I think people think of you know, millennials is very tech focused are very adept in the office using technology, but you know, millennials by and large grew up during the eighties in the nineties. They had landlines. They you know, they had to learn how to answer the phone. They grew up in an age of dial up internet this generation generation the they grew up with smartphones. When they cried in a restaurant there. Parents handed them an iphone. So we're talking about a cohort of young Americans whose whole social experience. This was quite a bit different. Now, you translate thought to the workplace when these kids get in. It's just a little the face to face is a little bit less natural for them. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She's done a deep dive on generation Z the group born in roughly nineteen Ninety-seven till up in just a few years ago. And that group has come into your office because they're turning twenty one at least the oldest of them right now. So speaking of a lack of face to face because of their their digital natives, right? What are companies doing video wise to try to teach them, right? You're having some companies are moving their training to YouTube style videos. A lot of training is moving to phone ruby. Tuesday was one company we talked to they've got these phone videos or they're teaching people how to grill burgers and slow cook reds, even on the interview side. You're seeing companies say that they they're doing allowing people to videotape there. Job interviews. Early job interviews and essentially send in video clips for interviews. You're also having companies trying to post more things on internally they're finding they need to post things on channels like slack. Incidentally, they're finding with in such a good economy with some of these young very tech savvy. Young people companies are finding that if they have a bad experience. Just in the interview, you they can they can get online they can post things about that. And so they're saying we heard from some employers, as you know, you've got to be careful with these kids just to not turn them after the interview process because among young tech talent. For example, somebody might, you know, put something up on Instagram that's negative about the experience. They had interviewing with your company. Will you don't want him to do that? John Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy twelve minutes now after the hour on This Morning, America's first news. What's in store? This black Friday at your local, Staples comfort and joy as.

Wall Street Journal reporter Janet Adamy Janet Adamy Janet Instagram US Diene creek Facebook John camp YouTube Staples America twenty five minutes twelve minutes
"janet adamy" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Generation Z are now adults and starting to enter the US workforce and employers have not seen a generation like this since the great depression. They are a scarred generation cautious and hardened by economic and social turbulence more from Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy Janet who are they. Demographic. We're talking about kids who were born around nineteen ninety seven or later up until probably just a couple of years ago. They came of age during the recession and a lot of during the period and a lot of other difficult events to see, you know, age of threats school shootings and also this immense Clarence social media. And the result is a generation that is really kind of hardened in a lot of ways. It reminds demographers are the kids who were born came out of the great depression the silent generation. Yeah. That was an interesting comparison. How come well there? There is a real craving for financial security. These kids are more interested in making money than any generation on record, which is go. You know, go these records that we know from survey data go back at least three generations, they crave financial security, and they're also very risk averse less interested in starting their own business and even until. Social behaviors you were of them are trying hall getting the driver's license, and even having sex these teen rites of passage that we think of those behaviors have decreased over the last couple of years. I couldn't understand being nervous about being an entrepreneur. Perhaps watching what their parents went through during the financial crisis. What what does that have to do with the social behaviors? Or is that some sort of trickle down social behaviors are tied to the fact that kids are hanging out less in person. Because so much of socializing has moved to social media. It's moved to not just text messages, but stop Chad Instagram, not Facebook generation, they use Facebook the newer platforms. That's socializing. And if you're not hanging out in person, there's you know, less of an opportunity to do some of these things that people have typically associated with teenage behavior in incidently what we really looked at. It's how this generation is coming into the workplace. So, you know, a lot of times people think you're young. Guest worker as millennial. Well, kids who were born in ninety seven they're turning twenty one this year. Businesses are starting to hire these kids into professional jobs in for the non college routes, some of the young people have been in jobs for a couple of years now. And what we're finding is that you know, when you grow up on these things you are a little bit not comfortable with social interaction. I think people think of you know, millennials is very tech soukous. They're very adopt in the office using technology, but you know, millennials by large grew up during the eighties and the nineties they had landlines. They you know, they had to learn how to answer the phone. They grew up in an age of dial up internet this generation generation Z, they grew up with smartphones. When they cried in a restaurant their parent parents handed them an iphone, so we're talking about. Cohort of young Americans whose whole social experience is quite a bit different. Now, you translate thought to the workplace when these kids get in. It's just a little face to face is a little bit less natural for them. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She's done a deep dive on generation Z the group born in roughly nineteen Ninety-seven till up in just a few years ago. And that group is coming to your office because they're turning twenty one at least the oldest of them right now. So speaking of a lack of face to face because of their they're digital natives. Right. Order companies doing I guess video wise to try to teach them, right? You're having some companies are moving their training to YouTube style videos in a lot of training is moving to phone ruby. Tuesday was one company we talked to they've got these phone videos, or they're teaching people how to grill burgers and slow cook read, even on the interview side, you're seeing companies say that they they're doing allowing people to videotape. Their job interviews. Early job interviews, and essentially send in video clips for interview. Us. You're also having companies trying to post more things on internally they're finding they need to postings on channels like slack. Incidentally, they're finding with in such a good economy was very tech savvy. Young people companies are finding that if they have a bad experience. Just in the interview, they can they can get online. They can posting about that. And so they're saying we heard from some employers, as you know, you you've got to be careful with these kids just to not turn them off during the interview process because among young tech talent. For example, somebody might, you know, put something up on Instagram that's negative about the experience. They had interviewing with your company. Will you don't want him to do that? Janet, Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy twelve minutes now after the hour on This Morning, America's first news. What's in store? This black Friday at your local, Staples comfort.

Wall Street Journal Janet Adamy Janet reporter Janet Adamy Facebook US YouTube Chad Instagram America twelve minutes
"janet adamy" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Choose a strategy for an unexpected data hack. One of the more common types of threats. The we've seen lately of the ransomware attack where somebody gets into your at work and essentially hold your data. Then says if you want to be. Encrypted data. You have to pay anthem Wall Street Journal reporter John camp on cities bracing for inevitable hacks. He's here in about twenty five minutes. Seventeen million members of generation Z are now adults and starting to enter the US workforce and employers have not seen a generation like this since the great depression. They are a scarred generation cautious and hardened by economic and social turbulence more from Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy Janet who are they this demographic. We're talking about kids who were born around nineteen ninety seven or later up until probably just a couple of years ago, they came of age during the recession and a lot of during the period of a lot of other difficult events, you know, age of terror threats school shootings and also under this immense Clara social media. And the result is a generation that is really kind of hardened in a lot of wisit reminds demographers of the kids who were born came out of the great depression, the silent generation that was an interesting comparison. How come well there? There is a real craving for financial security. These kids are more interested in making money than any generation on record. Which is go. You know, these records that we know from survey data go back at least three generations. They they crave financial security, and they're also very risk averse less interested in starting their own business. And even on social behaviors fewer of them are trying alcohol getting a driver's license and even having sex, and these teen rates have passage that we think of behaviors have decreased over the last couple of years. I understand being nervous about being an entrepreneur. Perhaps watching what their parents went through during the financial crisis. What what does that have to do with the social behaviors at some sort of trickle down to social behaviors are tied to the fact that kids are hanging out less impersonal because so much of socializing has moved to social media. It's moved to not just text messages, but stop chat. Instagram, not Facebook because this is not a generation they use Facebook. But the newer platforms, that's socializing. And if you're not hanging out in person, there's you know, less of an opportunity to do some of these things that people have typically associated with teenage behavior in incidentally, what we really looked at. It's how this generation is coming into the workplace. So, you know, a lot of times people think your youngest worker as a millennial. Well, kids who were born in Ninety-seven, they're turning twenty one this year. So businesses are starting to hire these kids into professional jobs in for the noncolored drought. Some of these some of the young people have been in jobs for a couple of years now. And what we're finding is that you know, when you grow up on these things you are a little bit less comfortable with social interaction. I think people think of you know, millennials is very tech soukous. They're very adopt in the office using technology, but you know, millennials by and large grew up during the eighties and the nineties they had landlines. They you know, they had to learn how to answer the phone. They grew up in an age of dial. Up internet this generation generation, the they grew up with smartphones. When they cried in a restaurant their parent parents handed them an iphone, so we're talking about cohort of young Americans whose whole social experience is quite a bit different. Now, you translate thought to the workplace when these kids get in. It's just a little face to face is a little bit less natural for them speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy, she's done a deep dive on generation Z the group born in roughly nineteen Ninety-seven till up in just a few years ago. And that group is coming to your office because they're turning twenty one at least the oldest of them right now. So speaking of a lack of face to face because of their well, they're digital natives. Right. What are companies doing? I guess video is to try to teach them, right? You're having some companies are moving their training to YouTube style videos, a lot of training moving to phone ruby. Tuesday was one company we talked to they've got these phone videos or they're teaching people how to grill burgers and slow cook reds. Even on the interview side. We're seeing companies say that they they're doing allowing people to videotape. Their job interviews. Early job interviews and essentially send in video clips for interviews. You're also having companies trying to post more things on internally, they're finding they need postings on channels like slack. Incidentally, they're finding with in such a good economy with some of these young very tech savvy. Young people companies are finding that if they have a bad experience. Just in the interview, you they can they can get online they can post things about that. And so they're saying we heard from seven players, as you know, you've got to be careful with these kids just to not turn them off during the interview process because among young tech talent. For example, somebody might, you know, put something up on Instagram that's negative about the experience. They had interviewing with your company. Will you don't want him to do that? Janet, Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy twelve minutes now after the hour on This Morning, America's first news. What's in store? This black Friday at your local, Staples comfort and joy as in the comfort.

Wall Street Journal reporter Janet Adamy Janet Janet Adamy Instagram Facebook US John camp YouTube Staples America twenty five minutes twelve minutes
"janet adamy" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

04:51 min | 3 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on WLAC

"Thanks for being with us about seventeen million members of generations e are now adults and starting to enter the US workforce and employers have not seen a generation like this since the great depression. They are scarred generation cautious and hardened by economic and social turbulence more from Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy, Janet, what are we learning about them? They're an interesting group. This demographic we're talking about kids who were born around nineteen ninety seven or later up until probably just a couple of years ago. They came of age during the recession and a lot of during the period of a lot of other difficult events to see, you know, ages terror threats school shootings and also under this immense Clara social media. And the result is a generation that is really kind of hardened in a lot of wisit reminds demographers of the kids who were born. Came out of the great, depression the silent generation. Yeah. That was an interesting comparison. How come well there? There is a real craving for financial security. These kids are more interested in making money than any generation on record. Which is these records that we know from survey data go back at least three generations. They they crave financial security, and they're also very risk averse less interested in starting their own business. And even social behaviors fewer of them are trying alcohol getting the driver's license and even having sex, and these teen passage that we think of behaviors have decreased over the last couple of years. I couldn't understand being nervous about being an entrepreneur. Perhaps watching what their parents went through during the financial crisis. What what is all that have to do with the social behaviors? Or is that some sort of trickle down to social behaviors are tied to the fact that kids are hanging. Out less in person. Because so much of socializing has moved to social media. It's moved to not just text messages. Stop chat Instagram, not Facebook generation, they use Facebook unity newer platforms. That's socializing. And if you're not hanging out in person, there's you know, less of an opportunity to do some of these things that people have typically associated with teenage behavior in incidentally, what we really looked at. It's how this generation is coming into the workplace. So, you know, a lot of times people think your youngest worker as a millennia well kids were born in ninety seven they're turning twenty one this year. Businesses are starting to hire these kids into professional jobs in for the noncolored drought. Some some of the young people have been in jobs for a couple of years now. And what we're finding is that you know, when you grow up on these things you are a little bit less comfortable with social interaction. So we're talking about a cohort of young Americans whose whole social experiences with quite a bit different. Now, you translate that to the workplace when these kids get in. It's just a little face to face is a little bit less natural for them. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She's done a deep dive on generation Z the group born in roughly nineteen Ninety-seven till up in just a few years ago. And that group is coming to your office because they're Twenty-one at least the oldest of them right now. So speaking of a lack of face to face because of their their digital natives, right? What are companies doing I guess video wise to try to teach them, right? You're having some companies are moving their training to YouTube style videos. A lot of training is moving to phone ruby. Tuesday was one company we talked to they've got these phone videos, or they're teaching people how to grill burgers and slow cook read even on the interview side, we're seeing companies say that they they're doing allowing people to videotape. Their job interviews. Early job interviews and essentially send in video clips for interviews. You're also having companies trying to post more things on internally, they're finding they need postings on channels like slack. Incidentally, they're finding with the young institute. Good economy was some of these young very tech savvy. Young people companies are finding that if they have a bad experience. Just in the interview, they can they can get online they can post things about that. And so they're saying we have from seven players, as you know, you've got to be careful with these kids just to not turn them off during the interview process because among young tech talent, for example. Somebody might you know, put something up on Instagram. That's negative about the experience. They had interviewing with your company. Will you don't want him to do that? Janet, Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She writes, by the way that the share of college freshmen nationwide who prioritize becoming well off rose to around eighty two percent when gen Z began entering college a few years ago, that's the highest level since UCLA began the survey in nineteen sixty six..

Janet Adamy Wall Street Journal reporter US Facebook young institute YouTube UCLA eighty two percent
"janet adamy" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

04:51 min | 3 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Being with us about seventeen million members of generations e are now adults and starting to enter the US workforce and employers have not seen a generation like this since the great depression. They are a scarred generation cautious and hardened by economic and social turbulence more from Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy, Janet, what are we learning about them? They're an interesting group. This demographic we're talking about kids who were born around nineteen ninety seven or later up until probably just a couple of years ago. They came of age during the recession and a lot of during the period and a lot of other difficult events. See, you know, age of terror threats school shootings and also under this immense Clarence social media. And the result is a generation, but it's really kind of hardened in a lot of ways. It reminds demographers of the kids were born came out of the great depression the silent generation. Yeah. That was an interesting comparison. How come well there? There is a real craving for financial security. These kids are more interested in making money than any generation on record. Which is go. You know, these records that we know from survey data go back at least three generations, they crave financial security, and they're also very risk averse less interested in starting their own business. And even on social behaviors fewer of them are trying alcohol getting a driver's license and even having. Tuck and these teen rights of passage that we think of behaviors have decreased over the last couple of years. I couldn't understand being nervous about being an entrepreneur. Perhaps watching what their parents went through the financial crisis. What what to do with the social behaviors? Or is that some sort of trickle down social behaviors are tied to the fact that kids are hanging out less in person. Because so much of socializing has moved to social media. It's moved to not just text messages, but stop chat, Instagram, not Facebook. Because this is not a generation they use Facebook. But did you know the newer platforms? That's socializing. And if you're not hanging out in person, there's you know, less of an opportunity to do some of these things that people have typically associated with teenage behavior in incidentally, what we really looked at. It's how this generation that's coming into the workplace. So a lot of times people think your youngest worker as millennia well kids who were born in ninety seven they're turning twenty one this year. Businesses are starting to hire these kids into professional jobs in for the noncolored. Some some of the young people have been in jobs for a couple of years now. And what we're finding is that you know, when you grow up on these things you are a little bit less comfortable with social interaction. So we're talking about a coworker of young Americans whose whole social experiences was quite a bit different. You translate thought to the workplace when these kids get in. It's just a little face to face is a little bit less natural for them. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She's done a deep dive on generation Z the group born in roughly nineteen Ninety-seven till up in just a few years ago. And that group is coming to your office because they're turning twenty one. At least the oldest of them right now. So speaking of a lack of face to face because of their their digital natives, right? What are companies doing I guess video wise to try to teach them, right? You're having some companies are moving their training to YouTube style videos. A lot of training is moving to phone ruby. Tuesday was one company we talked to they've got these phone videos, or they're teaching people how to grill burgers and slow cook grads, even on the interview side, we're seeing companies say that they they're doing allowing people to videotape. Their job interviews. Early job interviews and essentially send in video clips for interviews. You're also having companies trying to post more things on internally they're finding they need to postings on channels like slack. Incidentally, they're finding with and such a good economy was some of these young very tech savvy. Young people companies are finding that if they have a bad experience. Just in the interview do they can they can get online. They can post things about that. And so they're saying we have from seven players, as you know, you've got to be careful with these kids just to not turn them off during the interview process because among young tech talent, for example. Somebody might you know, put something up on Instagram. That's negative about the experience. They had interviewing with your company. Will you don't want him to do that? Jack, Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She writes, by the way that the share of college freshmen nationwide who prioritize becoming well off rose to around eighty two percent when gen Z began entering college a few years ago, that's the highest level since UCLA began the survey in nineteen sixty six..

Janet Adamy Wall Street Journal reporter Facebook US YouTube Tuck UCLA Jack eighty two percent
"janet adamy" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on KTOK

"Thanks for being with us about seventeen million members of generations e are now adults and starting to enter the US workforce and employers have not seen a generation like this since the great depression. They are a scarred generation cautious and hardened by economic and social turbulence more from Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy, Janet, what are we learning about them? They're an interesting group. This demographic we're talking about kids who were born around nineteen ninety seven or later up until probably just a couple of years ago. They came of age during the recession and during the period of a lot of other difficult events to see, you know, ages terror threats school shootings and also under the immense Clarence social media. And the result is a generation, but it's really kind of hardened in a lot of wisit. It reminds demographers of the kids who were born came out of the great depression, the silent generation that was an interesting comparison. How come well there? There is a real craving for financial security. These kids are more interested in making money than any generation on record. Which is these records that we know from survey data go back at least three generations, they crave financial security, and they're also very risk averse less interested in starting their own business. And even on social behaviors fewer of them are trying alcohol getting a driver's license and even having. Attacks and these team passage that we think of those behaviors have decreased over the last couple of years. I understand being nervous about being an entrepreneur. Perhaps watching what their parents went through during the financial crisis. What what does that have to do with the social behaviors? Or is that some sort of trickle down to social behaviors are tied to the fact that kids are hanging out less in person. Because so much of socializing has moved to social media to text messages, but stop chat, Instagram, not Facebook. Because this is not a generation they use Facebook the newer platforms. That's socializing. And if you're not hanging out in person, there's less of an opportunity to do some of these things that people have typically associated with teenage behavior in incidently what we really looked at. It's how this generation is coming into the workplace. So a lot of times people think your youngest workers millennia. Well, could you were born in Ninety-seven they're turning twenty one this year to businesses are starting to hire these kids into professional job in for the noncolored droughts. Some of the young people have been in jobs for a couple of years now. And what we're finding is that you know, when you grow up on these things you are a little bit less comfortable with social interaction. So we're talking about cohort of young Americans whose whole social experiences with quite a bit different. Now, you translate thought to the workplace when these kids get in. It's just a little face to face is a little bit less natural for them. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She's done a deep dive on generation Z the group born in roughly nineteen Ninety-seven till up. In just a few years ago, and that group has come into your office because they're turning twenty one at least the oldest of them right now. So speaking of a lack of face to face because of their their digital natives, right? What are companies doing video wise to try to teach them, right? You're having some companies are moving their training to YouTube style videos, a lot of training is moving to phone ruby Tuesday with one company we talked to they've got these phone videos, or they're teaching people how to grill burgers and slow cook reds, even on the interview side. We're seeing companies say that they they're doing allowing people to videotape. Their job interviews. Early job interviews and essentially send in video clips for interviews. You're also having companies trying to post more things on internally, they're finding they need postings on channels like slack. Incidentally, they're finding with young into good economy was of these young very tech savvy. Young people companies are finding that if they have a bad experience. Just in the interview, they can they can get online they can post things about that. And so they're saying we have from seven players, Gino. You've got to be careful with these kids just to not turn them off during the interview process because among young tech talent, for example. Somebody might you know, put something up on Instagram. That's negative about the experience. They had interviewing with your company. Will you don't want him to do that makes Janet Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy? She writes, by the way that the share of college freshmen nationwide who prioritize becoming well off rose to around eighty two percent when gen Z began entering college a few years ago, that's the highest level since UCLA began the survey in nineteen sixty six. This portion of the program is brought to you by light stream. If you're thinking about saving.

Janet Adamy reporter Wall Street Journal Janet Wall Street Journal Facebook US Janet YouTube UCLA Gino eighty two percent
"janet adamy" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Thanks. Being with us about seventeen million members of generations e are now adults and starting to enter the US workforce and employers have not seen a generation like this since the great depression. They are scarred generation cautious and hardened by economic and social turbulence more from Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy, Janet, what are we learning about them? They're an interesting group. This demographic we're talking about kids who were born around nineteen ninety seven or later up until probably just a couple of years ago. They came of age during the recession and a lot of during the period of a lot of other difficult events to see, you know, ages terror threats school shootings and also under this immense Clarence social media. And the result is a generation that is really kind of hardened in a lot of ways that reminds demographers to the kids who were born came out of the great depression, the silent generation that was an interesting comparison. How come well there? There is a real craving for financial security. These kids are more interested in. Making money than any generation on record. Which is these records that we know from survey data go back at least three generations day, they crave financial security, and they're also very risk averse less interested in starting their own business. And even on social behaviors you were of them are trying out getting a driver's license and even having sex, and these teen rites of passage that we think of the haters of decreased over the last couple of years. I couldn't understand being I guess nervous about being an entrepreneur perhaps watching what their parents went through during the financial crisis. What what does that have to do with the social behaviors? Or is that some sort of trickle down the social behaviors are tied to the fact that kids are hanging out less in person. Because so much of socializing has moved to social media. It's new to not just text messages. But yeah, stop chat Instagram, not Facebook generation, they use Facebook. But the newer platforms. That's socializing. And me if you're not hanging out in person, there's you know, less of an opportunity to do some of these things that people typically associated with teenage behavior in incidentally, what we really looked at is how this generation that's coming into the workplace. So a lot of times people think your youngest worker as a millennial. Well, could you were born in ninety seven they're turning twenty one this year. Businesses are starting to hire these kids into professional jobs in for the non college routes, some of the young people have been in jobs for a couple of years now. And what we're finding is that you know, when you grow up on these things you are a little bit less comfortable with social interaction. So we're talking about a cohort of young Americans whose whole social experiences with quite a bit different. Now, you translate thought to the workplace when these kids get in. It's just a little the face to face is a little bit less natural for them. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She's done a deep dive on generation Z the group born in roughly nineteen Ninety-seven till up in just a few years ago. And that group has come into your office because they're turning twenty one at least the oldest of them right now. So speaking of a lack of face to face because of their their digital natives, right? What are companies doing I guess video wise to try to teach them, right? You're having some companies are moving their training to YouTube style videos in a lot of training is moving to phone ruby. Tuesday was one company we talked to they've got these phone videos, or they're teaching people how to grill burgers and slow cook read even on the interview side, we're seeing companies say that they they're doing allowing people to videotape. Their job interviews. Early job interviews and essentially send in video clips for interviews. You're also having companies trying to post more things on internally they're finding they need to post things on channels like slack. Incidentally, they're finding with in such a good economy was some of these young very tech savvy. Young people companies are finding that if they have a bad experience. Just in the interview, you they can they can get online they can post things about that. And so they're saying we heard from seven players, you know, you've got to be careful with these kids just to not turn them off during the interview process because among young tech talent, for example. Somebody might you know, put something up on Instagram. That's negative about the experience. They had interviewing with your company. Will you don't want him to do that? Please. Janet, Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She writes, by the way that the share of college freshmen nationwide who prioritize becoming well off rose to around eighty two percent when gen Z began entering college a few years ago, that's the highest level since UCLA began the survey in nineteen sixty six. This portion of the program is brought to you by light stream. If you're thinking about saving.

Janet Adamy Wall Street Journal reporter Facebook US YouTube UCLA eighty two percent
"janet adamy" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Being with us about seventeen million members of generations e are now adults and starting to enter the US workforce and employers have not seen a generation like this since the great depression. They are a scarred generation cautious and hardened by economic and social turbulence more from Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy, Janet, what are we learning about them? They're an interesting group. This demographic we're talking about kids who were born around nineteen ninety seven or later up until probably just a couple of years ago. They came of age during the recession and a lot of during the period and a lot of other difficult events to see, you know, age of terror threats school shootings and also under this immense Clarence social media. And the result is a generation that is really kind of hardened in a lot of wisit reminds demographers are the kids who were born came out of the great depression, the silent generation did that was interesting comparison. How come well there? There is a real craving for financial security. These kids are more interested in. Making money than any generation on record, which is go. You know, go these records that we know from survey data go back at least three generations day, they crave financial security on. They're also Jerry risk-averse less interested in starting their own business. And even on social behaviors you were of them are trying alcohol getting a driver's license and even having sex, and these teen rites of passage that we think of behaviors have decreased over the last couple of years. I can understand being nervous about being an entrepreneur. Perhaps watching what their parents went through during the financial crisis. What what does that have to do with the social behaviors? Or is that some sort of trickle down the social behaviors are tied to the fact that kids are hanging out less in person. Because so much of socializing has moved to social media to not just text messages, but stop chat, Instagram, not Facebook. Because this is not a generation they use Facebook the newer platforms. That's socializing. And if you're not hanging out in person, there's less of an opportunity to do some of these things that people have typically associated with teenage behavior in incidentally, what we really looked at. It's how this generation is coming into the workplace. So a lot of times people think your youngest worker as a millennial. Well, could you were born in Ninety-seven they're turning twenty one this year? Businesses are starting to hire these kids into professional jobs in for the non college routes, some of the young people have been in jobs for a couple of years now. And what we're finding is that you know, when you grow up on these things you are a little bit less comfortable with social interaction. So we're talking about a cohort of young Americans whose whole social experiences with quite a bit different. Now, you translate thought to the workplace when these kids get in. It's just a little the face to face is a little bit less natural for them. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She's done a deep dive on generation Z the group born in roughly nineteen Ninety-seven till up and just a few years ago. And that group is coming to your office because they're turning twenty one. At least the oldest of them right now. So speaking of a lack of face to face because of their their digital natives right are companies doing I guess video wise to try to teach them, right? You're having some companies are moving their training to YouTube style videos a lot of training moving to phone ruby Tuesday. With one company we talked to they've got these phone videos, or they're teaching people how to grill burgers and slow cook reds, even on the interview side. We're seeing companies say that they they're doing allowing people to videotape. Their job interviews. Early job interviews and essentially send in video clips for interviews. You're also having companies trying to post more things on internally they're finding they need to post things on channels like slack. Incidentally, they're finding with in such a good economy was very tech savvy. Young people companies are finding that they have a bad experience. Just in the interview, they can they can get online. They can post things about that. And so they're saying we have from seven players, as you know, you've got to be careful with these kids just to not turn them off during the interview process because among young tech talent, for example. Somebody might you know, put something up on Instagram. That's negative about the experience. They had interviewing with your company. Will you don't want him to do that miss? Janet, Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She writes, by the way that the share of college freshmen nationwide who prioritize becoming well off rose to around eighty two percent when began entering college a few years ago, that's the highest level since UCLA began the survey in nineteen sixty six. This portion of the program is brought to you by light stream if you thinking about saving.

Janet Adamy Wall Street Journal reporter Facebook US YouTube UCLA Jerry eighty two percent
"janet adamy" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

04:51 min | 3 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Being with us about seventeen million members of generations e are now adults and starting to enter the US workforce and employers have not seen a generation like this since the great depression. They are a scarred generation cautious and hardened by economic and social turbulence more from Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy, Janet, what are we learning about them? They're an interesting group. This demographic we're talking about kids who were born around nineteen ninety seven or later until probably just a couple of years ago. They came of age during the recession and a lot of during the period and a lot of other difficult events to see, you know, ages terror threats school shootings and also under this immense Clara social media. And the result is a generation that is really kind of hardened in a lot of that reminds demographers the kids who were born came out of the great depression the silent generation. Yeah. That was an interesting comparison. How come well there? There is a real craving for financial security. These kids are more interested in. Making money than any generation on record. Which is these records that we know from survey data go back at least three generations, they crave financial security, and they're also very risk averse less interested in starting their own business and even on social behaviors. Fewer of them are trying alcohol getting a driver's license and even having sex and these team right to passage that we think of behaviors have decreased over the last couple of years. I understand being I guess nervous about being an entrepreneur perhaps watching what their parents went through during the financial crisis. What what does that have to do with the social behaviors? Or is that some sort of trickle down social behaviors are tied to the fact that kids are hanging out less in person. Because so much of socializing has moved to social media. It's moved to text messages, but you stop trout Instagram. Not Facebook generation, they use Facebook newer platforms. That's socializing. And if you're not hanging out in person, there's you know, less of an opportunity to do some of these things that people have typically associated with teenage behavior in incidently what we really looked at. It's how this generation is coming into the workplace. So a lot of times people think your youngest worker as millennial. Well. Could you were born in ninety seven they're turning twenty one this year? Businesses are starting to hire these kids into professional job in for the non college routes, some of the young people have been in jobs for a couple of years now. And what we're finding is that you know, when you grow up on these things you are a little bit less comfortable with social interaction. So we're talking about a cohort of young Americans whose whole social experiences with quite a bit different. Now, you translate thought to the workplace when these kids get in. It's just a little the face to face is a little bit less natural for them. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She's done a deep dive on generation Z the group born in roughly nineteen Ninety-seven till up in just a few years ago. And that group has come into your office because turning twenty one at least the oldest of them right now. So speaking of a lack of face to face because of their their digital natives. Right. Order companies doing I guess video wise to try to teach them, right? You're having some companies are moving their training to YouTube style videos. A lot of training is moving to phone ruby. Tuesday was one company we talked to they've got these phone videos or they're teaching people how to grill burgers and slow cook reds, even on the interview side. We're seeing companies say that they they're doing allowing people to videotape. Their job interviews. Early job interviews and essentially send in video clips for interviews. You're also having companies trying to post more things on internally, they're finding they need postings on channels like slack. Incidentally, they're finding with in such a good economy was very tech savvy. Young people companies are finding that if they have a bad experience. Just in the interview, you they can they can get online they can post things about that. And so they're saying we have from seven players, as you know, you've got to be careful with these kids just to not turn them off during the interview process because among young tech talent, for example. Somebody might you know, put something up on Instagram. That's negative about the experience. They had interviewing with your company. Will you don't want him to do that? Janet, Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She writes, by the way that the share of college freshmen nationwide who prioritize becoming well off rose to around eighty two percent when jen's e began entering college a few years ago, that's the highest level since UCLA began the survey in nineteen sixty six..

Janet Adamy Wall Street Journal reporter US Facebook YouTube UCLA jen eighty two percent
"janet adamy" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on KTRH

"Us about seventeen million members of generations e are now adults and starting to enter the US workforce and employers have not seen a generation like this since the great depression. They are a scarred generation cautious and hardened by economic and social turbulence more from Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy, Janet, what are we learning about them? They're an interesting group. This demographic we're talking about kids who were born around nineteen ninety seven or later up until probably just a couple of years ago, they came of age during the recession and a lot of during the period of a lot of other difficult events to see, you know, ages terror threats school shootings and also under this immense Clara social media. And the result is a generation, but is really kind of hardened in a lot of ways. It reminds demographers of the kids who are. Born came out of the great depression the silent generation. Yeah. That was an interesting comparison. How come well there? There is a real craving for financial security. These kids are more interested in making money than any generation on record. Which is go. You know, these records that we know from survey data go back at least three generations, they crave financial security, and they're also very risk averse less interested in starting their own business. And even on social behaviors fewer of them are trying alcohol getting driver's license, and even having sex some these teen rites of passage that we think of those behaviors have decreased over the last couple of years. I understand being nervous about being an entrepreneur. Perhaps watching what their parents went through during the financial crisis. What what does all that have to do with the social behaviors? Or is that some sort of trickle down the social behaviors are tied to the fact that kid. Are hanging out less in person. Because so much of socializing has moved to social media to not just text messages, but stop chat Instagram, not Facebook generation, they use Facebook the newer platforms. That's socializing. And if you're not hanging out in person, there's you know, less of an opportunity to do some of these things that people have typically associated with teenage behavior in incidentally, what we really looked at is how this generation that's coming into the workplace. So, you know, a lot of times people think your youngest workers millennia well kids you were born in ninety seven they're turning twenty one this year. The businesses are starting to hire these kids into professional job in for the non college somebody some of the young people have been in for a couple of years now. And what we're finding is that you know, when you grow up on these things you are a little bit less comfortable with social interaction. So we're talking about a cohort of young Americans whose whole social experiences was quite a bit different. Now, you translate thought to the workplace when these kids get in. It's just a little face to face is a little bit less natural for them. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She's done a deep dive on generation Z the group born in roughly nineteen Ninety-seven till up and just a few years ago, and that group has coming to your office because they're turning twenty one at least the oldest of them right now. So speaking of a lack of face to face because of their their digital natives, right? Water companies doing I guess video wise to try to teach them, right? You're having some companies are moving their training to YouTube style videos in a lot of training is moving phone ruby Tuesday with one company we talked to they've got these phone videos or their teaching people how to grill burgers and slow cook reds, even on the interview side. We're seeing companies say that they they're doing allowing people to videotape. Their job interviews. Early job interviews and essentially send in video clips for interviews. You're also having companies trying to post more things on internally they're finding they need to postings on channels like slack. Incidentally, they're finding with in such a good economy was some of these young very tech savvy. Young people companies are finding that if they have a bad experience. Just in the interview, they can they can get online they can post things about that. And so they're saying we have from seven players, as you know, you've got to be careful with these kids just to not turn them off during the interview process because among young tech talent. For example, somebody. He might you know, put something up on Instagram. That's negative about the experience. They had interviewing with your company. Will you don't want him to do that miss? Janet, Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She writes, by the way that the share of college freshmen nationwide who prioritize becoming well off rose to around eighty two percent when gen Z began entering college a few years ago, that's the highest level since UCLA began the survey in nineteen sixty six. This portion of the program is brought to you by light stream. If you're thinking about saving.

Janet Adamy Wall Street Journal reporter US Facebook YouTube UCLA eighty two percent
"janet adamy" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:06 min | 3 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"With Gordon Deal. Thanks for being with us about seventeen million members of generations e are now adults and starting to enter the US workforce and employers have not seen a generation like this since the great depression. They are a scarred generation cautious and hardened by economic and social turbulence more from Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy, Janet, what are we learning about them? Very interesting group. This demographic we're talking about kids who were born around nineteen ninety seven or later up until probably just a couple of years ago. They came of age during the recession and during the period and a lot of other difficult events to see, you know, ages CARA threats school shootings and also under this immense of social media. And the result is a generation that is really kind of hardened in a lot of wisit reminds demographers are the kids who were born who came out of the great depression, the silent generation did that was an interesting comparison. How come well there? There is a real craving for financial security. These kids are more interested in. Making money than any generation on record. Which is these records that we know from survey data go back at least three generations date, they crave financial security, and they're also Gary risk-averse less interested in starting their own business and even on social behaviors. You were of them are trying alcohol getting driver's license, and even having some these teen rates have passage that we think of behaviors have decreased over the last couple of years. I couldn't understand being I guess nervous about being an entrepreneur perhaps watching what their parents went through during the financial crisis. What what does that have to do with the social behaviors? Or is that some sort of trickle down the social behaviors are tied to the fact that kids are hanging out less in person. Because so much of socializing has moved to social media. It's new to not just text messages. But yeah, stop Chad Instagram not Facebook generation, they use Facebook the newer platforms. That's socializing. And if you're not hanging out in person, there's you know, less of an opportunity to do some of these things that people have typically associated with teenage behavior in incidently what we really looked at it how this generation is coming into the workplace. So a lot of people think your youngest worker as a millennial. Well. Could you were born in ninety seven they're turning twenty one this year? So businesses are starting to hire these kids into professional jobs in for the non college routes, some of these young people have been in jobs for a couple of years now. And what we're finding is that you know, when you grow up on these things you are a little bit less comfortable with social interaction. So we're talking about a cohort of young Americans whose whole social experiences was quite a bit different translate thought to the workplace when these kids get in. It's just a little the face to face is a little bit less natural for them. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She's done a deep dive on generation Z the group born in roughly nineteen Ninety-seven till up in just a few years ago. And that group is coming to your office because they're turning twenty one. At least the oldest of them right now. So speaking of a lack of face to face because of their digital natives. Right. Order companies doing I guess video wise to try to teach them, right? You're having some companies are moving their training to YouTube style videos in a lot of training is moving to phone ruby. Tuesday was one company we talked to they've got these phone videos, or they're teaching people how to grill burgers and slow cook read even on the interview side, we're seeing companies say that they are doing allowing people to videotape. Their job interviews. Early job interviews and essentially send in video clips for interviews. You're also having companies trying to post more things on internally, they're finding they need postings on channels like slack. Incidentally, they're finding with young in such a good economy. Was these young very tech savvy? Young people companies are finding that if they have a bad experience. Just in the interview, they can they can get online they can post things about that. And so they're saying we have from seven players, as you know, you you've got to be careful with these kids just to not turn them off during the interview process because among young tech talent, for example. Somebody might you know, put something up on Instagram. That's negative about the experience. They had interviewing with your company. Will you don't want him to do that? Nice. Janet, Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She writes, by the way that the share of college freshmen nationwide who prioritize becoming well off rose to around eighty two percent when gen Z began entering college a few years ago, that's the highest level since UCLA began the survey in one thousand nine hundred sixty six. This portion of the program is brought to you by light stream. If you're thinking about saving.

Janet Adamy Wall Street Journal reporter Gordon Deal US Facebook Chad Instagram YouTube UCLA Gary eighty two percent
"janet adamy" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Thanks for being with us about seventeen million members of generations e are now adults and starting to enter the US workforce and employers have not seen a generation like this since the great depression. They are a scarred generation cautious and hardened by economic and social turbulence more from Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy, Geno. What are we learning about them? They're an interesting group. This demographic we're talking about kids who were born around nineteen ninety seven or later up until probably just a couple of years ago. They came of age during the recession and during the period of a lot of other difficult events to see, you know, age of terror threats school shootings and also under this immense Clara, social media. And the result is a generation that is really kind of hardened in a lot of wisit reminds demographers of the kids who were born came out of the great depression, the silent generation did that was interesting comparison. How come well there? There is a real craving for financial security. These kids are more interested in. Making money than any generation on record. Which is go know these records that we know from survey data go back at least three generations day, they crave financial security, and they're also Jerry risk-averse less interested in starting their own business and even on social behaviors. All of them are trying alcohol getting driver's license and even having sex, and these teen rates have passage that we think of those behaviors have decreased over the last couple of years. I couldn't understand being by guess nervous about being an entrepreneur perhaps watching what their parents went through during the financial crisis. What what does that have to do with the social behaviors? Or is that some sort of trickle down social behaviors are tied to the fact that kids are hanging out less in person. Because so much of socializing has moved to social media to not just text messages. But yeah, stop chat Instagram, not Facebook generation, they use Facebook the newer platforms. That's socializing. And if you're not hanging out in person, there's you know, less of an opportunity to do these things that people have typically associated with teenage behavior in incidently what we really looked at. It's how this generation is coming into the workplace. So a lot of times people think your youngest worker as millennial. Well, could you were born in Ninety-seven they're turning twenty one this year to businesses are starting to hire these kids into professional jobs in for the noncolored droughts. Some of the young people have been in jobs for a couple of years now. And what we're finding is that you know, when you grow up on these things you are a little bit less comfortable with social interaction. So we're talking about a cohort of young Americans whose whole social experiences was quite a bit different. Now, you translate thought to the workplace when these kids get in. It's just a little the face to face is a little bit less natural for them. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She's done a deep dive on generation Z the group born in roughly nineteen Ninety-seven till up. And just a few years ago, and that group is coming to your office because they're turning twenty one at least the oldest of them right now. So speaking of a lack of face to face because of their their digital natives right are companies doing I video wise to try to teach them, right? You're having some companies are moving their training to YouTube style videos. A lot of training is moving to phone ruby. Tuesday was one company we talked to they've got these phone videos, or they're teaching people how to grill burgers and slow cook read even on the interview side, we're seeing companies say that they they're doing allowing people to videotape. Their job interviews. Early job interviews and essentially send in video clips for interviews. You're also having companies trying to post more things on internally, they're finding they need postings on channels like slack. Incidentally, they're finding with in such a good economy was some of these young very tech savvy. Young people companies are finding that if they have a bad experience. Just in the interview do they can they can get online. They can post things about that. And so they're saying we have from seven players, as you know, you've got to be careful with these kids just to not turn them off during the interview process because among young tech talent, for example. Somebody might you know, put something up on Instagram. That's negative about the experience. They had interviewing with your company. Will you don't want him to do that miss? Janet, Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy. She writes, by the way that the share of college freshmen nationwide who prioritize becoming well off rose to around eighty two percent when gen Z began entering college a few years ago, that's the highest level since UCLA began the survey in nineteen sixty six. This portion of the program is by light stream if you thinking about saving.

Janet Adamy Wall Street Journal reporter Facebook US YouTube Jerry UCLA eighty two percent
"janet adamy" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

04:51 min | 3 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Being with us about seventeen million members of generations e are now adults and starting to enter the US workforce and employers have not seen a generation like this since the great depression. They are a scarred generation cautious and hardened by economic and social turbulence more from Wall Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy, Janet, what are we learning about them? Interesting group, this demographic, we're talking about kids who were born around nineteen ninety seven or later up until probably just a couple of years ago. They came of age during the recession. During the period and a lot of other difficult events, you know, ages terror threats school shootings and also under the glare of social media. And the result of the generation that is really kind of hardened in a lot of ways that reminds demographer to the kids who were born. Came out of the great depression, the silent generation that was an interesting comparison. How come well there? There is a real craving for financial security. These kids are more interested in making money than any generation on record. Which is go. You know, these records that we know from survey data go back at least three generations. They they crave financial security, and they're also very risk averse less interested in starting their own business and even on social behaviors. You were of them are trying alcohol getting a driver's license and even having sex and these team rites of passage that we think of behaviors have decreased over the last couple of years. I couldn't understand being nervous about being an entrepreneur. Perhaps watching what their parents went through during the financial crisis. What what does that have to do with the social behaviors? Or is that some sort of trickle down social behaviors are tied to the fact that kids are hanging out less and person because so much of socializing has moved to social media to notch a text messages. But stop that Instagram not Facebook generation, they use Facebook the newer platforms. That's socializing. And if you're not hanging out in person, there's less of an opportunity to do some things that people typically associated with teenage behavior in incidently what we really looked at it how this generation is coming into the workplace. So a lot of people think your youngest workers. Millennia well kids who were born in ninety seven they're turning twenty one this year. So is your straighten to hire these kids into professional job in for the non college routes some of the young people have been in job for a couple of years now. And what we're finding is that you know, when you grow up on these things you are a little bit less comfortable with social interaction. So we're talking about a cohort of young Americans whose whole social experience is quite a bit right now, you translate back to the workplace when these kids get in the face to face is a little bit less natural for them. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Jennifer Adamy, she's done a deep dive on generation Z the group born in roughly nineteen Ninety-seven till up and just a few years ago. And that group has come into your office because they're turning twenty one at least the oldest of them right now. So speaking of a lack of face to face because of their their digital natives, right? What are companies doing video wise to try to teach them, right? You're having some companies are moving their training to YouTube style videos. A lot of training is moving to phone ruby. Tuesday was one company we talked to they've got these phone videos or they're teaching people how to grill burgers and Floca grads. Even on the interview guide. We're seeing companies say that they they're doing allowing people to videotape hair job interviews early job interviews, and essentially send in video clips for interviews. You're also having companies trying to post more things on internally they're finding they need posting on channels like slack. Incidentally, they're finding with DVR such a good economy was very tech savvy. Young people companies are finding that if they have a bad experience. Just in the interview, they can they can get online they can post things about that. And so they're saying we have from seven players are, you know, you've got to be careful with these kids just to not turn them off during the interview process among young talent examples. Somebody might you know, put something up on Instagram. That's negative about the experience. They had interviewing with your company. Will you don't want him to do that Janet Street Journal reporter, Janet Adamy? She writes, by the way that the share of college freshmen nationwide who prioritize becoming well off rose to around eighty two percent. Gen Z began entering college a few years ago, that's the highest level since UCLA began the survey in nineteen sixty six..

Janet Adamy reporter Wall Street Journal Janet Street Journal Facebook US Janet Jennifer Adamy Instagram YouTube Gen Z UCLA eighty two percent
"janet adamy" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"More details on this with the wall street journal's janet adamy i some top news headlines the house of representatives as expected defeated the more conservative of two immigration bills thursday the vote was two thirty one to one ninetythree the measure would have granted a three year renewable status to children of undocumented immigrants known as dreamers but would not have provided them a pathway to citizenship it also would have authorized twenty five billion dollars for border security the house has also delayed until friday a second immigration bill which is meant to be a compromise between conservative and moderate republicans friday is the day that the european union starts imposing retaliatory tariffs on us goods american exports were three point two billion dollars will be subject to tariffs immediately and nearly seven and a half billion dollars eventually president donald trump has threatened to hit back with duties on european cars in a peace offering germany's leading automakers have thrown their support behind the abolition of all import tariffs for cars between the european union and the us fiat chrysler is number one when it comes to recalls a glitch in its vehicles cruise control feature has vaulted fiat chrysler to the top spot in the category of recalls in the us the italian us automaker launched a campaign in late may to recall more than five million vehicles to address a flaw that could prevent drivers from canceling cruise control should an unlikely sequence of events occur fiat chrysler said no injuries were reported and that the recall was a proactive move after just one driver experienced the malfunction still it's the latest in a series of recalls fiat chrysler has made the company so far this year is recalled more than six million cars and trucks in the us way behind in second place is ford over two million recalls coming up a rapid rise in retiree age americans is.

wall street journal janet adamy european union president germany us chrysler fiat chrysler donald trump fiat ford twenty five billion dollars two billion dollars billion dollars three year
"janet adamy" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"And they include snow removal service wow we're speaking with wall street journal's janet adamy editor in the washington dc bureau talking about a piece entitled retirees reshape where americans live so what is what does this mean for some of these communities where a lot of people are suddenly moving in i think it's a good thing for these communities i do want to point out one other trend that we discovered in this new data and this is based off of new county population estimates that came up from the census the other place where we're seeing americans across the board of all ages move are the suburbs that includes some millennials younger generation x members who are finding that you know after years of living in the city and delaying some of the kind of life stage things like marriage and having children those groups are starting to move into you know what we think of as adulthood they want a suburban home they want better schools and what we noticed in our data analysis was a pretty steady uptick in my gration to suburban parts of the country across the country while the growth at the population growth in kind of core central large cities those populations are still growing but the rate of growth has tapered off this tied to the the economic recovery we've had over the past nine years this point i think what we're seeing is a sort of a more typical pre recession patterns during the recession you tell people flooding into cities that's where the jobs were that's where you know you had tech hotbeds like of course the bay area washington dc metro taking off and and the quality of life in the city's getting a lot better but you have the you sort of have these two dual forces of one this kind of life stage thing where the millennials who had put off having children during the recession some of them are starting to do it it's still somewhat depressed levels but there is so there are some signs that millennial women are starting to have the children that they put off having post recession but you're also seeing these big cities become in some ways and victim of their own success that's wall street journal news editor janet adamy it is thirty minutes now after the hour on this morning america's first news radio nothing new it's been here all along with free entertainment news sports music and information it's not just.

wall street journal editor washington dc bureau janet adamy america new county news editor thirty minutes nine years
"janet adamy" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"janet adamy" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"The wall street journal's janet adamy editor in the washington dc bureau talking about a piece entitled retirees reshape where americans live so what this what does this mean for some of these communities where a lot of people are suddenly moving in a good thing for the communities i do wanna point out one other trend that we discovered in this new data and this is based off of new county population estimates that came up from the census the only place where we're seeing americans across the board of all ages move are the suburbs that includes some millennials younger generation x members who are finding that you know after years of living in the city and delaying some of the kind of life stage things like marriage and having children those groups are starting to move into you know what we think of as adulthood they want a suburban home they want better schools and what we noticed in our data analysis was a pretty steady uptick in migration to suburban parts of the country across the country while the grow at the population growth in kind of core central large cities those populations are still growing but the rate of growth is tapered off this tied to the economic recovery we've had over the past nine years this point i think what we're seeing is a sort of a more typical pre recession patterns during the recession you tell people flooding into cities that's where the jobs were that's where you know you had tech hotbeds like of course the bay area washington dc metro taking off and the quality of life in the city's getting a lot better but you have the you you have these two jewel forces of one kind of life stage thing where the millennials who had put up having children during the recession some of them are starting to do it it's still at somewhat depressed levels but there is so there are some signs that millennial women are starting to have the children that they put off having post recession but you're also seeing these big cities become in some ways and victim of their own success that's wall street journal news editor janet adamy it is thirty minutes now after the hour on this morning america's first news.

The wall street journal editor washington dc bureau janet adamy america new county news editor thirty minutes nine years