19 Burst results for "Jane Philpott"

"jane philpott" Discussed on The Current

The Current

02:23 min | Last week

"jane philpott" Discussed on The Current

"The, he smashed pretty much every billboard and streaming record that matters. It has already been streamed more than a billion. Times. People still to this day point to this is the moment everything changed. But whether you agree with those claims are not this podcast is it really about him either you're not an astute businessman or you're inherently racist when it comes to black music and his country this is not a drake podcast available now on CBC listen or wherever you get your podcast. This is a CBC podcast stopping the spread of covid nineteen among under forties is a big concern but remember those early terrifying days of the pandemic when the disease was spreading fast and it was most devastating in long term care homes many staff had fled for fear that the disease. Could infect them perhaps, they were just worried about the disease and what was going on in broader society. The stories of what happened as a result were horrifying. There are patients who were left without food or water sometimes in their own urine and feces. Amid that disaster my next guest was among those who stepped forward to help before Dr Jane. Philpott was dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences a Queen's university before she served as federal. Health Minister Ingestion does I government she was a family doctor and went a care home in her area was struck with an outbreak. She answered the call like everyone else. I wanted to be able to be helpful I. This is not something I would've expected to do, but it's changed me and I am. You know we have gone through some terrible grief unfortunately, six of the forty residents died it was a horrible experience in that way but in terms of. understanding more with the lives of these people and those who care for them are like it has been a an experienced that has made me I hope a better person. I was chained Philpott on the current in May she has now written about her experience in a book she co edited called Vulnerable The law policy and ethics of covid nineteen. Dr. Jane Philpot Good Morning Good Morning Matt when you reflect on that time that we were speaking of out in May in your experience at Participation House. How do you think that experience changed you?.

Philpott CBC Dr. Jane Philpot Dr Jane Faculty of Health Sciences Participation House
"jane philpott" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

06:01 min | 2 months ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

"Live on look? No further than April twenty sixteen when I spoke with Doctor James. macos a cre-. Doctor based in Alberta at the time doctors serving first nations west of James Bay in -Tario reported an ongoing medical crisis, due in part to crowded living conditions and poor access to medical services here Makokha shares his thoughts about what was going on in Kosovo. On first nation, where some fifty cases of advanced skin infections had produced SCABS and lesions. So, it's not surprising that. These are manifesting in terms of skin conditions because a lot of the skin conditions that I'd have to work with and deal with in working on the reserve as an indigenous doctor, a lot of those had to do with overcrowding and lack of sanitation and also lack of potable water. Dermatologists will say no. That's not a dermatological condition that something that family doctors, primary care, nurses or nurse practitioners can deal with, but then if to also consider the access to health services, and also the treaty promise to health, which is enshrined in treaties six, which is the territory. The I'm from in terms of what first nations treaty. Treaty. People are supposed to receive and what we're actually receiving the way the health resources are allocated, so we think about public health, and we think about health populations who were in the most need that would mean that we would need more resources to be able to deal with these situations, so you're adding in the dimension of equity. Yes not only enshrined in our treaty, which is not being upheld, but in terms of equity. We also getting less to have to deal with more health issues than other populations back to the situation and Chechen I wanNA share with you now. The reaction of Federal Health Minister Jane Philpott. In a statement, she said this is another troubling reminder of the many social and health challenges that are faced by many first nation and anyway communities as a physician I find it unacceptable that these conditions exist in a nation as richest Canada. She did go on to highlight what she calls. A quote sustained comprehensive plan of investment, which is exactly the plan that the government laid. Laid out in this week's budget, this investment includes eight point four billion dollars for better schools and housing, clearwater and improvements for nursing stations unquote so James. How far does that go toward addressing what you've been talking about? It's start Most of our communities had health centers, and the reason why they had health centers and some of them. Even hospitals goes back to that. That treaty promise to health, and because those services haven't been maintained, we lose services in our people, then have to go off of reserve to go to the hospital and get an extra when they could have stayed on the reserve in got that because our laboratories aren't funded again, they have to go off reserved to do all their blood tests and microbiology and things like. Like that when these types of things are funded in our communities than how can you actually attract physicians and specialists and nurses to be able to work in our communities when they don't have the services to do their jobs properly a specific example which I think is absolutely horrendous that these types of things happen, but it's important for the larger population to know. We would have people that would have to do. Self Catheter Catheterization because they have bladder issues. You can reuse a catheter to empty the bladder. The packaging will list it as you can only use it once, however, in certain circumstances in it's called intermittent catheterization that they can be used if you have the proper sanitation, and if you have clean water to be able to. Rinse it out properly and things like that. If we think of the number of communities that are on boil, water advisories, which our community is that these same instructions were still being given by Health Canada to our people on the reserve that needed to do this on a daily basis, and then they would have recurrent urine infections because of the bacteria that was being introduced because of not having clean water proper sanitation. Sanitation or proper equipment, maybe in another community where there's clean water and sanitation that might function okay, but in our communities when we have these infrastructure issues that it actually further worsens our health status. What other kinds of changes to the system do you think would would make a difference in terms of better average health outcomes so I think one of the major reasons why? Why we have the issues that we have with their health problems. Is that our own? Indigenous health system has been destroyed? Our health will not improve without US restoring our own indigenous health system. People were taught about the NATO mosquito, our own need of medicines how to take care of themselves how to treat. Illness had to take care of one another how to help. Help one another and I always tell people what if all of the health, the hospitals health centres the Medi. Centers were shut down across this country the pharmacies. How would that impact People's health? And if we did that for a century, what would happen there would be total chaos in dysfunction and death and morbidity, and for Indigenous People for our.

Health Canada James Bay SCABS Jane Philpott Alberta Canada Kosovo -Tario Makokha James clearwater
"jane philpott" Discussed on The Current

The Current

13:06 min | 5 months ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on The Current

"I guess I guess my preference to that would be that Some of my best friends are bureaucrats. And so you know when we when we look back in the lessons from this. I think that there were real failures in February and March You know people died. Who didn't need to die because we couldn't make decisions fast enough But I think that this is a collective failure. It's not a bureaucratic failure. I mean you know an ordinary time when when the bureaucracy performance perfectly the rest of us sort of say to like yeah. That's your job. And when they whenever they get it wrong they are breaking the public trust. They are wasting taxpayers money so we asked for a bureaucracy to really focuses on on on minimizing the number of wrong decisions And so I think the question becomes because this isn't the last crisis is going to be the next one and so I think the question are what is our permission structure in a time of crisis you know. What are some of the broad principles that we allow people to just make decisions under going to be And we gotta get our stakeholders ready for that. You know we gotta get citizens auditors ready for that we gotta get boards and shareholders ready for that because when the next crisis comes life. We want to respond differently. Chris good to speak with you. But that's what an experience you've had three you. Thanks very much Chris. Turner is the author of the age of discovery navigating the storms of our second renaissance. This is the current on. Cbc Radio. One I Matt Galloway joined now by noted Long Distance Runner Tom Power host. Forgive Matt Galloway. Our Five K. Don relation texture over the weekend. I mean I should say if you're listening to this that I came into Matt's he was where the beginning of the pandemic and I sat in the studio and I said I'm thinking about starting this running thing and you were so encouraging and you were so wonderful and yet as a five k run her mass so now I'm just going to give it up for a couple of months the couches waiting. Yeah of course. I do in Five K. Back to couch ex. You're here to talk about Mr Daniel Brooks I am. I am so excited to tell you about this This is an interview that I thought was gonNA kind of I duNno. I thought it was going to be kind of meaningful and then it ended up being so much more than I ever could have believed. I mean we sort of like mouth agape sitting in our studio listening to Daniel Speak Daniel it legendary Canadian theatre director. He was supposed to be directing a run of. Chekhov's the seagull right now. That's of course on hold. Daniel Brooks is really thoughtful about what that means for him and what the pandemic means for him because he has stage four cancer so we got to talk about what he's learned about uncertainty that we can apply to our lives. Here's our conversation. Hi Daniel how are you? I'm good where do we go Tom? I'm sorry to hear about the seagull. Yeah well it was kind of interesting because we worked in rehearsal for about four and a half weeks and One Night I was having trouble sleeping and I thought why am I? This is not going to happen. This production is not gonNA happen. WHY AM. I going in exposing my immunosuppressed body to the world every day. Stop doing that. And that's when I stopped and then rehearsal stop the days later and it was really exciting rehearsal so as much as it was disappointing not to see the results of all that work. It was somehow tremendously a great boon to me that it was such a wonderfully productive and vital and goodwill rehearsal reminds me something you wrote in your notes about working on the sequel. He said I love checkoff because these plays he invented are symphonies working in dimensions of time and space and in body and in language. And in these you right time is Toronto Pressure Shimmering Mirage. A dream to tell me more about that. What is it that intrigues you? About time being a tyrannical pressure will You know night is falling. And it's a torrential of pressure as we try to achieve what we out to achieve in particular day but also I think in terms of what we imagine we might achieve with our lives what we imagine. We are So there's the Tarantula pressure of time which works on our bodies and makes us sick and eventually kills us. The dream part of it is that time is such Inevitably impossible to Manage experience and of course for me. Time is extraordinarily poignant and interesting reality given that. I don't know how much time I have left. I have staged for lung cancer and to even question what it means to ask the question. How much time do I have left like? What so. I get another three months so again? Another three years You know one is longer but at the end of the three months it'll be over at the end of the three years it'll be over. Eventually I will be meeting my maker as as day and it's almost irrelevant. How long I have because it's impossible subjectively to measure that time. And I think check off captures the experience of time the subjectivity of time in a beautiful way and and I think in creating a a checkup performance. That's part of the exciting work that a director and a design team have along with the actors is creating this kind of dream sense of time. You know I the one where the seems to be coming up. During covert nineteen is uncertain you know Cubans require a certain degree of certainty around their lives and right now we have no idea when we were going to be a lot out of our houses again. We have no idea what life is going to be like after this. We're we're even uncertain as to whether life will continue in the way we ever knew that it would and you know I can't help but think you know give him what you're telling me about living with stage lung cancer as long as you have. Uncertainty has kind of been your life for a long time. Do you have any perspective on uncertainty? I suppose in in a strange way. I live with less uncertainty now than I ever have in because I keep my horizons very close by that I mean I don't look too far ahead so if you don't look too far ahead then there's nothing to be uncertain about I you know I wake up every morning and I try to be as present as Possible in my day and in myself and in my relationships And so It kind of removes uncertainty. Because I'm not really asking too many questions about what am I doing? What should I do where shall I go? What's IT GONNA be like you know? What will it be like? We'll go to sleep at night will wake up in the morning. You know there are a lot of things that we do know. And I'm not so Caught up right now in guessing. At what kind of world we will have when we emerged from this thing. I don't even know if I'll be a part of that world if you don't mind me saying so like. I don't think it's a guarantee that you have the kind of perspective that you do right now. We'd like to believe that we would face something like you're facing right now. We would have some kind of greater perspective. But it's not a guarantee he seemed to have gotten somewhere with it. Your certainly can't compare myself anybody else. I had a life working With great literature and Great Great Theater in great ideas that I hope have taught me something. I'm also a the passing meditators and that's a I think helped me enormously in this journey But also I had one moment. That really helped me right off right off the bat. I camp with a a couple of families every year and I was. I went up for one day to this lake. We camp at and after a beautiful sunny northern Canadian shield summer day I was standing on the rocks looking at the water and I was looking at a rock over to my left where I had memories of my youngest daughter scampering on that rock and then I looked at the water shimmering in the light and I thought this may be the last time I looked at this in a realized. I couldn't do anything with that. So what if it was the last time what? How does that help me? What am I gonNA? How am I go? I can't lock it away. I can't own it. I can't can't do anything with this moment. Other than being it and that revelation about time has been an enormous eight me in the ensuing almost two years. Now since I've been diagnosed I can't do anything with that moment but being it is Is especially poignant to hear from someone who has devoted their life to theater. You know media that requires that sort of being in the moment. You know you can rewatch it like film. You can't rewind like television show that is central to what Cedar is. There are a number of of a very powerful metaphors. That theater can carry. And that's one of the main ones what I love about. You say when I asked. You you know not. Everyone gets to have the kind of perspective that you have. You said you know. I've I've had a life of literature and I've had a life of art. That is sort of helped me here and I think on this show. I'm always searching for kind of concrete examples of art mattering. Because I know it. Does you know I know deep down in my life that it does. But I'm always searching for those concrete examples and I think we're all questioning that right now. We lived through this time. And just to hear you say that is very meaningful to me because I I feel like I found one. What what can you say before we go? What can you say about what art can give to us? And what it's given to you on an integrator way in the world that I work in in the theater It relies on Collaboration between a group of Artists. And it just doesn't work without a collaboration. And I think that one of the things making art has taught me is the kind of unavoidable fact of our interdependence that human beings are interdependent whether they like it or not for the better for the worse it doesn't matter it's just the next essential fact of life and how we contend with that interdependence constitutes a great part of what our lives are and. I think that is something I've learned through both consuming and creating art it's meaningful to me then that you know as as you face cancer and as you face this play that had to be stopped for a little while. We hope you're giving those minutes. You have to teaching others in an online masterclass. What do you hope to give them to help? Ease the fear you know not. Many people get to spend two years with stage four lung cancer. It's a very particular experience. And if you take the fear away is something quite extraordinary about it quite beautiful about it so I guess one thing that I hope to do. Daniel thank you so much for your time today. I really appreciate it. I'm looking forward to seeing the production when when the time comes laptop. It does Tom Power Conversation with the Great Theater Director. Daniel Brooks I'm Ed Galloway. You've been listening to an extended version of the current. You can find part two of today's show in your podcast feed for more. Cbc podcasts Goto CBC DOT CA slash podcasts..

Mr Daniel Brooks Daniel Speak Daniel Tom Power Matt Galloway Chris director Great Great Theater Cbc Radio Toronto lung cancer cancer Turner Chekhov Director Cedar Ed Galloway
"jane philpott" Discussed on The Current

The Current

12:23 min | 5 months ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on The Current

"It never never happened never happen. Presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden responding to a sexual assault allegation from former staffer terror. Read in an election year. Like no other and in the wake of me to how Democrats are squaring Biden's denials with a desire to believe women. Plus we remember the rock and Roll Electric Fire Little Richard. We begin though in Your House. A few months into homeschooling. How's IT GOING? Good Morning. I'm Matt Galloway. And this is an extended edition of the current for a lot of people. It's all a blur speed with which this pandemic turn the school year. Upside down for. Many chaos has ruled parents figuring out how to be teachers. Teachers testing the limits of their technical abilities and students. Let's face it. A lot of the students are playing a lot of video games. One of our listeners cured Daniel asked her two kids what learning at home has been like. Okay what's it like to have me as your teacher sometimes daddy as teacher? It's sometimes really fun times really hard. I don't like being stuck in a house slow gay and when my parents around and you're doing work they pressure you will it's fine. It's like fun but I get that much work done and I miss my friends likeness whole school and it's hard. That honesty is real. It's hard on everyone. Some people are really struggling. Have a listen to this mom. Teenagers from Owen Sound Ontario. My fifteen year old son is getting lots of hours on his xbox and my thirteen year old daughter is the loneliest kid in the world so I don't know who's teaching them but it isn't me because I'm not a teacher and a half a job and my husband has a job. So what do you do with those kids? There's nobody here to watch them all day and make sure that they do anything they're supposed to do. While most don't see an end in sight we should mention that some students in Quebecer heading back to school today this morning. We're asking what we've been learning from the past few months but learning from Home Carolina. National is a mom with two kids and a fulltime job. She is in Halifax and Chemical Shibata is a teacher with the Waterloo region school board. She's in Kitchener Ontario. Good morning to you. Both caroline that mom we heard just a second ago is really struggling and talked. I think in a pretty honest way. About what a lot of us are going through and trying to figure out what this new reality looks like. What's it been like for you? How have you survived this experience with your kids? Well I can really relate to to what that mom was saying It's been it's been a real challenge When all of this I started and we got the home learning clan from the government of Nova Scotia. I was really motivated to try to get a program going and get started You know I had a binder printed. I had these boards for each of my children but it quickly fell apart It was too much for all of us and so we've just decided to to pull back and to focus on the school of life type of activities. What does that mean school of life? Well of course my kid's you know they. They also get a lot of screen time but we try to focus on Regular everyday things. They do laundry with us. They do dishes. They help with cooking. We try to get some outdoor time. And we try to follow whatever interests they have so if a question comes up like last week my daughter asked. Why do we get busy when we spin? Well we've tried to do research and learned that way based on everyday situations that come up for questions at the kids have and why. I want to bring Cuba in to this in just a moment but why for you has that being a better approach than we started out with in terms of the white board and a very Programmatic if I can put it that approach to dealing with home schooling well. My kids I quickly thought my kids. It's way more than just worksheets. School My son is in grade six and he was having a really hard time Focusing on what needs to be done with the with the signs at home Getting all the resources he needed Being able to interface with the technology and my daughter. Who's in grade three I think needs access to her teacher and to her peers in school and again to all of the resources that are normally in a classroom. That I just can't offer as I'm also working full-time you know managing the household with my husband We have other things that require our attention So it was becoming really stressful and really difficult and things were getting really tense and I just thought my kids are not learning optimally if everyone is is really tencent stressed out So we're just GONNA pull back. We're GONNA make sure that the read every day that they connect with their teachers when they have their Google hangouts but otherwise We're going to take a more relaxed approach. Kim Akasha about a year on the other side of this as a teacher What has it been like for you to pivot to teaching online. Yes well actually. I can relate as well as a parent because I will be completely honest. We are not logging onto my daughter's classroom every day because like you as a working mom I can't be at all of my online meetings assisting with my students and their families while also helping to do her work and we know that young children are not independent online learners. I have a little kindergarten and everything that she has to be done with me together. And so there's as we just don't log on and we don't get everything done and I'm so glad to hear that you understand that whole school of life like we do to validate the learning. That's inherent and basic household tasks measuring what ingredients for baking and cooking. Going for nature walks writing about and taking pictures of animals and insects and plants watching how they change and grow and really topping kids interest because my daughter while she's very interested in a lot of science topics and things and animals and when we we can just easily research things that she's interested in read those books and she's doing so much learning. It's not always the learning that half that's set out for her to learn in her classroom and that's okay how. I think we need to be really reassuring parents. How has that shaped as a teacher? What you're providing to your students you teach. Esl Yes. Students are anywhere from kindergarten to grade. Six and really tapping into interest has always been a passion of mine with my students for doing writing. Well how writing about something that you're interested in as opposed to something that I'm assigning to you and the buying a lot a lot better when kids are given that open rain of choose your topic. What are you interested in learning about? How can I help you to learn that? And under a specialized role. I do have the ability to modify things for my kids that way. But you know I think during the middle of the panic pandemic the more we can offer kids their own student voice their own student choice letting them do things a personal interest. The better learning. We're going to get out of them at this time. You feel at briefly. Do you feel as a teacher that you're connecting with those students through the online portal that you're operating through I do in a limited way? I'll be completely honest. This online distance. Learning like this is not in any way replicating what happens in a classroom. This isn't this isn't a regular school experience. This is not even can't even call it learning. It's emergency distance learning but not meant to replicate a regular classroom. Experience can't give kids that intense one on one in that smokers experienced that guided reading experience that immediate feedback that just. It doesn't happen even when we're trying to integrate some you options and Google hangout and various things like that. We still won't be able to provide kids with the same thing they had in the classroom so I think we just need to acknowledge up front. This is a stopgap measure to get us all safely through this pandemic but nothing about this business as usual. We've been hearing from kids about what it's like to be in this new environment. Have listen to this nine year old. And what the nine year old said on. Cbc College Show last week. It's horrible to have your parents as a teacher because there's no difference between school and home and so it's it's homework school or like the school day or is it just homework. It's horrible to have your parent teacher. Caroline you talked about changing your approach. How did you deal with the expectations that we as parents are under? When it comes to this this new reality well It started with taking a close look at what I What was my priority really and my priority was my kids Wellbeing and their mental health. And also my mental health so so with that priority in mind It was easier to decide to stop fighting. You know several hours a day about schoolwork and just choose a different path. I mean it's the expectations. My parents are huge. We've we've lost access to our whole village right of supports that we normally can rely on So parents have to play all of the rules in their child's life and So I think that I try to give myself permission to to just take one of those hats off and focus on on family well and health and and getting to safely through the pandemic. Mcateer you in the background agree we got caroline. I'm one hundred there right with you right like and we're in a situation. I I'm I'm assuming just from some of the things you're saying like you are in a situation where you're not necessarily having to worry about where your next meal is coming from and I'm hearing that you're you know fluent English speaker. Not PROBABLY NEW COUNTRY. You've lots of privilege and so do. I. And if we're finding it hard as parents to to do that schoolwork and to deal with the stress that it's putting on our kids. I just imagine right newcomer refugee families. We've got families are living with addiction and mental health issues. We have so many vulnerable interest marginalized families our communities. Some don't have no internet bandwidth to participate or the technology. We have kids who don't know where the next meal is coming from. We have so many families that are going through really tough times that are just the stress load on them is incredible so they're in that sort of trauma brain right now and as a society right now right. We're all going through this really this collective traumatic experience right now and everyone's feeling very real feelings of helplessness loss and grief. And you know we're not see people are saying you know we're not in the same boat but we're on the same storm so we all have different experiences in our homes. What what it. What do you say to the parents of those students that you're teaching about those expectations because we hear from Parents Carolina? She's managing those expectations but on the other side. What about what? The teacher says Of how to manage those expectations. Well my personal belief and this is again this is not what the minister vegetation's or signing or whatever but my employer but my personal belief is that any learning in elementary school right now needs to be presented as optional like the things that are that were accessing through the portals etc. Need THAT MESSAGE. Should really be to let parents relax a little bit that this is optional. We're being given so far we've been given direction that marks are going to be sort of based on the things for kids did up until The school closures and that kids can improve their marks but anything else is just That sort of formative assessment assessment for learning but not evaluating what kids are doing. And because not everyone's able to fully participate in this or wants to participate in it. I think it's fair to say you know what if your family is in a place where schoolwork you're one hundred percent priority and you're in that place where you WanNa do things great. We should be providing activities for you to do however if you feel like this is something you can handle right now..

caroline Your House Joe Biden Google Carolina Matt Galloway assault Waterloo region school board Kitchener tencent Owen Sound Ontario Cuba Daniel Quebecer Chemical Shibata Kim Akasha Nova Scotia Ontario
"jane philpott" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

08:31 min | 5 months ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"Susan says the Long Term Care Facility where she works followed policies set by the local health unit on controlling the corona virus. But she says the policies were inconsistent. Take returning to work at the nursing. Home I Susan was told by the local health unit. She needed to negative tests. Then she was told she could come back if symptom. Free for twenty four to forty eight hours. Another point of inconsistency the personal protective equipment. She and her colleagues were given to wear at the nursing home. Susan says there garb was not nearly as elaborate as what paramedics had on when they came to her workplace to test residents in some of the staff recovered nineteen. Ps WS included when the crew came in to swap residents. They were in full gear. They had the full body suits. They had respirators which are above ninety five so I discount Questioned in my mind like these people are coming in and these suits yet. We're working one on one with these residents you get coughed on and we're just required to have a face shield gowns surgical mask and gloves. You know you've got a heavy offer. Heavy Sneeze there's gaps at the side of your surgical masks. You know visors only go down so far and I had one of my friends actually had a resist of resident. Who KNOCKED OFF THEIR FACE? So how is she protected with nothing going to be very? You're not going to be very well protected if the mask has been knocked off your face. Yep I think there should have been an ninety five's available at all times To me there isn't enough science yet done on on the covert virus how easily transmittable it is so I just try to keep myself isolated as much as much as possible and then to find out a week later that you're positive again and now you're having symptoms then. I can't help but sit there and look back you know did I. In fact any of my workers workers did I in fact any of my residents in. We're GONNA have to see them. Get Sick I am. I going to have to see them. Die and and think it could have been my fault. Very distressing I have lost one of my residents. I not really sure how it all played out. You know if there's a possibility or not I try not to dwell on it because this would be too hard. How is morale where you work right now? But that's a good question Because we work as a group and it brought us together as a very tight group Everybody jumped in helped out. It made a stronger that respect. But you're still. They're afraid they're tired. They're frustrated they're exhausted. And that's now you worked at in Long Term Care before cove nineteen. What were the working conditions like? Before the pandemic we were already in a health crisis we were already working short. There wasn't enough. Ps step us. We have been trying through negotiations and everything trying to help out in that respect and actually asking government for help because there wasn't enough. Ps WS out there. We were losing. Ps WS because they were getting too exhausted and they were burnt out and yet through all this. You Love Your job don't you? Yes yes I do. I love my residents. My my biggest goal in a day is to make them smile. And if I can do that that I've made their day better is that what keeps you going back absolutely as of the last few days more than a dozen residents have died at your home. These are people you saw almost every day. It's it's it's a loss that that we often don't talk about. What kind of impact has that had on you to lose to lose someone that you cared about that? You were spending so much time with. It's hard because you know a lot of people say how can you be a PS? W YOU'RE GOING TO WATCH PEOPLE DIE and my perspective is. I'm there to increase the quality of their life and when they die if I'm holding their hand or I'm there I find it an honor so all you can hope for in that profession is to have somebody have a decent life and a respectful death in. Kobe does not give him that. You feel bad for the family because you know the family often as much as you know the resident so you feel like you've lost a family member. What do you hope our healthcare system from all of this? This awful experience. Well I'm thinking with the spotlight. Now on the long term care and w shortages and everything that they can't ignore it anymore we need our government to create a PS W to resident ratios so we can provide our residents with compassionate dignified as well as the time to be able to do the tasks that we need to do this would help our residents and the POW's and if they give us a wage deserving of it then were POW's will come back into the sector. You want the system to protect you a little bit better and and leave you feeling a little less vulnerable. Yeah that would be good. Well Susan I want to thank you for your time and I hope you recovered feel better soon. Thank you very much for having me. Susan says the spread of Covert Nineteen has made it nearly impossible to give the resident. She cares for a decent life and a respectful death. Her Passion for the work reminds me of the wonderful. Ps WS who cared for my mother before she died in two thousand fourteen. My name is Jeremy Saunders and I sick boy podcast best friends brian and tailored six four. Podcast we've talked to hundreds of people about what life is like living with chronic or terminal disease which sounds like a complete bummer of podcast. But here's the twist it's a comedy. Podcast are unfiltered. Conversations have shown us that the best way to deal with illness is simply to laugh. Join the conversations. We're having on sick boy every Monday. Wherever you listen to podcasts. You're listening to white coat. Black Art this week. The plight of personal support workers who take care of residents in long term care during the time of Kobe. Susan the PS. W we just heard from said grueling hours and low rates of pay are chronic problems in long term care. She thinks cove nineteen has made them issues can no longer be ignored. An international study released earlier this month by researchers who focus on policies related to long-term care found that Canada has the highest proportion of deaths from covert nineteen in nursing homes higher than countries such as Ireland Norway and France the crisis and long-term care triggered by Cova nineteen has led to calls for more oversight by the provinces and even by the federal government. One person was strong opinions about that. Is Dr Jane Philpott from two thousand fifteen to two thousand seventeen? She served as Federal Health Minister on July. First she takes over as dean of Health Sciences at Queens University in Kingston Ontario. Where show help guide the next generation of frontline healthcare workers? How're you doing well? I'm not too bad. Thank you? All things considered when the outbreak began Dr Philpot. A family doctor by training worked at the Covert Assessment Center at Markham Stouffville hospital just outside of Toronto Dan on Easter Sunday. A friend called and asked for help which she step in to help care for residents participation house. It's a long term home for people with profound physical and intellectual disabilities and they were in crisis more than thirty healthcare workers had come down with covert nineteen and the majority of residents had tested positive as we go to air six of died. Poker Philpott stepped up and she's been at Participation House every day since then Dr Philpot welcome to white coat black art. Thank you for inviting me. We gave you an excerpt.

Susan Long Term Care Long Term Care Facility Dr Jane Philpott Dr Philpot Covert Assessment Center Markham Stouffville hospital Kobe Jeremy Saunders Participation House Canada Kingston Ontario Queens University Toronto brian Cova Ireland
"jane philpott" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

07:00 min | 9 months ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Jane Philpott says it's clear what Canada should do about the opioid crisis but politics are getting in the way the physician and former liberal health minister has written a piece from claims arguing. Not just that. Governments should decriminalize criminalize the drugs for personal use but that they should also provide addicts with a safe supply. And while Dr Phil Pod believes her proposal is the responsible answer to the greatest just health threat of the past hundred years. She warns that politically her plan might prove hard to swallow. We reached Jane Philpott Instill Ontario. Dr Philpott Philpott. Why did you wait until you were out of government to make this push? Well thank you for the question. Certainly the article that I wrote in Maclean's advocated for both decriminalization of of the small amounts of illicit substances as well as SAFE supply as a as part of drug policy is completely consistent consistent with everything that I've pushed for many years now including the time that I was minister of Health Of course I can speak more freely about decriminalization now because I'm not part of a government that requires a a mandate per se to be able to speak about that but these are issues that I've been involved in for a long time time and have always known but that is the sensible an evidence based approach to how we address very serious concerns like the OPIOID overdose epidemic. That's taking in Canada. Did to privately argue for legalization and safe supply when you were in government These are things that I definitely talked about. regularly. I think if you talk to drug policy experts and people who I interacted with Over the years including Both physicians as well as people who use drugs And and advocates. They know that this is the kind of approach that I've always been supportive of but it takes takes time to build the political will for that and as I said when I became Minister of Health we were particularly focused on a really important. Change changed to drug policy particularly around the legalization and regulation of cannabis So that was our focus during that time. But certainly I've never been opposed so the idea of decriminalization as as the right way to go You talk about political will. I'm wondering what kind of response you got from your fellow. MP's particularly away from from people in your caucus. Well there are many people and I would say many politicians who are highly supportive of the evidenced search based approach of decriminalization very few of them speak openly about it Certainly there were members of our caucus who have I think of someone the likes of mcdaniel Erskine Smith. Matthew put forward This kind of approach which is a health and social justice approach so these are issues that have been discussed certainly at in the Liberal Party and as well I I know the party has always had a policy supportive of decriminalization so there are things that are talked about but often leadership and when it comes to two platforms. There's a little bit more hesitancy because there's no question that there's still a broad political will that needs to be built around understanding that this is actually the best for society as well as best for people who are at risk of of the harms that are associated with these substances. Well maybe you can help us understand what that kind of decriminalization for opioids would look like on the ground in practical terms. I think that's a great question. Because you know the word decriminalization. I think scares people a little bit but in fact as I said there is a lot of evidence that it works probably the classic place to look for what that is like the country of Portugal. That almost twenty years ago now in two thousand one decriminalized the possession of small amounts of of what substances that were Otherwise illicit and what they have done though is much more than just taking away. The criminal prohibitions. But they built around people who were found in in possession of small amounts of substances they built around on the kind of social health and legal supports that would allow people to address the fact that they were dependent substances. And you know we've never been successful in arresting our way out of this problem. What actually is successful for helping people to reintegrate into society and and sometimes even decrease the amount of using that they do is by supporting them with solving problems like Homelessness poverty often mental health. Issues that are associated with substance dependence and when people are treated as if this is a health and social justice issue rather than a criminal issue. We find that it's actually better not not only for those people but it it. It decreases drug related crime in the area and actually lowers the medical costs of addiction as well. Your hoping that Canadians are open to a new approach. But in the last election Andrew Scheer in the Conservatives ran chinese-language adds that seemed to resonate with some voters. They accused the Liberals of planning to legalize hard drugs. So what do you say to the Conservatives who are now going to be fighting to take over from share and and how they should approach the layout their position. Well you're right that it's very sad that unfortunately this kind of fear. Mongering does work and you know we. Canadians need to continue to demand that their politicians are More thoughtful and fair and honest. I think we're starting to see signs of that Of of even conservative employees who are speaking more boldly about the fact that they may not necessarily agree with all of the policies that have been put forward by their party And end you know. I think the public certainly needs to be supportive And and be demanding of other politicians to to be brave to talk about issues like the safe supply of substances for people who are at risk of dying when they go out to the streets to buy opioids and as Canadians the as you know continues Ways to be supportive of politicians. Who put their next out to to be able to make these kinds of statements and as I say there are some out there and I hope there will increasingly be politicians who will say what many of us believe quietly in the background and the more that that happens the more palatable it will be hopefully conservatives this will be among those politicians who will start to say you know what we actually really care about people and we do not want people dying? Unnecessarily from completely preventable venable causes a we WANNA see. People have their health restored in their health issues addressed in a fair and compassionate. Way Dr Philpott thanks for talking to us. Thanks asking okay bye bye bye for now. Jane Philpot is a physician in Canada's former minister of health we reached her instill Ontario.

Dr Philpott Philpott Canada Minister of Health Jane Philpott Dr Philpott Ontario Dr Phil Pod Liberal Party Jane Philpot Andrew Scheer cannabis Portugal Maclean Erskine Smith Matthew
"jane philpott" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

07:00 min | 9 months ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Jane Philpott says it's clear what Canada should do about the opioid crisis but politics are getting in the way the physician and former liberal health minister has written a piece from claims arguing. Not just that. Governments should decriminalize criminalize the drugs for personal use but that they should also provide addicts with a safe supply. And while Dr Phil Pod believes her proposal is the responsible answer to the greatest just health threat of the past hundred years. She warns that politically her plan might prove hard to swallow. We reached Jane Philpott Instill Ontario. Dr Philpott Philpott. Why did you wait until you were out of government to make this push? Well thank you for the question. Certainly the article that I wrote in Maclean's advocated for both decriminalization of of the small amounts of illicit substances as well as SAFE supply as a as part of drug policy is completely consistent consistent with everything that I've pushed for many years now including the time that I was minister of Health Of course I can speak more freely about decriminalization now because I'm not part of a government that requires a a mandate per se to be able to speak about that but these are issues that I've been involved in for a long time time and have always known but that is the sensible an evidence based approach to how we address very serious concerns like the OPIOID overdose epidemic. That's taking in Canada. Did to privately argue for legalization and safe supply when you were in government These are things that I definitely talked about. regularly. I think if you talk to drug policy experts and people who I interacted with Over the years including Both physicians as well as people who use drugs And and advocates. They know that this is the kind of approach that I've always been supportive of but it takes takes time to build the political will for that and as I said when I became Minister of Health we were particularly focused on a really important. Change changed to drug policy particularly around the legalization and regulation of cannabis So that was our focus during that time. But certainly I've never been opposed so the idea of decriminalization as as the right way to go You talk about political will. I'm wondering what kind of response you got from your fellow. MP's particularly away from from people in your caucus. Well there are many people and I would say many politicians who are highly supportive of the evidenced search based approach of decriminalization very few of them speak openly about it Certainly there were members of our caucus who have I think of someone the likes of mcdaniel Erskine Smith. Matthew put forward This kind of approach which is a health and social justice approach so these are issues that have been discussed certainly at in the Liberal Party and as well I I know the party has always had a policy supportive of decriminalization so there are things that are talked about but often leadership and when it comes to two platforms. There's a little bit more hesitancy because there's no question that there's still a broad political will that needs to be built around understanding that this is actually the best for society as well as best for people who are at risk of of the harms that are associated with these substances. Well maybe you can help us understand what that kind of decriminalization for opioids would look like on the ground in practical terms. I think that's a great question. Because you know the word decriminalization. I think scares people a little bit but in fact as I said there is a lot of evidence that it works probably the classic place to look for what that is like the country of Portugal. That almost twenty years ago now in two thousand one decriminalized the possession of small amounts of of what substances that were Otherwise illicit and what they have done though is much more than just taking away. The criminal prohibitions. But they built around people who were found in in possession of small amounts of substances they built around on the kind of social health and legal supports that would allow people to address the fact that they were dependent substances. And you know we've never been successful in arresting our way out of this problem. What actually is successful for helping people to reintegrate into society and and sometimes even decrease the amount of using that they do is by supporting them with solving problems like Homelessness poverty often mental health. Issues that are associated with substance dependence and when people are treated as if this is a health and social justice issue rather than a criminal issue. We find that it's actually better not not only for those people but it it. It decreases drug related crime in the area and actually lowers the medical costs of addiction as well. Your hoping that Canadians are open to a new approach. But in the last election Andrew Scheer in the Conservatives ran chinese-language adds that seemed to resonate with some voters. They accused the Liberals of planning to legalize hard drugs. So what do you say to the Conservatives who are now going to be fighting to take over from share and and how they should approach the layout their position. Well you're right that it's very sad that unfortunately this kind of fear. Mongering does work and you know we. Canadians need to continue to demand that their politicians are More thoughtful and fair and honest. I think we're starting to see signs of that Of of even conservative employees who are speaking more boldly about the fact that they may not necessarily agree with all of the policies that have been put forward by their party And end you know. I think the public certainly needs to be supportive And and be demanding of other politicians to to be brave to talk about issues like the safe supply of substances for people who are at risk of dying when they go out to the streets to buy opioids and as Canadians the as you know continues Ways to be supportive of politicians. Who put their next out to to be able to make these kinds of statements and as I say there are some out there and I hope there will increasingly be politicians who will say what many of us believe quietly in the background and the more that that happens the more palatable it will be hopefully conservatives this will be among those politicians who will start to say you know what we actually really care about people and we do not want people dying? Unnecessarily from completely preventable venable causes a we WANNA see. People have their health restored in their health issues addressed in a fair and compassionate. Way Dr Philpott thanks for talking to us. Thanks asking okay bye bye bye for now. Jane Philpot is a physician in Canada's former minister of health we reached her instill Ontario.

Dr Philpott Philpott Canada Minister of Health Jane Philpott Dr Philpott Ontario Dr Phil Pod Liberal Party Jane Philpot Andrew Scheer cannabis Portugal Maclean Erskine Smith Matthew
"jane philpott" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

13:29 min | 1 year ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on PRI's The World

"The British public will actually it's because of the EU that this deal didn't get through and I've done everything I can possibly do and they're the ones who have the problem with this interesting. Donald Toss who's the president of the EU Council he tweeted about this and that I had to phone calls on Brexit. I with Dublin then with London my message to Leo Varadkar is we stand fully behind Ireland my message to Boris Johnson the prime minister we remain open but still unconvinced or if the EU agrees to this deal would the deal still have to be voted on by the British Parliament. Yes it will done. This obviously is another stumbling block because currently he has a minority say in parliament is remains to be seen how he'd managed to get the deal through because opposition. MP's are certainly supporting him. This is Jeremy Corbyn the opposition leader and leader of the Labour Party this week. He's doing nothing but thinking and risking this country's future for his own political. Hey America I deal with president trump the proposals unrealistic and damaging and will as I think the prime minister full well knows who's been rejected in Brussels rejected in this house and rejected across this country Jeremy Corbyn leader of the Labour Party against the divisions in the UK continue the woods Berry in London. Thank you very much you can marco. There's another prime minister in the hot seat. Canadian voters have just over two weeks to decide whether to keep Justin Trudeau as their pm this week the candidates for Canada's prime minister faced off in a French language debate and they made an appeal appeal to a key voting bloc young women the world's Rupa Shenoy has more gender equity is a big issue in Canada's upcoming election import because Prime Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made feminism a cornerstone of his first campaign because it's two thousand fifteen Kudo and his Liberal Party have been champions of pay pay equity they increased support for childcare aid for low income families and Trudeau's cabinet was half female that was an important step forward says Sylvie Oetken a professor of Political Science University of Toronto but I think that the liberals have run up against the problem of setting a high bar high expectations because she says Trudeau failed to meet those high expectations earlier this year when his government was rocked by a scandal Canada's first indigenous Attorney General Jodie Wilson tabled alleged Trudeau and others inappropriately pressured her to protect construction company in a corruption trial. She was demoted I was he's just doing my job. Then she resigned a second Minister Jean Philpott also resigned in solidarity and the Prime Minister's Response Jodie Wilson Revolt and James Philpot Philpott are no longer members of the Liberal Caucus. Trudeau expelled the women from his party. The Treatment of Jodie Wilson Ray Bowen Jane Philpott on that story has stuck in the craw of members of the public to Puerto remarkable extent like a lot of them are very disappointed with the liberals but that's not to say that they're not willing to go out and vote because older voters in Canada tend to have higher voter turnout rates and are often willing to vote strategically in order to block one party from securing our the same Mormon. Trudeau expelled the two women from his party. He went on to speak in Ottawa at the House of Commons pleasure to see you all this morning. It happened to be the day that three hundred thirty eight young women were there as delegates to a program called daughters of the vote. I talked to several of them about the upcoming election. Kevin Hope Tough Burg was one of a few dozen who stood up and turn their backs win. Trudeau was speaking to show outrage at what he'd done earlier that morning hope is from Ontario. She's a police I major who started a nonprofit that encourages young people to vote. This is an important issue to me because it represents ministerial responsibility that we haven't seen I feel very often in Canadian politics. We haven't seen for a long time in such great forms like Jodie Wilson rebelled and Gene Philpott the conservative candidate for Prime Minister Andrew Scheer also spoke that day and made the most of the moment when strong women stand up and speak the truth to power. How do we treat them. That's important question that Canadians are asking right now. Some of the vote delegates walked out on cheers speech including including US me a nursing student from Alberta. She worries about shears stricter. Immigration Platform strategic voting sometimes feels like the only way that I'll all still be able to continue on and you know maybe keep the services that my family needs or still hope that we'll have a chance that you know maybe a family member. We'll be able to immigrate here the events at the House of Commons that day got widespread media attention it raised the profile of young female voters especially because young voters had historic turnout for Trudeau in the last election and this election for the first time ever millennial voters are set to make up the biggest voting bloc polls show that Trudeau and sheer are in a close race other candidates are running far behind even though Trudeau recently suffered another scandal when images surfaced of him amusing black face as a teenager and in his twenties but the biggest issue for many delegates is climate change and the environment this year Trudeau Green lit pipeline hype line expansion opposed by environmentalists and some indigenous groups so Lila Mansoor a daughters of the vote delegate from British Columbia has been door knocking for a local Green Party candidate. I think that it's really important to take a stand this election on climate change and the lack of Trudeau's government for taking action for one of the conservative delegates handoffs and Murphy of Nova Scotia jobs and taxes are the big issues has already run for local office lost and plans to run again. There has never been anybody to tear me down within my own party and I think that is something that something extraordinary for young woman to experience. She pointedly says she believes the conservative. Party supports women who run for office unlike Trudeau's liberals for the world. I'm emotionally some other political news from up north this week the conservative candidate Andrew Scheer who you heard there in route story he's American rather he holds dual. You will citizenship through his father. Shears critics are pouncing on him for not revealing that still on the parliamentary election tip. Let's head to North Africa. Tunisians are going into the polls this weekend to exercise their democratic rights. This would be hard to imagine a few years ago in two thousand eleven. Tunisia ignited the Arab spring. The political upheavals does that shook the Middle East hope sword throughout the region after several dictators were overthrown. Tunisians ousted their leader twenty five years and only Tunisia managed to establish publish anything resembling a democracy but that doesn't mean people there today are happy with their politicians as the BBC's Palmas has been finding out they fell rather lie being at a religious revival meeting in an upstairs hall in the provincial Tunisian in town of Russia. Bell campaign is for the heart of Tunisia Party. Were promising something close to heaven on earth. If only locals would send votes stairway of Tunisia is a relatively new political party led by the multi-millionaire owner river television station W. Koroi. Mr Koroi is currently being held in jail accused of tax evasion and money laundering yet he he has still managed to get through to the final two and Tunisia's presidential election and his party is top of some polls in the general election winning over supporters with with its claim to be the anti-establishment option. It's coming new way of guiding the country we feel for that of the old party's old ways and I feel that they can make the country the right way why you supporting the heart to the party. Oh my God is going to create the Tunisia of our the three the Tunisia. That would have no limit in the future. There are plenty of prime ministers and presidents. You've gained power in different countries in recent. Here's by claiming to be anti establishment outsiders but unity and democracy is less than a decade old. It might seem just a little premature to even speaking about the political establishment here the prominent political parties of the past eight years or indeed hemorrhaging support that if he wants to understand why people are apparently disillusioned will just listened to the man who stopped me in the street just now he told my microphone wanted to let me know that he was happier when the late dictator haters in Alabama Dean Ben Ali was empower Bonetti. It's better because there are so many poor. No no what you have to the poor. It doesn't mean anything though that at least you are free now you can say what you want without being arrested but in my life I am not afraid I don't have money for overpay for milk for baby bananas better and yet you meet plenty of enthusiastic people here trying to encourage students to keep faith with elections in the democratic process like the Ngo al-bassala which means the compass here. We are watching the live streaming of a parliamentary commission meeting the screen Julia was showing me how her team livestream all parliamentary sessions on a facebook page and then give anyone the chance to join in an online conversation here they someone commenting nothing is going to change there are also people so who pick up on what one of the MP's have said or one of the lobbyists readers. Pause it for a second. Let me ask you what you're hoping to achieve by. Doing this is to make sure that everyone knows what the MP's are wink but also for these politicians to at least know that they are constantly a being watched. We will have to make democracy work. There's no other choice back. Scottish Labidi seems to be enjoying democracy right now. Now she's a member of parliament for knocked the Islamist party which is being part of Tunisia's coalition government and which like the others is seen its support plummet. I caught up with out campaigning on the streets of Grimala the rather dusty old town an hours drive from the capital Tunis. You know you're having fun campaigning. Everything I've ever seen a candidate spent so much time laughing and smiling. This is why we speak with the people we laugh we joke and even if they are not interested in voting for me and for miles. The main thing is that they can vote. Will you say say that but there is a lot of disillusionment with democracy in Tunisia at the moment turnouts at elections has dropped what's going wrong. The fruits of democracy has not been harvested by the they are still waiting employment. They are still waiting health care better education but I'm sure that if ever given the opportunity to choose between Liberty Democracy and despotism Tunisian will choose again and again democracy and freedom that last voice there you heard a member of parliament for Tunisia's Islamist party Anoxia. She was speaking with my BBC colleague Paul Moss. When the show began twenty three two years ago the category world music was a thing I have not used that phrase in a while the Internet has made the musical globe much smaller so much so that music is as Duke Ellington once said either good or the other kind I N. Brennan travels the globe looking for the good kind he's a Grammy Award winning record producer and author author and he's just produced a second recording from an ensemble called the good ones there from Rwanda the albums titled Rwanda? You should be loved Adrian the Garin Joan. Va Have Okay Mono- are the good ones and they're in our New York studio performing for us their song the farmer it does Sir Adrian Joan. Va Do not speak English or French only Kenya Rwanda. That's the main language of Rwanda the producer I and Brennan told us the band story fantastic stuff. Thank you so much much so you have this new project. I on the good ones there from Rwanda duo and their album that you produces called Rwanda. You should be loved. It goes back to the Rwandan genocide in one thousand nine hundred four right yet. Does it even goes back further. They began playing music together in nineteen seventy eight as youngsters they were taught by Giambi as his older brother who happened to be blind very gifted musician and he sadly tragically perished in the ninety four genocide and that led them to feel like they didn't WanNa play music anymore..

Justin Trudeau Tunisia prime minister Labour Party Prime Minister Andrew Scheer Jeremy Corbyn parliament president Rwanda Tunisia Party Jodie Wilson London Trudeau Green Liberal Party Jodie Wilson Ray Bowen Jane Ph EU Prime Minister House of Commons Green Party British Parliament
"jane philpott" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on PRI's The World

"And with Jodie Wilson Ray bolt and Jane Philpott that trust has been broken. But it seems the trust that's been broken most of the trust in Justin Trudeau the world's Andrea crossing has been following the story. So take us back. What what exactly happened here, Michael? There are two women who are at the center of this story. One of them is a woman named Jodie Wilson rape, rebelled rape old resigned weeks ago because she said that for months Trudeau and people from his office had been pressuring her to interfere because she was attorney general in a case that was an investigation about a construction company called SNC laflin, the company had been charged with corruption and fraud. And she says that she was pressured by members of Trudeau's team to lower the charges against this company. I resigned from cabinet because I did not. Have confidence to sit around the table the cabinet table. That's why resign. So she's the one woman at the center of the store. The other woman is a woman named Jane Philpott. She was the treasury president, and she resigned in solidarity. No, the two women were allowed to stay in the liberal party. But then on Friday. Somebody like the McLaughlin, give him advice release this secret reporting that she took a one of Justin Trudeau senior aides pressuring. I am one hundred percent competent. I'm doing nothing inappropriate. And it's been incredibly damaging to the prime minister. Decided to Justin Trudeau's response to it is kind of shocking. He didn't apologize. He he kicked her. And this other woman Jane Philpott out of the liberal party. So to get a sense of what that means Marco it would be like President Trump kicking Mitch McConnell and Lindsey Graham out of the Republican party. This is massive it is and considering that there's an election in the fall in Canada. This is a huge issue, and Andy what is all this doing to Trudeau's image brand Trudeau? He is a brand. I mean, a friend of mine bought me a pin with Justin Trudeau's face on it, which I'm looking at it. Now, I I'm wearing it today actually, just for you. But yeah, he's been really really celebrated as this person who supported women, and there was this really a conic moment in two thousand fifteen after he was just elected and he introduced his cabinet which had a balance of equal men and women on the cabinet. And here's a reporter calling out a question to him that day Anderson one of the priority. Eighties for you was to have a cabinet that was gender balanced. Why was so important to you? Because it's twenty fifteen. Andy, I remember us all looking at that news conference. What was it like for you watching that moment? Well to take my journalist hat off for just a second. And just be a Canadian woman. It was amazing. It was a really powerful moment. And that really spoke to me, I thought this is a change. This is a huge change in the way that women are being treated and empowered in Canada and to go from that point where you run on a feminist agenda. Then you kick out to strong women from your cabinet. It becomes a moment of feminist reckoning. And you see it today. I mean, there was a moment that if you believe in karma Marco this is a karmic kick in the butt prime minister Trudeau was scheduled to speak to a group of young women called daughters of the vote for a conference on political empowerment for women. The prime minister addressed the group, and they all stood up and turn their backs to him today thing. Yeah. And it wasn't the only awkward moment. He was also a. Costed by a reporter during a scrum today. What do you say to the young women who are your daughters vote that might be discouraged that you just kicked to strong women out of your caucus?.

Justin Trudeau Jane Philpott prime minister Jodie Wilson Ray bolt liberal party Jodie Wilson reporter Canada Andy SNC laflin Michael Republican party rape Andrea crossing fraud treasury attorney Marco President Trump Lindsey Graham
"jane philpott" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:15 min | 1 year ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Have a responsibility to ensure we deliver Brexit across this house. We all have a responsibility making show that we do that as soon as possible and OBI deliver Brexit in an orderly way. And I think it is. Entirely right. I think members of the public the public expect us to reach out across this house to find a way through this. They want a solution the country needs a solution. The country deserves a solution. And that's what I'm working to find his Jeremy Corbyn said he was looking forward to that talks. I welcome. The prime minister's offer for talks following the meetings that I've held with members across this house and look forward to meeting her later today, and I welcome her willingness to compromise to resolve the Brexit deadlock. Live to Westminster correspondent, rob Watson. Rob they've lifted quite late night. They certainly have. And it's not exactly a marriage made in heaven. I wouldn't suggest and you could have played some other excruciating moments from prime minister's questions where those on the rights of the governing conservative party. Brexit is off Theresa May excruciating. Jeremy Corbyn, you know, as a national security risk someone you can do business with making play, of course of her previous attacks on the leader of the opposition party. But look, there's no doubt that this is a profoundly humiliating u-turn for Theresa May who would always prioritized getting Brexit through with a governing conservative party. But it hasn't worked out that way on this. I guess is the the price of that. When it comes to the the issue surrounding Brexit is there much common ground. I think only in the sense that the both of them would prefer not to be a second random. I think both of them would prefer some sort of all totally drawl but apart from that. I'm not sure that there is a, and of course, this is a real dilemma for Jeremy Corbyn. I mean on the one hand, I suppose, it sort of dangles out the prospects of being seen as a as a statesman. But on the other hand, a lot of critics and labor party would say one on earth, you doing going anywhere near anything shambolic has BRAC says also an awful lot of labor supporters, particularly those who remain voters, they think what on earth would he be doing propping up a prime minister conservative prime minister who's clearly in as much trouble. As Theresa May. There's another thing we should say because it's all this is about getting her withdrawal agreement through. I mean, I is anything going to change because both well the European Union. Suddenly said that they're going to be no alterations to that. So. So one wonders what the point of all this is a very good question. I think the EU is on very unlikely to change the withdrawal agreement unless there's some much much longer extension. Now, I think it's more about whether you could make some changes to the the non legally binding political declaration. And and that's the this short statements on the vision of Britain's future relationship with the European Union. And maybe progress could be made. But look, I think this is going to be immensely hard. Finding a bipartisan approach really do probe. Thank you very much. Well, Philippe Lamberts sits on the parliament's. Brexit steering group. He's a green member of the parliament from Belgium. Welcome to NewsHour. How encouraged you by the fact that the Prime Minister Theresa may is trying to find some sort of consensus with the opposition. Well, it's a bit late. Isn't it? She should have done that. I would say even before launching d- well initiating the article fifty proceedings, but now we are where we are. So are we going to see labour folding in for against the promise of a customs union membership may be I don't know. I really don't know. But but what my gut feeling is that the risk of no deal is still very very high and significantly above fifty percents. So. I would not bet by default on d Stokes being a fruitful Britain's going to need an extension, isn't it? You think it will be granted? Hip. But then again, I mean people ask about the extension before having a plan. What we need is a plan to be able to decide on an extension. So what would be the extension for quite obviously, if she can get us the labor party into voting short agreement, then I would guess that the extension is up until the twenty second of may as we discussed before all the to get the withdrawal organized from the British side. And by the way to pass so Isherwood agreement ratified on the on the European Parliament's? But other than that, I don't know what an extension would be for. So if she doesn't have a plan for for something, I don't know why an extension would be needed to she need a plan that it doesn't you just need to get the withdrawal agreement through because. Britain's relationship future relationship with the EU can be discussed for years afterwards. No, no. But so let me be clear if the agreement is passing the next few days, then indeed that is the plan. It's to carry out the transition period during the transition period to devise what the what the future relationship will be like, and that's perfectly fine alongside the question is rather if the Wishaw agreement doesn't pass mobster in the house of moms than what is the plan and based on that land. Yes, we can discuss an extension. But if the conclusion is okay. Well, we don't know what to do. I not true that adding a couple of months. Years. Oh, I don't know what will change very much. So so again, what if the house of Commons us? Okay. Well, we need to join and go to channel two action. Find that he's that he's strategy. It says we want to organize referendum as well. It's another strategy and both of those strategies required a time. Of course, that time will be granted. But of course, that also means that European elections should be organized United Kingdom. And I understand that. Mrs may doesn't. But then again BC's may ended up accepting. Many things she didn't want to accept. So we don't know exactly where this is going to win and talking about an election. That's the problem. Here isn't it that even if some consensus, emerges Britain comes up with us sort of clear idea of what sort of Brexit once a once if there is an election, and there's a new prime minister, and that prime minister decides to rip up the political declaration. We're sort of back to square one on me. Well, it really depends on whether it was agreement that's been passed or not just been passed. It doesn't matter so much because the political declaration is just a statement of intent it can be changed. I would say that promises. Only. On the bind those who believe in them. And in other terms in order to get the labor party to call a prime minister may offers to rights accustoms union into the political declaration, then there's election and the labour party votes the agreement and afterwards, there's a general election in which labor loses. And and Tori wins the Tory party winced and political degration. Well, the labor party will have been screwed. And and and the what can we do about that? But we won't be bound by the by the political declaration again, it is a statement of intent another thing, of course, is if. What agreement is not passed. And then issue with a child election any future prime minister will be found by the same restorative will face the same constraints as you're going one. So so no chance to renegotiate the agreement. And again, never forget that the hands of the of the British government are bound by the Good Friday agreement. Not by the you. It's really by the Good Friday agreement is what makes us think difficult through governing the border between Northern Ireland, and we'll have to leave it there. But thank you very much that was Philippe Lamberts. He sits on the European parliament said Brexit steering grip. Let's turn to Canada. Now where a political crisis around prime minister Justin Trudeau shows, no signs of abating last night. Mr. Trudeau expelled, two former cabinet ministers from his liberal party after they accused him of meddling in a criminal case involving an influential company, Tracy Wilson, rebelled, and Jane Philpott had already resigned from the government citing their concerns over the essence, he love affair the controversies cast a shadow over Mr. Trudeau's leadership months before a general election was speaking at a news conference in Ottawa said his decision was sparked by the release on Friday of a secret recording that miss Wilson rebelled had made with one of his senior officials if a politician. Secretly records a conversation with anyone. It's wrong. When that politician is a cabinet minister secretly recording. It public servant. It's wrong. When that cabinet minister is the attorney general of Canada secretly recording the clerk of the Privy Council. It's unconscionable. Let's go to Ottawa and talk to John MacGregor reporter with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Thanks for being with us. Just explain that a bit further. Why did the former attorney general Jodie Wilson rowboat secretly record that conversation? Well, it was an extraordinary step for her to take particularly because she was a lawyer herself. And there are a lot of ethical considerations around someone from the legal profession deciding to detailed someone without their consent. But she felt like she was under a lot of pressure from officials and the prime minister himself to intervene politically intervene in the public prosecution of SNC Loveland. This is a global engineering firm that was facing bribery charges for things that had done I with the Qaddafi government in Libya. Don't going back about a decade. And as those charges I continued candidate changed the rules. And and put this tool in place for it to avoid a criminal conviction. If it was willing to negotiate a remediation agreement pay a fine and admit wrongdoing as an alternative to being criminally convicted some people in Trudeau's government felt that was a better approach than proceeding with a criminal trial. But Canada's independent director of public prosecutions wanted to proceed to trial and Wilson Rabaul didn't want to overrule the prosecutor on this and was under an awful lot of political pressure to do. So so in the middle of all this we had this key conversation between her and the clerk of the Privy Council where the pressure kind of all came to an ahead. And then of course, last week they discovered there was tape. What's going to be the the longer term impact of all? I mean, what's it just intrigues as standing well? A lot. I you know, it's raised ethical considerations. That weren't there before about whether this government was intervening. I allowing a corporation that had done wrong internationally to somehow dodge at what was coming to it from Justice point of view. But it's also been very damaging for them to lose these two ministers in particular, both strong women from history Trudeau made a lot of his gender balanced cabinet. And the things he had tried to do to advance women in politics, female leaders. Both of them had key portfolios for him Philpott in particular was very strong performer on some tough files like health and indigenous services, and Jodie Wilson Ray, bald herself, you know. An extraordinary story Canada's first indigenous Justice minister, it is a big blow to this government to see this. Happen Travis we're out of time. But thank you very much. Indeed, Janice McGregor reporter with the CBC. Joining us there from Ottawa. You're listening to NewsHour. Distribution of the BBC World Service NewsHour made possible by American public.

prime minister Brexit Britain Jeremy Corbyn Theresa May Justin Trudeau Canada European Union Ottawa Philippe Lamberts European Parliament conservative party rob Watson Jane Philpott parliament Justice minister Privy Council Tory party
Opposition MPs turn to ethics committee to probe SNC-Lavalin affair

The Big Story

23:44 min | 1 year ago

Opposition MPs turn to ethics committee to probe SNC-Lavalin affair

"Canadians will have yet another chance to possibly hear the full story behind the scandal. That has completely changed both the image. They have of their prime minister and the landscape of the coming election. So will they know probably not for a whole bunch of reasons. If you wanna know how things are really going in Ottawa these days track down your grade. Seven civics textbook. Flip it open to the section densely packed with the arcane rules of parliamentary procedure, and then realize that there are tens of millions of dollars worth of politicians, and lawyers and advisers and pundits. And editors all trying to decipher the implications of the same damn stuff that they ignored back in middle school. And most of them are screaming at each other while they do welcome to the SNC laflin scandal part. I don't know part thirty six the part where the opposition asks again, and the government refuses again, and we all wonder how the hell Canadians will actually get the answers they want. And as it turns out, there are a few ways that that could happen whether Justin Trudeau lakes or not. I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story for MAC mcsweeney is the parliament hill reporter for city news for Rogers radio for the big story too. I is it going it's going well, except that this is the scandal that won't go away. And something new is about to happen today. It's going on Tuesday in Ottawa. Well, the ethics committee is meeting this afternoon to discuss the SNC lavon affair. I it's the second committee. That's going to be taking a look at all of this. And the conservatives have put forward a motion to basically launch another investigation into this affair after the Justice committee probe was shut down by the liberal majority on the committee after hearing from several key witnesses in this controversy on budget day, the committee decided that they had heard enough that they didn't need to hear anymore. Testimony on the. This and they were going to move on without coming to any sort of final report. They just let sort of you know, these witnesses air their stories and left it at that. And so now, the opposition is pushing for more testimony more witnesses. They're also calling for the prime minister to further wave privilege in all of this. So that they can get the rest of the story if you will. And so that's what we're waiting on to see whether the liberal majority on this committee, and since they're majority government, they have a majority on these committees. Whether they will allow another investigation after shutting down the first one, why would I mean, not to be partisan or anything? But like if they shut it down on the last committee, what is going to change this time, Jordan, if you're betting man, the odds would be against the liberals actually allowing this investigation to go through. And if if they're lines from the last. Committee investigation, and the reasoning as to why they shut that down will be used in this one of then you can expect the liberals to just simply say, look we've heard everything we need to hear within Canadians can make up their own minds about what happened. It's time to move on the former attorney general had had the chance to fully tell her story on whether or not she was pressured into all of this. And and that's that. So I I just imagine that they won't, but we'll have to wait and see you can you can never fully predict something in politics. And this controversy is is is proof of that. Because I don't think last year at this time anybody could even have had the idea that we'd be in this situation right now discussing the liberals polling numbers dropping the conservatives. Well, ahead of the liberals over a controversy that you know, had pitted. He liberal cabinet ministers against the prime minister's office. I I don't. Anybody could have predicted something like this. So where we go from here who really knows. The odds are against the fact that the liberals would would agree to this ethics investigation. What does a committee investigation typically, look like any way, and how typical or atypical was the Justice committee when they often are related to public policy issues and not sort of surrounded by controversies like we're seeing here. So it is unusual in that sense where it's not a common occurrence where we're having these major scandals that committees are investigating, but the committees are an avenue for parliamentarians to investigate things like this, especially when there are serious allegations, such as what we have here that the prime minister's office was putting improper pressure on the attorney general to make specific decision in a case that was before the AG the allegations are serious, and where you fall on after the testimony. I mean, I guess. It all depends on who you believe in the end, but they're serious enough allegations at I think, it was appropriate and even the liberals agreed that it was appropriate that the Justice committee look at this topic. So the Justice committee investigation was ended and the liberal said at that point, the essentially there were no stories left to tell the conservatives wanted ethics investigation because they say, there are still stories left to tell what don't we know because I know Jodie Wilson rebel and Jane Philpott have both spoken about this. But the conservatives want them to talk about other aspects of the affair the ordering council that was given by the prime minister to waive solicitor, client privilege and cabinet confidence to allow Jodie Wilson Ray bold and others involved in the allegations of improper pressure to freely speak about all of this that only applies for the time that Jodie Wilson rave old was attorney general so in relation to the SNC case one. She left and was shuffled out of the Justice. File she basically couldn't talk about what happened when she moved veterans affairs and on that shuffle day. That's where the story ends both Jodie Wilson Ray, bold. And Jane Philpott another minister, she was treasury board. President does she was involved in that shuffle decided to quit cabinet because she had lost confidence in the government's handling of the essence affair, but both Jane Philpott and Jodie Wilson. Ray bowled say that there is more to the story and Philpott spoke recently with mcclain's last week saying there is much more to this that needs to be told and because the order in council that granted the waving of all the privilege only ends when Jodie Wilson. Ray gold's left the attorney general's position. There are still questions about what happened after that. What was said after that in conversations with the prime minister between a Wilson Ray Gould's. And Justin Trudeau or others in his office such as Gerald butts, his former principal adviser because there were questions about that Jodie Wilson rebel did say that she thought that she was being pushed out of the position because of the SNC decision all conversations that happened after she left that position. She can't talk about. And so that's the big question. Mark over this. What else is there to say? And we still don't know the only way we will find out is if we hear from Jodi Wilson rebelled or Jane Philpott if she decides to talk about this. And you know, the question now is will we hear from them? And what will we hear from them if they decide to speak out in any form, how could they do guys? So there are many different ways that they could we could have another ordering council from the prime minister's office that extends the waving of privilege to go beyond. Johnny Wilson Ray Boltz time as attorney general. So if the prime minister. Decides to do that you know that would give her the free and clear because as a lawyer as attorney general to Canada, you're essentially, the government's lawyer and solicitor client privilege means that discussions around things that are not allowed to be made public a campy made public on unless you get you know, the permission of your client, which in this case would be the government and the prime minister. So if he decided to do that that would give Jodie Wilson Ray bowled, the the chance to speak possibly Jane Philpott, as well, what are the chances that that happens given that they shut down the Justice committee investigation, while the prime minister's already indicated that he doesn't think that there needs to be a further waving of privilege. He hasn't said in those exact terms, I don't believe. But when asked about this several times over the last couple of weeks about further, waving privilege. He has come back to the fact that he believes that the former attorney general Jodie Wilson rebelled was able to address all of the. The issues on the question at hand. Which is was there. Improper pressure on the over the essence he case he feels that the initial waving of privilege answered that question or allowed her to tell her full story on that question. She says there's more to the story. But he he believes that enough has come out already. He's satisfied with what he's heard. And he says Canadians have heard enough to make a determination about whether or not. There was any improper pressure in this case. So does she have any other options than if she wanted to get her truth out? This is interesting because recently there have been more and more calls about what is known as parliamentary privilege, and this is the idea that you can say anything you want in the house of Commons as an MP, and you are not going to be held responsible in any legal way for what you say in the house of Commons. I mean, you could get kicked out of the house of Commons, but you can say almost anything. And you know, they're they're free from defamation. Lawsuits are free from any kind of legal consequences for what they say in the house of Commons. So with that being said the question has been raised recently by a number of liberal MP's who seem to be getting frustrated with this whole scandal saying, well, why don't they just stand in the house and say what they have to say if this is so important to the national conversation about SNC laflin and the functioning of our government than just get out with it. Stand up in the house and say something, but there are limitations to that. It's not as simple as that. When you get up to in the house of Commons. The there's a procedure here, and you have to follow that procedure. Otherwise, you won't be recognized by the speaker, and you can't get up and speak. It's not a free for all. So as much as parliamentary privilege trumps all other privileges, meaning that solicitor, client privilege and cabinet confidence. Don't apply when it comes to parliamentary privilege and speaking in the house of Commons. They can only speak at certain times. So they. Could speak either Philpott or Jodie Wilson Ray bowled, but let's focus on Wilson rebelled since she's the person at the center of ultras. She could give a member statement every day before question period. Members have a chance to stand up and give what's called an SO thirty one standing thirty one. Which means they have about a minute to say, whatever the heck they want a minute is not along though. I think she spent around four hours testifying so run minute is really not a lot of time to get to the heart of the matter. Another thing she could do is stand up in the house of Commons and raise a point of personal privilege. This goes back to the argument that if it is so important to the nation and given the allegations that the AG felt improper pressure standing up in the house of Commons on a point of privilege could be a very valid point to make and she would have more time to speak at a point of personal privilege, if she felt her privileges were, you know, breached in some way through this scandal, which seems to be what she has. Been talking about since the start since these allegations came out, so she could do that. But even then the speaker doesn't always let you just go on and on for four hours the other the other option that I just want to squeeze in here, the one that that could give them a little bit more time to speak, but it might take some participation of the opposition members. Which would just make things really weird and awkward considering these two members are still members of the liberal party. But if there is a motion, a when you speak in the house of Commons, it has to be relevant to what is at hand. So, you know, if you raise a point of personal privilege, what follows has to be related to that point. If there's a motion from the opposition. And there have been a couple of motions already so they had the option to potentially speak. If there's a motion before the house of Commons. They could get up and speak to that any MP really has a right to get up and speak to emotion that is before the house as a part of normal debate. And then they take questions from the other parties about. What they had just said in their statement. They're limited on time with that though, they could get, you know, consent to continue on speaking and opposition MP's could also share their time. So if they decided to speak, then maybe a conservative MP would say, you know, what I'm going to hand my time over to Jodie Wilson rebelled to allow her to have. Yeah. Keep going keep going. So that's one thing that could happen. But that takes some agreement behind the scenes, and it would be rather unusual for an MP of the sitting governing party to strike some sort of deal with position MP's to have more time to speak in that scenario on the the final one that could be, but is unlikely as unanimous consent to make a statement in the house of Commons, three unanimous, consent and peace can do almost anything. They want in the house of Commons. If all MP's agree then anything's possible. So if Wilson Rabaul says, I have a statement. Wanna make it in the house of Commons. I'm seeking unanimous consent to give that statement at whatever time if every single party an MP agrees. Nobody objects when that motion is put forward to the speaker. Then they could do that. We'll have to wait and see whether they try to take advantage of that. Because you know, there are other avenues that they could take. In the meantime, to to try and get their story out with so many avenues. And so many people kind of calling from his Wilson Ray bowl to to speak to what she says is still left to be told. It seems strange to me. And please correct me if I'm wrong that the prime minister is willing to let this be dragged out so much as opposed to realizing that it's probably going to be addressed anyway and an opening up a a way for her to talk does that I am I way off base here. Does that not seem strange to anybody else auto from the early stages of this controversy? There have been a lot of criticisms from pundits. And political experts. About the way the Trudeau government has handled. This the conservatives argue that the liberal story keeps changing every day. I I don't think that's fair because I think it's not that it's changed. It's just that. They only allowed little bits to come out. Yeah. In dribs and drabs, and that kind of helps keep this thing going and a lot of people were confused about why they chose that strategy rather than just the rip the band aid off strategy. Get it out there get it out all on the table. You've got months to go before an election. You can deal with the damage early on let some heads roll. And for people who might be responsible. If there's if there was any wrongdoing and then just move on. Because that's the, you know, as some political experts have said, that's the way you deal with a controversy like this in politics. There have been some questions about the handling of this from the Trudeau government, and whether they they handle this properly. The at all. But now we're in a in a situation where it seems like every few days or at least once a week. We've got a new thing coming out last week before the budget. It seemed like the Trudeau government was trying to put this to bed. We saw the clerk of the Privy Council resign on the Monday. The prime minister announced that he was going to appoint a new adviser to advise the government, and and released recommendations on how they can change the relationship between the government and the attorney general, which you know, the big question there is do you split Justice minister role and attorney general role. And then the budget was the day that the Justice committee ended the investigation into the SNCF air. We we've now found out that the the prime minister spoke with Jodie Wilson Ray bowled on the Monday about the next steps, and he called it a cordial conversation. So one assumes that he was giving her the heads up about the actions that were were happening. On the Monday and Tuesday. But then by the Friday, Jodie Wilson Rabo publicly announced that she's going to be giving a written submission to the Justice committee complete with text messages and emails which she had promised to produce. But also some new evidence in her possession. So whenever she decides to submit that written submission. It's going to put this story back in the headlines, and we're gonna be talking about it yet. Again, not only that but the opposition has done its work to try and keep the story in the headlines disrupting the budget by delaying the speech, and then when Finance Minister Bill more, no spoke, they banged their desks and drowned him out than staged a walkout on break weeks when it was feared that the liberals might get a little bit of a break from coverage. That's when all these emergency committee meetings are happening, including the ethics committee meeting that we're talking about. So the opposition has been doing its work to try and keep this in the headlines despite some criticisms that they. Of they went to extreme too fast with the calling of the resignation of the prime minister that they kind didn't have anywhere else to go. The they promised us every tool in the toolbox. And it seems like they're they're continuing to do that. And look we're talking about it. So I guess if that's their goal to keep us talking about it. Then they're achieving that goal despite whether it was the best way or not politically speaking, of course. Oh god. I means we're gonna talk about this till October doesn't chrome. Yeah. I fully expect, you know, there are questions about whether there's going to be an early campaign call from the prime minister, and that we'd be heading to the polls this spring, not the fall, which doesn't fully make sense in in the basic way that the band aid off a. Yeah, it just doesn't make you know, you look at the facts, the liberals are pulling at their lowest point, I think in Justin Trudeau's mandate, so far you've got months to go to repair the damage, including the summer vacation where a lot of Canadians just tune out of the news. And then tune back in the fall where you can kind of reset the narrative again, you know, there there are those options out there for the prime minister. So an early election, call would seem odd, but the conservatives are pouncing on on that speculation and trying to fundraise off of it saying we need money now there could be an early election. So the opposition parties are are enjoying this because they got the fundraise off of it. But you know, the prime minister's office has been clear has been asked many many times over. The last year. Will there be an early election? They've never wavered from the fact that they said that they're going to stick with the fixed election date that prime minister Stephen Harper had put in place of October. Although that's not technically binding, you can break it. And I think Harper did as well. So it's not technically binding, but Justin Trudeau promised in October vote. And I think this is going to be one of those issues that the opposition continues to hammer on the campaign trail so to answer your question. Yeah. I think we will still be talking about this in October, regardless of what the election results will be last question are these stories from MS Wilson, Rabo them as Philpott going to come out some way like it seems inevitable now to me and my wrong about that. What's your thought? Here's the issue. Both Wilson Ray bold. And Jane Philpott have said that they have their concerns in. They're very cautious about the issues of solicitor, client privilege and cabinet confidentiality. Now, we spoke earlier. Earlier about how they could get up in the house, and they could say anything they want in the house of Commons and be protected from any legal consequences when they speak in the house because they enjoy parliamentary privilege, which allows which trumps all other privileges, and confidences, etc. So they could do that. But there hasn't to do something like that Jane Philpott in her interview with mcclain's was asked. Why don't you just do that as she said? Part of the issue is is timing. Of course, an and we went through that pretty clearly that there are limitations on how long they can speak in. If they've got another four hours worth of testimony. It's not going to be easy to use the house of Commons as the avenue to get that story out so Philpott aside from timing Philpott also gave a very interesting answer about the dynamic in liberal caucus and her relationship with colleagues, which I think is another aspect to all of this is really focused on it was fascinating to hear. Because you don't always hear that. She was talking about how a lot of her colleagues. Again, she is still a liberal MP. And the prime minister has given no indication that he plans to boot either Philpott or Wilson Ray bolt from his caucus Philpott has said that her actions and her decision to quit cabinet has created a lot of uneasiness amongst people who used to be closer colleagues in caucus, and she feels that some feel that her motives are not that that she's doing something that sort of works against the party, and that's creating friction with people. She never used to have friction with. And so she opened up a little bit about the personal struggles that she has in doing what she's doing. But says she's trying to you know, do what she's always done in. That is a take a moral stand. She doesn't care about what happens to her as a result of that. But clearly those personal relationships are taking toll for Jody Wilson Ray bowl. You know, you have not only cabinet confidence as as a concern out of all of this. But you also have. Hitter client privilege, and so there's some caution there because they don't want to break this oath that they made to the country so lightly just because people are saying we'll just get out and say it in the house of Commons. There's a very serious oath that you take when you join cabinet where you agree to serve her majesty the Queen and to keep all of the secrets that are held as a privy counsellor it to keep those secret essentially os are not usually easily broken by people who take those oaths they feel passionately about what they do regardless of political stripe. So that's something else. It sort of weighing over both Jodie Wilson Ray bold and Jane Philpott about whether they just get out there and tell their story, despite the fact that there's personal privilege whether or not we got the full story out of this. You know, there are avenues for both the Trudeau government and for Jody Wilson Rabo than Jane Philpott to make the decision to get that full story out. Whether they take those those avenues is another question altogether. And we'll just have to wait and see.

Prime Minister Jodie Wilson Ray Jane Philpott Jodie Wilson Justice Committee Attorney Justin Trudeau MP Trudeau Government Wilson Ray Jody Wilson Ray Bowl Johnny Wilson Ray Boltz Jordan Heath Rawlings Jodie Wilson Rabo Snc Lavon Affair Wilson Ray Gould SNC Ottawa
"jane philpott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"All things considered. Around the world. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is widely seen as a liberal icon championing climate change and human rights for refugees and indigenous peoples now, though, he is facing a big scandal at home, he's accused of meddling and a criminal case to protect a powerful company north country. Public radio's Brian man reports from the Canadian capital Ottawa this dangerous moment for Justin Trudeau erupted last month when a Toronto newspaper published an expose it claimed the prime minister intervened in the criminal prosecution of a multinational engineering firm headquartered in Montreal called s NC laflin level in is accused of bribery and fraud scheme that funneled tens of millions of dollars to the family of former Libyan dictator Muammar Qaddafi a decade ago testifying before parliament former attorney general Jodie Wilson rebelled said Trudeau himself pressured her to go easy on unlawfully. I asked. Are you politically interfering with my role my decision as the attorney general I would strongly advise against it. And quote, the prime minister said, no, no, no, we just need to find a solution. But Wilson rebelled says Trudeau refused to back off he and his staff kept pushing for months warning her that if the company was prosecuted aggressively, it could affect jobs in Montreal and cripple the liberal party's we election chances where they became very clearly inappropriate was when political issues came up like the election in Quebec in my mind. Those were veiled threats wasn't rebelled says she was later punished by Trudeau who shoveled her out of the attorney general's post and gave her a lesser appointments in his cabinet. She resigned over the affair and yesterday. Second high-profile cabinet minister treasury board secretary Jane Philpott also stepped down after writing a public letter accusing to know of violating the rule of law in Canada speak. With reporters Monday to knowledge lobbying on behalf of lavaman, but said his attorney general remained independent. This matter.

Justin Trudeau prime minister attorney Jodie Wilson Montreal Muammar Qaddafi cabinet Brian man Jane Philpott Ottawa Toronto bribery secretary NC Canada Quebec fraud
"jane philpott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"All things considered. Around the world. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is widely seen as a liberal icon championing climate change and human rights for refugees and indigenous peoples now, though, he is facing a big scandal at home, he's accused of meddling and a criminal case to protect a powerful company north country. Public radio's Brian man reports from the Canadian capital Ottawa this dangerous moment for Justin Trudeau erupted last month when a Toronto newspaper published an expose it claimed the prime minister intervened in the criminal prosecution of a multinational engineering firm headquartered in Montreal called s NC laflin laflin is accused of bribery and fraud scheme that funneled tens of millions of dollars to the family of former Libyan dictator Muammar Qaddafi a decade ago testifying before parliament former attorney general Joni Wilson Ray, bald said Trudeau himself pressured her to go easy on level. I asked. Quote. Are you politically interfering with my role my decision as the attorney general I would strongly advise against it. And quote, the prime minister said, no, no, no, we just need to find a solution. But Wilson rebelled says Trudeau refused to back off he and his staff kept pushing for months warning her that if the company was prosecuted aggressively, it could affect jobs in Montreal and cripple the liberal party's reelection chances where they became very clearly inappropriate was when political issues came up like the election in Quebec in my mind. Those were veiled threats Wilson rebelled says she was later punished by Trudeau shoveled her out of the attorney general's post and gave her a lesser appointments in his cabinet. She resigned over the affair and yesterday, a second high profile cabinet minister treasury board secretary Jane Philpott also stepped down after writing a public letter accusing to know of violating the rule of law in Canada speaking. With reporters Monday to knowledge lobbying on behalf of lavaman, but said his attorney general remained independent. This matter.

Justin Trudeau prime minister attorney Joni Wilson Ray Montreal Muammar Qaddafi Brian man liberal party Jane Philpott Ottawa Toronto bribery secretary Canada Quebec fraud
"jane philpott" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"One of Canada's top minister, sir squid saying she has lost confidence in the government's handling off corruption inquiry. Jane filbert's said she needed to abide by her values if responsibilities and constitutional obligations. It comes as prime minister. Just intruder faces calls to resign over the deepening. Political crisis motorcycles Toronto bureau, chief Thomas Lewis reports it has been another dramatic day here amid the NC Lavalin scandal, which really has become the kind of scandal that many Canadians haven't really seen in Gulf of prime minister. I think is fair to say for many years the latest resignation came from the president of the treasury board. Jane Philpott, she announced on Twitter following her letter of resignation to Justin Trudeau, which he has accepted. She stated. That she must abide by her core values and ethical responsibilities and her constitutional obligations in doing her task under serving as a member of the cabinet. I think what the implication therefore is is that the kind of pressures the kind of things we are seeing that the prime minister's office is alleged to have done meant that she wasn't able to do those. They were running counter to what she felt she was ethically. Able to do in representing the cabinet of the government of just in true though now on Wednesday. We are expecting another chapter in this story Gerald butts who was just in Trudeau's, most trusted confidante, he's widely regarded as the architecture if you like of his election win back in two thousand and fifteen he will give testimony to the members of the committee who are investigating this scandal. And that follows last week the very dramatic testimony of Joe. OD Wilson Rabaul. She is the former attorney general, of course, at the center, if you like in many ways of this story, she was pretty damning about what she alleged that the prime minister's office eleven members of his team. She claimed had pressurized her to do in trying to skew the legal process in the favor of the Quebec based engineering group. SNC lavar now that group stuns accused of corruption and bribery charges relating to contracts. It was trying for in Libya. Now, if it is found guilty, it will face a ten year ban on any federal contracts. Now, what is being widely seen as the damaging effect? That would have to the broader Konami of Quebec would be pretty significant. Which is why there is a concurrent debate looking at whether actually is it that extraordinary four prime minister's office to try and look at the best way of mitigating the effects of elite. Case against an entity that does have such a wide ranging economic and social place to play in a certain part of the country. I think Justin Trudeau was hoping that this story would go away. Interestingly enough, you look at the opinion polls recently since this story broke a few weeks ago and actually even though his approval ratings have been slipping for some time. This story in self hasn't really seemed to have dented thus approval rating very much a tour. We'll have to see whether this latest resignation, and whether the testimony of Gerald butts on Wednesday, whether that changes that, but this definitely has the feeling now over story that is gaining momentum. Rather than losing it was Monaco's Tomas Louis interim toe and now here is what else is making news today. The former head off from Nissan. Carlos Goan has been granted bail by a court into Okeyo. The move is surprising because bail is rarely granted in Japan. We those confession Mr. Goan us in charged with financial misconduct but Hurst's denied any wrongdoing seized detention at the end of last year. The United States is planning to end preference Schulte rate status for India..

prime minister Justin Trudeau Gerald butts Jane Philpott Carlos Goan Jane filbert Quebec Canada sir squid Rabaul treasury SNC Gulf Toronto Twitter bribery Nissan president United States Libya
"jane philpott" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"A new book about former FOX chairman and CEO. Roger Ailes mostly sunny is written by woman who was there FOX and friends meteorologist, Janice? Dean, she writes about being sexually harassed by ales and how she secretly convinced. Other ales victims to talk to hired investigators animals died bay 2017 newly declared democratic presidential candidate former Colorado governor John Hickenlooper has an affliction known most commonly as face blindness. It's a brain disorder categorized by the inability to recognize faces our own Carl Stephens spoke with a professor at Dartmouth College. Brad do shame about how can you function politically especially on a stage as big as United States president? If you have this. I guess what is colloquially called face blindness. Yes. It would certainly present a challenge, but I wouldn't say that somebody's pose a peg knows occur face plan. Couldn't be president. It's just a matter of sort of where they need to figure out who they're dealing with make it often use other cues accused other than the face to figure out who they're interacting with. And of course, the politicians going gonna have a lot more cues to that in many situations. How do you cope with that? I mean, we all rely on a lot of different types of information to recognize who people are their hair voice, the way, they move all these sorts of things. To rely on those to a greater extent that other people and declaring his candidacy Hickenlooper said he believes he can beat Donald Trump and can bring people together on the other side. And actually get stuff done. Melania? Trump is in Oklahoma to open a three state tour. The first lady is highlighting her be best childhood initiative. It's her first solo domestic overnight trip in her official capacity turmoil and Canada as a second member of Canadian Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau's cabinet has resigned. Jane Philpott says she has lost confidence in how the government is dealing with an escalating political scandal officials are being accused of pressuring a former Justice minister to help a major construction company avoid being tried for corruption. There were calls from the opposition for prime minister Trudeau to step down opposition leader, Guido returns to Venezuela and renews, his campaign to topple the existing government ABC's. Tom rivers has more on what? L translator struck a defiant tone on the streets of Caracas or older threats. I'm after old ahead this spreads. There's only one thing. One thing that can defeat hate. And that is love or are people love to help and to serve but his average today at fallen short the president Madero and his security forces remained firmly in place. Why could easily be arrested, but Madero knows that could spark more direct US action. Dahmer rivers ABC news at the foreign desk. Sport.

John Hickenlooper president Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Donald Trump chairman and CEO Janice Madero Roger Ailes Tom rivers ABC United States FOX Colorado Caracas government Jane Philpott Carl Stephens Dartmouth College
"jane philpott" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Googled Steve Cochran birthday, which showed me that you're dead. I Steve Cochran. That's gotta be Steve Cochran me actor. That's the guy was named after my mom had the hearts for this be actor named Steve. Cochran died on a boat with four hookers. Notorious womanizer Cochran was married and divorced three times was reportedly having with Mae west. Jayne, Mansfield, Joan Crawford and Mimi van Doren tired. I was under you died replaceable. Steve Cochran listened to his namesake. Weekday mornings on seven twenty WGN nineteen fifty I did the damned don't cry in nineteen fifty one. Tomorrow's another day, quite the actor. You. All right. Steve Grzanich comes up with the opening bell. And just a half an hour four thirty right now. Let's get to the newsroom at Vic Vaughn, a Chicago. Police officer remains in critical condition this morning, he suffered a broken neck and two broken legs and a single vehicle crash late Sunday night on the inbound side of the Eisenhower expressway near kids. He was off duty at the time it most state police haven't yet released findings in the investigation into what caused the crash US Senate has the votes to pass a measure aimed at blocking President Trump's declaration of a national emergency at the southern border. That's Gordon to Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell is fellow Republican US Senator rand Paul of Kentucky says he believes at least ten Republicans will vote to block the declaration. He already said he will president says he'll veto it. If it does make it through the Senate and a second member of Canadian Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau's cabinet has resigned. Treasury board president Jane Philpott says she lost confidence and the government's handling of allegations last year that officials inappropriately. Pressured candidates. Former Justice minister to help a construction company avoid corruption trial Philpot is the second woman to resign for president or rather true cabinet. He's facing an.

Steve Cochran president Senate Steve Steve Grzanich Vic Vaughn WGN Mitch McConnell Mimi van Doren Philpot Mae west Jane Philpott Senator rand Paul Justice minister Eisenhower expressway Justin Trudeau Joan Crawford US Jayne Prime Minister
"jane philpott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"President Emmanuel Macron has proposed a series of reforms to ensure the future of the European Union in a new. Newspaper article being published in each of the twenty eight Member States mR Macron has called for the reform at the us passport-free Schengen area an agency to protect the block against cyber attacks and a ban on the financing of European political parties by foreign powers. The French leader is advocating a Europe that protects ahead of the European elections. In may as he seeks to convince voters, not toback, nationalist. You're listening to the latest world news from the BBC. Canadian cabinet minister has resigned the second ticket up her job over a high level corruption scandal, the treasury board head Jane Philpott said she lost confidence. In the prime minister Justin Trudeau handling of a criminal case involving one of Canada's biggest engineering and construction companies Trudeau has said, he's conduct is low for the House Judiciary committee in the US. Congress has asked Eighty-one government agencies. Individuals and other organizations to submit documents in connection with its investigation into alleged obstruction of Justice and other irregularities by President Trump from Washington is Anthony Zaka the breadth of this investigation the scope of it. It's not just on obstruction of Justice don't abuse of power. It's a public corruption. It's hard to imagine anything that any scandal. That's around Donald Trump's presidency that wouldn't be encompassed in this investigation. So depending on what they turn up they could be making case eventually for impeachment hearings. If they. They don't turn over documents. The next step would be a congressional subpoena. If they ignore that. Then there could be contempt of congress charges brought up so there could be some legal bite to what they're trying to do. Eventually the president of the biggest group in the European parliament, the centre-right European People's Party says number of its members have requested the exclusion or suspension of Hungary's governing. Fetus party Hungary's right-wing, nationalist, Prime Minister, Viktor Auburn has angered psalmody EP with his stridently anti immigrant storms. Art expert in France, say a new drawing which bears a striking resemblance to the Mona Lisa may also be the work of Leonardo da Vinci, the charcoal work notice the Montana has long been attributed to Leonardo studio, but new analysis shows it was drawn by a left handed artist. Leonardo who died in France five hundred years ago. This year is the most famous left-handed painter in history. BBC news. I'm Marco werman, and you're with the world good to be back with.

President Emmanuel Macron President Trump Prime Minister Congress BBC European Union Hungary Jane Philpott France Anthony Zaka Justin Trudeau Leonardo Europe European parliament Marco werman Trudeau treasury European People's Party
What Does It Mean To Be A Liberal? A Canadian Perspective

The Big Story

07:56 min | 1 year ago

What Does It Mean To Be A Liberal? A Canadian Perspective

"And all of us. Has Justin Trudeau changed. The identity of what it means to call yourself a liberal in Canada today. I think he has or he's at he's at least shifted that identity who are the people in the Justin Trudeau government who would be the who had parallel to say John Manley or Paul Martin in the old Christian government. There were always those voices of that business, liberalism blue suit liberalism corner office, liberalism, you could maybe argue the Bill more. No. And Jim Kerr are in that or in that mold that certainly in the most prominent issues and players around the Trudeau government that they're in. They're in a different zone. Right. It's true himself. Catherine McKenna Jane Philpott, they want to be dent fide with issues like feminism concern for indigenous reconciliation concern for the environment. Those are all issues that sort of activate an animate the progressive core of liberal party. Now, a lot of those younger voters who came out in two thousand fifteen and help push it over the top. To be remembered. So, you know, those issues, they're they're powerful and our emotional level. But they're also potent an on an electoral level, and are they potent for the other side too. Because certainly on the issue of immigration. We've seen recently the conservative party taking a pretty hard tack on that and trying to use statements and media opportunities that Trudeau and his team might feel really work for them against them on that issue. Couple points on that one is everywhere in the world where right wing populism has risen both in its most extreme of nauseous forums, but also in its forms that aren't as frightening. There's been an element of concern about immigration as part of the mix. It can be outright xenophobic racism, or it can be something much milder than that. But it's part of the mix for right wing populism. So I think it's kind of an obvious thing that the consider conservatives are going to want to tap into. And I think we have to be careful in not denouncing that as automatically invalid. I mean clearly there. Our re re you know, realistically, there are issues about the border in Canada right now that would didn't exist three or four years ago. They're the kind of bored across miss become routine. I call it a trick. Because I don't really think it's big enough to call it a crisis. But oh, not everyone is calling it a trickle. No, a lot of people are calling it a crisis. And and I don't think it is a crisis. But there are legitimate polcy debates there just how much is it. Valid to amp them up the way that it's being done. That's the question like just on this question vote. If we're thinking about the the degree to which the conservative play off the liberals on some of these hot button issues. I thought one of the interesting things we discovered through the Abacus research that was done was that among Canadians who say I'm a liberal. That's about twenty eight percent of the Canaan canes will identify with the party directly. They they consider this. As liberals only about a third say, they hate conservatives. They will they will buy into the term hate a third, but among conservatives that's a vote a quarter identifies. Conserve? Active about fifty percents of the hate liberals. It's the kind of animus against your opponents is greater in the conservative base than it is in the liberal base. So if we look then at the tactics of Andrew Sheeran and Justin Trudeau, I think it's fairly obvious where that's gonna tend to nudge them. Andrew Scheer wants to appeal to connect with a base that really hates liberals and Justin Trudeau needs to appeal to connect with the base that is less likely to hate conservatives. They they're obviously not serve supporters. But yeah, you know, there's a difference between one and two of your supporters saying, hey, I hate the other guys and one in three saying, it's a it's a it's a factor in both camps. But it's a bigger factor. Andrew shears camp. Give him that the conservatives can kind of point to their base not wanting to be liberal to get everybody on board. How hard is it to unite the left and Canada in the same way that kind of the right side of the spectrum seems to come together a little bit stronger with their own disagreements about liberal policy? Well, there's no question that it that the left is more is more fragmented in Canada. If you look at the polarized voters, we identified in in our in that because survey of about forty five percent of them are conservative backers. And what forty seven back one of the left of center parties, but that is scattered among liberals and peers and green so just almost by definition at some more divided group on the other hand there are moments where not just the left and centre-left in Canada. But even beyond that Trudeau has shown an ability to bring people together. And I think the most obvious example was when he sparred with Donald Trump coming out of the Charlevoix g seven summit in in June. Wherever will remember that Trump blasted off when a little Twitter tantrum after yes. The conference about Trudeau sing some frankly, fairly mild mannered things about America tariff policy. It would be with regret, but it would be with absolute certainty, and firmness that we move forward with retaliatory measures on July first applying equivalent tariffs to the ones that the Americans have unjustly applied to us. I have made it very clear to the president that it is not something we relish doing. But it is something that we absolutely will do because Canadians were polite were reasonable, but we also will not be pushed around. What's interesting is that that week was by far and away just as best week in the polls in two thousand eighteen this is confirmed by both liberals and on liberals at their own polling and with publicly available pulling. So you step back and say, you know, what? Happened there. Well, what happened was the generalized Canadian unease which crosses flip over go spectrum, by the way, it's kind of remarkable about Donald Trump was activated and a camper. Mr. who seemed to express a kind of moderate pro Canada point of view, wasn't a staunchly. Progressive were an opera Gusset just to kind of pro Canada. I'm defend the country's interest point of view was able to get a lot of goodwill and support on side that's kind of gift that Donald Trump gifts. But it does show that there's a big swath of the Canadian public opinion that's ready to be to to congenial. When the messaging is you know is appealing. What do you think is the biggest challenge for the left over the next nine months leading up to the election? What's what's the big thing? They have to get done if they're going to pull this off. I think that if we think about the left is being dawn, mainly the the Trudeau liberals right now, I think what they need to do is remember that. The people who support the most vigorously on Twitter who donate money to the party who show up to rallies who cheerlead on valid issues like global warming fighting climate change, like indigenous reconciliation that a lot of those people are well to the left of the seventy five percent or so of the camp population that doesn't feel their polarized either into the left or right wing. And that the messaging has to be just no matter how tempting it is to cheer to to pitch. Your message to those most active most energetic, most vocal supporters. You can't risk doing that you need to pitch your message towards mainstream Canadians who are feeling less. Sure. But which side they wanna support less certain about some of these messaging and want to hear I mean, frankly, a more nuanced middle the road kind of message. So I think that's the challenge challenges to remember that the people you wanna talk to the the most are not necessary. The people who are talking back at you on social media or showing up that rally you've got to a large group of voters there who just don't communicate that way. That's

Justin Trudeau Canada Donald Trump Liberal Party Twitter Jim Kerr Catherine Mckenna Jane Philpot Andrew Scheer John Manley Canaan Canes Andrew Shears Andrew Sheeran President Trump Paul Martin America Seventy Five Percent Twenty Eight Percent
"jane philpott" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"jane philpott" Discussed on Ideas

"And if you look down you'll see the red earth toned, floor tiles, and they're in the shape of a star blanket and the star blanket is traditionally given to honor people at pivotal stages in their life such as birth or marriage. And if you stand at the center of star, and speak out, your voice echoes through the room. This is where we were. Ninety youth had gathered here from all over the country. And they were also here with politicians, including the national chief of the assembly of first nations Perry bell guard and Canada's indigenous service minister, Jane Philpott and representatives of Facebook believe it or not they were there too because Facebook is such a incredible tool in additions communities. Everybody uses Facebook messenger. So people stay in contact constantly and far far remote areas makes it easier. A microphone was passed. Around the circle, I'm gonna tell you what some of the youth said, this is Jenna she's from magma community in Halifax. And she told the group that she recently lost her cousin who had struggled with things -iety in depression. She said he was a mixed martial arts fighter. He was twenty years old a firefighter. He reached out if we had culturally appropriate mental health care. I think he'd still be here today he took his life after he was given a two month. Wait time for treatment, two months. We can't stop fighting. Then the microphone went to Laurie. Also meek Ma from Nova Scotia. And she said a lot of us here have undergone trauma sexual violence violence abuse from family members, people were supposed to be our friends. Microphone went to Cody. He's a neutral way youth who grew up in Ottawa. This is what he said, I see the poverty that is tier. I tier people struggling on the street. I actively use drugs and alcohol for years. I am twenty five years old. And I just met my relatives last year. It took me twenty four years to meet my family growing up. I felt inferior dirty like I didn't belong here. But being brought into a healing circle by elders and good medicine. Got me to wear today. And this is the coda Dakota is a young first nations paramedic from northern scotch on. And he said he stood up. And he said, you know, young people often call nine one one when they are feeling suicidal. They call us because they don't know who else to call. Quote, they call us for help. Some of them are brought into the hospital for help. And then they are let out two hours later, why did the hospital accept these kids, and let them out I want to create places for them that are close to home to coda paused before you continued. And then he said, I work CPR on young people, I breathe for them. You know, every indigenous nation has its own holistic healing, practices traditions and medicine, people that for centuries, it is relied on to take care of the body the mind and the spirit all of which in the engines worldview are connected all won.

Cody Facebook Jenna Nova Scotia Jane Philpott Perry bell Canada Laurie Halifax Ottawa twenty five years twenty four years twenty years two months two hours two month